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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, January 01, 1876, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1876-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1876.
VOL. IX.
=
MIDDLETOWN
GLOTHING HOUSE ! !
THE ONLY ONE IN TOWN.
The undersigned respectfully calls the at
tention of the citiiens of Middletowa and the
surrounding country, to the fact that they
have recently opened a
Firet-claw Clothing House,
And are prepared to sell at city prices.
We have whole suits.
Overcoat*.
Kersey Mils...—.
Kersey Punts_
6.00
7.00
1.76
'Also, a large stock of
BOTS' CLOTHING
on band. Besides ether Clothing at Low
Prices. We else make
SUITS TO ORDER
and guarantee a good fit. Give ns a call at
the old stand, Lockwood's Corner, before yon
go elsewhere.
S. B. ESTES & GO.,
Middletown, Del.
LUMBER AND HARDWARE.
J. B. FENIMORE & OO
Opposite the Depot,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE,
DBAUBBS W ALL KINDS OF
Lumber and Hardware,
BRICKS, LIME, hub, sash, DOORS, BLINDS
MOULDINGS, PAINTS, OILS,
GLASS, ETC. ETC.
Constantly on hand all kinds of
Building Material.
Janu*rjl6—tf
Janu*rjl6—tf
—--------
The Middletown Boot, Shoe
and Hat Store.
JL cjlrjd.
4 thorough knowledge
specie! line of business, gained
by cloee study of its details, ex
tended and
tbrongb all the principal manu
tnring districts of the conntry
and in almost daily contact with
leading mannfactnrers tbem
selvee, enables ns to offer to this
community a line of Goods that
for variety, style, quality,
prices, cannot be nrpaeaed.
Geode sold trom onr stores in
SMYBNA & MILFORD
bave gained a
St. Georges, in New Castle, to
Frankford, in Sussex.
Onr way of doing business
and system of repairing onr
goods, insures onr customers
against aay risk ia baying of os.
A little time will convince an
enterprising public of the advan
tages to be gained. Call.
Reepectfnlly,
E. M. à W. T. JOHNSON.
of onr
uent travels
and
ntation from
SIOEIS IN
Middletown tnd Smyroi.
nave tf
J. MELEE <fc BEO
MERCHANT TAILORS,
•f
S. K. Goa, Ssooed and Arch Sts.,
PHILADELPHIA,
Have ia Stock a foil line of
Of tbe newest designs for FALL and WIN
TER wear, which will be made to order in
tbe latest styles and best manner. Special at
tention given to Dress Suits.
^L^ND.RXAMINl
OUR STOCK.
SIEHE HEBE ! !
At Anderaon's Drug Store,
(BARR'S OLD STAND),
eau jet XX SWISS LINIMENT, a tare
for Frosted Feet, Lame Back, Rhenma
Yoa
care
tism, Bonions, Neuralgia, Pains in the Head,
8ide or Joints, Sore throat, Ac. Use it add
saflhr no longer.
IT ACTS LIKE MAGIC.
Taken Inwardly it cares Diarrhoea, Dysen
tery, Cholera Morbus, cramps, Ac.
All we ask for it is a fair trial. Sold only
by ANDKSON, who keep« all the Patent
Medicines a! tbe day.
Sep 18—ly.
M. E. DICKSON,
No. 35} SOUTH EIGHTH STREET,
PHILADBUPHIA,
DIALER IE
WATCHES AND JEWELRY,
SOLID STERLING
Silver and Plated Ware
Suitable for Holiday Presents.
N. B.—Fine s e l ection of It Kt. Wedding
Rings on Hand.
Gold, Silver and Steel Spectacle* to suit
•U •*•»- Dec. 10-rtf
THOMAS MASSET, JR.
£l
CLOCK AND WATCH MAKER,
Ueta UsiH , asxt ieerts Setleeel Hotel
middletawE, Delaware
*? bm :?ï arT ' * e ' n * aj
,ys on hand and for tele, Clocks,
s. Plated Ware, Forks. Simons. Sil
ts Rings. Sil
Wa
Tec N
Salt,
Gold
ver
Sogar aid Tea SjstMU, Batter Knives,
Breast-Pins, Ear-Rings, Finger-Rings, Sleeve
Battons, Watch Chains, Watch Keys, Key
Rings, Stas$ Watch Chaias, Ac.
AGENT YOB
De TINNY'S SPECTACLES.
Dac. is— tf.
=
1876. $1,200 1876.
IN PREMIUMS
TO BE GIVEN FOR NOVELETTES
BALTUIOlHi ^WEEKLY H3UNr
_
! !
—FOB THI
■ age, the
ly Sun of
Oa three occasions, several
proprietors of The Baltimore
fered prizes amounting, respectively, first to
$300, second $400 and third $500 for a stat
ed number of Peize Stories, to be submitted
in competition, the merits of which were de
cided by a critical committee, and the several
prizes awarded accordingly. These proposi
tions resulted in some very excellent addi
tions to literary fiction, which were received
with avidity by the many thousand appre
ciative readers of The Weekly Sun, and which
were extensively copied by the press through
out the country.
The proprietors now propose a similar mea
sure, but on a mach larger scale. They offer
six prizes, amonnting to
TWELVE HUNDRED DOLLARS
at
the
they
6.00
7.00
1.76
for the best six original stories, on condition,
stated below, to be furnished on or before
March 1.1876. The prizes will be distributed
as follows :
PRIZES.
$500
For the best story,
For the second, -
For the third, -
For the fourth, -
For the fifth, -
For the sixth
275
at
200
100
75
50
CONDITIONS.
The following conditions most be observed
by competitors, and we request their careful
observance by all who enter this literary tour
nament.
1. All the stories are to be American in
their scenes, subjects and character, in whole
or in part ; that is to say, the basis of the
story must be American, but this condition
does not preclude such incidental diversion
from American scenes, subjects and character
as may be necessary to interesting develop
ment of the story.
2. The stories mnst not contain sentiments
of a political, sectarian or sectional, nature, it
being especially required that allusions to the
late sectional war be avoided ; and they must
be of such a tone as befits the character of
such an extensively circulated Family Journal
as is The Baltimore Weekly Sun.
3. Ail the stories received in competition
for the prizes will become the property of the
proprietors of The Baltimore Weekly Sun after
an award of the prises has been made—this
condition including all the unsuccessful as
well as tbe six successful stones.
4. That the award may be made solely
upon the merits of tbe contributions, and in
dependent of all the influence connected with
name and position, tbe writer most withhold
bis or her name from tbe story itself, and en
close it, with tbe title of tbe story, in a sealed
note addressed to tbe pnblishers, either by
mail or inclosed in tbe MS.
5. The MS. stories, marked "prizestory,"
to be addressed to A. S. Abell A Co., publish
ers Baltimore Weekly Sun, Baltimore, Md.,
who will hand them over to the Committee of
Decision and -withhold the name of the antbor
until the award is made.
6. AH tbe stories to be submitted to a.Com
m it tee of Decision-selected by the proprietors
of The Baltimore Weekly Sun, with a view to
their literary experience, taste/ind judgment,
whose award shall be final.
7. The MS. to be on good paper—not thin
paper—and on one side of it only.
8. All the packages and lettars to be pre
paid in full, or they will ndt be taken from
the postoffice.
Tbe above offer of 'prizes is made to the
whole people—to those who bave already won
a name in literary annals and to those who
bave not. We have merely to add that im
mediately after the committee announce their
decision the money will be paid to the suc
cessful competitors, and the publication of tbe
stories commenced immediately.
The opportun! y is one which talent may
make available for great popularity, not onl
through thé immense circnlation of the Ball
Weekly Sun
throngbont all the States, from the Atlantic
to the Pacific coast—bnt the publicity thus
given to the name and talents of good writers
will be further diffused through the influence
of tbe liberal and impartial press of tbe coun
try with whom we ezchange. In this respect
onr offer addresses itself most favorably to aU
the writers of tbo whole country.
in
in
on
itself—which is distributed
more
of
A, I.ABELL * CO., FNMbtew,
Shu Iron Building, Baltimore, Md.
Baltimore, Dec. 11, 1875.
OLD BANK No. 2,
Middletown Hull Bnlldlng,
Store formerly Occupied by
Hanson & Bro.,
At the
OUK DOOR RAST OP POUT OFPICR.
The Ice cream season being over we have
refitted the place and are now ready to serve
onr customers, both ladies and gentlemen with
IN EVERY STYLE.
Families will be supplied at all times. Oys
ters furnished for parties upon short notice ;
fact, onr Oyster Départi
We shall, as usual, keep
rtment is complete,
on hand all kinds
in
of
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC FRUITS
DRIED FRUITS OF ALL KINDS,
Snch as Raisios, Currants, Citron, Prunes,
Lemon and Orange Peel.
large quantities ok
CONFECTIONERY
OP EVERY VARIETY.
Parties supplied with CAKE of every descrip
tion. Tbe
TOY DEPARTMENT
will be under the direction of Mrs. Rice, who
will keep everything in that line that is usual
ly kept in a toy and fancy store. That brancb
of the business belonging entirely to her she
solicits yonr support and patronage.
Don't purchase your Christmas goods nntil
yon have first called and seen onr pretty
things. Onr Christmas stock will be open
for inspection on or abont the 10th of Decem
E. B. RICE & CO.
N. B.—Cash paid for Poultry all the time.
her.
MIDDLETOWN
Nursery and Fruit Farm.
A Urge and varied assortment of
General Nursery Stock
For Sale at low rates.
PEACH TREES A SPECIALTY.
S. B. COCHRAN.
Middletown, Del.
Oct.l7-tf
ELECTION NOTICE.
New Castle County National Bank of Odessa,
December 2d, 1875.
The Stockholder's meeting for the election
of nine Director» to serve this Bank for one
rear, will be held in the Banking-House on
WEDNESDAY, January 6th, 1876, between
the hours of 11 A.M. and 2 P. M.
Dee 4—te
J. L GIBSON Cashier.
1876.
cPiddldoujit girtdorg.
CORPORATION OFFICERS.
Tow« Commissioners. — E. W. Lockwood,
President ; J. R. Hall, Secretary ; L. P. Mc
Dowell, J. H. Walker, L. G. Vandegrift.
Assessor —C. E. Anderson.
Treasurer. —Joseph Hanson.
H3UNr C wsSm and Policema» —Vacant.
Lamplighter. — F. C. Schreitz.
the
of
first to
stat
submitted
de
several
proposi
addi
received
appre
which
through
mea
offer
NOTARY PUBLIC.
John A. Reynolds.
TRUSTEES OF THE ACADEMY.
Hon John P. Cochran, Pres. ; Henry Davis,
Trees. ; Samuel Penington, Secretary ; James
Randy, B. Gibbs, R. T. Cochran, N. Williams.
Principal of Academy. — T. S. Stevens.
OFFICERS OF CITIZENS' NAT'L
BANK.
Dibectobs. —Henry Clayton, B. Gibbs, B.
T. Biggs, John A. Reynolds, James Colbert
, E. C. Fenimore, M. E. Walker, J. B.
Cazier, Joseph Biggs.
Prisidkxt. —Henry Clayton,
Cashier. — J. R. Hall.
Teller. —John S. Crouch.
DIRECTORS OF TOWN HALL CO.
J. M. Cox, Pres.; Samuel Penington, 8ec.;
J. R. Hall, Treas.; R. A. Cochran, Jas. Cul
bertson, Jas. H. Scowdrick, Wm. H. Barr.
CHURCHES.
Forest Presbyterian. —Rev. John Patton,
D. D., Pastor. Divine service every Sunday
at 10.30 a. m. and 7.00 p. m. Sunday School
at 9 a. m. Lecture on Wednesdays at 7.30 p.
m. Sunday School in the Chapel at Arm
strong's every Sunday at 2.30 p. m.
Sr. Aeeb's Protestant Episcopal.— Rev.
Wm. C. Bn tier, Rector. Service on Sundays
at 10.30 a. m. and 3.30 p. m. Sunday School
at 2.30 p.m. Services ou Fridays at 3.30 p.m.
Methodist Episcopal, —Rev. L. C. Matlack,
D. D., Pastor. Service every Snndayat 10.00
a. m. and 7.00 p m. Sunday School at 9.30
a. m. and 2.30 p. m. Prayer Meeting on
Thursdays at 7.30 p. m.
Colored Methodist.— Rev. N. Morris
Pastor. Service every other Sunday at 10.30
p. m.; 3 and 8 p. m. Sunday School every
Sanday at 1 p.m.
son
before
275
200
100
75
50
careful
tour
in
whole
the
it
the
must
of
the
after
as
in
with
en
by
Md.,
of
to
thin
pre
the
im
suc
tbe
thus
aU
MASONIC.
Adoniram Chapter No. 5, R. A. M. Meets
Masonic Hall on the second and fourth Fri
days of every month at 8 o'clock, p m.
Union Lodge No. 5, A. F. A. M. Meets on
the first and third Tuesdays of every month
at 8 o'clock, p. m. Masonic Hall.
in
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS.
Damon Lodge, No. 12 Meet« ewj Friday
evening at 8 o'clock. Lodge room in tbe
Town Hall.
PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.
Peach Blossom Grange, No. 3. Meets every
Tuesday evening at 7 o'cloek. Grange Room
in the Knights of Pythias Hall.
I. O. 0. F.
Goon Samaritah Lodge, No 9. Meets every
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. Lodge Room
in Cochran Hall, No. 2, Cochran Square.
BUILDING AND LOAN.
Middletown B. A L. Association.— Samuel
Penington, Pres.; A. G. Cox, Secretary. Meets
on tbe first Thursday of every month at 8
o'clock, p. m.
Mutual Loan Association or Middletown.
—Jas. Jl. Scowdrick, Pres.; A. G. Cox, Sec
retary. Meets on the third Tuesday of every
month at 8 o'clock, p. m.
MIDDLETOWN LIBRARY AND
READING-ROOM.
E W. Lockwood, Pres.; J. T. Bndd, Sec'y ;
Rooms in Tbanscbipt Building. Reading
Room open every day nntil 10 o'clock, p m.
Library open on Wednesdays and Saturdays
from 3 o'clock to 5 p m:
AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.
Penies. Agricultural and Pomological As
sociation. —Wm. R. Cochran, President; J. T.
sociation. —Wm. R. Cochran, President; J. T.
Bndd, Secretary ; Wm. R. Cochran, Chairman
of Board of Managers. Annual Meeting third
Saturday in January.
Md.
DIAMOND STATE BRASS BAND.
Meets for practice every Monday evening at
o'clock.'
8
POST OFFICE.
Omca Houbs. —Opens at 6 30 am and
closes at 9 pjn every day except- Sanday
Mails for the North close at 7.30 a m, and
2.45 p m.
Mail for the Soath closes at 10 15 a m.
Mails for Odessa close at 10.23 a m and 7.30
by
p m.
Mails for Warwick, Sassafras and Cecilton
cleat at 10.23 a m.
DELAWARE RAILROAD.
Passenger trains going North leave at 7.46
a m and 3 01 p m. ; going Sontb at 10.33 a m
and 7.55 p m. Freight trains with passenger
car attached, going North, leave at 5-20p.m;
going Sooth, at 6.30 a m.
;
stage Lines.
Stage for Odessa, with U. S. Mail, leaves
shortly after arrival of the 10.43 am and 7.55
p m mail trains.
Stages for Warwick, Sassafras and Cecilton
leave shortly after arrival of the 10.43 a m
train.
FUBNITUBE.
UNDEBTAKING.
UPHOLSTEBING.
The undersigned respectfully announces to
the citizens of Middletown and vicinity that
he has cn hand a large and well selected
stock of handsome and durable
Walnut and Other Furniture
!
which be will sell very cheap for cash. Buy
ing at wholesale cash rates be feels assured
that he can sell as low as the same goods can
be bought elsewhere. By buying of him pur
chasers will be saved the freight on their
goods from the city.
He is also prepared to attend to
CndertaklRg Work
i
at short notice, and io a manner excelled
by none. Persons wishing Metallic or Wood
en Caskets or Cases will find it to their ad
vantage to call on him. He has, also,
TAT LOR A SOW'S
Celebrated Corpse Preset ve i ,
The Corpse may be dressed in the finest fab
rics and not be soiled, (and can be seen at all
times) as nothing bnt dry cold air enters the
Casket.
GEORGE W. WILSON,
Practical Cabinet Maker and Undertaker,
Middletowa Del.
Febl-12m
~ ^
JCXj Ö -A. 4—1 ±Li j
Or Exchange,
A VERT fine thorough-brad ALDERNEY
BULL CALF, tea weeks old.
Oct 30-tf
i
j
1
E. R. COCHRAN.
£ried |oi[trg.
*
H
NEW YEAR'S CALLS. •
Now, Bessie, you're my dearest friend,
My very best, you know,
And New Tear's Day without you, dear,
Would be just dull and slow ;
So, darling, please be sure to come ;
We'll both "receive" in style;
For holding forth, just me alone,
Would hardly be worth while,
Since everybody knows quite well
That I am "caught" at last,
A willing and a happy bird
By Will's dear hand held fast.
Who came last year ? Well, let me see :
Ob, it was grand 1 The air
Was keen and bright, alive with fight
And gladness everywhere.
At nine o'clock in walked my boy—
That's Will, yon know; and, Bess,
How perfectly absurd he was,
And nice, yon'd never guess.
Then others came, a stupid lot,
Just fops, some six or seven ;
And then a crowd of silly bovs—
But Will came in at eleven.
Well, Bess, such grand times as we had,
With whispering and chaffing I
No one was there, it chanced, but annt :
I thought we'd die with langhing.
When he was gone, a horrid bore
Nasaed Jones came in ; and then
I almost yawned : yon never saw
Such horrid, gawky men.
But just as Dr. Tyng's struck one,
Who should come in but Will?
'Twas perfectly ridiculous,
And looked quite queer, but still
'Twas such relief to bear bis voice,
And see his noble form
(If Will should go upon the stage,
He'd take the world by storm.)
He staid an honr, and all the while
They came by strings and strings,
And wished me "many happy years"—
The tedious, tiresome things !
And so it went—a glorious day
That New Year's was to me,
For you must know that foolish Wiil
Came in that night to tea,
And all the evening we two sat
And talked and laughed together,
Letting dear annty see the rest,
And hear abont the weather.
'Twas splendid, dear. And now, my lore,
Ton can't know how I'll grieve
If you don't come on New Tear's Day
And help me to receive.
help me to receive.
"Doit Well.»
"There!" said Harry, throwing down
tbe shoe brush ; "there ! that'll do. My
shoes don't look very bright. No mat
ter ; who cares ?
"Whatever is worth doing, is worth
doing well," replied a serious but pleas
ant voice.
Harry started and turned around to
see who spoke. It was his father.—
Harry blushed. His father said :
"Harry, my boy, your boots look
wretohed. Pick up your brush and
make them shine. When they look as
they should, come into the library.
"Yes, papa," replied Harry, pout
ing, and taking up the brush in no very
good humor, he brnshed the dull boots
until they shone nicely. Wheu they
were polished be west.to his father, who
said to him :
"My son, I want to teil you a short
story. I once knew a poor boy whose
mothèr taught.him tbe proverb, "What
ever is worth doing, is worth doing
The boy went to be a servant
in a gentleman's family. He took pains
to do everything well, no matter how
trivial it seemed. His employer was
pleased and took him into his shop.—
He did his work well there. When he
was sent on an errand, he went qnickly
and did his work faithfully. When he
was told to make out a bill or enter an
account, he did that well too. This
pleased his employer so that he ad
vanced him step by step, until he be
came a olerk, and then a partner. He
is now a rich man, and anxious that his
sou Harry should learn to practice the
rule which made him prosper
"Why, papa, were you a poor boy
once?" asked Harry.
"Yes, my sou ; so poor that I had to
go into service and black boots, wait at
table and do other little menial services
for a living. But doing those things
well I was soon put, as I have told you,
to do things more important. Obedi
ence to the proverb, with God's bless
ing, made me a rich man
Harry never forgot tbe conversation.
Whenever he felt like slighting a bit of
work he thought of it, and felt spurred
to bis task. ' 'Whatever is worth doing
is worth cheered
M
well.
If
»
is worth doing well," cheered him in
his daily duties.
Silencing Skepticism.— It is said of
Robert Hall, that when some amateur
skeptic asked him about the future of
man, he roughly answered, "I don't
know whether you hsve a .soul, but
know I have,
fool according to his folly, and no
doubt tended to make him less wise in
his own conoeit. But wherewith shall
we best reprove sud silence the skeptic
of this generation? There is one ar
gument which speaks in all laaguages,
is known and read of all men, and is
quite unanswerable—a godly life. So
i to live, that be that is of the oontrary
part may be ashamed, having no evil
thing to say of ns.
This was answering a
,
Deep learning will make you accept
j able to tbe learned, but it is only an
i easy and obliging behavior, and enter
j taining conversation, that will make you
Christmas Notes.
The general custom of decorating the
churohes and houses with evergreen
descended from the Drnida. They be
lieved that sylvan spirits would dwell
in the evergreen boughs and garlands
until spring and protect the house from
H evil spirits_
The Puritans of England forbade
the general. observance of Christmas,
and even to this day the Middle, West
ern and Southern States indulge in
more unrestrained festivities than the
dwellers in Yankeeland.
There are, sometimes, touches of
sadness hanging around Christmas,
well as those of joy. It is the grand
anniversary of the year, and the re
membrauce of friends beloved and dear,
who bave gone to the better land, come
to us then with renewed sharpness.
Nearly every country has its own
mode of celebrating Christmas. In
Italy, feasting and singing is the order
of the day, and, as the shades of night
fall upon their lovely towns, numbers
of musicians go forth to celebrate the
ono who has most merited their esteem
and approbation during the past year.
The first authoritative command to
keep Christmas time holy is attributed
to Clement, a collaborateur with St.
Paul, and mentioned by the latter in
the Epistle to the Philippians. Clement
says: "Brethren, keep diligently fast
days, and truly, in the first-place, the
day of Christ's birth.
Long before the birth of Christ the
last days of December were dedioated
to the "Feast of the Sol.
dinavians watched the declining sun
from June to December, and as soon as
the first shadow of its retrograde course
was noticed, they danced and sung, and
inaugurated a week of festivities and a
season of boisterous revelry.
It was an old English superstition
that at midnight on Christmas eve every
living creature of the animal kingdom
involuntarily bent the knee, and even
at this enlightened day the idea finds
many believers. It arose from the
mediaeval fancy that the ox and the ass
that were stabled in the manger at the
birth of Christ fell upon their knees be
fore the Holy Baby in adoration of His
as
»
The Scan
fore the Holy Baby in adoration of His
divinity.
Christmas coming just as winter has
commenced his icy reign, the inner
warmth, and glow, and comfort make a
deeper impression on the soul, moving
it to thankfulness and rejoicing; and
branches and wreaths of evergreen form
a more fitting decoration in honor of
.our Saviour's birth than all the wealth
of tropical flowers, whioh blossom only
to wither and perish in an hour.
Christmas is the joyful time for re
union and rest. All business and study
being suspended, the family mansion is
filled with youthful life and freshness ;
the blooming daughter home from
school, beaming with fun and fancy ;
the youth forgetting for a time the 80 -
count book and visions of future wealth
—all throwing care aside and consider
ing a Christmas kiss, under the mistle
toe, the highest of earthly delights.
In Germany, and the Protestant dis
tricts of Europe, Christmas is especially
the children's festival, and poor, in
deed, is the family, that cannot have a
tree with its load of ornaments and pre
sents on Christmas eve. After each
one has had a present from the tree,
the father takes aside the sons, and the
mother the daughters, and tells them
what has been observed good, and what
faulty, in their conduct. The firrt part
of this performance, has been intro
duced pretty generally, into this coun
try, and doubtless the latter part might
bring additional profit, if not pleasure,
to the children.
In all the civilized world there is no
spot so secluded, and, perhaps, no heart
so dark that the sound of Christmas
chimes fails to awaken in it a sense of
joy and exultation. Round and round
the earth rolls the grand sympathetic
melody, calling on rich and poor alike
to put aside for a day all disputes and
jealousies, and over and above all trou
ble and perplexity swells the sublime,
reiterated strain :
Peace and good will, good will and peace,
Peace and good will to all mankind.
Santa Claus (or Klaus) is the Dutch
name for St. Nicholas who was called
the patron saint of boys. He is said to
have been bishop of Myria, and to have
died about the year 326. One story
goes that St. Nicholas bestowed mar
riage portions upon three destitute
maidens, by secretly leaving money at
their windows, and his day, coming
juBt before Christmas, he was supposed
to be the bearer of all the gifts to tho
children in Flanders and Holland, who
began the oustom of putting out a shoe
or stocking, on Christmas eve, confi
dent that Santa Claus, would put in a
prize for good conduct. Another story
is, that this saint restored three mur
dered boys to life, and thus gained his
title of patron' saint of boys.
My
mat
worth
pleas
to
look
and
as
pout
very
boots
they
who
short
whose
doing
pains
how
was
he
he
an
This
ad
be
He
his
the
boy
to
at
you,
of
in
of
of
I
no
in
ar
is
So
evil
a
It took Sir Isaac Newton less than
three years to thoroughly digest the
an principles of gravitatioo, while an In
diana farmer has spent eleven years
j trying to find out why a cow never
i kicks until the pail is tw»thirds full.
ftrçtrg.
the
is
be
dwell
from
forbade
West
in
the
of
grand
re
dear,
come
own
In
order
night
the
year.
to
St.
in
fast
the
the
sun
as
and
a
REMEMBER THE POOR.
Now winter has come, with its cold, chilling
breath,
And the verdnre has dropt from the trees,
All nature seemed touched by the finger of
death,
And the streams are beginning to freeze;
When wanton young lads o'erThT fiver can
slide,
And Flora attends us no more—
When in plenty you sit by a good fireside,
Then you ought to remember the poor.
When the cold feathered snow shall in beanty
descend
And whiten the prospect aronnd,
When the keen cutting winds from the north
shall attend,
Hard chilling and freezing the ground—
When the hills and the dales are ail covered
with white,
And the rivers concealed to the shore ;
When the bright twinkling star shall proclaim
a cold night.
Then you ought to remember the poor.
When the poor harmless hare may be traced
to the wood
By her footsteps indented in snow ;
When the lips and the fingers are starting with
blood,
When the marksmen a cock-shooting go ;
When the poor robin redbreast approaches her
as
cot,
And the icicles hang at tbe door,
WheD your bowl smokes with something re
viving and hot,
Then you ought to remember tbe poor.
When a thaw shall ensue and tbe waters in
crease,
And the rivers all insolent grow,
When the fishes from prison obtain a release,
When in danger the travelers go ;
When the meadows are hid by the prond
swelling flood,
And tbe bridges are useful no more,
When in health you enjoy everything that is
good,
Sara yoH ought to remember tbe poor. .
Soon the day will be here when onr Savior
was born ;
All tongues shall unite as one voioe,
All nations shall join to sainte the blest morn,
AH tbe ends of the earth shall rejoice,
Grim death is deprived of his all-killing sting,
And the grave is triumphant no more ;
Saints, angels and men hallelujah shall sing,
And the rich shall remember the
finds
the
ass
the
be
His
has
a
and
of
re
is
;
;
-
in
a
no
of
And the rich shall remember the poor.
Waiting for Home.
I do not know a more beautiful sight
on earth than a man who has served his
Lord for many years, and who having
grown gray in services, feels that in
the order of nature he must soon be
oalled home. He is rejoioiug in the
first fruits of the Spirit whioh he has
obtained, but he is panting after the
full harvest of the Spirit which is guar
anteed to him. I think I see him sit
ting on a jutting crag by the edge of
Jordan, listening to the harpers on tbe
other side, and waiting till tbe pitcher
shall be broken at the fountain, and tbe
wheel at the cistern, and the spirit
shall depart to God who gave it. A
wife waiting for her hnsband's foot
steps, a child waiting in the darkness
of the night till its mother comes to
give it the evening kiss, are. portraits
of our waiting. It is a pleasant and a
precious thing to wait and so to hope.
A Disappointed Bridegroom Lies in
Bed Forty-nine Years. —An artist
fond of subjects for still life pictures
could find all he wanted in the ease of
William Sharpe, who, according to the
Doncaster Gazette, went to bed in 1807
and never got up till he died there, io
1856—a still life of forty-niua years,
passed in a chamber nine feet square,
the windows of which had not been
raised for thirty-eight years. When he
was thirty he went one fine morning to
oburoh to be married, but bis affianoed
came not, her father haring an invinci
ble repugnance to Mr. William Sharpe
as a son-in-law. The mortified bride
groom went home, undressed, got into
bed, pulled the blankets over his head
and for forty-uiue years obstinately re
fused lo get up and olothe himself, or
to do any work, passing the time unin
terruptedly iu bed. He was never
seriously ill during this time. His body
was perfectly sound, iu spite of his
great age and great abuse, and he was
to
at
a
great age and great abuse, and he was
only sick one week before his death.
Enoch Arden in Kansas —As he
entered the oabiu he found the old
woman and her new husband engaged
in the double-working, baok-acting, re
eiprocative performance of pulling each
other's hair. They reversed engines for
a moment as he entered. "Stranger,
said be, "she was my wife, bat I've
hearn tell as you've married her.
shall never introod on your domestic
bliss agen ; but I warns you right here,
bein' a man as don't like to see his
neighbor took in, that this is a game
whar you don't stand no show. Stranger,
she can draw to a bob-tail an' make
full hand ary time." Then be bowed,
lifting his hat from a bald bead, and
withdrew.
It will be a happy day for this ooun
try when people oan go to weddings
withont being expeoted to send a hand
some present in advanoe, and when a
man oan die without having^hia last
moments disturbed by the thought that
to bury him as fashion demands, will
impoverish the family he leaves behind
him.
Parisisu ladies are said to "look like
pencils covered with raiment."
lumoroua.
"Why, Alic e what is the matter,'Ll!
A Chattel.
She was sitting in a rooking-ehair,
and held a newspaper in her hand.—
From behind the handkerchief before
trees,
of
can
north
with
;
her
her eyes, there issued, every now and
then, a smothered sab.
ventured to enquire.
She did not answer at first, but pre
sently became calmer, and ventured to
tell me her trouble.
"You know Harry and I have been
to the city."
" Yes.
things were imagined.
"Well, wc stopped at the — House,
Before we were married, I had eyery
thing that I desired. If I do say it
myself, I never lacked for attention, and
really had come to the conclusion that
I was of some social importance. Now,
what am I? An object,—something
to be classed in with the lbs., and the
hhds., and the pigs.
Her tears began to flow afresh when
she handed me the paper, and I saw,
among the list of hotel arrivals, " Mr
Harry Brown and wf.
All sorts of improbable
>>
»
n
re
in
is
.
"Papa, I want a new Bunker Hill,
said a West-side girl yesterday morn
ing. "A new Bunker Hill I What
under the sun is that ?" ' 'Why, that's
the name of the latest fall style of bon
net." "It is; eh ! Why do they call
it that?" "Oh, I don't know, papa.
Well, what does it cost?" "Only
"Ob, I see now why they call
"Why, papa?"
" Because it's so high." "Ob, you
horrid, dear papa. There.
A clergyman, meeting a little boy of
his acquaintance, said, "This is quite
a stormy day, my sou ?" "Yes, sir,
answered the boy, "this is quite a wet
rain." The olergymau, thinking to re
buke such hyperbole, asked if he knew
of any other than a wet rain. "I never
knew personally of any other," returned
the boy, "but I have read in a certain
book of a time when it rained fire and
brimstone, and I guess that was not a
very wet rain.
tf
??
(t
$50.
it 'Bunker Hilf.

ft
tt
ft
very wet rain.
Thi rudeness of Dr. Parr to ladies
was sometimes extreme. To a lady who
had ventured to oppose him with more
warmth of temper than cogency of rea
soning, and who afterwards apologized
for herself by saying that it was the
privilege of women to talk nonsense.
"No, madam," he replfed, " it is not
their privilege, but their infirmity;
ducks would walk if they could; but
nature suffers them only to waddle I"
Tuet were husband and wife, abd
aa they stood before tbo Soldiers' Mon
ument she asked : "What's that figger
oq top ?" " That's a goddess," ha an
swered. "And what's a goddess?
" A woman who holds her tongas," he
replied. She looked sideways at him
and began planning to make a peach
pie withjhe pits in it for the benefit of
his sore tooth .—Detroit Free Prett.
A ladt called upon a milliner the
other day to get the character of her
servant. The respectable appearance
of the latter was beyond question.—
"But is she honest ?" asked tbe lady."
"I am not so certain about that," re
plied the milliner, "I hare sent her to
you a dozen times with my bill, and she
has never yet given me the money.
A new telescope in Paris brings the
moon within ten miles of the earth.
When it gets only eight miles off and*
we ean sling a hawser aboard, the mem
bers of the moonarchical government
shall have the "Herald" every morning
at earth rise.— N. Y. Herald
his
in
be
the
has
the
sit
of
tbe
tbe
A
to
a
ft
>>
in
of
the
io
he
to
or
ff
"Now," said •» citizen of Rawlins,
Wyoming Territory, at a recent dance,
"yon see that heifer in a red dress:
that's my wife ; an' ef yon dance with
her more'n two times, pard, I'll shute
the hull top uv yer head off. What'll
yer drink ?"
A little bo; in a Scotch school was
asked if he did not wish to be born
again. "Born again!" said Tommy;
"no, I wadna." "You wouldn't!"
cried the teacher sadly; " why not?
" For fear I'd be boru a lassie," said
Tommy.
he
old
re
for
I've
1
his
a
and
ft
??
It is sad to hear the Eastern Free
Press singing :
Oh t my love bas left the garden gate,
Sbs sits on tbe steps no more ;
And tbe old man swears if I go inside,
He'll boot me out at tbe door.
The Woman suffragists of New
Haven are wrestling with tbe question,
"Who is the superfluous woman?
Of course we can't tell, but we know a
number of family mon in town, eaeh of
whom thinks he has married her.
M
a
"Was the orowd tumultuous?" in
quired one man of another who had
just oome from a mass meeting. "Too
multuous," replied the oiher. " Oh,
no ; just about multuous enough to com
fortably fill the hall "
The New York papers tell about a
"drawback on sugar." That'* noth
| ing. There has been a fearful pull
; back on 'lasses all summer.
ftorirfi«.
It is a safe plan to watehr the man
close who suspecta everybody.
Men's judgments often mskaa blon
der, bat their conscience never does.
Wisdom is never dear, provided tbs
article be genuine.— Greeley.
The top of a wind ow shou ld never
be more than a foot below the oeiling.
True affection grows stronger as it
grows older.
Death has this also, that it openeth
the gate to good flame, and extinguishes
envy.— Bacon.
It is estimated that fifteen million
brooms are annually manufactured in
the United States.
To supply a man's necessities takes
but little, but to feed his dentes takes
an empire.
Why should Mans of Kellogg's opera
troupe be a good sailor ?—Because he's
at home on the high C's.
I never knew a lasy man yet but
thought he was the hardest working
man in all his neighborhood.
Assisting the curate to bang a
ohureh with greens is called theological
flirtation.
The Saltan of Turkey's harem has
twelve hundred inmates. And still he
isn't hsppy.
The first election of the Centennial
year will be that of New Hampshire,in
March.
Philadelphia wants a ehuroh in
which a man wearing old clothes will
feel at home.
"Laughter," says a philosopher, "is
one of the products of eivilisation.
How about "smiles."
The Mayor of New Tork receives
$12,000 per annum, while the Comp
troller receives $10,000.
Barbet, the celebrated French tenor,
has sung himself benind the ban of a
lunatic aaylnm.
The Great Eaetem is being refurn
ished at an expense of $100,000 for
centennial trips.
Truth itself shall loose its credit, if
delivered by a person that has
South.
The one strnsture that no neighbour
hood can afford to do without, is the
school-house.— Greeley.
There are few wild beasts mere to be
dreaded than a communicative
with nothing to communicate._ M. de
Boland.
to
it
I !
none.
Different ways of looking at it. M.
D. Con
**y* the Europeans paint
, and the Afrioaue take care
St
àïut him white.
The worst enemy of the poor men is
tbe demagogue who seeks to persuade
him thet the man of wealth is his en
emy.
The phrases that men are aceustom
ed to repeat inceasantly end by becom
ing convictions and ossify the organs of
intelligence.
"What men want" says Bulwer "ia
not talent, it is purpose. In other
words, not power to achieve, but the
will to labor.
A good praetieal education, includ
ing a good trade, ia a better outfit for
a youth than a grand estate with the
drawback of aa empty mind.— Greeley.
Most men profit by experience as
they do by their daily bread ; after it
is earned and eaten, they forget all
about it.
»
When a man get« so old he haa
taste for the follies of life, then he be
gins to reprimand them severely in
others.
It is very hard to define economy ;
all we seem to know about it is, that
one man will make a dollar boy twice
as much as another md can.
Men and gold. Anything Midaa
tonched turned to gold. In these days
touch a man with gold and he'll tarn
into anything.
The latest Parisian visiting cards
are coated with gold leaf to the value
of 500 francs each. Housekeepers
expected to return tbe csrds to visitors.
Politeness is the mother of pe sos
She keeps familiarity and impndence
from being knocked to death, and often
eaves herself a broken head.
The man who expeeta to get through
this world by following other people's
advice, will travel over as mneh ground
to aa little purpose, as a lost dog does.
Mind what you ran after ! Never
be content with a babble that will
buret, or firewood that will end in
smoke and darkness. Get that which
you can keep, and whioh is worth
keeping.
Bridal toura are going oat of fashion,
and the young man can enjoy the first
blissful days directly under the watch
ful eye of hia mother-in-law. — Milwau -
kee Scntinal.
Whenever, from undoe excitement
of any kind, the passions are permitted
to overrate the reaion, tbe result h
disease: the heart empties itself into
the brain; the brain ia stricken, the
heart is prostrate, and both are lost.—
B. W. Richardton , M. D., F. R. S.
no
are

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