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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, December 26, 1868, Image 1

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MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 26, 1868.
VOL. I.
NO. 52.
NEW GOODS
AT
REDUCED PRICES.
NAUDAIN & BROTHER,
are opening a fresh stock of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS,
P URCHASED since the fall in many kinds of
the same. Being bought for Cash, and from
avoid the second
first hands, principally—hence
profit of the jobber and intend giving the advan
tage to our liberal friends.
Our stock consists of Merinocs, blk col'd Al
pacas, Wool Poplins, Wool de. Laines,
assortment of Prints, Cotton and Wool Flannels,
1J, 2i Bleach'd and Bro. Muslin, Balmoral
8kirts, Snawls and Hoods, Ladies Vests, Gents
Knit Shirts and Drawers, White and Col'd Blank
Good
1,
ets,
HATS AND CAPS, DRUGGETS,
CARPET AND OILCLOTHS,
Fainted Window Shades,
GLOVES, HOSIERIES, AND
FANCY GOODS.
In fact, anything kept in a first class country
store.
We call particular attention to our fine stock of
Over-Coatings, Cloths & CaBsimeres,
which wc make a Speciality.
Receiving from the Manufacturers, Ladies'
Mimes, and Children's Shoes, Gents sewed and
pegged, double upper and sole, Calf flouts, Men's
heavy, winter Boots k Shoes, that we have made
of the best material ; and guarantee satisfaction.
MACKERE» , SH AD, AND HERRING
Hand.
Always
THOMPSONS' OLO VEFITTING CORSETS
GENTS ARCTIC OVERSHOES ,
MENS BUCK G A UNTLETTS,
GLOVES, MITTS.
A Stock of Dried Fruit Consisting of
LAYER RAISINS,
NEWDRIED CURRANTS,
NEW DRIED CITRON,
j
les
DRIED APPLES.
Also an extra article of
Buckwheat Flour.
Liberal discount for chbIi, and show Goods with
pleasure.
NAIOAIX ti BRO.
Middletown.
Dec. 12—ly
HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
AT
D. L. I»I \ V|\G'N
YARÏÈTY STORE,
9IIPDLVTOWN, DELAWARE,
Consisting if, pa ft ui
Books, of every description,
Photograph Albums,
Fancy Boxes ,
Work Boxes,
Writing Desks, Ladies' Satchels, Pocket
Books, Fort Folios, Purses,
Portmonaies, Segar Cases, Picture
Frames, Back Gammon Boards, and
Games of all kinds.
Pocket Knives f Scissors, Sleeve Buttons,
Studs, Breast Fins, Finger Rings,
Neck Ties, Mcerchaum Pipes,
Paper Collars, Perfumery, etc.
E%c. 12—tf
WM. N. BRICE. .
WHOLESALE COMMISSION MERCHANT AND
PRODUCE DEALER,
No. 18, Central Market, Delaware
Avenue, above Race Street.
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.
P ARTICULAR attention paid to the sale of
GRAIN and LIVE STOCK,
promptly attended to. Consignments respect
fully solicited.
All orders
REFERENCES.
Hon. D. C. Bluckiston, Kent Co, Md.
Franklin Dyre, Esq. " " "
W. A. Brice, Fsq.
Wm. Lockwood,
J. G. Griffith,
F. T. Perry,
Harry Clayton, Middletown, '
Dec. 5, 1868—ly
Cecil Co.
Odessa,
HARNESS MAKING.
T HE undersigned having commenced Harness
making at
ODESSA, DEL.
ff prepared to furnish every article in his line
off Die most reasonable terpis.
* "HW e'xperiéncë tu euy and country justifies his
promise.that
I^lLL HIS WORK WILL BE OF THE
S&-BEST QUALITY.
And gives hint confidence to solicit a share of the
pu blic patronage.
^ar-His Shop is on Main street, in t);e house
formerly occupied by Joseph Tawresy.
WM. T. GALLAHER.
April JS—tf.
JOHN FULLMEU
Manufacturer of and Dealer iu
BOOTS AND SHOES,
No, 408 Market Street,
WILMINGTON. DELAWARE.
A® Particular Attention Paid to Cus tom Work
Oct. 11—tf-.
Middletown Carriage Works.
ESTABLISHED IX 1830.
Jf. Na COX & 11RO.. Proprietors.
W ! keep constantly on hand and manufac
ture to order Carriages of tbe latest sty
and finished in the best manner, as we employ
bone but first-class workmen and use only the
best material,
Repairing executed with neatness and
despatch.
«' All work warranted.
J»a 4—tf
\
grifft Jjocfrg.
DECEMBER.
Out in the woods the lonely
Toss and moan in the winter wind,
For the birds have flown far o'er the seas,
And they are left behind.
Bare and cold in the twilight dun,
They pine for the light of summer eves,
hen the golden rays of the setting sun
Shone through their golden leaves.
\Y
Far away o'er the purple hills
The moon is climbing to the skies,
And a faint gleam over the water thrills,
Where her trembling radiance lies.
The flowers are dead and the birds are flown,
And the wind blows cold from the chilly sea,
And I think of the days that are dead and gone,
That will never couip back to me.
But the flowers will hlloom again in spring,
And the birds fly home from ov
And, nestled in sweet green leaves will sing
All day to the happy trees.
And somewhere, deep in this heart pf mine,'
Under the sorrow, and car eand pairç,
Waiting for April suns to shine,
For April clouds to rain,
Lies a little Hope, like! a violet,
Ready to bloom with the other flowers;
And over the grave of my old regret
Springs a dream of brighter hours.
the seas
popular JOFates.
THE BABES IN THE CLOUDS
t
A THUE STORY.
Just ten years ago there suddenly hurst
upon the Western World, a magnificent
stranger from foreign parts, "with all his
travelling glories bn." It was the great
cornet of 1858, on the grand tour of the
universe.
We remember that comet-summer, not
so much for its great astronomical event,
as for two singular incidents that more
nearly touched oltr human sympathies,
which will grovel in poor earthly affairs,
even within sight of the most august celes
tial phenomena.
One pleasant Saturday afternoon during
the comet's appearance, an asrouaut, after
a prosperous voyage, descended upon a
farm in the neighborhood of a large mar
ket town in one of the western states. Ho
was soon surrounded by a curious troop of
the fuynicr's family and laborers, all ask
ing eager questions about the ypyage and
the management of the balloon, that, se
cured by an anchor and a rope in the hand
of the aeronaut, with its car but a foot or
two above the ground, was swaying lazily
backward and forward in the evening air.
It was a good deal out of wind, aud was a
sleepy and innocent monster in the eyes
of the farmer, who, with the owner's per
mission, led it up to his house, where, ns
he said, he could hitch it to his fence.
Rut before he thus secured it his three
children, aged respectively ten, eight, nnd
three, begged hinl to lift them "into that
big basket," that they might "sit on those
pretty red cushions."
While the attention of the aeronaut was
diverted by more curious questioners from
a neighboring farm, this rash father lifted
his darlings one by one into the car.
Chubby little Johnny proved the "ounce
too much" for the aerial camel, and brought
him to the ground ; and then, unluckily,
not the haby, hut the eldest hope of the
family was lifted out. The relief was too
great for the monster. The volatile crea
ture's spirits rose at once ; he jerked his
halter out of the farmer's hand, and with
a wild bound mounted into the air. Vain
was the aeronaut's anchor. It caught a
moment in a fence, hut it tore away, and
was off, dangling uselessly after the runa
way halloon, which so swiftly and steadily
rose that in a few. minutes those two little
white faces peering over the edge of the
car grew indistinct, and those piteous cries
of "papa!" and "mamma!" grew faint and
fainter up in the air.
When distance and twilight mistR had
swallowed up voices and faces, and noth
ing could be seen hut the dark cruel shape
sailing triumphantly away with its precious
booty, like an serial privateer, the poor
father Bank down helpless nnd speechless :
but the mother, frsntic with grief, still
stretched out yearning arms towards the
inexorable heavens, and called wildly up
into the unanswcrlng void.
The aeronaut strove to console the wretch
ed parents with assurance that the halloon
would descend Within thirty miles of the
town, and that till might he well with the
children, provided it did not come down
in the water or deep woods. In the event
of its depending in a favorable spot, it wna
thought that the older child might step
ont, leaving the younger in the balloon
Then it might again rise and continue its
j voyage.
"Ah. no." replied the mother. "Jennie
would never stir from the ear without
Johnny in her $rma."
The balloon passed directly over tbe
market town, apd the children, seeing ma
ny people in the streets, stretched out their
hands and e.nllej] loudlv for help But the
villager«, though they saw the bright little
heads, heard no call.
Amazed at this strange apparation. they
mi"ht have thought the translated little
creatures small angel navigators on Rome
voyage of discovery, some little cherubic
venture of their own, as beading towards
the rosy eloudlands and purple islands of
les sunset splendor, they sailed deeper and
deeper into the West, snd faded awav.
Some company they had. the poor little
sky-waifs. Something comforted them and
allayed their wild terrors—something whis
pered them that below the night and clouds
the
the
and
was homo ; that above was God ; that
wherever they might drift or clash, living
or dead, they would still be in Ilis do
main and under His care—that though
borne away among the stars they could
not be lost, for His love would follow
them.
When the sunlight all went away' and
the great comet came blazing out, little
Johnny was apprehensive that the comet
might come too near their airy craft, and
set it on fire with a whisk of its dreadful
tail.
in
is
a
to
a
Rut when his sister assured him
that the fiery dragon was " as much as
twenty miles away," and that God wouldn't
let him hurt them, he was tranquilized,
but soon after said, "I wish he would
come a little nearer, so I could warm my
self, I'm so cold !"
Then Jennie took off her apron and
wrapped it about the child, saying tender
ly: " This is all sister has to make you
warm, darling, but she'll hug you close in
her arms, and we will say our prayers and
you shall go to sleep."
" Why, how can I say my prayers be
fore I have my supper?" asked little
Johnny.
" Sister hasn't any supper for you, or
for herself, but we must pray all the har
der," solemnly responded Jennie.
So the two baby-wanderers, alone in the
wide heavens, unawed by darkness, im
mensity and silence, by the presence of
the great comet and the millions of unpity
ing stars, lifted their little clasp-hands and
sobbed out their sorrowful " Our Father,"
and then that quaint little supplementary
prayer :
"Now I lay medown to sleep,
I pray the Lord my Boui to keep ;
If I should die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take."
his
a
Ho
of
se
or
a
ns
nnd
that
was
car.
the
too
his
with
a
and
little
the
cries
and
had
noth
shape
poor
:
still
the
up
the
the
down
event
wna
step
its
tbe
ma
their
the
little
they
little
Rome
towards
of
and
little
and
whis
clouds
" There ! God heard that, easy ; for we
are close to him up here," said innocent
little Johnny.
Doubtless Divine Love stooped to hear
the little ones, and folded them in perfect
pence—for soon the younger, sitting on
the bottom of tbe car, with his bend lean
ing against bis sister's knee, slept as
soundly ns though he were lying in bis
own little bed at home, while the elder
watched quietly through the long hours,
and the car floated gently on in the still
night air, till it began to sway and rock
on the fresh morning wind.
Who can imagine that simple little
child's thoughts, speculations and wild
imaginings, while watching through those
hours ? She may have feared coming in
collision with a meteor—for many were
abroad that night, scoqta and hcralda of
the great cornet—or perhaps being cast
away on some desolate star island ; or more
dreary still, floating and floating on, night
and day, till they should both die of cold
and hunger. Poor babes in the clouds !
At length a happy change, or Provi
dence—we will sav Providence—guided
the little girl's wandering hand to a cord
cqpnected with the valve Something told
her to pull it. At ririoe the balloon began
to sink, slowly and gently, as though let
down by tender hands ; or as though some
celestial pilot guided it through the wild
currents of air, not letting it drop into a
lake or liver, lofty woodj or impenetrable
swamp, where this strange, unchildlikc
experience might have been closed by a
death of unspeakable horror, but causing
it to descend ns softly as a bird alights on
a spot where human care and pity await
ed it.
The sun had not yet risen, but the
morning twilight had come, when the little
girl, looking over the edge of the car, saw
the dear old earth coming nearer—"rising
towards them," she said. But when the
car stopped, to her great disappointment,
it was not on the ground, but caught fast
in the topmost branches of a tree. Yet
she saw they were near a house whence
help might soon come, so she awakened
her brother and told him the good news,
nnd together they watched and waited for
deliverance, hugging each other for joy
and warmth, for they were cold.
Farmer Burton, who lived in a lonely
house on the edge of his own private prai
rie. was a famous sleeper in general, but
on this particular occasion he awoke before
the dawn, and, although he turned nnd
turned again, he could sleep no more. So
at last he said to his good wife, whom he
had kindly awakened to inform her of his
unaccountable insomnolence : "It's no use;
I'll get up and dress myself, and have a
look at the comet."
The next that worthy woman heard
from her wakeful spouse was a hasty sum
mons to the door. It seems that no soon
er did he step forth from the door of his
house than his eyes fell on a strange, por
tentous el.ape hanging in a lara« pear tree
nbouf twenty yards distant. He could see
no likeness in it to any thing earthly, and
he had fancied it might he the comet, who
having put out his light had gone down
there to perch. In his fright and perplex
ity he did what every wise man would do
in a like extremity—he called upon his
valiant wife. Reinforced by her, he drew
near the tree, eautiously reconnoitering.
Surely never pear tree bore such frnit be
fore.
Suddenly there descended from the thing
a plaintive, trembling little voice: "Please
take us Jown; we are very cold."
Then a second little voice said : ' • And
hungry too; please take us down."
" Why, who are you? And where are
you from ?
The first little voice said: " We are
Mr. Harwood's little boy and girl, and we
are lost in a balloon "
The second little voice said : " It is us,
and we runned away with a halloon.—
Plcasé take its down." "
Dimly comprehending the situation, the
farmer getting hold of a dangling rope,
succeeded in pulling down the balloon.
He at first pulled out little Johnny, who
rapidly a few yards towards the house,
then turned round and stood for a few
moments curiously surveying the balloon.
The faithful little sister was so chilled and
exhausted that she had to be carried into
the house, where, trembling and sobbing,
she told the wonderful story.
Before sunrise a mounted messenger
was dispatched to the Harwood house with
glad tidings of great joy. He reached it
in the ufternoon, and a few hours later the
children themselves arrived in state, with
banners and mnsic, and conveyed in a cov
ered hay wagon and four.
Joy-bells were rung in the neighboring
town, and in the farmer's brown house the
happiest family on the continent thauked
God that night.
a
ry
v..H ,o ,k. a™ orP.ru.
A woman who signs herself E. D. W.
is writing her "Experiences in Europe" in
for the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. In
a late letter she describes as follows, a visit
to the celebrated sewers of Paris :
" Yesterday, the fifth of November, was
the day appointed by the chief of the sew
erage department for our party to enter
thc subterranean vaults of Paris, so inter
esting to the readers of Les Miserables,
The ticket of notification informed us that
we must be at the Place dc la Madeline,
on the side of Boulevard Malesherbcs, at
one and a quarter o'clock precisely. Ar
riving, we found about twenty-four per
tons assembled around a temporary railing
of iron that enclosed the opening to the
sewers, two iron doors that lay flat on the
payement just like our covers over the gas
and wati r pipes in the streets of Philada'.
The doors opened, a narrow spiral stair
way was disclosed, and a ray of light from
a lamp far down the dismal entrance rather
increased the gloom than any attractions
the place might have. However, when
the chief, dressed in government uniform,
with the title of his office in gilt letters
plnced conspicuously on his hat, gave the
signal, we started, single file, and in a mo
ment were nearly blinded by a glare of
light from rows of kerosene lqmps in the
hands of men who were to conduct us
through the sewers. At the foot of about
twenty-five steps, two large boats were in
waiting for us, and when my sight became
manageble, that was at first dazzled by
the swinging lights reflected upon the wa
ter, the boat rocking as each onq stepped
on the side, I tried to realize that I was
not entering a death barge on the Styx,
or a hearse gondola on the Via Mora, or
the funeral canal of Venice by night.
Who would imagine a sewer, through
which the dish-water of Paris was carried,
could be converted into a canal twelve feet
broad, a foot-path on cither side of solid
stono, whefe two persons could pass each
other, a vaulted roof, along which water
and gas pipes, two feet in diameter, were
conducted, and telegraph wires were held.
Frpui the center of the arch large lamps
were suspended every ten or twelve feet
Our party having seated themselves in two
boats, there were twenty men iu blue bon
nets, and wooden sabots ready to seize the
ropes when the command " avancez ," was
given. Presently a faint sound of a horn
was heard that grew louder as it was
caught up aud echoed from every angle of
the sewers. Our chief gave a shrill whis
tle, and the men started on a trot. On
the sides of the walls small white porce
lain plates were inserted bearing in black
letters the dates and heights of risings of
waters at different periods, some of them
I
a
a
for
So
he
his
a
his
tree
see
and
do
his
be
a
considerably above our heads, and sugges
tive of the horrors escaped by Jean Vali
jean, at the Place de la Bastile, at the
time of the French revolution. The names
ef the streets under which we passed and
the corners of the cross streets were mark
ed, so we could ttll exactly our direction.
Runaing down the main sewer of the Bue
Royal to the Place dc la Concorde, we
?—a train of
found—what do you suppose
cars, waiting for us ! Six of the prettiest
little ears I ever saw. They consisted of
six pliitforins, about eight feet square, with
brass railings, se&ts cushioned with red
leather, no top to the ears ; and on each cor
ner of the cars a brass lamp, with grained
glass globes, formed a bright and bcautful
finish to this fairy-like conveyance.
The sewer was narrower here and the
wheels of the cars ran on brass rails laid
on the edges of the foot-paths. Each car
hud an iron handle back nnd front, with a
brass cross-piece like those on our hose
carriages at home. When the cars started,
four men pulling and pushing each down
the grade of the Rivoli vault, the long vis
ta of the illuminated vault, the regular
clack of the sabots on the stone walk, wa
ter splashing into the side entrances either
on stone steps to break the force, or invert
ed arches to prevent splashing of the main
canal, the speed of our human locomotives,
the expression of delight and wonder on
the faces of our party, strongly thrown out
by the four foot-lights on each car—all
was so strange, and half pleasing, half
frightful that, like the reßt, I waited to see
what the end would be. After trotting a
mile and a half we were suddenly landed
at a large iron gate, and so intense was
the light there that I went baok to my first
theory, and concluded that we were at the
f a e of Dante's I
at the Place lu
the sun of noonday, on the white embank
ment of the Seine, and opposite the two
tiilf towers of the Palaisc de Justice, invi
ting td couie and see that we were in a
world 6? reality, that there the beautiful
Marie Antoinette suffered the tortures of
imprisonment, ajjd front there was released
by death alone.
And
are
are
we
us,
the
We had arriv» d
and the light was
In^rno.
Châtelet,
ISit and
ittmor.
ful
and
I
and
have
have
ed
ing
the
the
the
the
A Queer Hymn Book.
A gqod jftke is told of a preacher in Ne
braska, who had dined with a friend just
before afternoon services. As it happen
ed, this friend occasionally luxuriated in
a smile of the ardent, and sometimes car
ried a morocco covered flask in his overcoat
pocket.
By mistake, the minister took the
friend's overcoat for his own on his depart
ure, and wulking into the pulpit began the
exercises without doffing the garment, it
being rather chilly in the room.
Looking very ministerially over his con
gregation from behind his spectacles, he
begun drawing from his pocket, as he sup
posed his hymn book, with the introducto
ry remark that the congregation would
sing from q particular page which he se
lcc ? ed beforehand. V
The minister held the supposed hookup
in full sight of the congregation, and at
tempted to open it sideways, but it was no
go.
The situation was realized in a moment,
but alas ! too late,
His reverence vyap dumbfounded, the
whole scene was made ludicrous by a fel
low in the back part of the congregation,
who drawled out :
"Say, Mister, can't we all jine in that
ar' hymn?"
-•
In New York there is a lad proverbial
as being a bad speller. The school that
he attends has among its many rules and
regulations one that requires the scholars
to spell a column in the dictionary, and
give the meanings, just as the school opens;
well this lad wus foot of the class. The
next day the first word was admittance,
The lad was walking around sight-Bceing,
when his eye fell upon a circus bill, which,
among other inducements to draw a crowd,
had "admittance twenty-five cents—nig
gers and children half-price." He spelled
the word, and rcccollectiug it was the first
in his to-morrow's lesson, learned it "by
heart." Next day, strange to say, the
head boy missed, and the next, and the
next, and so on, until it came to our par
ticular friend, who was in the mean time
all exciteincut with the hope of getting
head, being sanguine that he was right,
Here's the result :
Teacher .—Boy at the foot spell admit
is
vain
the
and
I
are
The
on
The
ger
pea.
fail
the
of
see
ful
so
tance.
Boy. —Ad-mit-tance, admittance.
Teacher .—Give the definition.
Boy. —Twenty-five cents—niggers and
children half-price.
Rockhill A Wilson, at the Greag Brown Stone
Clothing Hall, G03 and G05, Chestnut Street,
Fhilndelphi
cellence of their Clothing;
sings of other themes. Hememb'cfing that the in
n needs a lining,
a covering, he thinks th
have a poetaster, to sing of the ex
d he sometimes
well us the &iter : 'man
is no material better
suited to the purpose than buckwheat cakes.
Hear him:
Buckwheat Cakes.
Hark ! Hark ! Ilnrk !
'Tis the sound of the breakfast bell ;
The tinkle we love
For it tells of the cuke^
Which Biddy bakes,
Of elegant buckwheat flour.
And we hurry to eat
Such a luscious treat,
Fit for a King to devour.
The griddle she's greasin',
The cakes are in season—
The savory odor's bewitching.
They're crisp and they're brown,
And we swallow them down,
As fust as they come from the kitchen.
Oh ! happy are we,
As soon as we see
The smoking hot buckwheat cakes,
Right hot from the fire,
Aud we truly desire,
To eat them as fast as she bakes.
oil !
at
of
Cocldn't Suuschide. —A pair of those
entertaining ladies, who seem to carry on
so large a business in the way of procur
ing subscriptions for new works, so sweet
ly un-get-rid-a-ble, called a short time
since at the office of a young lawyer for
the purpose of getting him to subscribe.
"Iudecd ladies," said he, "the partner
ship of which I am an humble member has
lately been so imprudent as to issue a new
work of their own, which, in consequence
of the enormous expense, attending its il
lustration, embellishments, Ac. has com
pletely crippled us."
"Then perhaps," replied the fair can
vassers, "we could procure you some sub
scribers. What do you call your work.
"Well, we haye not fully determined ns
yet ; but I guess I'll let my wife have her
own way, and cull it aftef hie—Charles
Henry."
a
a
of
A Boy's Composition.—M aster Shrimp
has favored the public with another cout
sition which
:ura evidence qf merit,
will some day make a logician, if he
fie
perseveres :
Ma is my mother. I am her son. Mu's
name is Mrs. Shrimp ; she is the wife of
Mr. Shrimp, and Mr. Shrimp is her hus
band. Pa is my father. My name is
John George Washington Shrimp. There
fore, pa's name is Shrimp too ; aud so is
ma's.
My ma haB a ma. Sho is my grandma.
She is mother-in-law to my pa. My pa
says mother-in-laws ought to he vetoed. I
like my grandma batter than pa does. She
brings me ton oent .t mips and lo'ivars.
She don't bring any to pa. Maybe that's
why he don't like her.
A Texan negro was overheard making
an honorable apology to another in this
wise: "I jes said, Sambo, dat yon lied ;
dat is, I jes said dat you lied,
told me you said you'd kill me
if you killed me I'd kill you," *
uatioq was satisfactory.
d
Den, Jim
in' 'I sàjtf
■Ë
io cxjila
Silence of the Arctic Night.
and
the
and
I
and
on
of
as
say,
fur
the
ton.
not
It
in
the
'
In his new work, " The Open Polar
Sea," Dr. Hayes thus describes the fear
ful solitude and stillness of the Arctic
night :
" I have gone out in the Arctic night,
and viewed nature under varied aspects.
I have rejoiced with l,er in her strength
and communed with her in repose. I
have seen the wild burst of her anger,
have watched her sportive ploy, and have
beheld hqr robed in silence. I have walk
ed abroad in darkness when the winds
were roaring through the hills arid crash
ing over the plain. I have strolled along
the beach when the only sqvypd that broke
the stillness was the only dull creaking of
ice-tables, as they rose and fell lazily with
the tide.
frozen sea, and listened to the voice of the
icebergs bewailing their imprisonment ;
along the glacier, where forms and falls the
avalanche ; upon the hill-top, where the
drifting snow, coursing over the rocks,
snng its plaintive song ; and again I have
wandered away to some distant valley
where all these sounds were hushed, and
the air was still and solemn as the tomb.
I have wandered far ont on the
" And it is here that the Arctic night
is mosl impressive, where its wonders arc
unloosed to sport and play with the mind's
The heavens above and
vain imaginings,
the earth beneath reveal only an endless
and fathomless quiet. There is no where
around me any evidence of life or motion.
I stand alone in the midst of the mighty
hills. The tall cliffs climb upward, and
are lost in the gray vaults of the skies.
The dark cliffs standing against their
slopes of white, are the steps of a vast
amphitheatre. The mind finding no rest
on their bold summits wanders into spaco.
The moon weary with her long vigils,
sinks to her repose ; the Pleiades no lon
ger breathe their sweet influence. Cassio
pea. Andromède, and Orion, and all the
infinite host of unnumbered constellations
fail to muse one spark of joy into this
lost their
dead atmosphere. They have
tenderness, and are cold and pulseless.
The eye leaves them and returns ^'the
earth, and the trembling cap, a^'iqis gpme
thing that will bfiak ' the oppressive ' si
lence. But no footfall of living thing
reaches it, no wild beast howls through
the solitude. There is no cry of birds to
enliven the scene ; no tree among whose
branches-the wind can sigh and moan.
The
tlie
one
the
at
pulsations of my own heart alone are
heard in the great yoid ; and tis the blood
courses through the sehrfitive organization
of the ear, I am oppressed as with dis
cordant sounds. Silence has ceased to be
negative. It has become endowed with
positive attributes. I seem to hear and
see and tcel it. It stands forth as a fright
ful spectre, filling the miud with over
powering consciousness of universnj death
—proclaiming the end of all things aud
heralding the everlasting future. Its pres
ence is unendurable. I spring from the
rock upon which I was seated, I plant my
feet heavily on the snow to banish its pres
ence and the sound rolls through the night
and drives away the phantom. I have
seen no expression on the face of nature
so filled with terror as the silence of an
Arctic night.'
The Inlands of Pyramid Lake, Utah.
A gentleman who has visited Pyramid
Lake, and explored several of its islands
at the season of laying and incubation for
the myriads of gulls, ducks, pelicans, and
other waterfowl that swarm upon its wa
ter, states that at that time the larger is
lands are literally white with eggs. In
walking from the shore toward the centre
of the islands it is impossible to proceed
fifty feet without stepping upou some of the
eggs, so thickly are they strewn over the
ground. The fowls inhabiting the islands
are described as being exceedingly tame ;
they hover and flutter upon the ground
about the intruder upon their breeding
ground, or circle and stream about his
head, and with but little show of fear.
This absence of feitr of man is doubtless to
be attributed to the fact that until lately
that "feathered biped," man, has never
been seen by thrill upon their islands.—
Owing to certain superstitions notions held
by them in regard to the lake, the Indians
have never, in the memory of their oldest
chief, visited any of the islands. Even were
they not withheld by the fear of monsters
in tho lake and upou the islands, they
have no boats or canoes, njid know not)|jna
even of that rudest"df nautical arts—raft
navigation.
Among the islands of tho }akp ufß two
small, rocky ones, near to each other, and
at no great distance from the shore from
the fact that they are alive with rattle
snakes. Huge and lazy old patriarchs of
the islauds, with long strings of rattles up
on their tails, busk in the Blinde of almost
every stone, while younger nnd more ac
tive members of the tribe glide about in all
directions, and the intruder upon these is
lands of snakes is often treated to a serena
de by a dozen sets of rattles of various
degrees of power and shades of tone. Of
course neither whites or Iudians would
care to tarry long on these islands, nor to
cultivate more than a passing acquaintance
with their musicul inhabifkpts.
It is supposed thjit the reason of these
two islauds being so completely alive and
crawjing with snakes, is that a few having
gotten on their shores by some i'oriident,
and finding convenient dens in thé rocks,
they have ever since fed and fattened upon
the eggs and unfledged young of tfie brood
ing water fowl, and have gone on increas
ing and multiplying, with nothing tfi de
crease or disturb them.
to
It
on
a
in
is
in
ns
he
of
is
is
pa
I
She
this
;
Jim
sàjtf
Improvement« In Delaware.
Rev. J. H. Lightbiirn, of Dover, wriljes
to'the tit. Michael's ('trine'' as fellow*.
The importance of railroads to the growth
and development of a country meets with
the fullbst demonstration in those towns,
and that part of the coriritry in "Delaware,
which lie on and are contigtibus \b' thd
railroad yi.hivh through the State.
I will give a brief sketch of the growth of,
some of the towns, and the devcWiuybpt
and enhanced value of the lands lyingup
on aud near the Delaware railroad. This
sketch shqll lie mostly 'from personal obser
vation.
Ip 1851 I visited, what was then known
te village of Middletown. It consumed
of a few small houses. ; A village iti Eng
land is distinguished from a town by the
want of a market. Whether Middletowu
could boast of so important an institution
as a market-house then, I am not able to
say, but this I do know, that the bo^serf
composing the village were indeed ''few and
fur between,
the most thriving towus south of Wilming
ton. Its long rows of neat, and substan
tially built huu.scs, and the enterprise and
wide-awake spirit of its business men, can
not fail to arrest uttcuflön, and command
respect. The laud 6ufrouqdiqg Middle
town, which could have been bought itf
1851 for a mere nominal price, is now 1
some of the richest, best cultivated, most
productive and valuable land In the State.
It abounds in peach orchards, and all
kinds of fruits, and is one of flyv
beautiful districts of country to be iüsàçf
anywhere. In 1833, 2800 acres of land
near here sold 'ftjr $2000. This tract is
now divided into srx' farms. Mr. Feni
morc who owns one of these farms, netted
in two consecutive years' crop of peached
$48,000. Mr. James V. Moore sold
cently a farm of 150 acres, about 'three
miles from Middletown, for $30,000, and
the purchaser iyd3 offered an advance of
$2,000 a »hört tiiuo lifter. Mr. ReyboJ^'*
peach-orchard is suid in the last three
years to have netted about $300,000.
Moa^ of these lands, before the railroad
was VVb^oted, ^'ere regarded ppor
eycrgrKwi! yy ith saisuftbs liuénes,' ad
sejd fttuiere nominal prices.
' Two and a half miles south of Dover is
Middletown is now one of
UlUSti
, were
d itère
tlie village of Wyoming. The village has
almost entirely been built up in the lUst
thj. ljt eontalp's 40'or Ö0 houses;
one of the' freatCst 1 amf hVrgest abudeiijUUfotr
the peninsula, q'WcH-kcpt hotel, two' stores, 1
doing a fine business ; blacksmith and
wheelwright shops, a large grist mill ad
joining the village, and promises soon to
take its stand among "the fuuiily Of
towns."
Thè tojyn of. Felton is situated on the
line of the rallroud'ftb'out eight tulles briPH
Wyoming. Less than ten years ago I was
at Felton station. Tliercl ! were tw(f small
houses, and an equally small depot. It is
uow a town of nb little importance, with
regularly laid nut streets, which are well
filled with uoat aud comfortable dwellings.
There is now, nearing completion, the
large.-t and most beautiful Seminary build
ing that I have seen any where on the pe'
ninsula. There arc two fine churchcm
The Methodist Church there is a station.
Felton is a self-sustaining stntion, which
tannot be said of Cambridge, Easton, St:
Michaels, Denton, 'Grcènsborough,
All honor to the noble, enterprising arid
liberal Feltonians. In ten years this
town has risen up as by the otiehifnter's
wand, and has already outstripped Aollie of
the oldest inland towns. • .
Dover, the capital of the State,
to become the metropolis of the peninsula.'
It is in the midst of the finest fruit-grow
ing region of Delaware. There is a mag
nificent stretch of country from Dover to
the bay. Dover already possesses the
putation of producing the best, and ship
ping the largest quantity of peaches of any
place iu the Stute, or in tho United Stateÿ
The town is situated on the railroad, arid
on high dry land. It is very healthy, and
the vpost beautiful and most desirable, ari
a place of residence, of all the towns with
in the range of my knowledge. Its growth
is extraordinary. In 1850 it had a popu
lation of about (500,Jit n >w has about 25005
During the past six mouths, about twenty
houses have been built. On the street in
which I live, and within a space less than
two squares, dwellings have been pu
in the last few months costing riot'lesV
$30,000. The spirit of improvciuent is
still rife, and I hear of extensive arrange
ments for building in tlïé Coming'Spring.
' TtiefeTs nb town lii Pelawaro that la
any distance from tho railroad that is not
in statu quo, or nearly so. It is to the
railroad that Delaware owes her growth
and improvtSlrjeiif. '
re
U 1
Flohips.— 4. letter to a Biijj,uioi
per, from Monticello, says:—I
suaded that a brighter day must
dawn upon Florida. Things must be at
their worst. Negroes in the Legislature,
in uinnr offices of the State, a negro runs
ning for Congress, another as Secretary of
State, the Governor and Lieut. Governor
each claiming to be Governor, and money
hardly* oirtsuiating at all because of thé
repented failures in the cotton crop —surely
we are at tho bottom, arid Will rise
We have a beautiful country, and a dc*
lightful climate, a fertile soil, a* ready
cess by railroad and water to market, and
a wide range of productions. Wheat docs
not succeed well here ; but we can rain«
corn,"rye, oafs, sugar cane, tobacco, sweet
and Irish potatoes, cotton, besides fraitg
of almost all kinds. The orange, lemon,
peuch, ,gra| e and pomegranate grow finely
and many garden vegetables are raised Ibr
market. Land is very cheap, aud plenty
for sale. ; ;
pa
nm peG
soon
now.
ac-

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