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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, October 17, 1868, Image 1

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MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 17, 1868.
NQ. 42.
VOL. I.
E. R. COCHRAN,
ilKALKR IN
GRAIN, LIME,
FERTILIZERS, &c.
Middlotown, Delaware.
W ILT, par the highest cash price* for all
kinds of Grain. Will sell Lime os low ns
the lowest. Will sell No. 1
PERUVIAN GUANO,
$90 per Ton.
Ellis' Fertilizer,
$56 per Ton.
BHODES' PHOSPHATE,
$50 per Ton.
BAUGH'S B AW BONE PHOSPHATE,
$56 per Ton.
BAUGH'S CHICAGO BONK,
$50 per Ton.
Baugh'B Chicago Blood Manure,
$50 per Ton.
SOLE AGFNT, at Middlrtown, for the Kin«
of Super Phosphates, viz:—MOKO PHILLIPS.
Gknuink ImpRovrd. The Bkst Phosphate for the
money in this or any other market. The Price
is not reduced, and neither is the quality of Hie
Manure. The retail price is $56 per ton—$6 in
a ton of Phosphate is a small item, when weeon
* extra peek of wheat to the acre, at
'iU more than pay the extra $6,
te of 200 Iks to
nuke the extra
ly other Phosphate, and
growth of grass
It contains in
sand and less plaster tha
vider that
present prices,
applying the Phosphate at the i
the acre. I will guarantee it to
]*eck of wheat, o\
also to make a he
wheat than
fier the
• No. 1
• oth
U
v strength.
has
•me others, there!»
of Moro Phillips'
trial to eon
Tliat all I have said
Phosphate is true, requires only
rince the most sceptical. T
in doubt to John P. Cochran, Esq. who
tons each fall,
I would refer pers
ys nfIv
to Win. Wood, or Wni. ft
it a fair trial
rltoni have give!
side by side ivitli oilier Phosphates.
A liberal dednetio " '
casli dealers or <
Of Hie Itaw ll<
niervial Manure* have pr
rket.
gel iheir money lau
Phosphates deliv
on the Pel
tlie Delaware
quantities of 5 tons ot
A liberal deduction to dubs.
Codtrun, both of
ill be made to
a price
T8 of lartre qui
IMiosphates Baujrli'
red to be the best in
s should use the best, and
lilies.
Cc
the
rim
•1 interest.
k with comp«
ï* red free of freight, at any
it ware Rail Rond, oi
Chesapeake waters.
stuti
lauding •
• upwards.
Send in your
f ordcrs eairly.
August«, 1868.—3m.
IstiKX Gkfick, Waiiukston. Va.
Moro Phillip«. August Htli, 1868.
Dkah .Siu :—I wrote you last yea y in regard
of vour Phosphate, and bqjjjj;||t a ton, which I
*«.\red on ten acres of wtywf; I also purchased
oilier Fertilizers, and put llte same quantity on.
1 have just thrashed my w heat, and delivered it
el the depot. I hauled with a '
twenty-four bushels at a lt»ad.
will» your Phosphate on it. '
1 ushels. ) 140 lbs. mo»** ..
sequence is, y
tily in this neighborhood, as
to me f«»r yolir add res
pamphlets, and I tyjll distrib
i»g
beat
and the
eiglied. ( the
than the other. The«
14
1.
will jell this fall
qm
• have
it
ml
» them tor von.
J. \Y. FINKS.
TIMELY HINTS TO ALL.
H OW many Iiuva lost a father, mother, bro
ther. sister, or an innocent little prattling
child, and have not even a shadow of resemli
lam c to look upon. After the separation some
little U»y or a trifling ar'iele is often kept for
years, and cherished as a token of roinemhenince.
llow* much more esteemed and valuable would
l»e one of Horning's Perfect Photographs, of the
loved and lost. The
• who
the features
that friend has been r«
c often hear the exclamation
hat would I
d«*cs not take plcusur«
gazing
«1 wl»e
of a friend,
moved by dentil,
with an express}«
not give for su« h a picture of my friend.
Beailcrs. perhaps you cannot do a better thing
mind is upon the subject, then take an
wo and visit Horning's Gallery, then
-•ou may, at some future jhmmocI, have reason to
teel grateful for these gentle hints from
JOHN M. HORNING.
Miildletown, Dél.
gret ; O !
now y
hour (
Tnc best memento that y
Or leave
Is the litc-spcuking picture taken i
Far better tin
July 11 -tf
can supply,
die,
health,
all of earth's fading wealth.
valued friend when v
FOR SALE.
75,000 Healthy Reach Trees
E MBUACING all the idijoke market and fam
ily varieties.
Hale's Early,
Troth's Early,
Early York,
•ford's Early,
Moore's Favorite,
Mary's Choice,
Mixon Free,
Reeves' Favorite,
Will be ready for planting in the fall of 1868.
or Spring of 1869.
Red Rarerijie,
ï Stuiiin the World,
j (tfawtord's Late,
j Ward's Late,
I Hinoek Free,
j ('rocket White,
I Vandyke's Favorite,
! Last of the Season.
«'
Apply to
K. R. COCHRAN, or
CHARLES ADAMS.
Middletown, Del.
August 8—6m.
Farmers, Your Attention!!
OT1CE that the PENINSULAR MACHINE
WORKS have "resumed labor," and par
ticular attention will be given to repairing Pen
.itigton k Hussc.v'b Reapers, Horse Rakes, Thresh
* ' nd Horse lowers of all kinds. A lot of 8n
hand. Farmers, look to your
•N
ers,
' perior Reapers
iulerst«, and purchase Reliable Machinery "made
at home," where you ein have your repairing
done promptly and reliably, aud at the shortest
notice. JpH" All work warranted equal to any
offered,
July 26 -tf
J. THUS. 11UDD,
Aaent.
.COAL! COAL!! COAL!!!
O VK HUNDRED TONS of the celebrated "SI
OAR NOTCH" LN.IHOH COAT, lift* Im
loading at New Castle, and will be ready for de
Mondav next, Ihe 17th Instant,
continued strikes in the mining regions have al
ready advanced the Price of Coal, nn,<J give
jiromise of High Rates the coming season. Now
iR the time, therefore, for Consumers to lav in a
JE. T. EXT ANS,
Middletown. Del.
livery
Tb.
supply.
Aug. 15—tf
M RS. S. M. HATCH intending to leaving Mid
dletown. requests all persons indebted to
her to settle their accounts. All Bill remaining
unsettled on the 20th of Octolier, will be placed
in an officer's Hands fbr collection.
; Oct. 10—2w.
NOTICE.
BARGAINS, BARGAINS,
Cash Buyers Look to your Interest.
S. R. STEPHENS & Co.
H AVING opened their New Cush Store, in
Middletown, Del. are now prepared to
offer to the Public a lurge and well selected
Stock of
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
They offer a large lot of CABPETS,
Vkiiy Low from Auction.
«fee
A FINK STOCK OF
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Cloths, Cassimers, and
Ready Made Clothing.
HATS AND CAPS,
Dress Goods, Tsotions,
HARDWARE, &C.
Canne«! Fruits, IMrklcs, Sauer*,
and all kinds of Goods usually kept in a country
store.
Having purchased
entire stock for cash,
prepared to sell at city prices for cash or
country produce.
Buyers would do well to give us a call.
SAML. It. STEPHENS & Co.
Middletown, Del.
July 4—ly.
TO THE FARMING COMMUNITY.
to
ter
of
rpiIK subscriber respectful I y calls the attention
JL of tho Farmers of New Castle co. Del. and
Cecil and Kent counties,Md. to the following list
of standard Fertilizers, always kept
and furnished to order, at
Deluwarc Railroad, or on
ware Waters.—Viz:
hand,
any station on the
Chesapeake and Dela
RHODES' SUPER PHOSPHATE
Moro Phillips' Super Phosphate,
Whann's Super Phosphate,
( roasilale'N Super Phosphate,
HE WES' SURER PHOSPHATE,
COE'S SUPER PHOSPHATE,
to
of
Opposite Depot, Middletown. Del.
p
And gives him confldenre to solicit a share of the
public patronage. #
^Sfr-His Shop is*on Main street, in the house
formerly occupied by Joseph i * nvi .
* . r A
Berger and Butz* Super Phosphate<
BAUGH'S SUPER PHOSPHATE,
BAUGH'S CHICAGO BONK,
PERUVIAN GUANO,
PACU'TC GUANO,
llO DUN DA GUANO.
E. T. RYANS,
July 18—if
BOAVJ^Ii'S
COMPLETE MANURE,
MA.VLFACTÜRKD MY
HENRY BOWER, CHEMIST,
PHILADELPHIA.
MA l»K FI
Super-Phosphate of fjfme, Ammonia and
Potash,
W*ARUANTKD FHF.K FROM ADULTERATION.
fl'MUS Manure contains all the elements to pro
-L duec large crops of all kinds, and is highly
recommended by «ill who have used it, also by
distinguished (hicinists wbo have, by analysis.,
tested its qualities.
Packed iu bags <»f 200 pounds each,
DIXON, SHARPLKKS A CO.
SOLE
30 South Water and 40 South Delaware Avenue.
PHILADKLIMIIA.
I ENTS.
For sale by WM. REYNOLDS,
70 South Street,
Baltimore, Md.
Also by JOHN A. REYNOLDS k SONS,
Middletown, Del.
And by dealers generally throughout the e
July IS, '68.
try.
Rhodes! Rhodes! Rhodes!!
Price Reduced lo per Ton.
T°d.
the price of Rliod«
reduced to $50 jht ton of 2000 lbs.
The quality of this* Manure bus not deteriora
ted, being better now than it was thirteen years
It is always dry and suitable for drilling.
All that is asked for Rhodes, is to try it along
side any oilier Fertilizer in the American market,
nnd note the result in the quantity and quality
of the grain at Harvest, and the subsequent
growth of clover or other crop.
Put up in bags
scriber at Middletown, Del.—on Chesapeake and
Delaware Canal, and
ware waters, at $50 ji
Send iu your ordi
limited.
July 18—tf.
meet the recent decline in Grain, nnd ir.
ons
Standard Manure has been
ptioji iu this reg'on
UEO.
fis, and sold by the sub
h
» Chesapeake and Delu
ton, clear of freight,
earlv,
E. T. EVANS.
Middletown, Del
the
pply is
HARNESSJMA&ING-.
T ÏIE undersigned having commenced Harness
making at
ODESSA, DEL.
t* prepared to furnish every urtielc iu his tine
on the most reasonable terms.
His experience in city and country justifies his
promise that
Im
de
al
a
ALL HIS WOBK WILL BE OF T1IE
X-0 BESf QUALITY.,##
April 25—tf.
GO T 0 DEAKYp'S
F OR everything that is nice, in the way of
fresh family Loaf Rre «d, Fancy Cakes, eu
Mid- perior Confectionery. lee' Cream, kc. Parties
to supplied with Caké* Confectionery, Re Cream &c.
to order, at shorYfcJjt' police. Goto Deakyne e
for everything that Is fuiv. ' *'
" ' J. ft. DEAKYNE.
' August 8—5m. Aliddlctow
Del.
Original {jortrg.
(
1
For the Middletown Tranter i/d.
MOONLIGHT AND LOVELIGHT.
Moonlight dancing mid the flowers
Through the quiet evening hours :
Moonlight shimmering through the trees,
Stirred by every passing breeze.
Moonlight plnving in the rill
Down the side of yonder hill ;
Moonlight resting on the green
(jiving radiance to the cene.
Moonlight in the prisoner's cell
Minding him of forest dell ;
Moonlight in the dusky street
Keeking with the days long heat.
Moonlight in the narrow room
Where small thought of heaven can conic,
Guiding faith to brighter days
Where all work is joy and praise.
Does not lovclight stray around
In each beauty, in each sound?
Smiles it not in every flower?
Fallj it not in Summer shower?
moonlight given,
Making earth a though« Uke heaven ;
God i
It in •
loving kindness sends
ils, brothers, sisters, mends.
Pi
Let us each he beams of love
living light wher'er we move
8o*diaU it be seen that we
Draw our.light, oh ! God, from thee.
Faith.
October 12/A.
(Entertaining Ainoiuledge.
Origin of Fnnitly Nnmrw.
A surname is an additional name added
to a proper or given name for the sake of
distinction and so called because originally
written over the other name instead of af
ter it, from the French Surnom or the
Latin Sujicrnomen, signifying above the
name. *
Surnames have originated in various
ways. Some arc derived from the pames
of places; from' personal peculiarities;
from the Christian or proper name of the
father; from the performance of certain
actions; from objects in the animal, min
eral and vegetable world and from acci
dental circumstances of every varied char
acter
According to Camden, surnames began
to he taken up in England at the time of
the Conquest, 10(56—just about eight hun
dred years ago.
Local names are from the largest class
of our surnames. First among these are
those which are natural, expressing the
Country whence the person first bearing
the name came ; as English, Scott,
French, Ireland, Britain, Fleming (from
Flaunders) Gaskin (from Gascony) &e
Names wore taken from almost every
p »unty, town and hamlet, ;b Cheshire,
Chester, Hull, Ross, Kent, Hastings.
For instance a person whose native place
was Chester might remove to another place,
the inhabitants of which would, to distin
guish him give him the surname of Ches
ter, originally prefixing it with "of,"
shortened fluently to " ()" or " A" sig
nifying from or cif, as John O'C /unter ,
Willfoill A. Kirby; these prefixes
after a time dropped and the names de
scended to children as simply Chester and
Kirby.
Besides these, we have a great number
of local surnames which are genet al ami
descriptive of the nature or situation of the
residence of the persons upon whom they
were Im stowed, as Hill, Wood, Dale, Park.
&e. The prefix At or Atte. was generally
used bpfore these names as John At Ililt ,
meaning John at the Hill t Jam ex At Well,
John At Wood, now Atwell and Atwood.
By and vnder were also used as prefixes
as ./fiwics By-Field, Tom Under-hill, In
this way men took names from rivers and
trees, frog) residing at or near them, as
Beck, Gill, Grant, Beach, Bush, Ash,
Thorn.
Surtimncs derived from Christian or bap
tismal numes are probably the next in
number to the local surnames; some of
these are probably the most ancient of all
surnames, many of them varied by prefixes
or affixes. Of this class wc have first the
names terminating in sow, which was add
ed to the name, of the father ; John the
son of William, was called John William
son. Johnson, John's son ; Thompson,
Thomas' son ; Simpson, Simeon's son ;
Wilson, 'Will's son, &c.
The Welsh merely appended " S" in
stead of son as Edwards, son of Edward ;
Davis , son of David ; Joues, son of John;
Hughes, son of Hugh, &c.
Then we have surnames formed from
sib' r 'viated names, pet names and nick
names, as H r ti/sow, the son of Wat or Wal
ter; Watts, signifying the same ; Dobson .
son of Dob or Robert, &c.
A great many are formed of abbreviated
and nurse names with the addition of the
diminutive terminations ette, kin, coek, or
cox, all of which signify ' 'little" or "child."
From the terminotion ette we have such
names as WiUet, which means little Will,
or the son of Will ; Ilnllctt, little Hal or
Henry. From bin or kin's wc have Wil
kins, Simpkins, Atkins, Higgins, Haw
kins, Dohliins. From cock or cox we have
^ ileox, Simcox, etc.
8ome surnames have the prefix Titz
which is of Norman origin signifying son,
as Fitz Clarence, Fitzgerald, son of Clar
gon of Ge^a((f. J?itz was applied to
s$ns both legitimate and iliegitmate.
The Welsh in like manner prefixed Ap
to denote son ; as Dfirid Ap Howell, Da
yid son of Howell ; Evan Ap Rhys, Evan
sop of Rhys or Rees ; Richard Ap Evan ,
Richard son of Evan ; John Ap Hugh,
John son of Hugh ; these names are now
abbreviated into Powell, Price, Bevan ,
a^id Pugh.
were
of
eu
e
The affix "Ing" is of Teutonic origin,
denoting progeny ; Whiling means the
Fair offspring, Browing, the dark or brown
child, etc. Let, of Anglo Saxon origin
means little, as Bartlett, little Burt or
Bartholomew.
The prefixes " Mac" and "O" found in
Irish names signify the first so», and the
hitter grandnim or descendant. Domicil's
son would be called J/«c-Donuell ; the
grandson would be called O'Donnell.
Of surnames from the Dutch the most
are derived from places in Ilo'land. Van
( Dutch), Von (German), signify nf or
from and denote locality ; as I tin Burnt,
from the town of Buren, Fun Antwerp be
1 aging to or coming from Ante e p.
Names of trades, occupations and pur
suits are next in number, as Smith, Car
penter, Taylor, Baker, Barber, Brewer;
Sherman (a - shear man, one who shears
cloth,) Naylor (nail maker,) Tucker (a
fuller,) etc. John the Smith was shor
tened to John Smith, I'etcr the Carpenter
to Peter Carpenter, etc.
Many surnames are derived from official
names both civil and ecclesiastical. Among
these may lie mentioned King, Ford, Karl,
Knight, Pope, Bishop, Bailey, Marshall,
Chamberlain, Priest, etc.
Personal characteristics have given ori
gin to another class of surnames descrip
tive of mental or bodily peculiarities.
Among these are names of color and com
plexion, as Black, Brown, White, Gray,
Dunn, (brown) ; and from the color of the
hair, as Whitehead, Fair-fax (fair hair,)
Swartz (black) Fairchild, Blackman, etc.
Those which indicate the mental or mor
al qualities are such as Goodman, Wise,
Wiley, Meek, Moody, Bliss, Gay, Sage,
Joy.
Among those derived from bodily' pecu
liarity and from feats of personal strength
or courage are Strong, Mickle, Little,
Long, Armstrong, Turtjbull, etc.
A few surnames are derived from ani
mals, as Wolf, Lion, Fox, Ilare, Roe, &c.
From Wild-hoar conies Wilbur ; from lit
tle Wolf or Impel'att comes Lovell ; Todd
means a fox ii| Scotch. And from Eher
or Enfer, a boar, is derived Everard, Ev
critt, Everingham, Everton, etc. Oli
phant is from Elephant.
Tlie names of fishes and birds have
been taken as family names, ns Pike, Sal
mon, Bert, Bass, Fish, etc ; Dove, Finch.
Peacock, Swan, Jay, Wildgoose (Wil
gus) Heron, etc.
The mineral and vegetable kingdoms
have contributed their full quota of names
as instance Garnett, Jewel, Steel, Iron,
Stone, Flint, etc.
From flowers, plants, shrubs nnd trees
we have the surnames of Lilly, Bose,
Pease, Bench, Thorn, Pine apt} Birch, etc.
One reason why persons regejved as
surnames the names of fishes, birds, ani
mals, flowers, ike. was because in ancient
times not only innkeepers, but all kinds
of tradesmen were in the habit of putting
on tlie signs over their doors a representa
tion of something to attract custom and as
a distinguishing mark of their place of
business. Dolphins, Elephants, Bulls,
Swans, Peacocks, etc. on signs gave rise
to surnames of those who put them up or
to some of their employees. In those
days in London and other places might be
seen on tradesmen signs, the Gun, the
Crane, tlie Bell, the Griffin, the Kettle,
the Pot, the Pitcher, almost every ob
ject animate and inanimate from which
circumstance wo can account for many
surnames which would otherwise seem
strange and absurd. Some surnames are
derived from some of the foregoing, on
coats of arms.
in
,
of
;
;
.
or
or
to
Ap
,
,
A few surnames have originated in
nicknames, epithets of contempt and ridi
cule, imposed for personal peculiarities,
habits, qualities, incidents or accidents
which happened to their original bearers,
as Doolittle, Bragg, Trollope, Sillitnan etc.
The foregoing give the principal sour
ces from which the greater part of our
surnames are derived, but many names
yet remain the origin of which are not ac
counted for, but all surnames must have
been origimdly significant.
The following list will give the origin
or meaning of some fainilliar surnames :
Aehcson, An inscription or memorial.
Acton, Tho oak town or oak hill—the
name of a town ip Middlesex, England.
Aikens, ( Aken, ) Oaken, hard firm.
Allen, (Allan,) This name appears
have several derivations. From the Gaelic
Aluinn signifying fyir, handsome lovely,
elegant. Irish Alun fair, beautiful ; El
us sun bright; and Aland Sclavonic,
a hound or wolf-dog.
Anderson, the son of Andrew.
Arnold, faithful or devoted to honor.
Ayers, (Eyres,) from a town, river and
district in Scotland.
Barton, from a town in Lincolnshire,
England.
Bates, signifies contention.
Beadle, ( BçdelL Biddle,) from Beadle,
the name of an office.
Blair, a cleared plain, a battle field.
Blake, the son of Lake—Ap Lake.
witty, sportive,
family, whence
Bndine, good hqqjqrcd,
Bond, the fattier of a
baaband, that is hotjse.-ftaiid.
Bottuel, the house on the cliff.
Bowers, a chamber, cottage or shady
recess.
Bfpven, son of Owen.
Bowman, one who shoots with a bow—
an anchor.
Boyd, .ycllojy-haired ; also from the
river Boyd a branch of the Avon.
Brand, signifies to burn ; also a sword
from its glittering brightness.
BreckenridgC, from Brechen, broken,
out qf rej »if and ridge the top of a hill or
house.
Brewer, (Brewster), a brewer of malt
liquor.
Bryant, (Brinnt), dignity, honor.
Brick, (Breek), broken, a gap; also
pasture.
Bristol, from a city in England ; the
name signifies "the broken chasm."
Bryan, (Brian), the nobly descended.
Budd, thrift, gain, prosperity, victory.
Burr, a wall, fortress or castle.
Call, prudent, discerning, cunning
Cameron, crooked nose or hooked nose.
Campbell, wry-niouth, the man whose
mouth is inclined a little to one side.
Cathcart, from parish Catlicart in Scot
land.
ChadwVi, the cottage by the harbour.
Chambers, one of the elan Cameron of
Scotland, going to France put bis name
in a Latin dress as was customary then,
styling bimself Dr Cumcrarid which was
called in French De la Chambre and upon
his return to Scotland be was called Cham
bers.
Chapman, a trader or shopman.
Clark, clerk or scholar,
Conklin, the son of Con.
bold, wise, knowing.
Crawford, from Crawford in Lanark
shire, Scotland.
Deacon, a church officer.
Davis, sou of David.
Evans, the Welsh for John, the same as
Johns.
Foster, probably a corruption of forres
Con means
ter.
Gervas, (Jarvis), steadfast, honorable.
Gibson, (Gibeson,) son of Gilbert.
Grover, from graver, one who carves or
engraves.
Haines, (Haynes), one who needs no as
sistance from others , one able to help him
self.
Harris, (Harrison, Herriep), son of
Henry.
Hartshorn, the born of the hart or male
deer —an emblem or sign over a shop or
inn whence the name "John at the Harts
horn"—shortened to John Hartshorne.
Havens, a harbor, a safe refuge.
Holmes, meadow-lands near or surroun
ded by water ; sometimes aq i*| 4 Hd.
Hooper, saiqo as cooper.
Hulsehari, a wood with deer or hart in.
Ilntchius, the child of Hugh.
Hutchinson, the child of Hutchinson
(grandson of Hugh.)
Jackson, son of Jack or John.
Jameson. (Jaincrson), son of James.
Jeffrey, (Jeffreys), from Geoffrey or
Godfrey meaning Gods peace or joyful
peace; this name was borne by the chief f)f
the royal house of Plantagenet.
Jenkins, from Jenks or John—little
John or son of John.
Jenks, the same as Johns ; son of John.
Jennings, same ns Jenkins; son of John.
Johnson, son of John ; a number of sur
mènes it will be observed have this mean
ing ns Jones, Evans, Jenkins, Jennings,
Johns.
Kelly, a hazel grove, also a ohurpb.
Lawrence, flourishing, spreading, from
Lannut, the laurel tree.
Mills, one who owned or lived at a mill.
Moore, from Mur, great, tall, a chief,
powerful, proud.
Morse, (Morris), a hero, warrior, a
brave man.
Mullen's, a Miller.
Pancost, a corruption of Prntecoet, a
name probably given to a child born on
that day.
Parker, tlie keeper of a park.
Randolph, (Bandall), signifies fairhelp,
good help.
Bcyuolds, sincere or pure love: strong
or firm hold.
. Bogers, one who keeps peace and quiet
ness ; strong counsellor.
Bussell, redhaired.
Spragg, (Sprngqe), speech, language,
eloquent—one noted for these qualities.
Stanton, a stone hill or stone town.
Stratton, the hill full of fresh springs.
Sutpheu, from Zutphen a city in Ger
many.
Teneyek, ten oaks or at the oaks.
Tilton, from a village in England where
tents were made in atjßient times.
Tovyjiseud, one jybo lives at the towns
end.
Trunx, the plncc on the waters ; or the
three waters.
Van Cleif, (Van Clccf. Van Clevo),
from Chleyes in Germany.
Vandervere, (Vemlcrvccr,), from the
ferry : one who lived by the ferry.
Van Horn, from Horn or Hoorn in Hol
land.
Van Volkenburgli, (Falkenburgh), frop
Vnlkenburgh Netherlands.
Vaij Zandt, from the shore or sand.
Vaughan, little, small in stature.
Walton, thé naine qf several villages in
England.
Wilkins, son of Will.
Wilkinson, son of Wilkins.
Worden, from Wocrdon a town in Hol
hind.
The foregoing art; derived from Cam
den, Lower and Artlier—chiefly from the
interesting work of the latter.
Of al) names the Smiths take the lead,
ap,! John Smiths are so numerous that it
almost ceases to be a descriptive name.
Pnc writer contends that the name John
Smith is not only common in Great Britian
apd A merica but among all the nations of
tljt, eifth. He insists that the Hebrew
napie Shern or Shcrnit meant Smith; in
Latin John Smith is Johannes Sinithius ;
Italian, Giovanni Smithi; Spanish, Joan
Ëmithiù ; Dtitch, Hans Schmidt ; Kfenojj)
Jean Smeets ; Bussian, Jojdnti Shmitta
jyskij Polish, Ivan Sehmittiweiski ; Chi
itese fatten Sljimmit ; Icelandic, Jaknc
Smithson; Welsh. .Tilton Schniidd ; Tqs
carora, Ton Qu Sniittia; Mexican, Joptli
Ti Siliitti. ' ' ..
or
^!0it and junior.
A Dombssio Farce. —"Why is i* f my
«on, that when you drop your bread und
butter, it is always on the buttered side F
"I don't know. The strongest sidle
ought to be up, and this is the strongest
butter I have ever seen."
"Hush up; it's some of your aunt's
churning/'
"Did shcchurnit, the great lazy thing/'
"What, your aunt?"
"No this butter. To make the old lady
churn it when it is strong enough to churn
itself."
"Ilush, Zeb, I've eat much worse in the
most aristocratic bouses."
"Well people of rank ought to eat it."
"Why people of rank ?"
"Cause it's rauk butter."
How to Keep Awake in Church.- f
" Take a piece of horse-radish root of good
size, and of a finger's length, to the sanc
tuary, and the moment the sermon begins,
put a piece in your mouth about the size
of a grain of corn, bite and moisten it
faithfully with the saliva, and the eyes will
be not only easily kept open, but a tearful
attpption may a|i,o be promoted, to the ex
clusion of dtow, mesa until the sermon
ends."
There is a story told of a celeb rated
French preacher, who, on delivering a
sermon on the duty of wives, said, "1 sie
opposite me, in this congregation, a woman
who has been guilty of the sin of disobe
dience, nnd in order to nqiq* her out to
universal condemnation, I will fling m\
breviary at her head." lie lifted Ills
book^ apd every female bead was dueked.
ï
A swajn visiting his gill the other day
found her putting up preserves, and cov
ering the jars with his love-letters. Tliob
beginning " Darling Susaq 1 ' were put on
peaches, and those with " My Own Lnvt"
on the apples. He left iu disgust when
she asked him to write another of the lat
sqrt fq qijjke qp tjje qjiijiber she wanted.
ter
Children are singularly inquisitive.—For
instance: "It is said tliuf a man should
cleaye tq his \^ife. tyfyqfc does elm f nca«,
p»?'* Î 4 It tneajig to unite together, to
stick to.' 1 "Does John unite wood, <>r
stick it together, when he cDavqs itj"
Ü Hem ! VVeU doq'f gq ' funlMb
questions, oliild. !i
An chlerly gentleman traveling in a
stage coach was amused by a constant fire
of words between two ladies One of th»|q
at last kindly inquired if their conversation
did not make his head ache, when he an
swered with a great deal of naivete : "No,
ma'am,
years/*
I've been married twenty-eiglit
Among the gifts to a newly-married
pair, the other evening, was a broom, sent
niexl with the follow
iis trifling gift accept
from me, its use I would commend: in sun
shine use the bushy part, in storm the
other en«l."
to the lady, aeconmat
ing sentiment : " Thi
A gallant w^it^r h^s recent|y recorded
his opinion to the effect that the virtues >f
the ladies exceed the magnitude of thoir
skirts, and their faults are as small as tlmir
bonnets. That chap is looking forward to
female suffrage, nnd intends to run for
some important office.
What is a pawnbroker 2 A phqss player
who chcpklflHtep gpciety with 4 " pawn,*'
Does he give any entertainment in honor
of his business? Yes—three halls. No
dinner? None, with him it is "Lent"
all the year around.
Mistaken mytholngists tell us that In
was turnail into a hoifpr, hut we have clean
qdjfroni a doctor's prescription the following
piece of information respecting tho doom
of that young person : Io dide of potassi
um."
Bousseau used to say, 1 ' that to write a
good love letter, you ought to lie^jq wit fl
out knowing what yog nteuii to say, and
finish without knowing what you have
written."
" Shall I out this loin of mutton saddle^
jgisc said a gentleman.—" No," said opo
of his guests ; " cut it hridlewisc, for then
I may get a bit in my mouth."
A merchant, not over conversant with
geography, on hearing that one of his ves
sels was in jeopardy, exclaimed, "Jeop
ardy, jeopardy !—where's that !"
9
An exchange says; "There is some
thing sweet about little girls." The Lou
isville Journal adds : "And it grows on
them as they grow bigger..'-'
;
"Sambo, did you ever sec the Gatskill
"No, Clem; but I've seen
Mountains !
the cats kill mice.
:
Prentice styst "We won't believe that
to kiss a pretty girl is so delicious, till wc
have it from their own lips."
It hss been asked, when rain falls, does
Jt ever get qp again ? Of course it <Jo«s,
in dew time.
The smaller the calibre of the mind, the
greater the bore of if perpetually open
pjoutlf
(Dur ((orrc'ipondence.
qf thr Middletown Trantcrijjt.
Savannah, Georgia, Oct. 18(5$.
Mr. Editor: —In pursuance of iny ex
pressed intention to keep you informed as
to how the " world wags'' in this reg^ojy.
I will make a few comments on men and
things hereabouts.
It needs but a slight acquaintance witl^
affairs in Georgia to convince any candi^
mind that the Kmlic.^ play, of Reconstruc
tion is a most egregious blunder. The
attempt to give supremacy to the Negrft
race has unsettled that people to a gr
extent and excited desires a^d aqt^
eipatioi s which they will not readily re
linquish. The Radical carpet-baggers at 11 ^
have the ear of a good number
blacks, and I fear that in their ^UP.pn.ÇÇ.
they will le excited to still gnater dc^ds o£
violence and bloodshed than those enactc.d(
at Camilla and other places iu this state.
The whites, exhibiting the tradition^
spirit of the Anglo-Saxon race, vie>y ^*ltq
Correspondent
unmitigated indignation, every fliKHUp!
subject them to the domiqatidn or an Ig
norant and barbarous race. The two
races are distinct and diffident, and
lapse of time will not cause them (p, çoiju
lesee. The white man, conscious of his
superiority intellectually and morally, wilj
n wer entertain the thought of niiseegep
ation or assimilation. It is manifest that
the doctrine of equality, politically am
socially, cannot be made to prevail, apt
jn the prêtant ignorant untutored stulgo' 1
the African mind, such an idea is too pre
posterous to be considered. It is useless
to speculate as to what changes time may.
work ill the status of the two race*.
Let us hope that the .African race wilj
bn elevated, improved and christianized sp.
that he may fulfil tlje fjfigtiuy which Provi
dence has in store for him. Congressional
dictation or outside interference of any.
kind with ttiis great question must be con
sidered meddlesome and mischievous. Let
ihe old Jeffersonian doctrine be maintained,
that the States arc to manage their own
domestic concerns, nnd, instead of t'up
antagonism between (ty) . fMC {» a S
been created anil fostered uy Griffe',
we should sepm have ty settlement of [||ja
question u hielt would promote the greatpsf
Of both races.
Those who migrated from the V. pjty of
oaks" to escape the heat of summer *mrq
returning every day with bronzed faces
and elastic step—refreshed and invigora
ted for the labors and duties of autumn
and winter. The Northern watering pjaccij
had a pretty large delegation of the'more
fashionable portion of our city. The
Southern people, however,
poverished by the war
few can undergo the expenditure of sum;
mer travel and a visit to the fashionaWe
places of resort.
Cotton is now coining from the interims
to this city quite rapidly, and business is
becoming active and stirring. By
of its system of railroads and its fine lines
of steamers to New York, Philadelphia
and Baltimore, this city has become ttiq
commercial metropolis of $ large
of the South.
During the recent storm, which com
menced last Friday, an immense quantity
of rain fell. The cellars in some parts
of the fjity yere overflowed, but the soil her®
is so sandy and porous tjpit 'ttyo £&(<<} fif
water that fi ll soon soaked into the ground
im
j were so
that comparatively
The
stornj
and lio mischii f was done,
delay cd the vessels that were aeady to gq
to sea, the heavy gale that was raging on
the ocean rendering it unsafe sor them to
go beyond the bar a^ |j|e mouth of thej
Savannah riv-T.
Tlie political campaign is viewed jniti
great interest by the people here, bg
there is no such furor of excitement as I
witnessed recently in Philadelphia and in
parts °£ tlfO State of New yoÀ." I| js lo
be hoped that the " had blood" of tfje two
parties will not cause any scrums distur
bance of the peace on election day.
I will write you fur. her in regard to
the status of affairs here wheneÿçj; anv
rise. " ' ""
5
«jucstinns nf interest a
• .Truly Tours,'
CosMopqp.rrn.
Good Bilks foh Am.. —J'rofane swear
ing is abominable ; vulgar language js dis
gusting ; loud luiighing is impolite ; rn
quisitivenesa is offensive ; slaiidejdqjg ' u
devilish; igiunatiee is disgrac'ttiil; ana
lying is shameful. Avoid Sll the abovq
vices, and aim at usefulness. Tltig is '{fa
'
rpid in which tu become respectable.
M itl'c in it, never be ashamed of hones)
labor. Keep g. q i conn ^ iy, Speak thq
truth at all tint •». Ne, er be ditteouragod,
but pers tvere, and mountains wijl becornè
mole bills before yuq. '* " v '" J
The qf ri gtgt.i.Mo r^tco of Indians
have been discovered near Marlborq tfpipt,
on the Potomac Biver. The discovery oï
a luge n imbec of beads, iqê^'ftsjqs, 'etc'.
|càve pu dojit of the character of the re
maitts.' The cfindiJuK of the re^ihs \n :
djuatc that they must be centuries old.
It was an old bachelor who said, ,,If
you meet a young lady who is »not very
jg'iy, you h^d better be a ljttle say your;
jelf.
There is a steam engine ijj New York
to'it runs J25 pressas,' prjpto ijU different
newspaper's,' makes hoop skirts, binds
hooks and runs a mile of shafting.
Whnt js the difference between a
and a burglar l One wears false Jocks ipd
tbe other false keys

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