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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, November 12, 1870, Image 2

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the
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 12, 1870.
VICTORY ! 11
In honor of the glorious victory gained at the
polls on Tuesday last, a Congratulatory Meeting
of Democractic and Conservative citizens will be
held at the Hotel of Geo. W. Ortlip, in Middle
town, this (Saturday) evening, at 7 o'clock.
riate to the occasion will be
Biggs and others,
and Odessa Bands will be pres
invited to attend.
There will also be a Grand illumination in the
town, between the hours of 7 and 9, in which all
white men are invited to participate.
Nov. 12, 1870.
sent
on
ing
of
The
as
a
in,
on
iu
the
by
the
ped
Addresses appropi
miMfte by Hon. B. T.
The Townsend
cut. All white
Many Democrats.
THE ELECTIONS.
The great political battle of November,
1870, ended on Tuesday last, and was the
most peaceful and quiet election held for
many years. One hundred and thirty
three members of Congress were chosen iu
twenty States of the Union, deciding the
political status of the Forty-second Con
gress which convenes next month.
Louisiana and Arkansas voted on Mon
day, and on Tuesday Delaware voted for
Governor, one member of Congress, meni
mers of the Legislature and local officers,
Maryland for five Congressmen, Virginia
for nine members of Congress and local
officers, New York, Missouri, Alabama,
Michigan, Nevada, Kansas, Massachusetts
and Tennessee for Govenor and Congress
men, New Jersey, Florida, Uliuois, Ken
tucky, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Rhode
Tsland for Congressmen and local officers.
The election in Arkansas was for a Legis
ture and three members of Congress. The
last Legislature contained one Democrat in
House and one in the Senate. The Legis
lature elected on Monday have to choose
a U. S. Senator. Louisiana voted for
members of Congress and a Legislature,
the Legislature to elect a U. S. Senator
end to act on four proposed constitutional
amendments. The States elected an ag
gregate of one hundred and thirty-thee
Congressmen, and arc represented in the
present House as follows :
a
the
to
of
Dem.
Rep.
New York
Massachusetts
New Jersey
Rhode Island
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Nevada
Minnesota
Maryland
Delaware
Virginia
Tennessee
Kentucky
Alabama
Louisiana
Missouri
Florida
Arkansas
Kansas
12
19
10
3
2
2
4
10
6
1
5
1
1
5
1
5
3
5
3
9
2
4
5
7
1
1
2
1
50
83
The Democrats have made large gains
everywhere except in New Jersey, where
they have lost one Congressman and the
Legislature and consequently a United
Senator. In Delaware tho Democrats
liRTe elected their State Ticket by about
2.500 majority ; aud tho Legislature is
•entirely Democratic. The Democratic
■majority in New Castle County is 509 for
Shariff and from 57 to 132 on the rest of
the ticket. Kent county 700 Democratic
-and Sussex county 1500 Democratic.
'The Democrats have gained four Con
gressmen in New York, and probably four
•in Illinois, fivo in Tennessee, one in Wis
consin and one in Michigan, one in Ala
Lama, two in Arkansas. Further returns
■will show more gains of Congressmen,
and the Republicans will not have more
than eleven majority in the next Congress.
The Democracy havo not only gained a
large number of Congressmen, but it ap
pears Dow that three and probably four of
the States which have hitherto been under
Radical control have followed the exam
ple of West Virginia and wheoled into the
Democratic line. The Democrats of Mary
land, with 30 OOOuegro votes to contend
with, have sweept aveything, electing all
of their Congressmen (five) and with a
majority in the State of 18.600. New
York has gone Democratic by 35.000 ma
jority, and the Legislature is Democratic
aa before. Nevada, for the first time sineo
its organization as a State, has bceDcarried
by the Democrats. The Radicals concede
the clection-eof Bradlev (Democrat) for
Governor, though they still claim the Con
gresman.
The indications are that Arkansas has
beon sweepMty the Democrats. The en
tire Congressional delegation is claimed.
Alabama shows signs of having elected
tho Democratic state ticket headed by Mr.
Lindsay for Governor, with three Demo
cratic Congressmen. Tho same symptoms
appear in Florida.
The Government had troops at the polls
in New York, Maryland, and in several
of the Southern States, hoping thereby to
intimidate Democratic voters and give the
State over to the Radicals. The Statos of
California, Connecticut, New Hampshire,
Georgia, and Texas, all have to vote this
fall, and probably with the following re
ault as to Congressmen ;—California,
Démocrate, 3 ; Connecticut, Democrats,
2, and Republicans, 2; Georgia, Demo
crats, 5 and Republicans, 2 ; New llamp
shire, Republicans, 6 ; Texas, Democrats,
and Republicans, 2. The present House
of Representatives stands 51 Democrats,
172 Republicans and 6 Conservatives;
the next will consist of about 108 Demo
crats, 122 Republicans, and 3 conserva
tives, leaving a Republican majority of 11.
A party of unprincipled white men were
sent down from Wilmington to Blackbird
on Tueaday last, for the purpose of steal
ing the ballot-box. A timely letter, how
ever, from Jesse Sharp, Esq. to Samuel
Townsend, Esq. apprised the Democrats
of the fact and put them on their guard.
The party was waited upon by the Demo
crats, aud invited to leave as soon as pos
sible, which they did, running their horses
as they went. This proceeding shows what
desperate straight the Radical party was
in, and to what mean and contemptible
tricks they would stoop to gain power.
The Wilmington Gazette says :—
The Radicals of this city driven to the
depths of infuriated despair, left no device
known to rasoality an<J villany untried to
obtain success in this couuty. Not con
tent with negro riots, with voting negro
minors who could not give their ages up
on cath, and dragging negro repeaters
from poll to poll and hundred to hundred,
they imported itjs said abou tiico hundred
thieves, pickpocketa and ruffians from
Philadelphia to assist their nefarious
schemes. The greater part of these
wretches were distributed and concealed
iu various quarters of the city, with the
intent to vote and then repeat them in the
different wards. About 40 succeeded in
the villany before detcctiou, and the rest
were prevented in the Democratic wards
by tho election officers apprised of the
scheme. Twelve were despatched to St.
Georges, Appoquinimink and Rod Lion
Hundreds with the instructions to attack
the polls and seize the ballot-boxes. A
timely warning sent ahead, however, nip
ped this censpiracy in the bud, and the
roughs were unaccountably allowed to re
turn to Wilmington unharmed by a justly
indignant people.
A Clean Sweep.. —Maryland has made
a clean sweep of it, electing all five of the
Democratic Congressmen by handsome
majorities The Republicans were con
fident of carrying the 1st, 4th and 5th dis
tricts, but the negroes, the marshals, and
the military, were to much for the people
to put up with,aud many an honest repub
lican vote was cast for tho Democratic can
didates. White men are determined to
remain masters of this country, and the
attempt to drag them down to a level with
the negroes has recoiled upon the heads
of its authors. The negroes iu Maryland
and Delaware were relied upon to wrest
both theso States from the hands of the
Democrats, but the effort has been fruit
less. Will tho Radical leaders learn a
lesson from these results, or will they,
with Sumner at their head, try more
stringent measures still, and pass his in
famous bill now pending in tho U. S.
Senate? We shall see. Negroes and sol
diers are not the cards to win, as the late
elections have proved. The Democrats
know a trick worth two of that.
Peterson's Magazine for December is
on our table iu advance. It is unusually
splendid even for "Peterson," It has
two superb steel plates, a mammoth col
ored fashion plate, a costly colored Berlin
pattern, and more than fifty wood engrav
ings. " Peterson" is unquestionably one
of the cheapest and best of the lady's
books. It will give, in 1871, one thou
sand pages of reading, 14 steel engrav
ings, 12 double-sizo colored steel fashion
plates, 24 pages of music, and about 9Ü0
wood engravings. Another leading merit
of this Magazine is its unequalled stories
and novelets. Mrs. Ann S. Stephens,
Frank Lee Benedict, and others of the
writers, contribute to it exclusively. Iu
1871 there will be given five copyright
novelets, besides about one hundred short
er stories. The price of " Peterson's" is
only two dollar's a year to singlo sub
cribcrs, while other magazines of its class
are three or four. To clubs the terms are
lower still, viz : five copies for $8 or eight
copies for $12, Every person getting up
either of theso clubs will receive the mag
azine for 1871 gratis, and also a splendid
coy-righ engraving, (24 inches by 20,)
" Washington at the battle of Trenton,"
of the merit of which we can speak from
personal inspection. Address Charles J.
Peterson, 300 Chestnut street, Philade
phia. The Transcript and Peterson's
Magazine will be furnished for the year of
1871, for $3.40, to all now subscribers.
Eevery person subscribing for tho Trans
cript for the year 1871 will receive it from
now till the end of the year gratis, the
name in every instance must be accompa
nied by the cash.
The attention of Peach Growers is call
ed to the advertisement of J. B. Clagctt,
in another column, who has Peach trees
of tho Plowden's Seedling variety forsalo.
This variety ripens twenty days earlier
than Hails Early, the earliest peech known
to the Peach Growers of this Peninsula.
Soldiirs in Maryland. —The soldiers
sent to the polls in Maryland did not im
pede tho election, whatever, nearly all
of them being democ rats. In many in
stances they went gunning, and those that
did remain at the poll electioneered for
democratic candidates.
DELAWARE ELECTION.
the
can
man
times,
ing
some
of
blacks
the
John
with
"
Give
ing
the
been
just
a
that
mado
sticks
sides.
ot
lasted
were
hsq.
ball
black,
heads
white
a
lie
from
right
him
being
and
horted
blow
by
fight
to
ing
no
tol
The Democrats have made a clean sweep
electing the State Ticket by from 2000 to
2,600 majority, the Legislature and all
the officers in the three counties.
NEW CASTLE COUNTY.
Ilcald in this county beats Biggs for
Congress 13 votes ; but the rest of the
Democratic ticket is elected by the follow
ing majorities:
Maj.
FOR GOVERNOR.
JAMES PONDER
57
FOR SHERIFF,
JAMES ARMSTRONG.
FOR CORONER,
DANIEL B. WOODWARD.
FOR SENATORS,
Leonard G. Yandegrift.
Dr. Allen Y. Lesley.
.509
,137
72
80
REPRESENTATIVES.
Lot Cloud
John Poulson Chandler.132
Aquilla Derickson.
Benjamin Caulk.'..
Sewell C. Biggs.
Albert O. Newton.
Francis Theodore Perry
LEVY COURT COMMISSIONERS.
66
6G
. 88
. 60
47
68
David Graves.
Levi Ruth.
William R. Bright.
Sereck F. Shallcross.
William N. Wilson.
Alexander Deakyne.
The following is the official majorities
for Governor, Congressman and Sheriff,
in the different Hundreds and tho city of
Wilmington :
77
. 96
.103
. 58
. 62
71
D C ^ $ "
î I sj
— ^ ö w -
p 9 O ^ *
W
o
Hundreds.
his
quite
The
the
raged
stored
The
two
Brandywine, E. D.
" W. I).
Chistiana, North,
" South,
11
15
30
42
52
53
34
82
80
58
Mill Creek,
New Castle,
Pencadcr,
Red Li
Red Li
St. Goorge's
White Clay Creek
Wilmington,
Appoquinimink,
21
23 38
217
21G
246
39
39
, East,
, West,
22
24
28
25
25
22
35
8
8
108
W.
hert,
Miller,
W.
will
Jam.Ca
road,
with
that
the
ter
that
were
tion
148
266
264
273
Wilmington, 1st w.
" 2d "
182
199
158
179
146
3d "
4th "
5th "
70
36
34
18
11
32
121
149
86
6th
150
156
142
7 th "
8th"
312
318
292
108
114
103
9th 1
6
12 5
SUSSEX COUNTY.
Whole Democratic Ticket elected by about
1,500 majority.
Dem.
170
Rad.
Georgetown Hundred,
Lewes and Rehobotb,
Dagsboro,
Cedar Creek,
Seaford.
Indian River,
Broadkiln,
53
128
5
98
12
226
KENT COUNTY.
Whole Democratic Ticket elected by 700 .
jority. Ponder's majority, 941 ; Biggs' majori
ty, 999.
WILMINGTON.
Rep. Majorities.
303
Courier, for Governor,
Henld, for Congress,
Harvey, for Sheriff,
Winslow, for Coroner,
380
148
Elk
was
ing
also
off,
269
MAHYLAND ELECTION.
In the First Congressional district
llamblcton, Dem. is elected over Torbert,
Rep. by 3,837 majority; in tho Second,
Archer, Dem. is elected over Marino,
Rep. by 6,552 majority; in the Third
Swann, Dem. is elected over Booth, Rep.
by 4,055 majority; in the Fourth, Richie,
Dem. is elected over Smith, Rep. by 1,816
majority; and in the Fifth, Merrick, Dem.
is elected over Gary, Rep. by 2,489
jority. »
Kint co.—In the first district, Ham
bleton's majority is 25 ; in tho second 30;
in the third 30; in the fifth 192; in the
fourth district Torbert has 92 majorty.—
Hambleton's majority, 191.
lie
the
was
gar.
of
may
by
ma
of
up.
will
BUSINESS LOCALS.
Coates' Spool Cotton, 7 cents per spool, at
J. A. Reynolds & Sons'
in
day
of
be
of
set
be
HAVE YOU SEEN THEM—Th
cheap goods
being sold at No. 1 Town Hall, bought for cash
at bottom prices. Such good» at such prices
new iu Middletown—We know whereof we speak.
Go and see for yourselves.
in
Hanson Bros.
Every Working
should call at Reynolds
A Sons' and buy a pair of 19 inch leg, whole
leather, double soles and tap boots—every pair
warranted.
Terrible Fall in Middletown, at the Town
nail, No. 1. All arc struck with astonishment
on being shown the stock and learning the pri
ces. A full line of shoes, hats, cassimeres, silks,
trimmings, &c. See them. Hanson Bros.
Prime Fresh Sage, pure black pepper, ground
and in the grain; pure Cayenne pepper, salt pe
tre, and spices of all kinds of superior quality,
for sale at Chamberlaine's Druu Store.
Heavy Buckskin Gauntlets and Gloves for men
and boys' wenr at Reynolds a Sons' .
Thomas E. Hum, is making extensive prepar
ation for niuking up Fashionable Garments for
Fall and Winter use. He has procured a supe
rior workman from the extensive and well known
establishment of Rockhill k Wilson, Philadel
phia, and is prepared to give the fullest satisfac
tion to his customers. For a neat and tasty coat,
vest or punts call on Hum.
we
at
is
a
1,
"
Cold weather will soon he upon us, but Han
son Bros, fresh stock of Kip Boots will bid de
fiance to the coldest weather.
If you want a Suit of Ready-made Clothing,
or some good Cloth, Cassimere or Kersey, stop
at Win. IL Moore k Co's.
Gents, Hanson Bros, have received a fresh su
ply of the latest style Hats, and you would
well by oalling to see them.
To
Heavy Boots, made to order, and every pair
varranted, for sale by Wm. H. Moore k Co.
all
in
for
IU vue de Grace Blockaded. —The oys
ter police fleet of the State or a portion of
it, we learn, arrived about the beginning
of this week at Havre de Grace, for the
purpose of regulating tho duckcrs of that
vicinity. A naval engagement on the
head waters of the Chesapcnlce may be
daily expected.
I,OCA I, ASO STATE AFFAIRS.
OU
a
It
of
the
a
for
Disturbance at Odessa .—A fight took place at
Odessa, on the morning of the election, between
the whites and blacks. We do not know that we
can give a correct version of it, but the following
statement of the affair is as near correct
information will make it. A non-resident black
man presented himself at the polls to vote, three
times, but was as often turned away. Present
ing himself again, his persistance occasioned
some excitement and remonstrance, on the part
of the Democrats, when the crowd of whites und
blacks grew so dense ns to obstruct free access to
the polls. Just then a colored man, named John
Williams, who lives in a house belonging to Mr.
John P. Cochran, stepped up on the hotel porch
with a club in his hand lifted in a threatening
position. Mr. Cochran observing him, said
" John, what are you going to do with thatclub?
Give it to me," taking dolil of his arm and press
ing him back to keep him from going In umong
the crowd of excited white men. There had
been no fighting up to this time, but a blnck man
just then rushwl upon Mr. Cochran and gave him
a blow with a stick upon the side of the head
that felled him to the ground. A rush was then
mado upon the negroes by the Democrats, and
sticks and stones were vigorously used on both
sides. The fight did not take place at the place
ot voting, but in the street nearly opposite, and
lasted for four or five inimité». Two p stol shots
were heard, hut by whom fired is not positively
known. A colored man living with Win. Green,
hsq. who was not in the fight, received a pistol
ball in the leg. and five or six persons, white and
black, emerged from the conflict with contused
heads and quite bloody. One stalwart young
white man snatched a cudgel from the hands of
a negro, and dashed into the thickest of the fray,
lie received two severe blows upon the bead, one
from a stick and another from a stone,and although
literally covered with gore, he felled the negroes
right and left and fought right through the
crowd, while five or six negroes were attacking
him at the same time. From fifty to a hundred
seemed to be engaged in the fight, the negroes
being so hard pressed that they finally gave way
and retreated up the street, although they ex
horted each other to "stand .vour ground,"
"don't run," and like rallying crys. The first
blow was struck by a negro,
by Persons in the midst of the crowd. And the
fight originated from the attempt of a negro man
to vote when he had no residence, the negro be
ing urged to do 80 by a white man. There was
no interruption of the voting, for ballots were de
posited while the battle was going
progress of the fight a negro man leveled a pis
tol at a white raon, and another made a cut at
as our
the
ley
•re informed
W.
bet
to
do
. Iu the
his neck from behind, but fortunately was not
quite near enough to reach his intended victim.
The next iu9tant the knife of the white
the flesh of the negro. Fortunately, howeveT,
•as fatally injured, although the contest
raged with the most determined fury. The dis
turbance was soon over and order and quiet re
stored which continued throughout the day.
The fight occurred between 10 and 11 o'clock.
Disturbances also took place at Smyrna and in
two wards in Wilmington.
love
J.
of
List of letters remaining in the Postoffice at
Middletown, Del. November 1st, 1870 : Anna An
derson, Stephen Brister, Jeremiah Brister, John
W. Bright, Hannah Cummins, O. B. Crossmun,
William Cooper, George Conway, William Cal
hert, James C. Fallows, Paul Garforth, George
Hayward. Mr. Ilill, Jonallmn Harman, J. M.
Horning, S. M. Hatch, Elizabeth Murry, Elias
Miller, James Pennington, Alfred Price, Joseph
Singer, John II. Thomas, Philip Viniard, George
W. Wood. Persons calling for th* above letters
will please say they arc advertised.
The Smyrna Times says : Tt is reported that
Jam.Ca r isk, the New York railroad jobber, is in
terested in the construction of the Vineland rail
road, and consequently tho Bombuhook road,
with which it is to connect. It is also reported
that Fisk and the P. W. k B. R. R. Company
looking to the purchase of the Md. k Del. road,
the former to connect it with his scheme, the lat
ter to prevent it from being connected with bis
scheme, while the Md. k Del. Company declare
that their road is not for sale.
Fish for the Delaware. —Two large tanks
containing some 800 black bass, arrived via the
Belvidere and Delaware Railroad at Philipsburg,
Bucks county, one day last week, and the fish
were at once transferred to the waters of the Del
aware. The railroad company very generously
transported them free of charge, as their dona
tion towards stocking the Delaware with these
luscious specimens of the finny tribe.
far
in
Fire ix Elkton. —The bridge that ßpnnned the
Elk River at the foot of Bridge street, in Elkton,
was entirely destroyed by fire on Tuesday morn
ing last. À schooner that wr
also badly damaged, having all the rigging burnt
off, and the mast so injured that it will have to
• one. Some suppose it
inceudiary. while others think it
lying
lie replaced by
the work of hi
was set on fire by seme one lighting a pipo
gar.
d
Look out
tooric display
vernber. They have made their appearance pune
pubt, and
to-morrow night,
s them. The best time for
midnight and day, if the
light of the moon should not interfere.
Side-Walks. —Bricks were hauled to several
ths ago, for the purpose
tuk Meteors. —The
•curs
nunl
about the 13th of No
tually on the 13th, for several ye
may he witnessed to-night,
by those anxious to
observation is between
places in town, some
of laying pavements, but they still remain piled
up. We would remind the parties that winter
will he upon us, freezing anil thawing will com
mence and it will be too late. Pavements arc
rinter than summer, and
•eded i
hope they will be laid ere long.
Several gold fish have recently been caught in
Appoquinimink Creek. Mr. McrittN. Willitts
caught one, in a seine, on Saturday last, which
weighed a pound and a half. These fish arc r;
waters. Indeed, we have never heard of
their being caught here until lately. They art
said to be plenty in the Schuylkill.
Odessa Tauleaux. — Th» Tableaux, announced
in our last issue, to come off iu Odessa,on Thurs
day and Friday evenings next, the 17th and 18th,
will be held in the Presbyterian Church, instead
of the Hotel parlors. The Odessa Orchestra w ill
be present and assist iu the entertainment. The
proceeds will he applied for the benefit of the
Sunday school library.
Incendiarism. —The stables nnd carriage-house
of Hon. George V'iekers, at Chestertown, Md.
set ou fire on Tuesday night last, and entirely
consumed, together with a horse, wagon and
dearborn. This was the work of some malicious
person or persons who should be ferretted out
and brought to justice.
Elkton is to have a courso of five lectures, to
be delivered at intervals of two weeks, commenc
ing about the middle of December,
pineott ( Grace Greenwood,) George Vnndenhoff,
Dr. A. A. Willits, and "Josh Billings" have
been named as lecturers.
in
Mrs. Lip
. L. Bucke has put up a handsome
fence in front of his reside
One improvement begets another, it i
we would not he surprised to see substantial iron
fences substituted iu many places for wooden
oues.
Mr. W
in Middletown,
id, und
Mndigan k Co's. Circus patsed through this
town on Sunday last, cn route for Philadelphia.
The show was poorly attended at all places on
the peninsula, and we understand that it
under the Sheriffs hand iu two places.
Laving Bricks by Moonlight.—O ne of the ma
sons engaged upon the Bank, worked awAy by
the light of the moon, on Monday night last, the
moon being about full, and the evening bright
and pleasant.
Same twd
at Seaford. The parsonage of the M. E. Church
is nearing completion, and when finished will be
a respectable addition to the town.
A special communication of the M. W. Grand
Lodge of A. F. A. M. of the State of Delaware
will be livid in Wilmington, on Thursday, Dec.
1, at 10 o'clock, A. M.
The Preacher's Convention met at Smyrna on
Tuesday lust. The object of the convention is
" to consolidate, instruct and inspire Methodism
on the Peninsula."
Morning Star Lodge, No. 6, 1. O. of O. F. of
3myrna, will hold a festival in the Town Hall,
the 23d and 24th inst. for the beqpfit of their
widows and orphans.
fifteen buildings arc going up
of
be
We gather the following from the Wilmington
papers in regard to the riot 9 there on election
day :—The election was the occasion of
OU 8 outrages by the radicals. The negroes pa
raded the streets in large bodies, armed with re
volvers, razors, clubs, Ac. They passed from one
ward to another,for the purpose of creating a dis
turbance. The sixth ward poll was the scene of
a riot, shortly after noon, during which pistols,
clubs, razors and brick bats were brought into
requisition. The negroes came running to the
scene of disorder in l«rge numbers, from the di
rection of their headquarters, all well armed
and eager for the fray. The negroes drove the
whites from the polls. During the fight one ne
gro was shot in the head, a white man through
d several others slightly wounded.
It is said that from 60 to 70 shots were filed.
Tho second riot took place at the time the polls
closed, five o'clock.
The negroes came upon the ground in large
bodies, and commenced another attack, during
this fight there were several seriously wounded,
d one young man named Richard Pointer was
taken to his residence ou French street, seriously
wounded.
It is reported that-several were killed. It is
also reported that a policeman was seen to stand
upon the corner and lire four shots into the party
of whites.
The Sheriff was attacked by a desperate negro
with a bayonet, the officers and all others who
were in assistance with the Sheriff were also at
tacked and badly injured.
The crowd of negroes paraded about the ward
yelling and shouting desperately.
Howard Day, (negro,Jharrangued tho infuriated
mass, and when requested by the Sheriff to in
duce the murderous crowd to disperse, he an
swered that he would try to do so,but he thought
the Sheriff should take the white man also.
The Sheriff was cut through the clothing with
a razor, in the hands of a desperate negro, and
for a few moments his life was in immenont
peril.
During the riot at the Sixth ward, the blood
thirsty negroes rushed into the residences and
beat up the white men. One man named Zeb
badly beaten.
The Deputy Marshals carried their badges in
their pockets and with their hands full of tickets
were electioneering around the polls.
.*eral of the wards it is said the Police
were very busy during the day electioneering.
in
this
ico
a
pect
fair
zens
all
ride
the
the
Prof. Win.
ley w
A Novel Bet. — Thomas Coehrnn und George
W. Ingram, Esqrs. of this town, made a novel
bet on the late election in this county, the loser
to wheel the winner in a wheelbarrow from tlie
office of George W. Ingram k Co. down Main
street to the depot and back, with a forfeit of ten
dollars in the
that the Republicans would carry New Castle
county by 160 majority, Mr. Ingram betting that
they would and Mr. Cochran that they would
not, and ns the county was carried by the Dem
losesnnd consequently has to
do the wheeling. The affair is to come oft' on
Saturday afternoon next, the 19th inst. at 3
The Townsend Brass Band will be
of
The
bad
of
f a
pset. The bet w
crats. Mr. I
present on the
Sale of a II
sold her house on Main street, now occupied by
J. R. Hall, to G. W. W. Namlain, for $4,000.
Monday
rery member bp present.
The Bank of Smyrna has declared a
of six per cent, for the last six months.
—Mrs. Lvdi
Rothwell lias
The Middletown Lyceum will meet
evening next. Let
tho
Tho
will
on
nnd
age
a
in
of
dividend
THE WAR NEWS.
By data furnished by an America^ cor
respondent at Versailles, it would appear
that the military status of the French is
far from hopeless, whilo tho situation of
the Prussians is not a surety for the suc
cess of their demands. According to this
exhibit, Paris, in the first place is im
pregnable, and is fully supplied with two
months' provisions, while Gen. Trochu
has 250,000 men fit for offensive service
in the field. Then, outside of Paris, there
are the armies of the Loire, 120,000
strong, under Palladia ; of tho west 109.
000 strong, uuder Keratry ; of the Rhone,
110.000 strong, under Michel; of contrat
Franco, 90.000, under Triphant ; of the
north, 65,000, under Bourbaki ; and of
the Vosges, 45,000, making a total of
530.000 men, all well armed, and fully
supplied with everything needful, to say
nothing of the numerous bands of Franc
tirours and sharpshooters operating in an
independent fashion. On the other hand,
tne Prussian» whoHro besieging Paris
charged with a large daily sick list; their
recruiting power is said to bo at a halt,
their last recruits being nearly'all boys un
der 19 years of ago. In spite of these
and other disadvantpges, however, the
Prussian armies continue to act vigorously
in the interior, but if the foregoing figures
are not merely an idle boast, it will be
simply wonderful if the French have not
the better bargain before the last of De
cember.
There is no further intelligence con
cerning the " general engagement near
Orleans" reported form Tours Wednesday.
A» it is not mentioned in the dispatches
from either side, it is possible that the re
port originated from the minor engage
ment which took place on Monday, in
which the Prussians were repulsed.
It reported that the French corvette
Desaix has captured seven German vessels
since the 4th of October. The Hamburg
Korsen-halle ( nespapet) says that nine
French vesitla are iu tight west of Heli
goland.
Important events are reported from Or
leans. The Prussians, after a series of
engagements with the French army of the
Loire, havo been forced to eveauate that
city, and bave fallen back ten miles.
The French losses arc said to have been
very heavy. Brilliant sorties have lately
been made from Paris, resulting in the
capture of several Prussian camps.
Chinese in San Francisco. —It appears
from the census, says the Sau FraucUoo
Bulletin, that there aro 11,817 Chinese in
San Francisco, of whom 2,040 are females,
mostly of the lowest class, 1,148 aro under
fifteen years of age, and 320 were born in
California. They own but little property,
the returns showing only $74,800 of real
estate and $1,188,080 of personal prop
erty ; altogether only $1,262,880. This
would be less than $110 for each individ
ual, while the remaiuder of tho city's val
uation, $258,793,035, divided between
tho remainder of the population, 138,544,
would give an average of nearly $1,900 to
each person. The houses the Chinese
eupy are nearly all rented from
people, and the small wealth is loss evenly
divided than among ourselves ; and yet
their wants aro so simple that they preseut
fewer examples of pauperism. Probably
the greater part of the money they
goes to China, whither they all expect to
return, and thus they seeip to be poorer
tliau they really are.
a iv
to
on
by
the
be
on
is
of
oc
our own
up
West Virginia Election. —This State
for the first time during its existence elects
a democratic governor, auditor, treasurer,
secretary of state, &o. also a majority to
each house of the Legislature, which will
give the ballot to twenty-five thousand dis
franchised white men, and elect a United
States Senator this winter. 1
ITEMS OF SEWS.
While great events literally hang fire in
France, the long-neglected heatres of po
litical and volcanic eruptions in Mexico,
Central aud South America are advertised
in the dispatches as especially attractive at
this time. There have been «0 many rev
olutions down that way that it was impos
sible to keep the run of them, and so the
destinies of tuercuriul nations in uud be
yond the tropics havo generally become
matters of indifference to the rest of the
world. But now, with "one terrible rev
olution, and several not so terrible, or at
least not so announced, going on in Mex
ico ; another in Uruguay, where ono is
presented with the spectacle of a national
army going over to the rebels ; another on
a small scale in Venezuela, aud the pros
pect of complications iu one way or another
with foreign governments, tho southern
quarter of the western hemisphere is in a
fair way to recover its interest in the
public eye.
Among the devices which the Prussians
have introduced into the art of war, a
very singular one is their habit of securing
safety for their railroad supply trains, iu
hostile 'regions, by tying prominent citi
zens in front of the locomotive. Several
weeks ago we were told that " in nearly
all the departments now held by the Prus
sians, influential citizens are compelled to
ride upon the locomotives. The Prus
sians have adopted this course, which,
they say, is the only way to prevent the
tearing up of track by French noncombat
ants. " And now a Tours telegram in
forms us that "the Prussians continue to
force the most eminent citizens living on
railway lines to ride upon the locomotives,
the object being to prevent accident to the
trains."
Our Texas exchanges bring us frightful
accounts of destruction of property and
crop», both of corn and cotton, by the
overflow of rivers from the heavy rains re
Thq flood i
ccntly in that State.
in many
of the streams is represented to exceed in
destructiveness that of the spring of 1869.
The floods have extended to the entire
territory of middle and Western Texas.
Many fields of cotton on the bottoms, that
bad not been touched for want of sufficient
picking force, were totally destroyed.
Great gloom and despondency prevail
mong the people, many of whom, in their
eagerness to gather cotton to tho neglect
of their corn, have lost their entire corn
n
crops.
A despath from New Oilcans dated No
vember 9, says :—It is stated that three
hundred persons, supposed to be couuting
tho votes of the city, receive $8 per day.
Tho "Times" says the reason why the
election returns are not counted with
prompitude, is simply $8 per day, and nn
interest in the issue. The ofticial returns
will be in about Christmas. As these
ballot boxes are in charge principally of
Republican officials, no fears are enter
tained of the delay reducing their majority.
In Cuba the Spanish and Cubans still
continue fighting with varying success.
Skirmishes take plrce every Monday in the
insurgent districts, with considerable loss
on both sides ; the contest is as protracted
nnd obstinate as that between this country
and sominolos, with the advantage of cour
age and intelligence on the side of the pa
triots. Of 56,000 regulars the Spaniards
havo not 14,000 left, so great have been
their losses. There havo been two politi
cxecutions.
A largo number of prominent business
and professional men of New Haven, Conn,
including the Yale professors, have signed
a letter endorsing Secretary Cox for his
action in retiring from the cabinet, con
demning tbo assessment of officeholder» for
party purposes, and urging reform in the
manner of appointment and tenure of office
in the civil service.
The proprietor of a vineyard near Terre
Haute, Indiana, has made 10.200 gallons
of wine this season, and sent four tons of
grapes to market.
The hurricanes which recently visited
Cuba have destroyed one-quarter of the
whole sugar crop. Fruit was also seri
ously damaged.
to
The Latest Bond Robbery. —The de
tectives at the Central office last night
ported that a bold bond robbery bad oc
curred at the St. Nicholas hotel
the statements made by them, and from
such as could bo elicited from the
re
F rom
proprie
tors ot the St. Nicholas, the following ap
pear to be the facts: Mr. J. F. Joy, whose
arrival at the St. Nicholas was noticed in
the Herald of Sunday morning, and who
came to this city on business connected
with the railways of which he is president,
went to a down-town bank, yesterday,
where he was engaged for soino time in
the transaction of certain financial
tiens connected with the roads ho
opera
repre
sents. He then roturned to the hotel and
repaired to his room, where he remained
for a short time, and afterward took
nage to visit some friends. A few moments
after he left a well dressed man appeared
in the hull, near Mr. Joy's room, and
requested the chambermaid to open the
door and admit him, as bis friend,Mr. Joy.
had left a package for him. She innocent
ly did as he desired and lie soon camo out
with a small bundle, and, thanking her.
left. b
car
On Lis return Mr. Joy discovered that
$50,000 worth of bond» which he had
carelessly left on a table had disappeared,
and be immediately repaired to the police
headquarters nnd notified the detectives.
4 ho bonds uf $1,000 each were of the
Chicago and Iowa railroad, state of Illi
nois, and endorsed, "Farmers' Loan and
Trust Compauy" of New York. They
issued from tho road of whrch Mr. Joy i
president, and are the only ones which
can be thrown upon the market at the
present moment, and would, of course, be
cosily deteotod iu consequence. Aside from
this, the bonds are registered, and the
loser being the signer of them they will
not he paid without great sorutiny (if at
all, under the circumstances) into the
manner in which they have been passed
from hand to hand since tho theft.
It is supposed the thief had been notch
ing Mr. Joy since his arrival in the city,
and that he followed him from the hank
to the hotel, and, on witnessing his depar
ture, adoptd the bold and successful, hut
unprofitable, ruBe for robbery.— New York
Herald, November 8,
I
to
PLOWDEN'S SEEDLING PEACH.
I ran with confidence now offer a few Trees of
the above named Peach—having tested it for
the past two bearing seasons, maturing its fruit
on the 26th of June of both seasons suitable for
market, twenty days earlier than Ilule's in tho
same orchard. Having purchased the buds of
the original'tree of Col. Plowden/at a large cost,
expressly for my own planting, never intending
the sale of any of the trees, ( not being at all in
the business,) I have consented to part with a
few of them, which will be budded from, for sale.
I have concluded, for an early distribution of
this early variety, to offer for sale, four hundred
of the six hundred budded last year. Thu tree»
are ft
dit ion.
Orders will bo strictly filled in rotation, as re
ceived , with the best grown trees, ( as the sea
son will permit.)
Te.ruiM Cash.-Price per Tree*
which will be carefully packed and delivered in
Washington City, and freighted as per order,
J. B. CLAGETT,
healthy con -
two to six feet, und are i
ithout extra charge.
Brightwood P. O. District of Columbia.
REFERENCES.
We were shown a few days since very remark
able specimens of Early Peaches—"Plowden's
Seedling." The fruit is solid, beautifully form
ed, and delicately colored ; one of them measur
ed fully eight inches in circumference. They
seem to be of a variety never before known. They
were picked on the S 6 th of June. Specimens of
the fruit have been sent to the Agricultural De
partment, and are much admired by Commission
er Capron. — Sunday Gazette, Washington City,
July 4, 1869.
[ From lion. Ethan Allen, N. F - .]
Office U. S. Dist. Attorney, June 28, 1869.
Mr. J. B. Clauett :—Your present of fine
Peaches have arrived in good condition, and are
delicious. 1
formed they
considerably ahead of time, considering your lat
itude
Broadway and was in
just from Florida ; so you are
some
[ From lion. Frederick Stone, JfdL^
Col. Plowdin : July ft, 1I8WÎ
Your sample of Peaches arrived safety yester
day. I have no doubt myself as to it» being a
new variety.
[From I/on. D. G.Harris and Hon. G.F.Maddox.~\
We thank you for the present of the beautiful
Peaches sent on the 4th of July. We received*
from you some specimens last year, which ap
pears to be entirely different from any Peaches*
have yet
If our peach growers could secure some of Col.
Plowden's variety, which matures fourteen days
in advance of Hale's Early, it would make quite
a difference in their accuuts, as the earliest peach
command the highest prices.— Middletown
( Del.) Transcript, July 22 d, 18C9.
Ripe Phaciiib.—M r. J. B. Clagctt exhibited to
day some very fine samples of the New Seedling
Peach, which attracted so considerable attention)
last year. They are of medium size, beautiful in
appearance, und delicious in taste. But the great
feature is the fact that they ripen about twenty
days earlier than any other Peach ever known in
this vicinity.— Eeveniny Star, Washington City,.
June 27/A, 1870.
[I'otomac Fruit Growers' Association, July 6 , '70}>
Mr. J. B. Clagctt exhibited some specimens of
" Plowden's Seedling Peach." The Committee
Fruit report on the Plowdcn Peach, thus :—
" A free-stone, and very firm, delicious, an~d rich..
It ripened 011 the 26th of June, lust year and
this, thus fixing it us un early bearer."
Nov. 12—31*
of
THE LATEST
NEWS ! !
A REAL LIVING CASH STORE l
IN
MIDDLETOWN,
■yynERE YOU CAN FIND A FULL LINE
DRY GOODS,
HAT3, CAPS,
BOOTS, SHOES,
LADIES' CLOAKS, COATS & FUTES,
SINGLE AND DOUBLE SHAWLS,
WHITE AND C0L0EED
BLANKETS! !
COVERLETS, LAP ROBES, Horse Blanket»,
HARDWARE, CEDERWARE,
QUEEN 8W ARE,
GROCER.ES, &c. &c. &c.
These goods are all bought from first hand»
for Cash and will be sold at prices low
ï goods can he sold by
than
y store doing
other than a net cash business. Thankful for the
liberal patronage bestowed on us since we open*
call your attention to the stock now
opening, still lower than ever, at the cash stör».
J. F. ELIASON k CO.
Lockwood Corner.
the
ed, we
Nov 12—3mos
nOIERSlUENT HARNESS
YT at AUCTION ! !
Will be sold at Public Sale, in the Hotel Yard of
Curtis Lippencott, at Middletown,
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER DOtli, 1870,
At 10 o'clock, A.JII^
25 Pairs of Ambulance Harness,.
25 Pairs of Wheel aud Lead Harness*
100 Pairs of Dotublo A Single Driving Lines^.
50 bead halters, 2 riding bridles; also
Government blankets,
McClellan saddles,
50 artillery traces 12 feet long,
and other articles uot herein enumerated.
in
in
Farmers and persons in need of Harness should
make it a point to attend this sale, as this may
be the last sale of Government Harness.
All this harness is iu first rate order and ready
for immediate use, without any expense of repar
ing.
Sale positive and without reserve,
cash, as :
Goods ope
Terms
soon us the property is struck off.
ii for inspection early on morning
of sale, and no postponement on account of
weather.
J. S. TOPIIAM k CO. Washington. D. C.
L. W. Stidham k Son, Auctioneers and Real
Estate Agents, 111 East 4th st. Wil. Del.
nov 12—ts
i
be
at
| t.ViTII S C. <• Ill ltll,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
617 Market Street, Wilmington, Delaware.
nov 12—3m
ESTRAY,
S TRAYED from the undersigned on Wedne»>
day, the 26th nit. a small DARK RED
COW, with a White Stripe across her hack and
a White Forehead. A suitable reward will be
given for her return. JOHN G. SCHAICH,
Middletown, Del^
F OR SALE.—Two pairs of Mules.
Apply to E. R. COCHRAN,
Nov. 8—lm Middiotowo, D«l.
NORWAY OATS
FOR SALE.
TN Quantities to suit purchasers.
E. R. COCHRAN,
Middletown, Del.
Counter Tor Sale,
E. T. EVANS,
Middletown, Off.
nov S—4 mus.
CIRE OF
nov B—lm]

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