OCR Interpretation


Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, January 22, 1876, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1876-01-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for



4
kill
A
r . •

«
NO. 4 :
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 22, 1876.
VOL. IX.
NEW
STOVE AND TIN STORE
!■ MIMMswa.
Eliason & Benson,
Manufhcturers and Dealers ita
STOVEÔ,
HEATERS, RANGES,
AMD Tnr WAKE
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
We have in stock the most popular and
"
Delight, Morning Light, Florentine, Toscan,
• Bon Ton, Florence, Charm, Belle, Regulator.
Centennial, Palace Cook, Golden Eagle,
Eureka, Combination Cook, Wabash, Model
Complete, Victor Cook, Pretty Range, Pet
Range, and can furnish on short notice any
other stove manufactured.
We invite special attention to the Regula
tor "Revolving Top for convenience. Sur
passes anything in the stove line ever offered
in this market.
Stoves repaired on the shortest notice.
Roofing ant spouting a specialty.
We hope by giving our personal attention
to business, aod> making moderate charges to
receive a share of the public patronage.
Givt us a call. ELI aSON A BENSON,
Middletown, Del.
LUMBER AHD HARDWARE.
J. B. FENIMORE Ac CO.
Opposite the Depot,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE,
DEALARa IN ALL KINDS OS
Lumber and Hardware,
BRICKS, LIMB, hue, sash, DOORS, BLINDS
MOULDING8, PAINTS, OILS,
GLASSrETe.^TCr
Constantly on hand all kinds of
Building Material.
January 15—tf
The Middletown Boot, Shoe
and Hat Store.
O Ai kC>«LJ.
in
A thorough knowledge of onr
special line of business, gained
by close stndy of its details, ex
tended end frequent travels
through all the principal manu
tnring districts of the countrv
and in almost daily contact with
lsUipg manufacturers them
selves, enables ns to oflhr to this
community a line of Goods tbat
for variety, style, quality, and
prices, eanaot be surpassed.
Goods sold from onr stores in
on


SMYRNA à MILFORD
have gained a rep
St. Georges, in N<
Frankford, in Sussex.
Onr way of doing business
and system of repairing onr
goods, iasunr oar customers
against shy risk in buying of ns.
A little time will convince an
enterprising public of tbe advan
tages to be gained. Caix.
Respectfully,
ntation from
ew Castle, to
of
R. M. & W. T. JOHNSON.
sraassix
Middletown and Smyrna.
noT6 tf
8
2.45
p
close
J.MEIER 4BR0.,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
S. E. Cos, Second and Anch Sts.,
PHILADELPHIA,
Hava in Stock a full line of
ria. Ov.rcwUags, Saltlap, Casalwaarca,
aad Vnllagi
Of tbe newest designs for FALL and WIN
TER Wear, which will be made to order in
th* latest styles and best manner. Special at
tention giren to Dress Suits.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK,
oot 10-tf
a
and
car
p
leave
train.
SEE HERE ! !
At Anderson's Drug Store,
(BARR'S OLD STAND),
You can get XX SWI8S LINIMENT, » sere
cars for Frosted Peet, Lame Back, Rheuma
tism, Bunions, Neuralgia, Pains in the Head,
Side or Joints, Sore throat, Ac. Use it and '
fuller uo longer.
IT ACTS LIKE MAGIC.
Taken inwardly it cures Diarrhoea, Dysen
tery. Cholera Morbus, cramps, Ac.
Ail Ws aft far it is a fair trial.
Sold Only
by ANDERSON, who keeps all the Patent
Medicines of tbe day.
Sep 25—ly.
The
the
be
stock
which
ing
that
be
g
at
by
en
E. DICKSON,
No. 35} SOUTH EIGHTH STREET,
ranUADBLPHIA,
DIALBft IV
WATCHES AND JEWËERY,
_80LID STERLING__
SilTer and Plated Ware
Suitable for Holiday Presents.
N. B.— Fine selection of 18 Kt. Wedding
Rings too Hand.
Gold, Silver and Steel Spectacles to soit
Dec. 10—tf
all age*.
TMOMA8 MASSEY, JR.
&
CLOCK AND WATCH MAKER,
SCala SMMA musm. to RMtoad Hotel ! Th
. 1 rics
times)
i Casket.
.. .
■«LOCKS, Watches, Jewelry, Ac. neatly ,
j a nd promptly repared.
Always on band and for sale, Clocks,!
Watches, Plated Ware, Forks, Spoons, Sil
Ter Napkin Rings, Silver Thimbles, Salt,
Sugaf and Tea Spoons, Batter Knives, Gold I
Bottons, "watch Chains, «fetch Keys, Key
Rings, Steel Watch Chains, Ac.
"''SPECTACLES j A
1 Oct
Middletown, Delaware
De
Dec. U—tf.
(Ptiddlftouin Sirtdorg.
STORE
CORPORATION OFFICERS.
Tows CoHHissiosBHS —E. W. Lockwood,
President; J. R. Hall, Secretary: L. P. Mc
Dowell, J. H. Walker, L 0. Vandegrift.
Assessor —C. E. Anderson.
TaSAseasa.—Joseph Hanson.
Jttarie* or res Peace.— DeW. C. Walker.
Constable and Policeman.— Vacant.
Lamplighter. — F. C. Schreite.
„ , „ . 0 I
J R HaP? tÆ '' R 84 ""Cochren, g J°M. cSi- j
bertson, Jas. H. Scowdrick, Wm. H. Barr, j
NOTARY PUBLIC.
John A. Reynolds.
TRUSTEES OF THE ACADEMY.
Hon John P. Cochran, Pres. ; Henry Davis,
Treas. ; Samuel Penington, Secretary ; James
Kanely, B. Gibbs, R. T. Cochran, N,Williams.
Principal or Acadsmt.— T. S. Stevens.
and
OP CITIZENS' NAT I.
Toscan, BANK.
Regulator. Directobs.— Henrv Clayton, B. Gibbs, B.
Eagle, T Bi j ohn A Reynolds, James Cnlbert
Model g" n. Fenimore, M. E. Walker, J. B.
Pet Joseph Biggs
any Prmjdrrt — Henry Clayton,
Cashiib —J R Hall
Regula- Telles. —John S. Crouch,
Sur
offered
attention
to
Del.
DIRECTORS OF TOWN HALL CO.
CHURCHES.
Forest Pbssbytesian.— Rev. John Patton,
D. D , Pastor. Divine service every Sunday
at 10.30 a. m. and 7.00 p. m. Sunday School
at 9 a.m. Lecture on Wednesdays at 7.00 p. |
m. Sunday School in the Chapel at Arm
strong's every Sssday at 2.30 p. m.
St. Asks'* Protestant Episcopal.— Rev.
Wm. C. Butler, Rector. Service on Sundays ;
at 10.30 a. m. and 3.30 p. m. Sunday School
at 2.30 p.m. Services 011 Fridays at 3.30 p.m. j
Methodist Episcopal, — Rev. L. C. Matlack, [
D. D., Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10.00
a. m. and 7.00 p m. Sunday School al 9.30
a. m. and 2.30 p. m. Prayer Meeting on
Thursdays at 7.00 p. m.
Colored Methodist.— Rev. N. Morris
Pastor. Service every other Sunday at 10.30
p. m.; 3 and 8 p. m. Sunday School every
Sunday at 1 p. m.
CO.
MASONIC
A do in rah Chapter No. 5, R. A. M. Meets
in Masonic Hall on tbe second and fourth Fri
days of every month at 8 o'clock, p m.
Union Lodge No. V A. F. A . It, Meet» o n^
the first and third Tuesdays of every month
at 8 o'clock, p. m. Masonic Hall.
j
I
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS.
Damon Lodos, No. 12 Meets every Friday
evening at 8 o'clock. Lodge room in the !
Town Hall.
PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY. !
Peach Blossom Grange, No. 3. Meets every i
foÄ'Sb!."Vp;i'Ä. a ""' , ~" j
I. 0. 0. F.
Good Samaritan Lodge, No 9. Meets every
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. Lodge Room
in Cochran Hall, No. 2, Cochran Square.
BUILDING AND LOAN.
Middletown B. k L. Association.— Samuel
Penington, Pres.; A. G. Cox, Secretary. Meets
on tbe first Thursday of every month at 8
o'clock, p. m.
Mutual Loan Association or Middlstown.
— Jas. H. Scowdrick, Prer.; A. G. Cox, Sec
retary. Meets on the third Tuesday of every
month at 8 o'clock, p. m.
MIDDLETOWN LIBRARY AND
READING-ROOM.
B W. Lockwood, Pres.; J. T. Budd, Sec' y ;
Rooms in Transcript Building. Raadklg
Room open every day nntil 10 o'clock, p m.
Library open on Wednesdays and Saturdays
from 3 o'clock to 6 p m.
AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.
Pastas. Agricultural and Pomolosical As
sociation. —Wm. R. Cochran, President; J. T.
Budd, Secretary; Win. R.Cochran, Chairman
of Board of Managers. Annual Meeting third
Saturday in January.
DIAMOND STATE BRASS BAND.
eye
her
and
the
Meets for practice every Monday evening at
8 o'clock.
POST OFFICE.
Omet Hours. —Opens at 6 30 am and
closes at 9 p m every day except Sunday
Mails for the North close at 7.30 a m, and
2.45 p m.
Mail for the South closes at 10 15 a m.
Mails for Odessa close at 10.23 a m and 7.30
p m.
Mails for Warwick, Sassafras and Cecilton
close st 10.23 a m.
in
DELAWARE RAILROAD.
Passenger trains going North leave at 7.46
a m and 3 01 p m. ; going South at 10.33 a m
and 7,55 p m. Freight trains with passenger
car attached, going North, leave at 5.20 p m ;
going South, at 6.30 a m.
STAGE LINES.
Stags for Odessa, with U. S. Mail, leaves
shortly after arrival of the 10.43 am and 7.55
p m mail trains.
Stages for Warwick, Sassafras and Cecilton
leave shortly after arrival of tbe 10.43 a m
train.
!
'
j 1
from
the
I tiou,
first
her
such
care
the
All
did
sign,
FURNITURE.
UNDERTAKING.
UPHOLSTERING.
The undersigned respectfully announces to
the citizens of Middletown and vicinity tbat
be has cn hand a large and well selected
stock of handsome and durable
Walnut and Other Furniture
which be will sell very cheap for cash. Bay
ing at wholesale cash rates he feels assured
that he can sell as low as the same goods can
be bought elsewhere. By buying of him pur
chasers will be saved the freight on their
g ood«from t h e city .- 11 "
He if also prepared to attend to
Dadertaklag Work
at short notice, and in a manner excelled
by none. Persons wishing Metallic or Wood
en Caskets or Cessa will find it to their ad
vantage to call on him. He has, also,
TAYLOR A SOM'S
Celebrated Corpse Preserver, :
I
er,
I her
tbe
! Th * Corpse may be dressed in the fineat fab- j
1 rics and not be soiled, (aad can be seen stall !
times) as nothing bat dry cold air enters tbe !
i Casket.
. • i
, GEORGE W. WIL80N, ,
i told
Practical Cabinet Maker and Undertaker, is
Febl-I2m Middletown Del.
I - - - - ing
lEOIR, SALE j was
Qj. Eichflllge.
j A BULL CALF h r n n i h e;k7^1d ALDKaN,SY ! C0Bld
1 Oct 3fl-if e. r. COCHRAN. 1 as
felijtt frçtrj.
Mc
THE MUSIC OF CHILDHOOD.
BV JEAN 1NGEL0W.
When I hear the waters fretting,
When I see the chesnnt letting
All her lovely blossoms falter down, I think,
"Alas the day I"
Once with magical sweet singrng,
Blackbirds set the woodland ringing
That awakes no more while April boars wear
themselves away.
In our hearts fair hope lay smiling
Sweet as sir, and all beguiling ;
And 'there hong a mist of bluebells on the
slope and down the dell;
And we talked of joy and splendor
Tbalthë years unborn would render;
And the blackbirds helped us with the story,
for they knew it well—
Piping, fluting, "Bees are humming;
April's here and Summer's coming ;
Don't forget us when you walk a man with
men, in pride and joy ;
Think on us in alleys shady
I When you step a graceful lady ;
j For no fairer da - vs haTe we 10 ho P* for - nt,le
j girl and boy."
I.
Langh and play, 0 lisping waters !
Loll oar downy sons and daughters ;
. ...
Come, 0 wmd, and rock their leafy cradle in
thy wanderings coy ;
| When they wake we'll end the measure
<1
With a wild sweet cry of pleasure,
And a "Hey down derry, let's be merry, little
;
j
[
girl and boy!"
A TOUCHING STORY.
It miy not be generally known, yet
it is probably true, that tbe famous novel
of "East Lynne," although written in
England, had tbe ground-work of its
story in a singular marriage which took
place in this, city, the notice and attend
ing circumstances at the time being
copied by almost every paper in the
country The mutter was about as fol
lows :
A Mr J. M., a clerk in a down town
house, fell in love with a young lady.
whose father was a well-to-do Second
street merchant, and after a proper
season of attention the couple were mar
ried.
»•" '«"» d "* lb «j •"«
not happily mated, and after a marriage
of seven years, during which time they
had three children (two boys and one
girl) they mutually agreed to the hus
band applying for a divorce, merely on
the ground of incompatability of temper.
The divorce was granted, and the wife
went home to her father, who through
indorsing lost bis business and all his
property. The daughter's and his misfor
tune weighed so heavily on the father's
mind that during a moment of mental
alienation he took his own life, leaving
his daughter penniless, sod to rough it
with tbe cold charity of the world as
best she could. The woman, a brave
He
will
out
life
the
by
false
tion
of
into
little creature, tried every way the knew
bow to gain an honest livelihood ; in
fact working so hard giving music les
sons aod doing embroidery for old
school-mates that her health gave way,
and having do money to pay her board,
must
, starve or go to tbe poor
house.
To turn to the other side of the pic
ture, the husband, after a mouth's re
lease from the marital bauds, again
married, and at the time of which we
speak had not only the ohildren by tbe
first wife but also in addition theroto a
little two-year old girl by hia second
wife The letter lady being ill, the
husband advertised for a nurse and
housekeeper, which notice reached the
eye of the first wife, and she, in her
trouble, went to the.former partner of
her heart, told him of her sad condition
and then applied for the position in bis
household. The husband giving her
ample funds for all immediate wants
asked her to call again at his office on
the following morning, promising to
consult his wife about tbe matte.' in tbe
meantime.
but
be
given
arises
Promptly as per agreement wife No.
was on time, as waa the husband, and
from there they went to reside where
the two wives had their first conversa
tiou, ending in their agreement for the
first wife to come and accept the vacant
place, which she did, seemingly de
lighted at having a peaceful home over
her head, notwithstanding the very
strange circumstances under which
such shelter was given. Necessity de
manded that the entire past should be
obliterated, and the new house-keeper
treated aa any other help; tbat she must
care for the children—her own offsprings
—and the other child, as any hired
nurse wonld do; that she must eat at
the second table to care for ber ebarges
All these things and even more humility
did the poor woman show, never by
sign, word or look, exhibiting the least
evidence of discontent. What, howev
tbe
settle
in
is
who
ages,
those
gloom
would
eheer.
son
fretter
soul
storm.
I makes
i like
misery
able
is no
ro
ness
mast have been the true feeling of
her heart, when seeing another filling
tbe place she had once tried, as she !
hard to fill.
thought, so

The above is from files of an old
Cincinnati paper, but tbe sequel, as
, . . .7 . .
told us by one conversant with the facts,
stranger than what wc have alreadv
if ,,,, , , , 3
narrated. When the oholera was rag
in onr city in 1856 the second wife
taken very ill with it, and being
C0Bld "°' a feW bo0r8 at m08t '
she was then taken in ■ collapsed
informed by the physician that she
greatest
ondition, she asked that all go oat of
the room excepting her > husband and
housekeeper, when she told how much
she dreaded leaving her little child
amongst strangers, and as a dying wife
entreated them to marry again. The
proposition was a strange one, but both
promised, and in a few months after
ward, when the second wife bad been
dead a sufficient length of time not to I
cause remarks, the two were again
married, brought together after a cruel
separation of so many years, and we
believe, are now living happily together
in a cosy West End house.— Cincin
nati Enquirer.
think,
wear
on the
render;
story,
;
with
nt,le
I
Shall We Meet Again.
The following is said to be one of I
most brilliant articles written by the |
" The fiat of nature is inexorable. I
„ lt
There is no appeal for relief from the
great law which dooms us to dust. We
flourish and fade as the leaves of the
forest, and the flowers that bloom and
wither in a day, have no frailer hold
upon life than the mightiest monarch
who ever shook the earth with his foot
steps. Generations of men will appear
and disappear on earth, and the multi
tude that throng the world to-day will
disappear as the footsteps on the shore,
Men seldom think of the great event
of death until the shadow falls across
their own pathway, hiding from their |
eyes the faces of loved ones whose liv- j "
ing smile was the sunlight of their ex
istence Death is the antagonist of life, of
and tbe thought of the tomb is the
skeleton of all feasts. We do not want!
lamented G. D. Prentice :
;
...
in
little
yet
novel
in
its
took
attend
being
the
fol
to go through the dark, although tbe
passage may lead to paradise ; we do
not want to lie down in tbe damp
grave, even with princes for bed-fel-1 \
lows In the beautiful drama of Ion,
the hope of immortality, is eloquently
uttered by the death devoted Greek and
finds deep response in every thought- J j
ful soul. When about to yield bis j
young existence as a sacrifice to fate, [
his Clementhe asks if they should meet
again, tq which he replies: 'I have
asked that dreadful question of the hills
tbat look eternal—of the clear stream
that flows forever—of the stars amoBg
whose fields of azure my raised spirits
have walked id glory. All were dumb,
but as I gaze upon thy living face, I
feel there is something in the love that
mantles through its beauty that cannot
wholly perish. We shall meet again,
Clementhe.' "
io
to
town
lady.
mar
•"«
they
one
hus
on
wife
his
it
as
are
and
two
To the boy, tbe world beyond hia | the
immediate surrounding is only a picture.
He does not know how real arc
sorrows, tbe passions, the ambitions of I
men. Its absorbing interest, its heroes
and its martyrs, are heard of by him g°>
without understanding or with iudif
ference. His sport, his lessons, his The
home-life, are alone real. But there
will come a change. The ordinarily t^ 6
slow growth into manhood, with its and
business or professional pursuits and
widening relations or startling events, are
such as the death of a parent, or some
intellec'ual or spiritual appeal, striking there
out the latent soul, will make vivid and girls
earnest what was indistinct and unin
teresting. Like a stereoscopic picture hold
before it is put in the stereoscope, tbe |
life of man has no reality ; bnt when
the boy awakens, as with tbe pictnre
within (he instrument, so with him, a
solidity and naturalness will be acquired
by the external world, and he will feel
what it is henceforth to live and move
amongst these grander and graver I 8ub
forms. Many mistakes will he commit, Æolu8
false estimates will he form of propor- in
tion aDd perspective, the earnestness and
of his new conceptions will hurry him in S
into extravagances and generous errors; 1 8an,
"
larger
"
size
Beauties of Manhood.
the I their
in
les
old
pic
re
we
tbe
a
the
and
the
her
of
bis
on
to
the
but if there is truth iu bis nature and
nobleness iu his spirit just views will
be formed, and the day iu which it is
given him to work will find him not
unmindful of the responsibility which
arises from a knowledge of the coming
night.
at
"
shade
Frettino.-Ouc fretter can destroy |
tbe peace of a family, can disturb the ."
harmony of a neighborhood, can un- | C
settle the councils of cities and hinder '
in legislation of nations He who frets
is never the one who mends, who heals,
who repairs evils; more, he discour
ages, enfeebles, and too often disables
those around him, who, but for the
"
handle
lady,
every
possible
sumed,
gloom and depression of his company,
would do good work aniTkeep^up brave
eheer. The effect upon a sensitive per-,
son of the mere neighborhood of a her
for
fretter is indesoribable It is to the
soul what a cold, iuy mist is to tbe
body—more chilling than the bitterest
storm. And when the fretter is one
beloved,whose nearness of relation to us
I makes his fretting at the weather seem
i like a personal reproach to ns, then the
misery of it becomes indeed insupport
able Most men call fretting a minor
fault—a foible, aod not a vioe. There
is no vice except drnkenness which can
ro utterly destroy the peaoe, tbe happi
ness of a borna.
quired
" I
I am
have
of
!
of
or
wise
words
pear
Lord
Pcbsuit not possession, is to os tbe
greatest source of enjoyment.
An Earnest Life.
oat of
and
much
child j
wife
The
both
after
been
not to I
again
cruel
we
together
Cincin
Earnestness does not always move
with a clatter. There are other things
in this world which are quite as pleas
ant and edifying as the rub-a-dub-dub
of a snare drum. In fact this kind of
I melody is not generally the highest
style of music. Have you never known
a man bustling and officious, and clam
orous and loud, but who did not weigh
heavy after all—a thing very well un
derstood by every one except just the
man who might have profited by that
piece of information ? And have you
never known a man, quiet and unosten
tatious and faithful, and who was a per
petuol blessing, a golden man, deep
souled and true, whose memory lingered
of I long after he was gone, like light upon
the | the hills after a gorgeous sunset ?
The shallow stream rattles along its
I course ; but when it is met and drowned
lt , .... „. . t
the by the majestic tides rolling in from the »«
We sea, there is silence on the hills. In the
the great *ide 'here is the power of more
and than a hundred rivulets, yet its coming
hold is almost as quiet as the celestial forces
that bring it. The tide flows down and
foot- shallow grows the stream, and again
appear the empty obaltering goes od. And
multi- this is what we wish to say, that thiogs me
will most potent, although demonstrative,
shore, as indeed they must be from their
event effects, are not necessarily noisy. A
across strong and earnest life need not make
their | "hat people are in the habit of calling cast
liv- j " a fuss." It is better to be known by on
ex- the lead that strikes, thin by the bang "e
life, of the gun that sends it.
the - .* - 1
want! Mexican Life. And
,
came
tbe
do
damp
\
Ion,
and
J j
bis j
fate, [
meet
have
hills
I
that
Although the Mexicans are a lazy
people, and pass hour after hour in laz
iness, they rise early—the gentlemen
io take their morqing ride, the ladies
to go to early mass, which is tbe only
occasion in which they appear in tbe
streets on foot. They take a luncheon
between twelve and one o'clock. Mex
was
time,
for
and
lief
ican men are, as a rule, temperate;
but gambling is thoir passion, and they
are not particularly honest. They are,
however, companionable and hospitable,
and though frugal iu their way of liv
ing, provide bountifully when they en
tertain. At dinner there are always
two or three covers laid for guests who
chance to come in. In many Mexican
houses they have, as a rule, no regular
dinner. If they are hungry they eat
some simple dish or drink a cup of
chocolate, which is excellent; the coffee,
however, although they raise a good
quantity, is not good—they do not
know how to prepare it. At six o'clock
hia | the y drive out a" d from the promenade
8° *° °P er * or theatre, taking
of I them,
place of amusement to which they can
g°> l ^ en they remain at home, and
amuse themselves at cards and music,
his The young people make dancing their
principal enjoyment. More than half
t^ 6 population of Mexico are Indians,
its and a curious phase of Mexican do
mestic life is that their house servants
are principally Indian girls, although
among the eight million inhabitants
there are half a million of negroes. The
girls are treated very kindly by their
employers, and are skilled in house
hold affairs as well as in the use of the
| needle,
a
I 8ub J' ecled - One midsummer day, when
Æolu8 8,e P 1 ' 8nd tbe thermometer stood
in th .° ni " eties > a lad y entered a st « re
and * n< l u ' red ^ or parasols. The- oblig
in S P ro P rie,or 8 P read out bef ° re b "
1 8an, P les of a lar 8 e and varied 8tock '
" Have you any of the shade a size
larger ?" said the lady.
The size was produced.
" I think on the whole I prefer tbe
size smaller."
when
and
its
which
an
and
like
finite
round
as
while
cently
sive
child.
sir,
bor
a
"Th.
'■«,
walk
the
him,
again,
my
"How
the I their daughters, dressed iu their finest,
If perchance there ia no
A Sell, Not a Sale.
Amiable shopkeepers deserve to be
canonized. Here is an illustration of
the trials to which they are constantly
very
then
with
door
lunatic's
j many
and
and
utations
..
there
, 1
back
ships
ents
man
which
were
but a
but it
life is
asleep,
closet;
the
The size smaller was presented.
" Have you any of this size slighter
shade of blue?"
| Tb ! shade out.
." HaV fV of ,h,s k,nd with
| C **°° 6 a °
' Tbe 8bade " ,,h the Cr0 ° ked handle
appeared.
" Haven't you any with tbe crooked
handle not quite so heavy ?" said the
lady, and so continued her inquiries for
every conceivable size,shade and weight
possible in the line of parasols.
After nearly an hoqr had been con
sumed, the fair shopper gathered up
her handkerchief and gloves,and moved
for the door.
smallest
dearest
stanoe,
little
"Can't I sell you a parasol?" in
quired the exhausted proprietor.
"Oh, dear, no," replied the lady,
" I was merely inquiring the prices. ,
I am going in mourning myself, and W 60
have one for sale." everyth.ng
one
men
turns
one
luck,
is no
! favors
There sometimes wants only a stroke
of fortune to discover numberless good
or bad qualities, which would other
wise have been eternally concealed ; as
words written with a certain liqnor ap
pear only when applied to the fire.—
Lord Oreville.
Don't monrn over fancied grievances, j fortune.
No God.
He dreamed that he was in the
move
things psrish church, and that he saw the
pleas- dead leave their graves and gather
kind of
about him. "The shadows stood con
breast throbbed and trembled in the I
place of a heart. One, which had just
been buried in the church, lay still
upon its pillow, and its breast heaved
not, while upon its smiling countenanc,
lay a happy dream, but on the entrance
of one of the living, he awoke and
smiled no more. A lofty, uoble form,
having the expression of a never-ending
sorrow, now sank down upon the altar, |
and all the dead exclaimed, "Christ, is
gregated near the altar, and in all the
highest
known
clam
weigh
un
the
that
you
unosten
per
deep
there no God ?"— And hr- answ ered.
'There is none !' I have traversed the
worlds. I ascended into the suns,
lingered
upon
its
" d "f ' " i ' h lb ;, ""'r " , V l, ,T' h |*
the »« no God . I descended as far as be
the iog throws its shadows, and gated
more down into the abyss, and cried
«loud, 'Father, where art thou ?'
forces but I heard nothing but the eter- j
and "al storm which no one rules; and 1 e
again "ben I looked up to the immeasurable
And void for the divine eye, it glared upon
thiogs me from an empty, bottomless socket,
and eternity lay brooding upon chaos
their Then there arose, and came into the 1
A 'eoiplo the dead children who had up
make awakened in the churchyard ; and they
cast themselves before the lofty form
by on the altar, and said, "Jesus have be
bang "e father ? and he answered, wtih |
streaming eyes, "We are all orphans
1 "atTu 7° *" 7 F# ' he [ il
And I fell down and gazed into the
gleaming fabric of worlds, I beheld tbe
. , . , , ,
, "" d , ""*• of *!><* *•*« ,f ,
.od ™ fo id,. g ,h.
doubly. Then she wound herself tu a
thousand folds around nature, and I
crushed the world together, and all be-1 8inc
came narrow, dark and fearful, and a
lazy
laz
only
tbe
was about to strike the last hour of | dust
time, when I awoke ! My soul wept
for joy that it could again worabip God ;
and the joy, and the tears, and the be
lief in Him were the
bell-hammer stretched out to infinity
they
are,
liv
en
who
eat
of
not
prayer. Audi
when I arose, the sun gleamed deeply one
behind tbe full, purple ears of corn,
and peacefully threw the reflection of ««ug
its evening blushes on the little moon,
which was rising in the east without b *
an aurora. And between the Heaven
and the earth a glad, fleeting world
stretched out its short wings, and lived, tbe
like myself, in tbe presence, of the in- m00
finite Father ; and from all nature
round me flowed sweet, peaceful tones I
as from evening bells-"— Jeal I'atd | l* 8t
to
To
Hs Hid bis Hsad.— The superin- 1 a
tendent of an insane asylum in France,
while passing through the wards re
cently noticed a man of very inoffen
sive appearance, sobbing in bed like a tbat
child. " My poor friend, what is the I My
matter? inquired the physician. " Ah, I
sir, said the lunatic, " my next neigh- soul."
bor has played me a sad trick. He he
concealed my knife, and I have been could
looking for it two hours without being plied
a smile, childlike and bland. " Bot I what
"Th. P 'Y retar "'" liDg
Tbat s all right, said the supertu- my
tendent, consolingly patting him on the for
shoulder as he passed on. Two days the
'■«, ,b. M
walk through the same room early in of
the morning His insane friend stopped | cleft
him, and said : " I have found my knife
again, and have played tbat trick on
my comrade, as I told you I should do.
"How is that?
Richter.
no
of
" While he was
This man ia i
very crazy, thought the'superintendent;
then he asked, and what did you do laughed
with it then?" " I put it in the linen | hour,
with
The physician walked I
mechanically to the closet, opened the ed
door and looked in. The head of the for
lunatic's comrade was there. tunes
' •- and
Lost Things.— There are a great iff.
j many things lost that are found again, A
and a great many others tbat are lost little
and never found again. There are rep- he
utations lost, which cannot be regained; ing
.. . , , .. , 6 . j
there are hopes lost, which come not body.
, 1 .
back again; there are joys and friend- and
ships lost ; there are thoughts and tal- boast
ents lost, that are never found. Every world.
man has at sometime lost something, at the
which he would give the world, if it reverses
were his, to recover. It may have been knows
but a single pearl from the- thread of or tbe
friendship, or a more h o pe o f hia «on! a writ
but it was prooiously dear to him, and | what
life is sad and dark without it.
asleep, I hid bis bead.
closet; but you need not tell him," was
the answer.
The j a
smallest thiogs are oftentimes the paying
dearest to the heart'of man, as for in- kind
stanoe, a little wife, a little fortune, a ifest.
little home. What wonder, then, tbat brings
chaff.
and
not
, , ...
W 60 A 8 ! e , ° 8t ' °. wou d ** ve
everyth.ng he had tor the.r recovery !
While ten mon watch for chances,
one man makes chances; while ten
men wait for something to turn np, one
turns something up ; so while ten fail,
one succeeds, and » called n man.of
luck, tbe favorite of fortune. There
is no lnok like plnok, and fortune most
! favors those who arc moat indifferent to
fortune.
hangs
honks
sounded
and is
that
A Garions Romance.
the
the
gather
Norfolk street, Strand, says the Lon
don Court Journal, has a curious com
memorative monument. An observant
con
spectator will notice that the first-floor
windows of a large house at the corner I
in the I 0 f Howard street present a peeulisr ap
just pearsnee. The shutters are up, and I
still they are covered thickly with dust, |
heaved wb n e through the chinks can be seen
tba blinds, also thick with dust, and
entrance mouldering away with age. Those
and shutters and blinds have been in exactly I
form, the same position, untouched, for about
fifty yearg During that time no human
altar, | jt is believed, has entered that I
is
all the
And the reason is this :
room.
ered.
the
suns,
Fifty years
was engaged to be married, the day
fixed, the wedding morning arrived. I
,T' h |* h * b, " k, " , *" '■« •"* » »P- 1
oio „„ dh , ndM „ Bra> „ |h>lrilU .
be- groom wag roady , 0 proceed t0 obnrcb
gated when jt wag discovered , hat the brida
cried waa m i a8 j„g ; a nota io her handwriting h*
?' wag f onnd addressed to the bride-groom 1ID
eter- j briefly informing him that she had
and 1 e j oped , bat morn ; D g w j t j 1 b j g . tbegf
maD » a g ty and gallant captain of
upon dragoons. The jilted bridegroom did I
socket, not aty mncb . but be went alone tQ tbe
chaos r00m j„ wb ; cb tbe wedd ;„g breakfast
the 1 waa j a j d outi w j tb h j g own banda f
had up the gutters and drew the blinda. I
they looked the door and took the key
form He gave ordera that ^ doors should
have be naUed up and bmed ^ pad , ocked
wtih | bar)li and tbat no one abon j d enter tbe |_
r00lll again When , he hoU8e w>> , et
[ il w " atipulated that the room in quea
the tion abould remain UDtoucbed a ; d A
tbe suin 0 e ronn npr _ ' •, . .
, &um ot per annum waa paid to I
,f , he teB „, f „ th , of .h. Ll
rooa The D - oMenltll hl ,
tu a been dead aome yeargi but jg ^„4
and I tbat the room has never been
be-1 8inc e he closed it, and there
a
are the
"wedding meats" mouldering silently
away, and the ornaments crumbling to
of | dust in the funeral gloom,
wept
;
be
«
Rock of Ages Cleft for Me."
Audi In the pleasant county of Devon, in I you
one of its sequestered passes, with a few the
cottages sprinkled over it, mused and | best,
of ««ug Augustus Toplady. When a lad
8l 'xteen and on a visit to Ireland, be
b * d «trolled into a barn in which an il
^terato layman was presetting—bnt
preaching reconciliation to God through
tbe de «th of his Son. The homely ser
in- m00 took effect, and from that moment
gospel wielded all the powers of his
I brilliant and active mind. During his I
| l* 8t illness, Augustus Toplady seemed
to lie io the very vestibule of glory.—
To a friend's inquiry, he answered, with
1 a sparkling eye: "0, my dear sir, I
cannot tell the comforts I feel in my
re- soul—they are past expression. The I cbi,d
consolations of God are so abundant a 8
a tbat he leaves me nothing to pray for a P
the I My prayers are all converted into praise. J
I enjoy a Heaven already within my I light.
soul." And within an hour of dying, I "hioh
He he called his friends and asked if they I
could give him up; and when they re-1
plied iu the affirmative, tears of joy rau 1 more
b. .id.d, .'ob j ti
I what a blessing that you are made wil- cover
liDg 7 T" 6 ° Ver t0 the haDda of »
my dear Redeemer and part with me ; g in
for no mortal can live after having seen
the glories which God has manifested build
-L-t-MP A.d,b..d M .b.„uJ
in of tbe beautiful hymn, " Rock of Ages
| cleft for
ahke
the
least
a
said
ble
I us
much.
tbe
was
me.
A Trnthful Sketch.
Let a man fail in business, what
ia i *1 h* 8 ° n his former creditors !
SD
"bo bave taken him by the arm. greiog
laughed and chatted with him by tbe 1 > 0D
| hour, shrug their shoulders and pars 00 P r *«
with a cold "how do you do ?" Every ^** r »
I of • bill ia hunted up and present
ed 'b« 1 "ould not hnte seen the light St.
for months to come, bqt for the miafor- très
tunes of the debtor. If it is paid, well opening
and good ; if not, tbe scowl of the aber- the
iff. perhaps, meets him at the eorner. day.
A man that has never failed knows but 1
little of human nature In prosperity L,„„.
he sails along gently, wafted by favor- Holmes
ing smiles and kind words from everv
. j „ ., .. " ver J man
body. He prides himself on his name «jji
!
and spotless character, and makes bis sweetens
boast that be has not an enemy in the
world. Alas! tbe change. He looks
at the world in a different light when
reverses come upon him He hardly W '!*
knows how to move or to do this thing '
or tbe other; there are spies about him, j " 7 ° u
a writ ia ro»H y fn r hj g back. To know | ec b°'
| what kind of stuff the world is made of
An
calls
where
said:
sir."
good
most
j a person must be unfortunate and stop
paying once in a lifetime. If he has
kind friends, then they are made
ifest.
brings out the wheat and shows the
chaff. A man thus learns that words
and pretended good will are not and do
not constitute real friendship.
man
A failure is a moral sieve—it
A
near
told
talk
Wbnt » revolution ! The expression
''Everything is lovely and the goose
hangs high " corrupts the saying,
"Everything is lovely when the goose
honks high,
sounded by the wild goose in its flight,
and is about the only music it which
that bird indulges.
''your
nothing
I have,
got to
agent;"
book
The bonk is the note
ttoritö«.
Lon
com
Don't insult a poor man.
Your buisness will surely be attended
to if you do it yourself.
first-floor
corner I Soft words and soft water should
ap- «bandant in every home,
and I God gives every bird its food,
dust, | does not throw it into the nest,
seen
and
Those
exactly I ;
about .
human . Wh#t ,S T,rtae bnt " mediciBe *
that I V, ° e but * ?—iktfer.
Life cannot subsist m society bnt
reciprocal concessions.
Eternity—the endless chasm compos
ing the life of God !
Humility is the solid foundation
all the virtues .—Chinese Saying.
If we drive to the bottom of pleasure
day
I we * re sure to bring op dirt.
»P- 1 Tb« appreciation cf noM. deal.
.
»...
brida I Ti v l * "* ""
h* * * 1 ",, ^ b ° 00 "" rted
1ID 0 a 80 1 maM as hard " »»rble.
had
tbegf
of
did I Wben you get into hot water go
tbe your friends! You'll find them cool
enough,
f
I r,tber abondance, that creates avarice,
—Montagne
He enjoys much who is thattkfol for
Hule . A grtteflI i M h g . .
tbe |_ Seeker. *
et u ia anral narrow ^
quea- supposes money to be the cWefVood
A Johnson *
. . „
to I Success hu« ÜMmbl.
.h. Ll „ d „ii
hl ,
He that speaks tbe truth trill find
himself in sufficient dramatic situations.
—Christopher North.
In plain troth, it is not want, bnt
men.
Not the oeka of intellect bat the blos
the
to
wreath of fame.
A great many persons wish to Kve
their lives over again, beoauae they see
where they might bave sinned, and
did't.
In life it is difficult to say who does
in I you the most mischief—enemies #ith
few the worst intentions, or friends with the
and | best,
lad
be
il
his
his I
I
I cbi,d - and was a clerk, a schoolmaster
a 8 old m i Ber . » printer, an editor, and
a P oet before ba became of age.
J Live to be useful. Live to give
I light. Live to accomplish the end for
I "hioh yon were made, and quietly and
I steadily shine on, trying to do good
re-1 To succeed iu the world it is much
1 more ueccessary to 1 - the oenstra
j ti „.,, ... rrZub..T£.
cover who is a clever man.— Talleyrand
of » » curious to note the old seamar
; g in , of human «y.
oenturv r p V4sa . g ' »«»"Wg
build m0Dgters _ ged J LT*
""" ,0 We
W
In the East Indies tbe ladies of the
country are subjected to tbe labor of
building railrolds and keeping them in
running order.
Honesty and bapphteaa seam to be
ahke in this particular—those who have
the most of either seem to mako the
least of it.
Let roe up," said the under man in
a fight, the other day. "I won't do it,"
said the other; ' it was too much trou
ble to get you do an."
Bret Harte commenced life
M a
Success io life is very apt to make
I us forget the time when we were not
much. It is just so with the frog
tbe jump; he can't remember when he
was a tadpole, but other folks can
on
!
Love seizes on us suddenly, without
greiog us any warning, and our dispoai
1 > 0D or our weakness favors the sur
P r *« e 5 one look, one glanee, from the
^** r » fixes and determines us._ Bruy ere
The subterranean gallery of the new
St. Gothard tunnel will be 15,000 me
très long. It ia not expected that the
opening will take place before 1880
the drift advances but
day.
1 t.. • T n .
L,„„. .. tL k-ii"«» * «oucilaid
Holmes sa a • "A g °
. 8 L™ W °'
man is said to resemble a Cremona
«jji- , . . .
! fiddle—age but inoreaaes ita worth and
sweetens its tone "
"
^° U b>Ye olbers tbe J * 0Te
8 P eak hiodly to them they
W '!* 8 P eak k ' nd ty to J 0B - it re
' ^ 0Ve > Bnd hatred with hatred,
j " 7 ° u * d J ou b ear • aweet and pleasant
| ec b°' 8 P ea ^ 8weetly and pleasantly
. as
seven metres per
An old preacher, who had sovera)
calls to take a parish, asked his servant
where he should go, and the
said: "Go where there is most sin,
sir." The preacher concluded that
good advioe, and went where there
most nosey.
servant
was
A book agent called on a former
near Oriakaoy tbe other day, and
told that the farmer was too bsey to
talk with him.
was
"Bnt," said the agent,
''your form work is nil done, yon hare
nothing to ocenpy yonr time." "Yee,
I have, too," retorted the former, "I've
got to plant my foot and raise n book
agent;" and be did. He railed the
book agent about four fret.

xml | txt