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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, January 15, 1870, Image 1

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VOL. 3.
MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 15, 1870.
ISO, 3.
ROCKHILL & WILSON.
ABE NOW
R
KADY with the richest and rarest styles !
vercoats in countless variety !
Ç/hevoits, Cassimeres and all fine Coatings!
lothes! Klothes! Klothes! Klothes!
eight of the fashion !
Indeed you will be pleuscd,
ï-iook at the
Lots of elegant clothes!
O
K
H
003 and 005
Chestnut St.
Philadelphia.
AAAAAAA
NNNNNNN
DDDDDDD
"Winter, gentlemen
lee, «note, frost, and-ao-forth 1
Idowest prices for winter defences 1
afe against storm and snow, in
vinter !
s
Ov
•ercoats of Rocklilll A Wilson !
ow is the time to lay in your winter clothes !
The cold is great,
Rut the rush is greater,
From all parts of this State,
And every other State.
The best men come to
Buy their Best Clothes
Wonderfully cheap,
At the Great Brown Hall.
N
ROCKHILL & WILSON,
603 fc 60» CHESTNUT Street,
PIIII.ADEI.PHIA.
December 11, 1869.
NEW STOVE, TIN,
AND
HOUSE-FURNISHING STORE.
THOMAS H. ROTIIWELL'S
NEW BUILDING,
WortK Side of Main Street, 4 lliilldtnga Ti'nl
of Town Hall,
Middletown, Delaware.
Where lie has constantly on hand, and is pre
pared to manufacture
ALL KINDS OF TIN WARE
At Short Notice.
Particular attention paid to
ROOFING AND SPOUTING.
Orders respectfully solicited und promptly atten
ded to.
STOVES.
THE NATIONAL,
CONTINENTAL,
ORIENTAL,
CHARM,
GEM,
SUN,
LITTLE GIANT
BRILLIANT,
Prize and the Victor Cook.
I
Orders will be received and promptly filled for
any kind of Stove that may be ordered.
GALVANIZED RUSSIA AND SHEET IRON
ZINC,
COAL HODS, SKIVES,
POKERS, SHOVELS,
TEAKETTLES, BAKE PANS, WAFFLE IRONS
SAD IRONS, BRASS ft ENAMELLED
PRESERVING KETTLES,
ENAMELLED SAUCE PANS,
•TEA BELLS, JAPANNED CHAMBER BUCKETS,
SPITTOONS, WAITERS, LANTERNS,
FLOUR AND PEPPER BOXES,
BAND CUPS , MATCH SAFES (Cast Iron,)
MOLASSES CUPS,
PEACH CANS,
( Soldered and Self-Sealing )
LATENT CLOTHES FRAMES, Ac. Ac, Ac.
Attention is respectfully called to our new
FAMILY & RESTAURANT STOVE
Which ia especially adapted to stewing, frying,
and broiling oysters.
No wood, no coal, no coal gas, no stovo pipe,
no ashes, no dirt, no wood boxos, no coal scut
tles, no kindling wood but a friction match, and
tne fire in full blast in half a minute, oven hot iu
two minntei, stealc broiled in seven minutes,
"***" baked in thirty minutes, the firo extin
guished in a moment. It has no rival in all
kinds of cooking, and in economy, convenience,
neatness, safety apd durability, "
Please call and examine it in operation at
Thomas H. Rothwell'a Store Store,
MIDPLETOWN, DEL.
Sole owner of )hn stove for the Slat«.
Prompt attention to business, moderate prices,
competent workmen, and a deta/mination to
may at a|| times bp expected hy those who
m*y favor hilft ayilh their oitstom.
Aug. ÎI—y
i' 1
MIDDLETOWN HOTEL.
J. H. WALKER,
Proprietor.
H AVING succeeded Mr. L. R. Davis, in the
proprietorship of this well known, long es
tablished, and popular establishment, the present
proprietor will spare no pains to insure the com
fort of his guests, and make his house, as hereto
fore, the favorite resort of the traveling public.
A well filled larder, a well furnished table ; com
fortable and airy apartments; the choicest brands
of Liquors, Cigars, and Tobacco; with a deter
mination to render the fullest satisfa -:ion, com
bined with attentive waiters, reliable hostlers,
and moderate charges, will, lie feels assured, se
cure to him a continuance of tile liberal patron
age heretofore bestowed upon the establishment.
Accommodation for Drovers and Dealers in
Horses and Mules can always he secured. A lib
eral share of the public patronage is respectfully
solicited. JOSEPH II. WALKER,
Oct. 17—ly Successor to L. It. Davis.
BANKING HOUSE OF
John McLear & Son,
607 Market St. Wilmington, Del.
Establisiikd, 1848.
W E Are offering for sale the Six per. Cent
bonds of the City of Wilmington, At par,
in sums of $50, $100, $500, aud $1000. Inter
est payable April and October. Registered Cer
tificates.
The City Loans of Wilmington have always
been highly esteemed us an investment, and the
rapid growth and general prosperity of the city
make them more than ever desirable.
We continue to transact a general bunking
and brokerage business, aud are continually
larging our facilities.
Money received on deposit nnd returned
demand with interest» Parties keeping accounts
with us may draw checks on us payable at sight,
precisely ns in the case of banks.
Dratts or. England, Ireland, Germany and
other countries drawn.
Parties desiring to invest money in bond
mortgage, are invited to examine
euritiesof this class.
Passage tickets from Europe, by nil good
lines sold.
Government Securities taken in exchange for
any other scurities at the highest market rates.
JOHN McLEAR A SON.
June 5th, IfiCO—tf.
!
('ii
id
list of
DR. J. J. VANDERFORD,
Grndnate of 11 .r Pnin.ylvanla College of
DENTAL SURGERY.
H AVING located in Middletown, Del
respectfully announces to the publir^ffiB?
that he is prepared to perform all operations
taiuing to the practice of
per
dentistry.
ARTIFICIAL TEETH Mounted on Dental Vul
emote, a material superior to metals in its adapt
ability and durability. r
Persons having badly adjusted gold plates can
have them exchanged for the Vulcanite.
Great eare will be given to Children's Teeth;
irregulurtiC'S corrected, and deciduous teeth pre
served until tile permanent ones make their
ippenrnneo,
ff'b superior Dentifrice constantly on hand
Office on the corner of Scott ami Main streets,
formerly occupied by D. L. Dunning.
April 10, 1869—ly
WINE AND LIQUOR STORE,
Middletown, Delaware.
TIIE undersigned takes this method of notifv
mg the Public that he haw «pencil a
WINE AND LIQUOR STORE
In Middletown Del. on Wood street, opposite tho
Depot, where he has on hand a large and varied
Assortment of W hies nnd Liquors, in Lotties nnd
ensks, which he offers on advantageous terms to
purchasers nt wholesale
ßdT- Also, a fine stock of choice TO B A OP O
AND CIGARS. THOMAS MURRAY
or retail.
LIVERY STABLE.
H (, J! R £ S AND CARRIAGES for hire at the
J--L Stables of 7 homas Murray, on Scott street,
rhe horses arc sate, and careful drivers will be
provided-when desired. Terms moderate
ply to
Jan. 2
Ap
THOS. MURRAY.
At his Store on Wood St.
-y
Middletown Furniture Warerooms.
JOSEPH H. E1VOS
K E FnRNi"Tnnr tly " 80rtnM! "' of
•*-"r FURNITURE suitable to the market, con
sisting of '
COTTAGE SUITS,
REDSTEAD.S, CHAIRS, WASHSTANDS,
Parlor and Dining Room Furniture, &e.
ALSO
FURNISHING undertaker.
COFFINS of all kinds and styles; Metallic Cas
kets ; 1 ateut Burial Cases to order. Jan. 4_tf
no
to
It,
JOHN A. REYNOLDS,
-STOTT A pTyoT T/^1 ^
X Y -PUBLIC
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
MANSION HOUSE HOTEL,
North Weit Corner Fayette & St. Paul St».
OrroSlTB BABSUM's CITY HOTEL,
BALTIMORE.
Isaac Alborston.Proprietor.
J^Tlds is one of the most pleasant and ccn
tral locations in the city,
January 4, 1868^—ly
Aar WHOOPING COUGII
-PÏ
CURED BV
DELAVEAU'S CELEBRATED REMEDY.
JP*** Price Fifty Cents.
Prepared at Sixth and Wood {Bts. Philadelphia.
Ask your Druggist for it.
Mar, S^-ly
MIDDLETOWN IRON FOUNDRY
AND
MACHINE SHOP,
P LOWS and Plow OMings, Machine Castings
Of all kinds on hand or made to order.
Particular attention given to Repairing Machi
nery. Cash for old Iron.
WM. L BFCKE ft SON,
Founders and Machinists.
April 4-tf
• May j, |0«3.
jwlert jpoftrg.
8LKIGHING SONG.
Of all the joys vouchsafed to man
In life's tempestuous whirl.
There's nnughi approaches Heaven so near
As sleighing with a girl—
A rosy, laughing, buxom girl ;
A frank, good-natured, honest girl ;
A feeling, flirting, dashing doting.
Smiling, smacking, jolly, joking,
Jaunty, jovial, poser-poking,
Hear little duck of a girl.
the
es
in
Pile up your wealth a mountain high,
You sneering, scolding churl,
I'll laugh ns 1 go dashing by
With my jingling bells and girl—
The brighest, dearest, sweet girl ;
The trimmest, gayest, neatest girl ;
The funniest, flushest, frankest, fairest,
Roundest, ripest, roughest, rarest,
Spunkiest, spiciest, squirmicst, squarest
Best of girls with drooping lashes,
Unit'concealing amorous flashes—
Just the girl for a chap like
To court and love, and marry, you see—
With rosy checks and clustering curls,
Tlte sweetest aud the best of girls.
me
Hortirultural Department.
CULTURE OF STRAWBERRIES.
BY EUWARD 8ATTEUT1I WAITE.
Krad la-fare the I'enneyh-ania Hurt. Society, June 1, 00.
It is within the memory of many of the
members of this society,"that the culture
of what is called small fruit, at the bead
of which stand Strawberries, Iiur grown
up to be, what it now is, a very impor
tant branch of productive industry.—
Twenty-five years ago the culture of
Strawberries in large quantities
ket product, was almost unknown,
baps the first noticeable epoch in the his
tory of the Strawberry, was tho produc
tion sonic twenty-five years ago of the
far fuuicd " Ilovey's Seedling," by the
celebrated horticulturist whose name it
bears.
a
of
a
as a mar
l'er
This was a great step in advance,
and seemed to give a stimulus to the pro
duction of improved varieties, that lias
gone on increasing in an accelerated ratio,
until the number lias become
so great as
to make it quite out of the power of any
one cultivator to make even a collection
of all the celebrated varitics, much less to
test their value.
a
The next great epoch in Strawberry
culture after the advent of the Ilovey,
was the introduction some twelve
ago of that wonderfully productiv
riety, the " Albany Seedling." The pro
duction of this fruit will justly immortal
ize the name of its propagator, John
Wilson of Albany. Brought out as it
was, modestly, without auy flourish, it lias
dono more by far, than any other variety,
to establish the business of growing Straw
berries in this part of the world, us a per
manent and profitable branch of tcrrncul
ture. The " Ilovey Seedling," opened
the eyes of horticulturists to the capacity
of the Strawberry for improvement in all
the good qualities of the fruit, and the
" Wilson's Albany" demonstrated that it
was capable of producing an amount of
food per aero, that is exceeded but by few
products of the soil.
It may seem strange, and certainly it is
to be regretted, that as largely as this
fruit is now cultivated, and with the groat
number of tine varieties that we now lmvc,
varying in their habits, so that some may
bo found adapted to every variety of soil
and situation, its cultivation is very far
from being as general us it should be.
A long and extensive experience in the
culture of this fruit, enables me to speak
with confidence, when I say, that no pro
duct of the soil that 1 am acquainted with,
yields a more bountiful and sure return
for the labor bestowed, when that labor is
tclligenlly and skilfully directed. And
certainly there arc few but who will agree
with me that no other fruit or vegetable is
more grateful to the appetite or more
wholesome,—coming as it does, the first
fruit of the season, and at a season of the
year when fruit is not only the greatest of
luxuries, but absolutely necessary
health. J
years
o va
I
all
tho
up,
and
in
>\
to the
, after
To me, it has long been a subject of dee
amazement, that a very largo proportion P a
of the cultivators of the soil in this coun- e
try neglect to grow, as they should do, a a !*
bountiful supply for their families of this n '
delicious fruit, There really is no good
reason, why Strawberries should not be thc
grown in sufficient abundance every year,
on every farm in tho country ; for the w
culture of this fruit is attended with less
real difficulty than that of any other
fruit I speak advisedly when I say this,
In the culture of all other fruits, difficul
ties arc encountered that are sometimes
insurmountable, and failure often unu- work,
vo l da ''>?' , tunlly
Iu this part of the world, all our tree at
fruits havp bepomp almost worthless from 'her
tile ravagea of the curpulio, and for this f
no remedy has been devised, and no
amount of skill or labor can overcome the be
difficulty. Other small fruits Jj a ble arc
to fail from tho severity of tho winter or ire
late frosts, or cold storms in the spring Gme
The Grape has innumerable maladfcs
that seem to bo without remedy, and with most
It, with all the pare that can bombes?« Jèd
failure is the rule, a n d success the £
ception. Drôught-, which Rometiipes outs onfy
abort the crons Of other small C " ex
ectsbutsligEtlythe Strawberry "'crVlf
they havo reoeived proper attention, at all
Strawberries roquiro » oertain amount of
intelligent labor, but with that they „ever they
^ * un hkc all other fruits they appear to some
have no insect enemies. In twenty vear« I
experience in thc extensive culture*^ of all in
products, I have found this to be the
certain of all.
growing au abundant crop.
It is in the country and on the farm
alone, that the Strawberry can, and ought
to be enjoyed in its greatest excellence,
and the almost total neglect that it there
receives seems to be utterly inexcusable,
though not altogether unaccountable.
There are I suppose but few cultivators of
the soil, but who, sometimes in their lives
make the attempt, generally unsuccessful,
to grow Strawberries. And it shall be
my object in the few remarks to which I
confined, by the limited time allowed
in their preparation, to endeavor to point
out some of the causes of this failure. I
have said that the actual labor necessary
to produce a crop of Strawberries is not
so great, if that labor is guided by skill
and intelligence. And the great trouble
is, that most persons go into it with their
heads full of erroneous ideas upon the
subject, derived from theoretical essayists,
who have no piactical knowledge of what
they are writing about,
regretted, but seems to be unavoidable,
that all the useful information obtainable
from the mass of stuff daily printed, upon
agricultural subjects is like a grain of
wheat in a bushel of chaff. This is be
cause people who write seldom work, and
those who work, have no inclination to
write. I have noticed that all, of the
many writers who constantly undertake to
enlighten the publie upon this subject
through the
Summer or
a
I
al
of
as
so
be
of
by
I
say.
I
one
will
I
most
I have never failed in
It is much to be
00.
the
bead
of
his
the
the
it
newspapers, recommended
Fall planting; this is tho first
great mistake. It is in vain be is told by
the market gardener where lie goes to
procure his plants, that the Spring is the
proper time to plant Strawberries. He
has read of the wonderful crops obtained
the next year from plants set out in the
fall, and lie can't think of losing a whole
year. So the plants are procured, and
with much patient care and time spent in
watering and nursing them, a few are
persuaded to live, and gome even make a
tceblo growth. The next Spring, the
Strawberry patch presents a rather
promising appearance, with here and there
a feeble looking plant, and huge intervals
of empty space in the rows. Still the
hopeful proprietor is sanguine of at least
a part of
mar
l'er
pro
lias
as
any
to
He is sure he has
earned it, as ho has spent a deal of labor
and done everything laid down in the
books to insure
appointment to find his crop of fruit barely
a taste for the neighboring Catbird
Robin, fetill he is not ready to give the
matter up. He is determined that all the
hard labor lie lias bestowed in digging and
trenching and hoeing and watering and
weeding, and money spent for plants and
for phosphates and fertilizers, shall not be
thrown
crop.
pro
it
lias
per
all
the
it
of
few
is
this
soil
far
be.
the
is
is
of
Great is his dis
suceess.
va
or
away. He thinks the fall must
have been too dry, or the winter too
vcrc, or the spring too unfavorable, and
the crop will be a sure thing next year.
Accordingly bo goes to work as soon as a
few runners have taken root to fill up tho
gaps in his rows. He finds now the soil
hard and unpromising in appearance, and
the plants now set out have even a harder
struggle for existence than their predeces
sors. The prospect is not encouraging.
I he owner finds a vast amount of tedious
labor necessary to save his Strawberries
from being choked to death with other
vegetation. All the weeds known and
unknown persist in growing there ; and
all tho grasses, cultivated and uncultivated
spring up from the manure used
mulch, to use a homely expression, as
thick as the hair on a dog. For a time,
tho warfare against these is doggedly kept
up, but human patience has its limit. By
and by the idea of Strawberries becomes
associated in his mind with unpleasant re
collections of fatiguing and unprofitable
toil, and the Strawberry patch finally
abandonod to its fate, becomes a sod. The
owtfer avoids its sight as much as pos
sible. Strawberries arc a humbug, his
mind is made up about that, and he
wants to hear the word
It
It
I
with
one
very
beds
kept
and
me,
it
of
less
well.
never
mentioned.
>\ hen the strawberry season conies round
again and the good wife comes to look for
to the long wished for fruit, she is rewarded
after much patient research, of the sight
of dee P do » n amongst the clover, of a few
P a ^ e acid berries. A crop of grass is
e at,, eied instead of a prop of Strawberries,
a a !* d t * ms 'b® experiment is ended.
n ' neteen cases out of twenty of the nt
'empts to grow Strawberries this is about K"
thc result. and
The main cause of failure in this case
w "s, as I havo said, planting in the wronc • .
season of the year. Had this man been mt
willing to wait till Spring, and been con- S r< J
'«uted to obtain a full crop of fruit the .
following year, he would no doubt have
found, that Strawberries require a deal nf ?,
work, but with a quarter of the labor ne 7.
tunlly bestowed, he would have bad a cron that
at least sufficient to have encouraged fur
'her efforts. 6 '7'
f havo *1 : - „ whafc
particularly because t'i,. cau6 ° of fmlure find
be more common H 1 h n " tlc ed it to time,
arc of course man! atlT 'Tl \ h °
ire commonly made . ,nls T take8 tl|a ' that
Gme to sZk of ^ 1 h " VC DOt
Next P to the aeosen e 1 .• much
most importait matter and ^" 7' i ®
ïïlïïtSkïrî» nZt * h, .° h
In^^rZr varied 1^1 wil?^"' J. d *
onfy a certain sort that thp
ex ensivelv nuffT'and Ii,s£ 8660 U'°
miser^ P 1
at all m tbeir soil ■ with nih»r<. d IS to
berricJare aïilra LjïLi'. 8,ra W- one
they can lt the chiné«? S ÿ " 8 "«»nth
some ignorant m irkof 'i ^ Start
I nu lrtu * ß ard A ? ner in,
in thc family for a nwrter of ' ^ }*** ?e * S °
In
farm
there
of
lives
be
I
point
I
not
skill
their
the
of
be
and
to
the
to
a few plants, to dig up wild ones and plant
them ; he might as well gather the seeds
of wild carrots from his fence rows and
plant them to save the expense of a few
seeds.
It must be admitted, that amateur
Strawberry growers are oftimes cheated in
the plants they purchase. Many nursery
men are careless enough to let their
rieties get mixed and send them out in
that condition ; sometimes with a few
plants of some strong growing and worth
less sort amongst them, which soon get
possession of the whole bed. I have very
often known this to happen. I have inva
riably found the Albany Seedling to be
sent out by nurserymen in this condition.
Some nurserymen have ulso done much
harm to the cause of Strawberry culture
by sending out a great number of worth
less seedlings with high recommendations.
I could name one establishment in partic
ular, near New York, that has inflicted
immense trouble and loss upon experiment
al eulturists, by this abominable praotice
of sending out hundreds of new seedlings,
each one represented to be better than any
other, and all of them worthless.
While on the subject of varieties, I may
as well say all that I have to say on that
subject. The number of varieties is now
infinite, and to choose the proper sorts to
plant, has become the most perplexing
part of the whole bueiness. It would, I
think, in the present state of Strawberry
culture, be wrong to recommend
servcdly any particular varieties, as some
are best adapted to some soils aud situa
tions and modes of culture, and some to
others, and none are suitable for all. The
varieties that do well in our Pennsylvania
loams with high cultivation, rarely do
well in the light sandy soils of New Jer
sey, and vice versa, even in the same lo
cality, and where there is no appareut dif
ference in the soil and surroundings, I
have noticed the most striking difference
the productiveness of the same variety ;
so that it seems impossible to say with any
degree of certainty that any particular
variety will do best in any location. My
remarks therefore on this subject must be
very general. In selecting varieties for
planting for market purposes, the first re
quisite is large size. They
be firm-fleshed and as nearly as possible
of a bright scarlet color. If it has these
properties, the flavor is not of much
sequence, at least that is my experience.
All Strawberries arc good enough, the
only thiug required is that they should
present a fine appearance. Of course, for
profit, in addition to the above qualities,
they must be productive, and what I have
found to be of great importance, they
should be strong growers, as I have found
by experience that strong growing va
rieties require far less labor in cultivation.
I havo been reluctantly compelled to
abandon the Albany Seedling almost en
tirely on this account, it being compara
tively a poor grower and requiring too
much labor in its cultivation. I would
say. also that I never knew any foreign
riety to do well for any length of time ;
I would therefore not recommend them.
The best plan would seem to bo for every
one to experiment a little with those sorts
that he sees doing well and continue to
cultivate those that do best for him. I
will however name a few of the sorts that
I have found on several years trial to con
tinue the most profitable of a great
sorts that I have tried.
most
in
be
unre
first
by
to
the
He
the
and
in
are
a
the
the
should also
has
the
the
the
and
and
be
con
dis
or
a
as
many
The first of these is tho Eady Finger.
It is too well known to need description.
It is not of the largest size, but of a most
beautiful color, and bears carriage to
market better than any other variety that
I am acquainted with. It has proved
with me a most abundant bearer, and
one of the best growers that I know,
grows with mo so luxuriantly as torequi
very little labor in weeding. I havo had
beds of it in bearing for five years, which
kept perfectly clean with almost no labor,
and bore abundant crops to the last.
Though this variety has done so well with
me, I cannot recommend others to plant
it largely without a trial, as from some
reason I cannot explain, it does not gen
erally give satisfaction. In the light soils
of New Jersey, where it grows with much
less foliage, its color is too dark to sell
well.
do
in
of
be
fine
I
life
me
"
the
be
and
I
same
never
but
valve.
pers
ing
to
it
^ Cxt , 111 P 0,n . 1 l >rofit I must name the
K" 88 « 11 '» prolific. It is of very large size
and has proved with me exceedingly pro
'l"" 'rTi'T 8 r0 * ur ,'
• . A ß r,0ultun8 ' I fi '>d a valuable va
mt y' vcr >' lar ge, productive, and a good
S r< J w< : r '
. . "A" cont ; nu ® t® cultivate, to some ex
' D ,°7 ner 3 P , r . 0, , lfic ' Au8t,D ' and a few
?, r old sorts which continue to do well,
7. . C a 3 ° ° n t , r ,' a a numbcr of new sorts
that .P r0 . m,s0 WC . 1L , .
trv^then ''- 1
'7' th T en J ud S e for myself, aqd that is
whafc 1 would recommend to others. I
find that I bave nearly exhausted my
time, and have as yet said nothing upon
\ h ° n '° St in, P ortant P art of th « subject,
that of cultivation, and perhaps all that I
""V"? u P on this object will not be of
much acoount . as m y belief is, that the
® ultlvation "nothing can only be learned
observation and'experience,
J. d * " V°™ der W partÎPUlar prépara
^ ie ^ neo ° 2 sa r y for Strawberries,
U'° « round 8 '> 0 «l d be prepared as for
P 1 ""«"* other gardop products ; my plan
IS to plant in rows Ul feet apart, and from
one to two feet ip the row, always in thc
"«»nth of April. As soon as the weeds
Start t0 £ row ' t * ,e h° r8e cuttivator is put
in, and we continue to use this the whole
?e * S ° n ! ° f C0Ur8 ° mU8t be cIeancd
(he
cultivator will draw the runners along the
row and keep the apace open between
them. As the season advances, the rows
gradually widen by the runners taking
root, and in the fall they should have
formed beds from 1J to 2 feet in width.
The cultivator, of course must be grad
ually narrowed, and finally but one tooth
is used.
I
The following year, after the picking
season is over, if the buds are to be kept
for ant 4, 'er year, the cultivator with
tooth is used to keep open the walks, the
beds must be weeded by hand. We com
monly pick our beds for two seasons, some
times more and sometimes only once,
cording to the sta'to they happen to be in.
In the winter, when tho earth is hard
frozen, the whole ground, the walks as
well as the beds, is covered evenly and
carefully with stable manure. The plants
grow up through this in the spring, and
it serves to keep the fruit clean,
eare must be taken to get manure that is
clear of hay seed, as grass is the one
great enemy of the strawberry.
I have followed this plan for 20 years
and have never seen any cause to wish to
change it for any other.
The large Strawberry growers of New
Jersey and other places, cultivate in beds
double this width, and I suppose find that
to suit them best. The much talked of
plan of growing in hills. I never had any
faith in. I have tried it on a small scale,
without success. The great Strawberry
grower, Mr. Knox of Pittsburg, advo
cates this, as the only true plan, and he
certainly grows one, and I believe only
one, variety with great success. I do
not profess, as he does, to grow straw
berries by the fifty acres ; but I am sure,
when I saw his Strawberry crop, three
years ago, there was not as much fruit on
his whole fifty acres, as I can now show
on three acres. I do not mention this in
any spirit of boasting, but merely
means of comparing the two systems of
cultivation. 1 wish it to bo understood
that in making these remarks I am not
advocating any particular system of cul
ture as better than any other,
sential part, so far as mere cultivation is
concerned, seems to be to keop tho beds
clear of weeds and grass ; and any system
of cultivation that will do this perfectly,
and with the least labor, is the best. I
might add, that I think it important that
the ground should be stirred, and the
ners trained along the rows, so that the
beds will bo compact, and the walks be
tween them kept open. I know of no
implement that will do this so effectually,
and with such facility, as the common
horse cultivator ; .and I will just say here,
that I consider horse culture, or, what is
better, mule culture, by far tho best for
everything of tho kind, as it stirs the
ground more thoroughly than is ever done
with the hoc.
The question of wide or narrow beds is
only important as it regards the facility of
gathering the fruit in the best condition,
and would bo worth discussing, if time
allowed.
The relative merits of the " Hill" and
" Bed" systems have been so thoroughly
discussed that there is probably nothing
new left to be said on the subject, aud
nothing but facts can settle it.
There are a thousand other questions
connected with this subject, which it
would be interesting to discuss, but fear
ing that I have already trespassed too
long on your patience, I will leave to
ers,
an
tion
are
and
the
that
this
make
open
to
ton.
the
lload.
to
that
when
Such
It
of
their
to
at
their
it to
the
have
tertown
expense
think
feasting
Baltimore
rection,
ing
!\9.
nc
Great
as a
The cs
run
others tile further discussion of the subject.
FaMltlonablc Religion.
Fanny Fern makes the following sharp
thrust at fashionable religion : Our Cath
olic brethren have at least one good
pie ; their churohes are not silent aq the
tomb on week days, Their worshippers
do not do all their religion on Sunday. It
may be only for a few moments they step
in through that open church door,
week day, to kneel and lay down burdens
too heavy else to be borne, I like the
tom. I should rather say the remainder,
and the opportunity thus afforded them
and I heartily wish that our protestant
churohes oould thus be opened. If rich
Christians object to the promiscuous
of their velvet cushions and gilded prayer
books, at least let the aisles and the altars
be free to those who need God on the week
day—for the poor, the tried, the tempted
—for those who shrink, in their shabby
habiliments, from the Sunday exhibitions of
fine toilettes, and superfine Christianity.
Were I a minister, and obliged to preaob to
paniers and diamonds and satins on Sunday,
think I would have to ease my heart in
some such way as this, to make my pastoral
life endurable, else my office would seem to
me the most hollow of all mockeries._
The rich and the poor meet together, and
the Lord is the Maker of them all," should
iusoribeil outside my oburch door, had I
. I could not preach to those paniers
and their owners. My tongue would be
paralyzed at tbo sight of those kneeling
distortions of womanhood, bearing Buoh a
rcscmblanoe to organ grinder's monkeys.
am not sure that I should not grow hys
terical over it, aud laugh and ory in the
same breath, instead of preaching. I can
never tell what vent my disgust would take ;
I am sure it must have some escape
valve. You may say that such worship
(Heaven save the mark !) need preach
to. I tell you that women given over
"the devil and his works" are past
praying for— 1 1 having eyes, they soe pot ;
having cars, they hear not." They
ossified—impervious ; they aro Dead
apples, full of ashes.
exam
on a
IDS
•y
cus
are
Sea
The worst millers are those who grind
faces of the poop.
l*U*r Arwi K«at Craatr, M4.
Correspondence oj the Middlttosrn JVanseript..
My Dear Editor.—T he last day or an*
feelings it
eventful year has come. What
awakens f Thankfulness for the mercies
and blessings of a whole year should moat
assuredly predominate. Regrets will min
gle with our joys,—such is the web the
passing years weave for all ; shadow and
sunshine ; but it is a blessed thought that
when careworn, restless mortals cease to.
measure time by fleeting years, the shad
ows will all disappear, "there shall be no
night there."
Of the wonderful events of the year,
you gentlemen of the press have kept the
reading world apprized, and of minor
and more local matters your correspond
ents have contributed largely to thegeueral.
interest. Perhaps you will agree, that,
with one exception, they have done well.
Now for the future ; will they not redou
ble their vigilir.ee and industry to give
variety and interest to your excellent pa»
per. Let no one wait for the other, buk
seize every local event of importance and
turn it to best account.
This last day of 1869 is worthy a place
among the die» fat of ancient Rome,
ter a series of dark wet days, it is like
mid summer without its intolerable heat.—
•So bright, so cheery, so suggestive of de
lightful rambles ! But a glance at the.
leafless trees through the open casement
gives positive nssuranoe of the reign of'
winter. But a truce to sentimentalism,
let us to facts.
I hear of a most disgraceful altercation
resulting in blows and blood-letting be
tween one of the members of the old
School Board, L. M. Strong, Esq. and.
his successor elect, J. C. Taylor, Esq»
The fracas originated in money matters,,
and the newly elected Commissioner came
out second best. As, however, it is like
ly that the matter will claim the attention,
of the Grand Jury and the Circuit Court»
I deem it prudent to withhold further par-,
tieulars. But being School Commission
ers surely they should not have forgotten,
or ignored those highly poetic lines of tho
Hornbook,— beginning with—" Let doga.
delight to bark and bite—"
In the vicinity of Bock Hall a dastardly
attempt was made upon the life of a quiet
and inoffensive man on Wednesday eve
ning preceding Christmas.
As Copt. W. Whalen was quietly pur
suing his way, a man concealed behind a
tree
blow
was
detection ; Capt. W. was
...
'■in their supremacy, and ® rc ever »el
como '° '" c lu °st sceptical. Among tho
recent marriages were those of two broth,
ers, James H. and John L. Gale, and at
an entertainment when both gentlemen
were present, a wicked wag offered tho
following sentiment, " Tho lovely brides,
may they have many Gales on life's voy
age, but never a »quail." It was drank—
blushing.
The Mayor of Baltimore and a deputa
tion of the City Council are again on a
visit to the Eastern Shore, ostensibly to,
pect the finished portion of Kent Coun«
Railway, with a view to a municipal
subscription to its stock, or of an endorse
ment of its bonds ; neither of which, they
are well aware, will ever be done with tha.
approbation of the people of Baltimore,
and it is understood that it cannot be done
without their consent. It is a disgrace to
the public spirit and enterprizo of that city
that her capitalists and merchants will
this Road struggling with difficulties in
abortive efforts to reach them with a large
share of the trade of this Peninsula and
make no effort to aid it. Well, they will
open their eyes to its importance when tho.
whole trade, traffic and travel is diverted;
to Philadelphia, Middletown and Wilming
ton. There is not entire satisfaction with
the management of tho Directors of this
lload. Thero has no publicity been given
to their proceedings, and it is surmised
that a great deal of money has been
necessarily spent in useless surreys, and
extensive journeys by their engineer,
when a letter would have done as well.
Such is the current of public opinion,
whether just or not I cannot say.
It is, however, certain that the Board
Directors have reached tho bottom of
their exchequer, and tho road is complete
Kennedy ville, tlad they commenced
the lower end, ao as to have brought all
their heavy material hy water and carried
to its destination on their own track,
saving of freight would have been no
inconsiderable Item, and Baltimore would
have been in direct connexion with Ches
tertown long since. There ia one item of
expense whioh a great many reflecting men
think might he saved, and that is, any furlhi r
feasting and junketing of the public authorities
Baltimore with a view oTaecuring aid In that di
rection, Of coarse nobody blames them for rat
and drinking and making merry, but eat bo,
Your», as ever,
A tV
stepped out and gave him
and immediately ran off. The night
very dark and the miscreant eluded
quite severely
hurt, but was taken care of by some Good
Templars on their way to Lodge meeting.
Among the things new under the sun in
this latitude is the organixation of a Farm
ers' Club at Bees' Corner. William P»
Francis, Ksq. is the President, and Chae.
Gordon llicaud, Secretary. I have not
found it convenient to a: tend any of tho
meetings, but will endeavour to keep pace
with their proceedings. They meet oq.
Thursday evenings.
Christmas has been very generally ob»
served and the festivities of the season,
stimulated by several weddings, have suf
fered no abatement by reason of the hard
times and the scarcity of the pictures of
Chief Justice Chase, and other notables.
Notwithstanding the fluctuations of the
gold and bond market. Greenbacks main
a stunning
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