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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, March 20, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1869-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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NO, 12,
MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 20, 1869.
VOL. 2.
NEW GOODSl
AT
REDUCED PRICES.
G. W. W. NAUDAIN,
is opening a fresh stock of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS,
P URCHASED since the fall in many kind? of
the same. Being bought for Cash, and from
.'oid the second
the ad van
first hands, principally—hence
profit of the jobber und intend giving
tage to our liberal friends.
Our stock consists of Merinoes, blk. col'd Al
pacas, Wool Poplins, Wool de. Laines. Good
asflortment offprints, Cotton and Wool Flannels,
1 , Ik 2 À Bleach'd and Bro. Muslin, Balmoral
Skirts, Shawls and Hoods, Ladies Vests, Gents
Knit Shirts and Drawers, White and Col'd Blank
• tf,
IIATS AND CAPS, DRUGGETS,
CARPET AND OIL CLOTHS,
Painted Window Shades,
GLOVES, HOSIERIES, AND
PAÎTCY GOODS.
In fact, anything kept in a first class country
•tore.
We call particular attention to our fine stock of
Over-Coatings, Cloths & Cassimeres,
which we make a Speciality.
Receiving from the Manufacturers, Ladie»'
Misses, and Children's Shoes, Gents sewed and
Mgged, double upper and sole, Calf Boots, Men's
heavy, winter Boots k Shoes, that we have made
of the best material ; and guurnuteo satisfaction.
MACKERE' ,811 AD, AND HERRING
Always
THOMPSONS' G LOVE FITTING CORSETS
GENTS ARCTIC O VERSHOKS,
MENS BUCK G A UNTLETTS,
GIjO ves, mitts.
A Stock of Dried Fruit Consisting of
Hand.
LA YER RAISINS,
NEW DRIED CURRANTS ,
NEW DRIED CITRON,
DRIED ArVLES.
Also an extra article of
Buckwheat Flour.
Libera! discount for cash, aud show Goods
pleasure.
rith
Ci. W. W. IVAUUkAI-Y.
Dec. 12—1 y
Middletown.
TO THE FARMING COMMUNITY.
T HE subscriber respectfully calls the attention
of the Farmers of New Castle co. Del. and
Cecil and Kent counties ,Md. to the following list
of standard Fertilizers, always kept on hand,
and furnished to order, at any station on the
Delaware Railroad, or on Chesapeake and Dela
ware Waters.—Viz :
RHODES' SUPER PHOSPHATE
Moro PMllips' Super Phosphate,
Whann's Super Phosphate,
Croandale'H Super I-lionpliaJe,
IIEWES' SyPER PHOSPHATE,
, - COE'S SUPER PHOSPHATE,
Berger and Butz' Super Phosphate.
BAUGH'S SUPER PHOSPHATE,
BAUGH'S CHICAGO BONE,
s
PERUVIAN GUANO,
PACIFIC GUANO,
RODUNDA GUANO.
E. T. EVANS,
Opposite Depot, Middletown, Del.
July 18—tf
BLACKSMITHING AND
'W'lieelwrigh.ting.
T IIE undersigned have commenced the above
business in Middletown, corner of Main and
Anderson streets, and solicita share of the pub
lic patronage. They flatter themselves that their
work cannot be surpassed. The Blacksmithing
will be conducted by John C. Vandenbrauk, and
Wheelrighting department by J. Leauby.
Wagon, Plow and all kinds of country work
and Coach Smithing, done to order.
ßSP Repairing neatly and promptly attended
to. Special attention given to the repairing.
All work warranted to give perfect satisfaction.
JOHN C. VANDENBRAAK,
LEAUBY k LEE.
the
April 11th, 1868—tf.
Tanners, Look to Your Interests.
A. T. BRADLEY,
At the Depot in Middletown
HJ, pay tile highest market price for Grain.
jto will supply Wright's and Rambo's
tuf Bitfp, purposes. Also, Clover and Tim
Hspedat car* »411 »¥* given to shipping
gram when entrusted »dtp It )iy parties shipping
on their own responsibly, (fo looney advanc
ed on grain before delivery,
Dec. 6—-Cui.
w
jUnMi
»thy
of
Chr«$i0 Irpn Spherical Burglar Safes,
Burglar's Implements for
, ■r»* n y length of time.
TYLH^SE mud for a Catalogue of Fir* and
A Burglar Proof Safes.
MARVIN & CO.
WSU resist all
..
265 Broadway, New York ; 721 Chestnut Street
v Philadelphia; 108 Bank st. Cleveland, Ohio.
Februpfy IS, 1869—3mos.
FOR HENT.
C ART Wright Shop, 20 by 22 feet, nearly new.
Also Black Smith Shop, nearly now. Jrith 2
forges: of the best stands for repairing and
wholesale new work, as it fronts on the railroad.
Po.^ given on tb Ä of ÄaBND
Tewniend, January 29, IITO—tf
B00K ' STATIONERY, AND
VARIETY STORE.
A
S CHOOL HOOKS and Miscellaneous Works,
Hibles, Prayer Books and Hymu Books,
Blank Books, in vurious styles und binding;
Tuck, Memorandum and Puss Books.
STATIONERY,
and Note Paper,
in variety;
Mourning Paper and Envelopes to
Writing, Lotte:
Envelopes,
latch.
tian
of
the
the
of
FANCY ARTICLES.
Photograph Albums, Work Boxes, Fancy Boxes,
Writing Desks, Ladies' Satchels, Pocket Books,
Port Folios, Purses, Port Minuties, Sugar
Cases, Picture Frames. Tasspl aud
Cords, Looking Glasses,
BACK GAMMON BOARDS , CHESS AND
CHECKER MEN. G AMES of alt KINDS.
Rubber Pencils and Penholders,
Writing Fluid and Ink Stands,
Pocket Cutlery, Roger's Scissors, so.
s, Studs, Breast Pins, Fiuger Rings,
Sleeve But
Spectacles,
Violin Strings,
Combs, Brushes, Nail and Tooth Brushes,
Bands. Watch Keys, Key Rings,
und Pulf Boxes.
A fine assortment of Colgate & Co'», Soap.
PHALON'S NIGHT BLOOMING CEREUS,
Wright's und Taylor's Superior Extracts,
Pomades, Hair Oils,
And Dental Soup of the First Quality.
es,
of
of
for
ses
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.
Nick Tics of various styles, Bismarck Collars,
Gloves, llose, Handkerchiefs, Cults, Wristlets.
Segars, Tobacco Pipes, Meerschaums, and To
bacco Pouches.
Lamps, Lamp Chimneys, Wicks and Coal Oil.
NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES.
Harper's Weekly, Bazaar and
Leslie, Chimney Corner,
Weekly, Girls nud Boys Weekly,
Gleason's Literary Companion, &c.
Godey's Poterson's, Atlantic, Arthur's,
axy und Mui'e Deiuorest's Magazine;
1). L. RUNNING,
Corner of Main und Scoit streeti
Middletown, Dei.
New York Ledger, i
Magazine, Frank
G;
A
Jun. 30—ly
GRANVILLE WORRELL,
220 AND 222 MARKET STREET,
Wl'anlu^ten, Del.
AMERICAN, ENGLISH, GERMAN AND FRENCH
DRY GOODS.
for
ENGLISH AND AMERICAN
CARPETS and Oil Cloths.
CHINA AND CALCUTTA
MATTINGS, MATS, RUGS, &c. &c.
W E are prepared to fill orders for Churehes,
Hotels, Private Dwellings and Public Build
ing, furnishing them complete, including Sheets,
Blankets, Counterpanes, Towels, Curtains, Cor
nices, Stair Rods, Carpets, Oil Cloths, Danmsks,
Ac. Orders will be taken and estimates furnished
of the whole cost, with articles furnished or oth
•isc, as parties commencing housekeeping may
prefer.
We cannot enumerate evei
uients, owing to the extent of
have a full assortment of various lines i
nal
lending depart
busiucss. but
DRESS FABRICS,
MOURNINGS,
WHITE GOODS,
FURNISHING GOODS,
HOSIERY,
FLANNELS, &c. &c. &c.
Our long experience, combined with our inti
mate and extensive acquaintance with the largest
and best Importing and Domestic Houses of this
conntry give us, we believe, advantages shared
by no other house to the same extent in Delawi.
and we wish distinctly to state that we are pre
pared to sell always as low or lower than Philudel
phia Merchants.
TIIK MOTTO OF THE HOUSE
CHEAP, PROMPT AND RELIABLE.
March 7, 10C8—lv
CHIC KERIN G & SONS,
MANUPACTURKKS OP
Grand Square, and Upright Pianos,
Received the First Grand Gold Medal, and the
still higher recompense,
The CROSS of the LEGION of HONOR,
AT TUB
Universal Exposition, Paris, 1867.
f pHESE wore the highest awards of the Rxpo
X sition, and the. house of Chickering k Sons
wo« the only one so honored.
In the United States we have been awarded 60
first rpemiums in direct competition with the lead
ing manufacturers of the country, and ai the
Great Exhibition ip Loudon we received tiie high
est award giy.e# to apy manufacturer in tiie Uni
ted States. Tot#l, 71 First Premiums, und the
most flattering testimonials from the loading ar
tists iu tho world.
Warerooms, No. 11 East 14 th New York,
Between Broadway aud Fifth Avenue.
Feb. 13—3m
I:
on
EUGENE M. HANSON
WITH
WATS0N & DE YOUNG,
IMPORTERS AND-JOBBERS OF
Hosiery, Notions, White Goods, &c.
No.»»» MARKET STREBT,
PHILADELPHIA.
Jar Orderrjpromptly attended to,
Feb. îo-- îm 1 '
2
THE GREAT
ZINGARI BITTERS.
A SAFE BLOOD PURIFIER,
A PLEASANT BEVERAGE,
A SPLENDID TONIC.
A' CERTAIN CURE
AND
Preventive of Diseases.
compounded
from a prescription of the celebrated Egyp
tian physician, I)r. Cheopsus, who, after years
of trial and experiment, discovered the Zivgnrini
lkrb , the most remarkable vegetable production
the earth, perhaps, hag ever yielded—certainly
the most effective in the cure of disease. It, in
combination with the other valuable properties
of which theZingari Bitters is composed, will cure
Dyspepsia, Fever and Ague, Billions Fe
ver, Cholic, Colds, Bronchitis, Con
sumption in its first stage, Flatu
lency, Nervous Debility, Fe- *
nude Compta i n ts ,
Rheumatism, Dysente
ry, Acute and Chronic Di
arrliœa. Cholera Morbus, Cholera,
typhoid and Typhus Fever , Yel
low Fever, Scrofula, Diseases of the
Kidneys, Habitual Costieeness, dice, iPc.
rpilE ZINGARI BITTF.RS
In the prevention and euro of the above discas
thousands
es, it has never been known to fail,
of our most prominent citizens throughout all parts
of the country, will testify. Let the afilicted send
for circular containing testimonials and certifi
cates of those who have been cured after their ea
ses have been pruuounced hopeless by
physicians.
best
F. RAHTKR k CO.
No. 6 N. Front St. Philadelphia.
RECOMMENDED BY
Ex-Gov. David R. Porter, of Pennsylvania,
lion. Robert J. Fisher, "
Hon. Edward McPherson, "
Hon. Joel B. Danner, "
Hon. Win. McSherry, "
RW Send for Circulars.
Principal Depot,
Feb.
0 — 1
MIDDLETOWN ACADEMY.
A First Class Boarding and
DAY SCHOOL,
VXD Eli THE DIRECTION OF
WAHREN* T. IIIOKS. A. Ti ) „
HUDSON A. WOOD, A. !i. / 1
NCIPALR,
Mrs. GENIE II HICKS and Mrs M ARY WOOD.
F ALL Term U,>
December 24th.
WINTER Term begins January 4th and ends
March 26th.
i September 13th, and ends
SPRING Term begins April 5th and ends June
25th.
Tuition per Quarter of 12 weeks, payable at the
middle of each Term :
Small Scholars in First Lessons.$ 5 00.
Primary Department.
Academical Department
Classical Department....
Instrumental Music.
Vocal Music. ....
Use of i
German and Fix»«»
Tuition per annum,
wood, lights, und
The same per Term.
Students charged from the time of entering.
For further particulars address the Principals
for Circular, Middletown, Del. Oct. 3—tf
8 00 .
00 .
.15 00.
.12 00 .
on:
.2 00 .
r, U.
: 2 <. oo.
75 00.
BAUGH'S
Eaw Bone Super Phosphate of Lime.
STANDARD WARRANTED.
"(Ter to Farmers undJDeulers in Manures
VV the present season our Raw Bone Super
Phosphate of Lime as being highly improved.
It is not necessary at this day, to argue the
claims of this manure, us a useful* and economical
application for Corn, Oats, und all Spring crops.
Tiie article has a reputation of over fiftee
standing, and is sail manufactured by the origi
nal proprietors.
Farmers will please send their orders to the
Dealer early, as this only will ensure a supply.
\e :irs
BAUGH <t SONS,
Sole Manufacturers,
Office No. 20 South Delaware Avc.
PHILADELPHIA.
Feb. 20—3m
TNTTilW
EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE.
Lock Stitch.
R
ECE1VED the First Prize at the Great Fair of
the American Institute, in New York, Oct.
26, 18G7, and highest premium for best
turing machine at Paris Exposition, July, 1867.
Why is it the best? It
right ; it will take fifty stitches to the inch—finer
than any other machine will ; It will sew heavier
and thicker goods than any other machine ; it
uses any and every kind of thread ; it
starched goods
ufac
er seams all
nstarched ; it sews the
most delicate, thin, soft Fabric, without drawing.
I: sens a bias seam as well ns any other.
Agents wunted.—Liberal discount given.
Empire Sewing Machine Company,
234 Bowery, New York.
well
EVERY MACHINE WARRANTED.
Feb. 13, 1869—3mos.
HARNESSJMAKINGh
T HE undersigned having succeeded Win. T
Gailalier In the above business in
ODESSA, DELAWARE,
Is prepared to furnish
on the most reasonable terms.
His experience justifies his promise that
cry article in his line
ALL IlIS WORK WILL RE OF THE
enf'BEST QUALITY.
And gives him confidence to solicit a share of the
public patronage.
yS^-IIis Shop is on Main street, in the house
foimqrly occupied by Win. T. GaRaher.
VYM. C. DRAPER.
Jan. 9—3mo.
For Rent.
T HE Well Known Store House, at the corner
of Broad and iMain streets, in Middletown,
occupied by G. W. W. Naudain. J?
•ion given on the gÇty pf Mavch^n^st. to
On th# Premises.
BO#
March 3t
Öriflinal |3octiu
THE NIA IDEM OP MIDDLETOWN.
Written for the Middletown Transcript
BY TIIE ODESSA BARD.
How dear to the heart is the sweet recollection
Of lH-auty angelic, with graces that ch
Whore the tints of the rose and the lily's perfection,
I Fas fiat's living ami warm ;
•ii tie spirit looks out in its lightness,
From eyes ever liquid with Purity's light,
As some beautiful star in the regions of brightness,
l'ceps out from its coll through the curtains of night.
There
There w
Of feeling I
Like the ligh
Wiiat Artis
That graced the sweet m >uth and t!
Or tiie white pearly sentinels
At the carmine gat
c limn'd on tli
the swe
Who
s majesty veiled by tiie queenliest graces,
beautiful brow,
s intellect stam|K-d
blood fluahed it« visible tr
T Aurora on
aid copy tUc
utlilets of h
ty,
soft dimpled chin,
of tiie courts within
Oh! were you e'er waked from oblivion's slumber
At midnight, by music sweet, only to learn,
That the last dying strains of the soft Rowing numbers
ere melting i
And who, that I
Where rarest and
.
liked through a tropical chamber,
est exotics
id wondered, wh
gone, yet their fragrance re
lin
<1
stranger,
Though the flow
maiued V
will memory forever reve
Transcendant und peerless
the real,
> Art,
For tl.e spirit of Jlcnuty transferred tbe ideal,
i sunlight a pletur
my heart.
'Twi
May Ilea
thy life witMts belli
Then bring thee where Angels, thy kindred,
jou loveliest Maiden of good Middle
a joy to 1
lacly. p
telling,
idwclllug
Tli
On i
i, Del. March, 1809.
Dotes of trauet
Recollection* of the Mother Country.
Written for the Middletown Transcript.
No. 6.
Having " done" London, the stranger
will naturally ask, what is to be sccu in
its vicinity T To the American, who has
witnessed the scenery of the Hudson, the
grandeur of Niagara, or tho vastness of
the West; or the Continental, who talks
of the beautiful Rhine, the romantic Switz
erland, or the classic Rome,—the sights
and scenes of a quiet English landscape
are only attractive for their state of cul
tivation and their placidity. Historic as
sociations will also combine to render them
interesting to the lover of Fnglisli litera
ture—and who that can read it does not
love it? To those economical of time, the
>-t course is that laid down by Murray,
s a visit to Hampton Court,
which is situated on the north side of the
river Thames, about twelve miles from
London, and i- : easily reached by rail from
Waterloo l atit
The Paine
be
h
advi
esignod, as a res
idence for hiinstdf, by Cardinal Wolsey ;
but, in order to propitiate his master, he
exchanged it for Richmond Palace aud
other propert
greatly to the original buildin
comprises throe quadi
apartmoiits, which an
cs of
\Y il liai
m
Hud
it now
am
i b'd into
occupied chiefly by
'ho hold
lus
poor rul
old- tlr.i.il
1 poniiiv-io
tenure »
of the crown.
S|v,c:
vhi'.h
The bui
stone cornices and divpsi
t red brick, with
gs, is a lofty aud
rather imposing structure, and is open to
the public except F riday. Over one thou
sand pictures arc exposed to view, some of
th 3in very famous.
The garden and park are also among
the most noteworthy of the vicinity, the
former having a grapevine over ninety
years of age, which yields annually more
than 1200 pounds of grapes, which go to
her Majesty's table. One braneli alone is
110 feet long, and the vinery that covers
it is 72 feet by 30 feet.
In the Bark is the celebrated
lii
izc, tho
great delight of juveniles and sentimental
couples, who can lose themselves in the
most delightful manlier without an effort.
The whole walk being so complicated that
the quaint definition of the word net by
Dr Johnson, is brought to mind, viz:—
" Anything reticulated or tesselated at
equal distances, with interstices between
the different intersections."
Passsing over the country between
Hampton and Windsor, which does not
comprise many spots interesting to stran
gers, we come to tho famous royal domain.
Windsor, is situated in the county of
Berks, 22 miles west from London, and
occupies a rising ground on tho south
bank of the Thames, and is interesting for
its ancient and extensive castle, the gran
dest royal residence iu this country. The
gates of the castle grp close upon the main
street of the town, and load to enclosures
containing a number of quadrangles, tow
ers, gates, mansions, barracks, and other
structures. Besides the chapel, the chief
parts of tiie castle attractive to visitors arc
the state apartments in the upper or north
ern court. Outside the castle, facing the
uorth, is the famed Terrace , from which a
view is obtained o\ ; er a most beautiful ex
panse of country. On another side are
the new royal stables, the finest in Eng
land, haviug with the Riding House, cost
£70,000. In the gardens adjoining the
Queen's apartments, the royal family, be
fore the death of Prince Albert, were
wont occasionally to promenade, at an
hour when the public might see them. The
Long Walk, extending three miles, is one
of the grandest things of the kind in the
world.
For more than seven centuries, Windsor
Castle has been a royal residence, tradi
tion assigning its origin to King Arthur
himself, and romance has seized it as the
locale of the famed Round Table and its
valiant Knights. Edward III was born
here, and Geoffrey Chaucer was once clerk
of the works of St. George's Chapel, at a
salary of two shillings a day.
Eton College , famous all over tho world,
with its school-rooms for 900 boys, chapel,
quadrangles, and playing-fields, lies beau-,
tifully situated opposite Windsor Castle.
A ramble from the Plough »Station, near
Eton, would take a visitor to the scenes
rendered memorable by Gray's Elegy.
Returning on the river Thames, by
steamer, a journey of over two hours,
Pope's Grotto, at Twickenham, is discern
ed ; Strawberry Hill, the Sham Castle of
Horace Walpole is readily distinguished ;
and the Ham House, notorious as th
meeting place of the " Cabal" of Charles
IFs time. To these the nearest stopping
place is " Richmond Park," where a walk
in tiie park, 8 miles in circumference, and
a dinner at tiie Star and Gai ter will amply
compensate for tiie time and money ex
pended. Thence to tiie famed Kcw Gar
dent is but a matter of a few minutes, pas
sing en route Sion House, occupied by the
Duke of Northumberland. These famous
" Rotanie Gardens" contain a rare collec
tion of plants, obtained from all parts of
the world, arranged and labelled in ad
mirable order by Sir William Hooker.
The flower beds, hot houses, and conserva
tories, are very numerous. The great
Palm-honte, with its collection of the
celebrated Victoria Regia, reaching to a
height of CO feet, and costing £ 00,000,
forms a grand object.
A bill has been passed in the Now York
Legislature, empowering tiie Central Park
Commissioners to lay out sueli a garden
on tho easterly side of the Central Park,
nearly opposite the 71st street entrance.
To the botanist and horticulturist such
gardens present great attractions.
A little lower down on tiie Thames, the
world-renowned vegetable gardens of Chis
wick engrosses the traveller's attention ;
and the house in which Hogarth died is
still existing in the locality. Still further
on appears Fulham, and its quaint old pa
lace, the official residence of the Bishop of
London. To this point tho Thames is
comparatively clear and very shallow,
while the river between here and London
is a dirty, swift and muddy stream ; looked
upon by Americans, accustomed to their
noble streams in the new world, as a poor
apology for a magnificent river.
The next point of interest before reach
ing London, is the far-famed Chelsea Hos
pital, founded by Charles II, and planned
by Sir Christopher Wren, which is reser
ved for retired invalid soldiers. Over 400
pensioners arc maintained in this establish
ment. The principal objects of attraction
to the visitor, apart from tho superannua
ted veterans of so many battles, are, the
Chapel, a neat edifice, with a fine painting
of the Ascension by Ricci, and the Di
mug-hall, in which are displayed a nuin
tropliics of British prowess,
among which figure some American bun
ting.
to
ia,
a
oil
"
of
so
a
on
her of fl
One especial object of interest in the
them vicinity of London, is the famed
Crystal Palace, Were London blotted
out from the face of the earth, leaving
nothing behind it but this fairy-like struc
ture, the journey to it would alone well
repay the visitor. This structure owed
its existence to the great Exhibition of
1851, in Hyde Park. It is situated on a
lofty eminence near Sydenham, about 7
miles from the metropolis, commanding a
most extensive view of the adjacent coun
try and the city. The building, construc
ted entirely of iron and glass, is about
1GÛ0 feet long, 380 feet wide, and at the
centre transept 200 feet high. Tiie foun
tains are the finest in the world, the prin
cipal jets rising 250 feet in the air, and
the minor jets numbering over 12,000,
forming combinations which no description
can sufficiently portray. A whole week
might be spent in examining the various
treasures contained therein ; for the Palace
and grounds are interesting in each of the
following features—Sculpture; Illustra
tions of Architecture ; Pictures and Pho
tographs ; Botany ; Ethnology ; Geology ;
Hydraulic Skill in the Fountains, aud
Musical facilities of an unprecedented kind.
Near the centre transept are all the ne
cessary arrangements for two concert
rooms—one on a stupendous scale, in
which 5000 singers and instrumentalists can
sometimes be hoard at once. A great
concert came off here in 1867, with about
20,000 visitors, which was graced by the
presence of the Queen and family, inclu
ding the Pripce of Wales. The latter
personage was seated in his own box near
us, and all his movements could easily he
noted. His free and easy manner on that
occasion evidently did not please his moth
er and family, who, like all of royal blood
desire to preserve a court etiquette op all
occasions.
iu
a
to
in
The Prince clad in a costume which lie
has established as full-dress, viz ;—Light
pantaloons, blue frock coat, yellow vest,
and with the accustomed blue tie, seemed
to enjoy himself and act as any Bohemian
would ou a like occasion. Aside from his
spendthrift habits, the future King seems
to be a favorite among all classes. Tiie
shop-keepers even like his liberality and
his prodigality, because their business is
largely increased thereby. The only com
plaints heard against the Queen arise
among the trades-people, who cry bitterly
because of tiie retirement of her majesty,
since tho death of the Prince Consort, from
tho fashionable world, and, consequently,
tho court-levecs and balls come off very
seldom ; tints depriving the haberdashers
Ac. of sales in extravagant wearing ap
parel. Crowned heads are expected to
spend their money profusely to gain popu
larity among the middling classes. Napo
leon understands this fact and keeps up
his popularity by giving employment to all
the working classes, in order that they
will not have time to talk and plot.
In our next wo propose to overhaul our
notes taken in Paris during the G reat Ex
position.
New Yens. March, 18«fr
B S. T.
a
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a
the
ed
of
at
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or
of
the
fer
ble
"
the
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to
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tho
REMINISCENCES
OF TUB
GREAT MEN OP OTHER DAYS.
BY JOHN COLLINS m'caBK, D. D.
" It is not only commended by ancient practice
to celebrate the memory of great and worthy
men, as the best thanks which posterity am pay
them, but also the examples of virtue are of more
vigor when they are thus contracted into indi
viduals." * Duyorn.
" Lives of great men nil remind us
make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sunds of time."
We c
Long fellow.
John Marshall, Chief Justice of the
United States, was born on the 24th of
September 1755, in the small village of
Germantown, in Fauquier County, Virgin
ia, and died iu Philadelphia on the 6th of
July, 1835.
To write the biography of Judge Mar
shall would be to fill volumes—-for it would
be, in a great measure, tiie history of the
leading events of the country with which
bis name was associated for more than half
a oontnry. I shall not, therefore, enter
oil so ambitious a task, but confine my
self to the briefest outline of his public ca
reer; and, with here and there extracts
from unpublished memoranda in my pos
session, and tny own recollections of the
" Old Chief," as lie was called, together
with authenticated anecdotes of tiie
man,
close, as rapidly os I can, say in two or
three or four numbers, ui y first sketch of
one of the great men of other days.
Ilfs father was an officer of the Conti
nental Line, a native of Westmoreland
couuty, Virginia, and distinguished him
self in the battles of Trenton and Brandy
wine. Ilis mother, Mary Keith, was the
daughter of a Scotch Episcopal Clergy
man, who, being, involved in the rebellion
of 1715 in favor of tho so called Pretender,
was forced to fly his couutry and came to
Virginia, and located in Fauquier county.
Although the father of John Marshall
was a man of limited resources, so much
so that he could not afford to give his son
a thorough classical education, yet, by his
judicious training of him under his own
personal supervision in his earty j'ears, was
doubtless laid the foundation of tiiat char
acter which in after years shone so conspic
uously iu the life of the Chief Justice of
the United States.
The Bible, Shakspcarc, Milton, Pope,
and Dryden, were his principal studies, as
we learn from Mr. Horace Binncy, and
"these, with judicious histories, were the
only volumes placed within his reach until
his fourteenth year." At the age of four
teen he was sent by his father to a clergy
man named Campbell, residing in West
moreland, for the purpose of studying
Latin, where he had for a classmate, James
Munroe, subsequently President of the
United States.
He returned to Fauquier, and resumed
for a year his classical studies uuder a
Scotch clergyman named Thompson—he
knew nothing cf Greek, as we are assured
on competent authority :—and this, the two
years study of Latin, was the extent of his
classical education.
From this beginning, as one of his eu
logists has informed us, " John Marshall
wrought oat iu after life a comprehensive
mass of learning which accomplished him
for every station which he tilled, and he
filled the highest of more than one descrip
tion."
In bis 18th year lie commenced the
study of law, but in conscqnence of the
threatening aspect of affairs between the
Colonies and tiie Mother Country, instead
of devoting himself exclusively to the ac
quisition of legal science, with an intuitive
perception of the result, he sat about learn
ing the skill necessary for the battle field,
iu a volunteer corps of his native county.
The threatened storm soou burst
upon
the Colonics, and the first news of the bat
tle of Lexington found young Marshall
ready to venture his life iutho cause of his
injured country. The following, furnished
a distinguished gentleman some few years
since by a near relation of tho Chief Jus
tice, after his, Judge Marshall s, death, is
not without interest at this stage of our
sketch: "It was in May, 1775. He was
then a youth of 1!). The muster field was
some twenty miles distant from tho C. II.
aud in a region of country peopled by till
ers of the earth. Runtofs of the occnr
rcnco near Boston, had circulated with
the effect of alarm and agitation, but with
out the means of ascertaining the truth, for
not u paper was printed nearer than Wil
liamsburg, nor was one taken within the
bounds of the militia company, though
large. The Captain had called the com
pany together, and was expected to attend,
hut did not, Soon after, Lieutenant Mar*
shall made his appearance on the ground ;
those who knew him clustered about him
to greet him, others from curiosity and to
hear the news. He proceeded to inform
the company that the Captain would not
bo there, that he had been appointed Lieu
tenant instead of a bettor, and that be had
come to meet them as fellow soldiers who
would be likely to be called upon to defend
their country and their rights, invaded by
tiie British—that there had been a battle
in Lexington, Massachusetts, between tbe
British and Americans, in which tiie latter
were victorious ; but, that more fighting
was expected, that soldiers were called for,
that it was time to brighten their fire-arms,
and learn to use them iq the field ; and,
that, if they would fall into a single line,
he would show tfiem the new manual exer
cise, for whioh purpose he had brought his
gun, bringing it at tbe same time to his
shoulder. The sergeant put the men into
line, and their fugleman put himself is
front to the right."—"I have now before
me," writos his venerable kinsman, " hia
figure. He was aboWt MS feet high,
straight, and rather slender, of dark com,
plexion showing little, if any rosy red, yet
good health ; the outline of his face nearly
a circle, and within that, eye* black to
darkness, strong and penetrating, beaming
with intelligence and good nature. An
upright forehead, rather low, was termina,
ted in a horizontal line by a mass of raven
blaek hair of unusual thickness and
strength. The features of his face worein
harmony with the outline, and the temple*
fully developed, The vesuH-of this com,
bination was interesting, and very agreea.
The body and limbs indicated agility
rather than strength, in which, however,
he was by no means deficient. lie wore à
a purple, or pale blue hunting shirt, (and
trowsers of the same material) fringed with
white. A round blaek hat mounted with
the buektail lor a cockade, completed tho
figuro and the man. He went through the
manual exercise by word and motion do,
liberate]) - planned and performed, in tbe
presence of the company, before he rcijuir,
ed the men to imitate him, and tbcq prCh
needed to exercise them with the most per,
feet temper. Never did a man possess a
temper more happy, or if otherwise, more
subdued, or better disciplined. After a
few lessons the company was dismissed, and
informed that if they wished to bear more
of the war, and would form a circle around
him, he would tell them what he knew
about it. Tiie circle was formed, and ho
addressed them for nearly an hour. I re,
member, for I was near him, that he spoke
at the close of his spceeli of the " Minute
Battulliun" about to be raised, and said he
was going into it. and expected to bo
joined by many of his hearers, Ho tbeu
challenged an acquaintance to a game of
quoits, and they elosed tbe day with foot,
races, and other athletic exoroises at ichich
there teat no betting."
"This is a portrait," says n distin
guished coteniporury of the Chief Jtutiee,
" to which in simplicity, gaiety of heart,
and manliness of spirit, in everything hut
tho symbols of a youthful soldier, and one
or two of those lineaments which the hand
of time, however gentle, changes, and,
perhaps improves, he uevcrlost his resent,
iilanee. All who knew hint well, will re
cognize its trutli to nature."
The determination which tho youthful
Marshall announced to his friends on the
muster ground was no idle declamation.
Unlike those who warm into eloquence ou
the subject of war, when its prospect is
distant, but when its thunders break, pro,
fer tho race with the swift, rattier than tho
battle with the strong, or like the inimita
ble Artemus Ward, who said lie was wil
ling to sacrifice ull bis wife's relations for
" tbe vigorous prosecution of the war,"—,
the summer of 177-1 saw the name of John
Marshall enrolled on tho lists of tbe "Min
ute liattallion," with the rank of hicuten,
ant; and in the battle of Créât Bridge,
near Norfolk, when Lord Duumore was de,
feated and forced to bis ships, tbe subject
of our sketch shared in the triumphs of
the victory, and had full and honorable
mention of his name in connexion with
that engagement. The next year, os
Lieutenant in the 11th Virginia Hcgimeut,
he marched to the Middle States, where
in 1777 lie was promoted to a Captaincy.
At Brandywine, Germantown, and Iron
Hill, tbe tall form of the young captain
might have been seen towering in the hot
test strife, and his bold manly voice been
heard uttering its tones of cheer. Throe
times was iic in the battle's brunt with
George Washington, and twice in the fields
of Brandywine and Monmouth with that
young and gallant Frenchman, who leaving
tbe purple clusters of his vinoy France to
blush for other eyes, drew his chivalrous
blade in tho cause of young freedom, and
was proud to be called "the adopted son
of Washington"—the brave Layfayette !
"The officers of the Virginia line" says
Judge Story, "appeared almost tu idolixo
John Marshall."
He was again in the field at the battle
of Stony l'oint, and, in October 1780,
when Yirgiuia was invaded by a British
force, under tho infamous Benediot Ar
nold, Marshall was again at his post. But
why enumerate all this of the young sol
dier, when tiie campaign of '78, would of
itself have stamped undying glory upon
the history of the humblest subaltern in
that immortat band, "who," in tho elo
quent language of Iloraco Binucy, "nn
surpassed in earth's annals, unpaid, almost
starving and nuked, left the bloody
prints of their toil-worn inarch upon tho
snows of Valley Forge, in that vigorous
winter, and who never turned their faces
from their oountry in resentment, or from
their enemies in fear."
Before passing on to behold John Mar
shall in the more extended field of his use.
fullness, and in his rising fume, I cannot
better close this present number, without
one more tribute to tiie man from that dis
tinguished lawyer, and personal friend of
the Chief Justice, Horace Binncy,
—"A man of the people, deriving hU
existence from a cultivator of the earth, a
stranger during youth to all the indulgen
ces which nourish a sense nf superiority
to others, or deaden the sympathy with the
humble; imbibing his morality, his know
ledge, his tastes, his estimate of mankind
from a brave and virtuous yoeman, aud at
the age of nineteen seining a sword from
tho armory of his country, »nd, without
the thirst for military glory
oommand, carrying it for
sheathed in the cause qf equal rights :—•
sueh a man, at the age of twenty.five, must
have turned out his father's blood from hi*
veins, aud have dug out from the native
soil of his heart, every peod and plant a#
his youth, or he oould have had no choicQ
bnt to live and to die, a republican !"
(TO M COXTtNl'BD.)
1.1«-.
foot-:
, or the love of
aig yean un-

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