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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, March 05, 1870, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1870-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 3.
MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 5, 1870.
NO. 10.
E. T.
E. T. EVANS,
GRAIN Commission MERCHANT,
Buys exclusively for
J. k S. P. TRUSS, NEW CASTLE, DEL.
P INNOCK CORN SMELLERS, at
K. T. Evan*' Agricultural Warohoiuu.
OT8* AND MINSKS' SKATES
B
AT EVANS*
gLEIGH BELLS FOR SALE AT EVANS'
ALEP HAY For Sale at EVANS'
"ROYS' SLEDS—A FINK ASSORT
■" MENT AT EVANS*
D O you wish to make your wife
Present! Buy her a
a Christmas
DOTY'S CLOTHES WASHER AND UNI
VERSAL WHINGER.
Read the following testimonials :
From Rev. L. Scolt , J ft shop <f the , 1 /. E Church
— Dkar Sib: —Wc like our machine much ; could
not be persuaded to do our work without it, und
with the uid of Doty wc feel that we
of the position. On one occasion, the clothes
were prepared, but the washer-woman failed us.
We were not to be defeated that way. 1 took
hold (which of course 1 should not have doue il
we had had no machine) and in 2.] hours wc put
through eleven dozen pieces, many of which
were sheets, and they were well done too. We
wish you greut success.
From Rev. Henry Ward Beecher .—After n
stant use of the Universal Clothes Wringer for
more than four years in my family, I ani.author
ized by the "powers that be" to give it the most
unqualified praise, and to pronounce it an
peusiblc part of tlie machinery of housekeeping.
Our servants hare always been willing to use it,
aud always liked it.
From Rev. Thto. /,. Cuyler .—Life is too short,
and human strength is too precious for our wo
inankiud to be kept at the old process of clothes
washing and wringing. In the laundry of my
house there is a perpetual thanksgiving on Mon
day* for the invention of your excellent W *
1 wish human hearts could be cleansed
; masters
con—
indis
Orange Judd, Editor of American Agriculturist,
Mays: —Doty's Washing Machine we have tried
thoroughly, in competition with many others,
and for actual sow ice this seems to be
provement upon every previous machine we have
tented. Our "better half" says this is take
most kindly by the "help," aud that she cannot
t iersuadc them to use any other,
land.
m
to
•bile this is at
Solon RoLi
says : —Fimf.xo Doty —Your last
improvement of your \\
plcte success. À slim girl, ten years of age uses
it, and an invalid lady, who has to sit down to
work, can wash without fatigue. I assure you
our machine, after u year's use, is thought more
of to-day than ever, and would not be parted
with under any circumstances. You have won
blessings from all the women about this hdltsc,
he assured of that.
hing Machi
From the wife of the Hon. S. C. Fessenden. —Mr.
Fessenden, ut mv request, purchased for inc
of your Doty \\ ashing Machines. It has 1
used to do my weekly washing for more tl
year, and I have no hesitation in s;
tnj opinion, it is all a housekeeper!
the purpose for which it is desired, it In
me entire satisfaction.
de
e, for
givi
For Sale nt
K. T. EVANS' Agricultural Wareho
Middletown, Del
use.
Ike. 25—2ni
N'OTICIE.
T HE undersigned having purchased from the
heirs of M. J. Haines tin* unexpired Patent
for Qrinn Drill, know
Haines k Wood," or "Wood's Drill," has made
several important improvements in it, viz:—
A Cost I ron Bottom,—Front Feet of Box Hinged,
so ns lobe independent of the Frame,—Combined
open Mctalic Spouts, distributing the Phos
phate and Grain togc ", Ac. Ac. and secured
the same by Letters Pate . dated No verni er 30,
I860, have combined wit my celebrated
• Kulm' s A Haines
PHOSPHATE WER,
With its Movable Cast Iron Bottom, adjusted by
sett screws, Ac. also secured to me by Letters
Patent, dated Oct. 27, 1868, and confirmed July
U>, I860, by a decision of the Supreme Court of
the District of Columbia.
As there lias been over 100 of these machines
introduced and used in this neighborhood, with
in the last two years, with entire satisfaction. 1
am enabled to offer to the public
y improved
DELAWARE PHOSPHATE DRILL
As a first class
mine, with a full guarantee
of good workmanship aud satisfactory perform
ance. I would also notify nil persons that 1
shall prosecute any infringement upon any of the
Improvements secured to me by either of the a
bove Letters Patent.
W. N.-HAMILTON, M. I).
Odessa, Del.
Dec. 11, 1869—tf.
1 1» 11 \ ^ f % i f ?
T O THE WORKING CLASS.—We are now
prepared to furnish all classes with employ
ât home, the whele of the time or for the
spare moments. Business new, light und profita
ble. Persons of cither sex easily earn from 50c
to $5 per evening, and a proportional sum by de
voting their whole time to the busiuess. Boys
girls can earn nearly as much as men. That
all who sec this notice may send their address
and tost the busiuess, wc make this unparullod
/jffer: To euch ns arc not well satisfied, we will
^end $1 to pay for tlie trouble of writing. Full
particulars, a valuable sample, which will do to
,coiumence work on, and a copy of The People's
Literary Companion —one of the largest and best
family newspapers published—all sent free by
mail. Render if you want permanent, profitable
wprk, address E. C. ALLEN A CO.
Jlmn. Agusta, Maine.
-
and
I. REYNER DUKES,
Denton, Mil.
****** ft
Miktfin, Md.
MAY & DUKES,
GRAIN k GENERAL PRODUCE
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 24 SOUTH WATER ST.
■•tween Cheitnnt A Market St«»
PHILADELPHIA.
Consignments of Grain and Produce solicited.
Orpers fpr Guano, Fertilizers and Groceries,
Nov. 6—tf.
promptly attended to.
Z EPHYRS and Germantown Wools for knit
ting Shawls, Nubias and Afghans, also
stocking and knitting Yarn*.
Samples sent by mail, and goods sipt by Ex
press, to any part of the country. Sold at retail
at thç IVAvERLY MILLS 1024 Lombard Street,
Dpc. )J—3mcB Phlla<f«lpl)lft' IM,
NEW STOVE, TIN,
AND
• HOUSE-FURNISHING STORE.
THOMAS II KOTHWELL'S
NEW BUILDING,
North Side of Main Street, 4 litiilcllngs Went
of Town Hall,
Middletown, Delaware.
Where lie has constantly on
pared to manufacture
hand, and is pre
ALL KINDS OF TIN WARE
At Short Notice.
Particular attention paid to
ROOFING AND SPOUTING.
Orders respectfully solicited and promptly atten
ded to.
COOK STOVES.
STAU, COTTAGE, NATIONAL,
CIIABM, PRIZE, & VICTOR COOK.
PARLOR STOVES.
ROQUET BASE, GAS, BURNING
BASK, DIAL, VIOLET, REVERE, UNION AIR
TIGHT.
Stoves suitable for Btorcs, offices, hotels, and
school houses.
Orders will be received and promptly filled for
any kind of Stove that may he ordered.
GALVAX1ZED, RUSSIA, AND SHEET IRON,
ZINC,
COAL IIODS, SEIVES,
POKERS, SHOVELS,
TEA KETTLES, BAKE PANS, WAFFLE IRONS
SAD IRONS, BRASS A ENAMELLED
PRE.SER YING K EITLES,
EX AMELIA: I) SAUCE PANS,
TEA BELLS, JAPANNED CHAMBER BUCKETS,
SPITTOONS, WAITERS, LANTERNS,
FLOUR AND PEPPER BOXES,
SAND CCDS, MATCH SAFES (Cast Iron,)
MOLASSES CUPS,
PLU sa c: ANS,
(Soldered and Self-Healing)
PATENT CLOTHES FRAMES, Ac. Arc. Arc.
Prompt attention to business, moderate prices,
competent workmen, and
please, may at all times Lc expected by those who
may favor him with their custom.
determination to
THE VAPOR COOKING STOVE.
Mo Cool, mo Stove Pipe, no
Ashes, no Dirt, no Wood Boxes, vo
Coal Scuttle,
Xo Wood,
Kindling Wood,
But a Friction Match,
And the lire in full blast in half a minute, ove
hot in two minutes, steak broiled in seven
utes, bread baked iu thirty minutes, the fir
tingnished in a moment.
Please call and examiue it in operation at
Thomas H, Roth well's Stove Store
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
Sole owner of the. stove for the State.
Feb. 10— y
ANTICIPATING
TIIK
FALL TRADE.
f|RIE undersigned has made the most clabor
X ate preparations und already otters to those
ly in making their Fall
ho
ay wish to I
and Winter purchases,
FULL STOCK OF GOODS.
Suitable for Fall
d Winter wear and usage.
My stock of DRY GUUDS will consist in part
of
BRACK uml COLORHD ALPACAS,
Wool Delaines, Wool Poplins,
Alolmii's,
A good assortment of Prints, Cotton
Flannels, 1, 1 j, 2$ Brown and Bleached Muslins
Heavy Domestics, Bal. Skirts, Shawls, Ac. Ac.
d W
NOTIONS.
Hosiery, Gloves, Ladies Corsets, Ladies Vests,
Ribbons, Edgings, Gents Undershirts, Ladies
Collars and Cuffs, Combs, Hair Brushes, Velvets,
and in fact everything you could well expect to
find iu a first Class Notion House may here be
had.
I ask Ihe pnrticulur uiiention of (lie gentlemen
to my assortment of FllKNtlll and AMERICAN
CLOTHS, and Fancy Coosimcrs. New Styles of
which 1 urn constantly receiving and disposing
of at reasonable priées.
Also to the Community in general to my Stock
of Mens llsavY Roots, and of Mens, Womens
and Missus Heavy Shoes, which I have made to
OitDEit of the Rest material, and on any of which
I am willing to guarantee satisfaction. I have
also a good assortment of Meus sowed and peg
ged, single and double upper and sole Calf
Roots, and Ladies Dress Shoes in Various
Styles.
Hats and Caps.
Carpets, Druggets, Oil Cloths, Oil Clotb Win
dow Shades, Door Mats, Hardware,
Ccdarwarc, Quccuswarc, Earthen
waru, 3foneware, Groceries,
Ac. Ac. Ac.
Glass, Oil, Puiuts, Mackerel, Shad, and Her
ring always ou hand.
ßST' Will show goods with pleasure, and
make a liberal discount for Cash.
G. W. W. NAUDAIN.
No. 3. Middletown Ilall.
Oct. 16—tf
QORONER! !
To the Democratic Voters of New Castle Co.
Fellow Cjt zjjvs :—At the earnest solicitation
of my friend# I again offer myself as a candidate
for tho poiiflqation of Coroner of New Castle Co.
and am YhapkOil to my friends for the support
they gave mp at &c lost nomination election, aad
pledge myself tp abi4ß the decision of the party.
illCUAUD GROVES,
Delaware City, Feb. 5 tn
Select floDtnj.
the river in the mammoth cave.
BY GEOI1UE U. PRENTICE.
Oh, dark mysterious stream, I sit by thee
In awe profound, as myriad wanderers
Have sat before. I see thy waters
out the ghostly glimmering of my lump
Imo tho dark beyond as noiselessly
As if thou wert a sombre river drawn
Upon a spectral canvas, or the stream
Of dim oblivion flowing through the lone
And shadowy vale of death. There is
To whisper on thy shore or breathe ft
Wounding its tender bosom
And jagged
The
Fr
all,
thy sharp
In numerous mingled tones,
Ice of the day and of the night,
Are ever heard throughout all outer world,
''or Nature there is never dumb, but here
1 turn and turn my listening ear and catch
No mortal sound save that of my own heart
That 'mid the awful stillness throbs uloud
Like the far sea-surf's low and measured beat
I pon its rocky shore. Rut when a cry
Or shout or song is raised, how wildly back
Come the wierd echoes from a thousand rocks
As if unnumbered weary sentinels,
The genii of the spot, caught up the voice
Repeating it in wonder—a wild amaze
Of spirit tones, a wilderness of sounds.
Earth born but all unearthly.
•ks.
Thou dost seem,
river of the dead
er of some blasted, perished world,
Wandering forever in the mystic void,
No breeze
Oh
zar«l stream
A
thy solemn tide,
ith his wing.
iks thy surf
No bird
h
No star, or sky, or b
Within thy depths, no flu we
breathes
glassed
c\
blade e'er
Its frag
...„ranee from thy bleak banks
?, here are flowers,
the air.
T
semblance of flowers
Carved by the magic fingers of the drops
That fall tipon thy rocky battlements—
Fair roses, tulips, pinks and violets—
bite us cerements of the coffined dead :
But they are flowers of stone,
The sunshine or
Whence coincst thou and
Above,
A h
d never drank
the dew. Oh, sombre streai
- - whither gocst?
pon the surface of old earth,
dred rivers o'er thee pass and
In music and in sunshine to the „v..,
Thou art not born of them. Whence contest thou
None of earth can know.
No mortal e'er has gazed upon thy
No mortal seen where thy dark waters blend
\\ ith the abyss of Ocean. None may guess
The mysteries of thy course. Perchance thou hast
' undred mighty cataracts thundcri
urds earth's eternal cen
Itf not for
veep,
And whither goest?
A h
ï
but this sound
. Ail
Is that thy tide rolls out, a
From yon stupendous, frov
And
ot
k
spectre .stream,
all of rock,
•mug
little way, sinks dow
iss of rock
Beneath another
And, frowning,
Born of the fathomless eternity,
Steals
dark
s life—our little life—
on u moment then disappears
eternity us fathomless.
jacket ^ioriî.
AN UNEXPECTED RIVAL.
BY KATE CLAIR.
Brightly glowed the tire in the polish
ed grate, aud brilliantly flashed the light
from a dozen gas jets, throwing, through
the crimson-curtained windows, a rich
glow upon tho snow-covered pavements
without ; speaking to 'the weary hearted
toil-worn children of poverty, passing by
to cheerless homes, of warmth and
fort and blessing which might ''never be
thrtrs.
Within that
naught
ury, a young girl stood behind the drap
ery, gazing out into the stormy night,
aud tapping her little foot impatiently
the floor, while an expression of angry
discontent shadowed a face perfect in out
line aud coloring, marring sadly its other
wise exquisite loveliness.
The snow fell thick and fast, and but
few pedestrians were abroad ; none suve
those who were compelled by necessity to
brave the chilling blast and the blinding
storm.
Suddenly, with a gesture of vexation
and disappointment, she dashed aside the
folds of crimson, and advanced to the
fireside, exclaiming :
" It is provoking, intolerably provok
ing ! Here 1 have been watching for
that girl for one hour, and yet she does
not come. What does she mean by this
delay? I shall he raging, if I am disap
pointed of my dress this night, of all
others."
" Why, surely, Ella, you are not go
ing out in this tempest?" »aid a noble
looking silver-haired man, who entered
the room just in time to catch her last
word
" Indeed hut I am, Guardy. Dr. Hun
ter is coming for me to go to Mrs. Erls
ton's bull, ami I would not miss it for the
world. I am determined to crown my
reign as belle of the season, by bringing
him to my feet, if possible, before another
day dawns. He is the best match in the
city, and I mean to secure him at once.
The girls are all crazy about him, and 1
long to triumph over them."
" You speak confidently," said Mr.
Revere, " so I shall expect to be wok«
up iu the small hours of the morning with
tidings of your success."
Turn we now to another home,, the
abode of poverty, where Mary Grey, the
young seamstress, is bending wearily over
her work, a richly embroidered dress,
whose silver lilies of tho valley, with
richly tinted blue bells, are artistically
wrought in graceful patterns on a ground
work of white silk. It is the dress for
which the beautiful heiress is waiting—the
dress in which she expects to captivate
" tho best match in the city."
Very lovely is Mary Grey, though no
roBe tint blooms on the pure white of her
complexion—very lovely, though her glo
rious eyes, shaded by long silken lashes,
»re dimmed with wutching tears. Her
fingers fly nimbly over her task, nearly
completed, the payment for which is 4o
bring needful supplies to those who for
two days bare scarcely tasted food —ber
com
curtained room, where
'Cined wanting of beauty or lux
on
invalid mother and her little sister Lucy
who is now nestling at her feet, crying
with hunger. 1 he work is completed at
hist, and Mary, drawing the child fondly
to her side, says soothingly : _ _
u> i darling . hush. Sister is going
now to take home the dress and bring you
a r° J wenty-five dollars
we II have for this ; won t we bo rich my
pL m j , , , , , ,
iears filled her eyes, but she brushed
tliem hastily away ». a well-known rap
heaicl, followed by the entrance of a
very elegant looking man, who, holding
out his hand to Mary, said pleasantly :
"lam earlier than usual, this eveuiug,
but I am obliged to escort a fair lady to a
ball at ten o'clock, and thought I would
look on, my patient before making my
toilette."
was
" Ah, doctor, how can I thank you for
your kindness ?' said Mary, raising her
sparkling eyes to bis face, but dropping
them again instantly as she met the
gaze of ad
blushes brightened her fair face into
beauty.
" Mother is worse, I fear, Doctor,"
said Mary,
this evening.
" lias she had proper nourishment to
day ?"
" Mamma has not had anything to cat,
doctor?" broke in little Lucy ; and sister
and I haven't had anything either but dry
broad, and we are very hungry ; but sis
ter is going to get some money to-night."
" Hush ! Lucy," said Mary, while a
painful look of embarrassment fell
her before bright countenance,
tor, excuse her; she talks too fast.
An anxious, inquiring gaze rested on
her, and in a voice trembling with emo
tion, Doctor Hgptcr exclaimed:
" Mary, is it uidccd so?
She bent her head in assent but after a
moment of silence, found voice to say,
" I shall have money to-night."
Giving but a glance at bis patient,
whose cmanciated face spoke of suffering
and want, even in sleep, he left hastily.
And Mary, folding her work, and
fully placing at her mother's side the
medicine she might need ou waking, at
the same time charging little Lucy to stay
by her in her absence, started out in the
fierce storm, to carry the dress to the
heiress, who sat chafing at her delay.
Mary*8 father had once been rich, but,
crushed by adversity, had died and left
his family poor, and his widow an invalid.
Dr. Hunter had known them in their
days of prosperity, and on his
home from the continent, a month
to our story, had sought them out
and offered his services gratuitously—an
offer gratefully accepted. lie knew they
were poor, hut never until Lucy's revela
tion had he dreamed of the extent of that
poverty. Tho loveliness of Mary had
made a deep impression on his heart, and
when lie left them that night it was with
the resolve to shield her in future, under
his protecting love, from all life's cares
and hardships.
It was, indeed, a fierce storm that Mary
was forced to < ncouutur on her way to Mr.
Revere'« sph udid ahnde, aud her progress
was necessarily slow.
As, ehilled by the stinging blast, ami
red up the
steps of the brilliantly lighted mansion
and rang the bell, a sleigh dashed to the
door, and when it was opened to admit the
trembling girl, a gentleman alighted and
lightly up, passing in, ere it was clos
find saying to the servant, "I will wait
for Miss Ella in the drawing-room."
Mary started; she knew the voice of Dr.
Hunter, and not wishing to be recognized
drew lier hood closely around her face.
"Poor girl!" thought the doctor ; "what
a night for u woman to be abroad!"
lie little dreamed who he was pitying.
Directed by the servant, Mary tapped
lightly at the opposite room. It was
peued by Ella Raymond in a towering
rage, lier face distorted with passion.
"So you have oomc at last ?" she ex
claimed angrily; "two hours behind time.
I did think, Mary Grey, you were poor
enough to have the virtue of punctuality."
"I am sorry I have disappointed you,
Miss Raymond. * I have sat up three
nights until day-break to complete it in
time; but my mother has beeu ill, and
needed my care, which must be my ex
cuse."
warm
iration in his, while crimson
new
in
of
in
" She seems quite exhausted
upon
" Doc
care
ret ui
pre
blinded by the «now, she sta
ra
■d,
o
Dr. Hunter, in the drawing-room, caught
the silvery accents, and-—forgive him rea
der—listened.
"What is your mother's sickness to me?
You promised the dress at seven and it is
now nine Your excuse is a poor one."
"Believe me, I regret it, hut it was im
possible for me to he earlier. You will
oblige me, as I am in some haste, if you
will now pay me for it, and let mo go."
"Pay you indeed ! Not I. I'll punish
you for your tardiness. I'll teach you how
to make promises and hreak them. Just
as many hours as you kept me waitiug for
my dress, so many days will I keep you
out of your money. 1'
"Oh, Miss Raymond, you will not, you
cannot be so cruel ! My mother is ill,
and needs nourishment ; my little sister i»
starving ; aud I depend on this twenty-five
dollars from you to supply their wauts. I
must have the money !"
"Not from mo," said Ella, with a taunt
ing laugh, ns she shut the door in herfape,
and turned into the room to admire the ex
quisite garment.
Faint from want of food, and ornshed by
her disappointment, Mary left the abode of
wealth, not knowing where to look for help
in her trouble. Ou the pavement still
brightened with the rich crimson curtains,
she slipped and fell insensible. Ptrong
iu
to
arms raised her tenderly, and lifted her
into the fur-lined sleigh at the door, and
at swiftly it sped homeward. Her fit of in
sensibility, produced by exhaustion, and
distress, was a long one, and when she
awoke to consciousness, warmth and light
were around her—while at the table, on
which was spread a comfortable meal, sat
famished little Lucy, eating to her hearts
, Cl,ntent — ,le f ,le "d was pillowed on the
breast of Dr. Hunter and his arms enfold
ed her. Dlushingly she sought to wilh
a draw from his embraoe, but bcuding ten
derly over her he whispered •
"No darling; lie close to my heart shel
tcred by my lovo. No more poverty, no
a more sorrow, if you will only give me'the
tight to shield you from it, dear one."
Trembling with happiness unspeakable
Mary hid her face against his shoulder ;
hut gently turning toward him, he looked
down into the depths of her wonderful
eyes, and reading there how fully his love
was returned, pressed a fervent kiss upon
her lips, and rising, led her to her mother,
for her consent to and blessing on their
union.
The clock struck ton, ami the doctor
said with a fond g'ance at Mary :
"I must leave you now, to keep my
appointment with the heiress.' She must
display my darling's work at the ball to
night or die of vexation."
The expectant fair one waited half an
hour for her tardy escort, but no look of
anger crossed her beautiful face, no dis
cordant notes marred the harmony of the
soft, sweet tones with which she chided
Dr. Hunter for his want of punctuality.
It was just one month since the night
of Mrs. KrLton's ball. In that time Dr.
Hunter had bought and furnished an ele
gant residence on Fifth Avenue. ' He was
weary of single life, he told his friends,
and was preparing a cage for the bird of
his choice. Invitations were out for a grand
house-warming, at which the world should
know the selected bride ef ''the best match
in the city."
Every one fixed their eyes on the hello
of the season, and were confident that the
charming heiress, to whom of late he had
been paying marked attention, was the en
vied one.
"He will certainly prop^Shto
Guardy," sho said to Mr. ldR
sto id b fore the glass ai ranpB«
ful ringlets. "You will not have
your handsmuch longer."
"Disappointed once Ella, you may he
Still, you may wake me, if you
come home engaged to Dr. Hunter."
The rooms were crowded, as Ella, su
perbly dressed, swept into the splendid
hall she expected soon to call her own.
Many curious eyes were upon her as she
passed with queenly grace to the reception
room, and reached the spot where the host
stood, with a lady beside him, in blidul
attire, "lovely.as a poet's dream."
She started, turned pale, but recovering
her self-possession, advanced ; while he,
holding out his hand, greeted her
friend, then leading her gently forward
presented her to his bride.
Stupefied she gazed in the face of Mary
Grey, the despised seamstress; then striv
ing to gasp out congratulations, uttered an
hysterical shriek, and fainted away. She
had indeed met an unexpected rival, and
the shock of seeing the child of poverty
elevated to the position her ambitious hopes
had led her to believe would be her own,
was too much even for pride to conceal.
Mary, ever considerate, came to her side.
"It is the heat," she said to the inquis
itive crowd. "Do take her to the conser
vatory, and leave her with me."
Need I describe the recovery, the ahamc.
the remorse, on the one side ; the charity
which thinketh no evil, and forgives all
things, on the other?
The heiress returned home humbled and
saddened, having learnt a lesson that
night never to he forgotten.
She did not, as may bo imagined, awake
her guardian ; nor did he wonder when he
read the morning papers of the surprise
Dr. Hunter had prepared for his friends.
Comfort and happiness soon restored the
invalid mother to health, and rounded the
form of little Lucy.
To Mary, life flows on like a fairy dream
brighter far by contrast with the past; and
we need hardly add that Dr. Hunter has
never ceased to bless the night of the storfii
in which he opened bis arms and heart to
take into their warm shelter the poor un
paid seamstress, Mary Grey.
of
to
lic
as
in
to
is
no
-night,
as she
grace
me ou
again.
as q
Awful. —The following apt hit at a
very absurd method of exaggerated speak
ing, we commend to certain persons of
our acquaintance. There was onee an
awful little girl who had an awful way of
saying "awful" to everything. Sho
lived in an awful bouse, in an awful street
iu an awful village, which was an awful
distance from every other jiwful place.
Sho went to an awful school, where she
had an awful teacher, who gave her
awful lesson out of awful books. FI very
day she was so awful hungry that she ate
an awful amout of food, so that she looked
awful healthy. Her hat was awful small,
aud her feet were awful large. Sho went
to an awful church and her minister
an awful preacher. When sho took an awful
walk she oliinbcd an awful hill,and when she
got awful tired she sat down under
ful tree to rest hersolf.
found the weather awful hot, aud in win
ter awful cold. When it didn't rain there
was an awful drought, and when the
ful drought was pver, there was an awful
rain. So that this awful girl was all the
time in an awful state, and if she don't
get over sayiug " awful " about every
thing, I am afraid she will, hy and by,
conic to an awful egd
an
of
i
u as
an tw
in summer she
aw
'SÙlit and Humor.
of
the
use
are
for
At
the
ted,
It
tion.
eter,
so
ded
and
the
the
that
only
the
forty
upon
be
It
great
tem,
fully,
ble
and
from
speed
times
they
a
with
last
office,
A MONUMENT TO MOTHER EVE.
"Natalie," a feminine quill-driver for
tho press, says the Golden City, having
read that a monument to Adam is in con
templation, aud that each member of the
human family is expected to contribute
one cent towards raising it, wants to know
what Aduiu did for the race more than
Eve, that a monument should be erected
to him and none to her. Why is it, in
deed, asks "Natalie." that monuments are
always erected to men, while none are
erected to women? This is just what we
would like to know ; and if the men really
intend to do monumental honor to the
Father of the human family, we would ad
vise the women to pitch in with all their
might and raise one to the Mother there
of—such a pile as shall "overtop old
Peliou, or the skyish head of blue Oly
pus"—or,
—-" ' till Eve's monument,
Singeing its top against the burning zone,
Make Adam's like a wart."
That's exactly what we should go in for
did we belong to the " other sex." It is
proper to state, however, that "Natalie"
does not object to the proposed monument
to Adam. She simply wants justice done
to Eve, or auy other woman who has
made a name for herself! " Have there
not been just as many good aud wise wo
as there have beeu good aud wise
men ?" asks the champion of the weaker
sex. " Have there not been plenty of
heroines among the sex ; and are not he
roines as much entitled to monuments as
heroes? But what Freuchman ever
thought of erecting a monument to Char
lotte Corday ? or what Spaniard to the
Maid of Saragossa, who mail'd—or as one
of her admirers quaintly says, wotuan'd
—the artillery of the fortress of old
Spain ? What American has ever dream
ed of honoring with a statue our own rev
olutionary heroine Moll Pitcher? As yet
America has not erected a monument to
Christopher Columbus—hut no doubt
Christopher's time will come—but what
man will think of honoring in like man
ner Queen Isabella—and without Isabel
la's aid what would Christopher have ever
accomplished? Would there have been
any America? or any Americans to erect
monuments to anybody ? But, as Mr.
Billings would say, this is a prize conun
drum, aud wc give it up. We
turn to the battle-field and the hospital,
to say that though women have frequently
distinguished themselves in both places,
that no mau has ever considered her sacri
fices of enough value to merit their per
petuation in marble. But it is well known
that though men are very fond of playing
tho part of the hero, that they have no
fancy for heroines, and this may be the
reason why there hive never been any
monuments erected to them. But there
are women who are not heroines—or pub
lic ones—who have no capacity for any
particular line of duty, outside of the do
mestic or social eircle, where they shine
as wives and mothers, to whom, in the
words of a writer on the subject, a whole
army of saints and sagos have ascribed
whatever was best and glorious in their
lives. This being the case, why arc all
the monuments eroded to the Saints and
Sages, and none to the women who brought
them into the world, and who devoted
their lives to making them what they
were? We see statues of George Wash
ington, but no man ever thought of erect
ing a monument to George Washing
ton's mother. Napoleon's reply to Ma
dame de Staël, when the great authoress
asked him : " Who is the greatest woman
in Franco," is well known. " Madamo,"
said ho, "it is the woman who gives
France the most soldiers." Why don't
somebody act upon the idea, and if we
can't do any better, erect a monument to
the woman who, when found, will, accord
ing to the great Emperor's idea, be the
greatest woman living. In short wo want
to see a monument erected to a woman,
and if a numerous progeny can entitle a
woman to the honor, Mother Eve's chance
is a good. As we have said, we have no
no objections to the proposed monument to
Adam, but we might as well say hero that
we don't intend to contribute the required
ceut towards its erection without the same
honor is paid to Eve."
ineu
will rc
ed
"but
souri,
of
still
the
knife,
and
coolly
see
and
ted:
and
could
A wit says the reason so many gentle
men are seen walking erect, notwithstand
ing the prevalence of the Grecian bend, is
that the people have been in straitened
circumstances of late.
Progress of " woman's rights,".—thp
imes editor hy
thrashing of the Chicago Ti
the blondes.
IIow do people manage to sleep on a
spring mattress all through the winter ?
A wringing machine—the income tax.
The poetry of winter—rime frost.
the
given
bees
the
ing
by
bees
uot
Ashes for Fruit Trees. —The editor
of tho Horticulturist says:—"We have
known quite a number of instances—in
deed, so often as to make it quite a rule—
that old orchards apparently dying out
have beeu brought back again to fruitful
ness by tho liberal use of wood-ashes, also
stirring the soil, l'otash is the most im
portant clement in the successful growth
of all kinds of fruit trees. An old gentle
man told a clnb, not long ago, that he
had knowu a man to make and preserve an
orchard of npple trees in a flourishing aud
productive condition, originally placed on
very poor ground, by sprinkling every
year around each tree, to the circumfer
ence of tho extent of its branches, half a
bushel of ashes. Wo consider this a very
importipt item."
in
A New Invention.
Quite a revolution will probably be
made in the transportation of produce, and
of many descriptions of merchandise, and
possibly of the mails, by a newly invented
system of sphero-locomotiou, patents for
which have been obtaiued in this country
and Europe. The inveution consista in
the application of the sphere instead of the
wheel to the Pneumatic Tube tracks. We
use this word for want of a more exprès^
sivc one, to describe the tubes whieli
are now in established use in Londou
for the transportation of mails and pack
ages, atmospheric pressure being used in
stead of steam as a locomotive power.
At present a line of rails is laid within
the tubes, on which cars run. A decided
saving of propelling power is thus effec
ted, and the tubes running uuder ground
afford every facility for rapid transportation
through crowded districts.
Put there is still the same difficulties
arising from axle friction, wear and tear,
breakage and other causes which arc neces
sarily inseparable from wheel locomotion.
It is now proposed to do away with the
wheeled car and the rails, and to use the
hollow sphere as the vehicle of transporta
tion. These spheres can be of any diam
eter, from two to ten feet, and will be
made of cast steel, turned with precision
so as to roll smoothly. They can be load
ded with grain, oil, meats, and, indeed,
anything else which can be packed tightly
and distributed wo as not to disturb the
ceutre of gravity too much,
made tube will furnish a smooth and solid
passage way, free from dust, dirt or other
obstructions, and protected from rain and
snow. Tubes can be cheaply constructed
above grouud, supported on posts, and
piers. They can bo made of wood, the
planks being tongued and groved and the
joints cemented.
This need not be unusually strong, as
the atmospheric pressure required to move
the spheres, at a velocity more rapid than
that obtained by the steam engine, would
only be a few ouuccs to the square inch.
Indeed, when the system is perfected, the
sphere will probably be projected at double
the speed of the fastest express trains.
Already in London ten tons are projected
forty miles an hour by a pressure of six
ounces to the square inch, the pressure
upon the atmosphere under complete ex
haustion being, as is well known, iifteeu
pounds to the inch. The difficulty of
stopping at the points of destination will
be overcome by a succession of brakers or
springs, and by the creation of air cushions.
The system is, of course, in its infancy.
It is impossible, however, to predict tho
great results to which it may lend. It
eertaiuly strikes one us bciug a vast im
provement on the present pneumatic sys
tem, and when experience has taught tho
proper method of loading the spheres care
fully, so ns not to disturb the centre of
gravity, and not to injure the cargo, no
matter how delicate, we can have periwha.
ble fruits of the tropics, game from the
prairies, gold nuggets from California, and
newspapers, letters, and even greenbacks
and stock certificates, shot through to us
from all points of the continent with a
speed and safety which we cannot hope to
obtain by the present system of steam and
railway transportation.
A Full Hand. —Although tho flush
times have passed away on the Mississippi,
they still have eomo queer and some times
rough customers on the river boats. On
a recent trip of the "Highflyer," crowded
with passengers, the clerk had allotted tho
last state room, and was about to close his
office, wheu he was astonished by the ap
parition of a tall Missourian, who exclaim»
Tho Pueu
ed :
"I sav stranger, I want one of them
chambers."
"Sorry, sir," said the official blandly,
"but our state rooms are all taken."
"The deuce they are!" responded Mis*
souri, "I've paid my fare, 'n I waut wun
of them chambers."
"Allow me to see your ticket," sgit] tho
still polite clerk.
Putting his hand to the back of his neck
the passenger pulled out a ten inch bowiu
knife, and driving it quiveringly into rim
counter, said :
"I'm from Pike county, young fellow,
and thar's my ticket. I want wun of thciq
chambers."
Before the steel had ceased to sound tho
prompt clerk quietly thrust a loaded and
capped six shooter under Pike's nose and
coolly answered :
" I've only got six 'chambers,' and you
see they are all full."
The Missourian edged out of "range,"
and putting up his " toothpick," ejacula
ted: " A fqll hand's good, by the hokies!"
and strode off to seek such quarters gs b$
could find.
Bees Beneficial to Fruit. —Dr. A f
Packard replies to a query in regard to
the effects produced upon fruit by the &
gency of honey bees, that all the evidence
given by botanists and zoologists who have
specially studied the subject, shows that
bees improve the quality and tend to in
crease the quantity of fruit. They aid in
the fertilization of flowers, thus prevent
ing the occurrence of sterile flowers, and
by more thoroughly fertilizing flowers &K
ready perfect, render the production of
sound and well-developed fruit more sure.
Many botanists think if it were not for
bees and other insects, many plants would
uot bear fruit at all.
QueenVictoria js a passionate lover of
music, and gratifies her last* by keeping
in her employ some of the finest iustru
meqtalists iu the worj').

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