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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, June 24, 1876, Image 3

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TERMS—$2.00 a year, payable in advance,
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§hc Jltiddldoum transcript
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SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 24, 1876.
LOCAL AND STATE AFFAIRS.
Items of Local Interest.
John T. Smith, formerly of Middletown, is
in the dry goods and grocery business at
Taylor's Bridge.
The strawberry festival recently held at
Summit M. E. Church was a pecuniary suc
and the managers are grateful.
now
cess,
A lady named Grafton, in Wilmington,
whilst gaping the other day, dislocated her
jaw. A physician fixed things for her.
A firm in Milford tried the experiment of
packing trout in ice and shipping them to
Philadelphia, this season, and it is said the
experiment paid well.
hank at Milford
The projectors of the new
expect to organize the latter part of this week.
They will start on $55,000. Col. Fiddeman
of course is expected to be the President.
A Smyrna wedding, that just occurred, was
quickly fixed up. The groom was a widower
weeks standing, and the bride,
of only seven
who went to keep house for him, maintained
that relation only fonr days before the nup
tials.
Diamond State Band of this town continues
the practice of new music, which they will
play on July 4th in Philadelphia. The ex
that the band will astonish
pectations are
Philadelphians, and we earnestly hope it will
gain the praise that is due a first-class coun
try band.
Wheat harvest was commenced near Sassa
fras on Wednesday, at Summit Bridge on
Friday, and at Middletown on Thursday.
The wheat at Sassafras is partly damaged by
rust but the average yield.will probably reach
At Middletown a
twenty bushels per acre,
larger yield is anticipated.
Martin King, of Kent county, who was con
victed in the United States District Court, in
Wilmington last April for selling liquor with
out license, has been pardoned by ihe Presi
dent. King was sentenced to an imprison
ment of six months, but U. S. District Attor
Higgins and Marshal Dunu recommended
his release on the ground of meritorious ser
vices performed during the
Miss Annie Offley is going to re-establish
Smyrna Seminary in the fall.
Dashiel, a former popular educator of our
midst, has accepted the Principalship, and
Miss Knight, educated in music at Hamburg,
in Germany, is to take charge of the music
says the Smyrna Times. We sup
the lady referred to is Miss Fannie
nej
war.
William H.
room, so
pose
Knight, of Middletown.
J. H. Bewley, of Smyrna, was robbed of
his pocketbook on a Second street car in
Philadelphia, Tuesday. He recovered it from
the conductor of the car, whom be questioned
closely as to induce him to hand it over.
The conductor said he found it on the street.
Fortunately Mr. B. had his money in a wallet
in another pocket, hence there was not much
object to the thief in keeping the stolen book.
It contained negotiable paper, however, to
the amount of over $1000.
so
Narrow Escape.
Mr. Joseph West narrowly escaped a
very serious accident on Wednesday last.
He was cutting wheat when one of the horses
balked. Mr. W. got down to lead him, when
the horse suddenly jumped away from him,
causing the reaper knives to strike near his
ankle and with such force as to throw him on
the platform, and thus he escaped the knives.
We are pleased to know that no more serious
results followed than a painful cut, which
has been properly attended to.
«•Big Frank" Recaptured.
"Big Frank" McDonald, so well known
over the country, as a "Bank Cracker," and
who twice made his escape from New Castle
jail has been captured again, this time in Nor
folk, Va. It is stated that the New Castle
authorities have been notified of his capture
and requested to come and get him, but no
attention has been paid to the request. The
recapture was brought about by a boy who
found some burglars' tools under a bridge,
and telling other persons about it they re
paired to the place armed with guns. Frank
came along, by and by, and fell an easy
victim.
Blackbird Camp.
The first drawing for tents for the Black
bird camp took place last Saturday, when
twenty-five were drawn, by the following
persons: Wm. E. Evans, Wm. R. Davis,
F. C. Stidham, Thos. Bratten, I. D. Johnson,
C. R. Collins, T. Hartup, A. Hayden, J. T.
Smith, J. L. Collins, M. D. Wilson, G. Hurd,
M. Rickards, A. L. Quillen, Mollie Porter, C.
Ferguson, J. B. Roberts, of Middletown, J.
C. Vandyke, J. C. Hutchison, Jas. VanWin
kle, Thos. Deakyne, A. J. Collins. Coleu
Ferguson was awarded the bread tent and—
Warren the food pen.
Building Improvements.
Mr. Sewell Holten has recently erected a
neat cottage two stories and a half high on
Cass street. The dwelling corresponds with
the other fine ones on this pretty and retired
street.
The Misses Vandegrift are building a front
to their dwelling on the same street, adding
greatly to the beauty and value of their pro
perty.
Messrs. Eiiason A Benson are now finishing
a stable in the rear of their store, and R. A.
Cochran, Esq., has improved the appearance
■ofMain street by enclosing the lot adjoining
dheir store.
Wife Beating.
Middletown is not free from the manly
practice of wife-beating. Last week a young
married man of over a year's stunding, the
father of one child, finished up his matri
monial engagement by performing this cow
ardly act on a frail wife, so when the circum
stance became known, Mr. H's father-in-law
became indignant, intending to resort to law
for a healing of wrongs, but the husband had
fled,and now the landlord's bill is to be paid
from the proceeds of a constable's sale. This
circumstance leads us to remark that if one
half the misery caused by family disturbances
in Middletown was published it would make
n good-sized book.
Railroad Accident.
There wns rather n serious railroad smash
up at Wyoming last Saturday morning. The
passenger train which leaves there at 5.30 in
the morning was standing on the side track,
w h ere it had been switched off the night
before, as usual. But the switchman, after
switching *he train off, forgot to set the
gw jj c |, back. So the next morning, a freight
train, in attempting to go by Wyoming, was
diverted by the misplaced switch, and ran off
on the side track where the passenger traih
standing. The result was a smnsh-up.
was
Two or three cars were completely wrecked
and one or both of the locomotives. Simon
Hillyard, an engineer, wns badly hurt, as
also a fireman and a brakeman. It was
were
all the result of stupid carelessness.
as
Resolutions of Respect.
At a stated meeting of the Board of Trus
tees of Delaware College, held June 20, 1876,
the following resolutions were adopted :
Resolved, That in the death ot Dr. Hy. F.
Askew, a late member of this Board, we have
lost one of the most active and efficient friends
of the College. One whose large experience,
professional training and zeal in the cause of
education, made his counsel invaluable; and
to whose able and faithful discharge of every
duty as a trustee, much of the success of the
College is due.
Resolved, That we recognize in the death of
-laborer a loss not to the College and
cause of education alone, but equally to the
profession of which he was a member.
Resolved, That we sympathize with the
family of the deceased in their irreparable
loss.
in
our co
the
Resolved, That the papers of the State be
requested to publish these resolutions ; that
they be spread upon the records of the Col
lege and a copy sent to the family of the de
ceased.
(Attest)
Painful Accident.
Mr. Leonard G. Vandegrift met v> ith a very
painfnl accident on
engaged in hauling bricks upon the farm, of
M. E. Walker, Esq., near Armstrong's, and
while in the act of unloading his cart, his
horse suddenly started as if to run, and Mr.
Vandegrift caught at the lines to stop him.
In doing so, he was drawn between the
wheel and the post of the gate through which
the team was passing. The hub of the heavy
wheel struck the unfortunate man, crushing
him against the gate post, breaking his thigh
and knocking his hip out of joint. Persons
near ran to his assistance and Drs. McKee and
Barr were summoned to his relief. He is
now doing as well as circumstances will admit
but suffers much pain. Mr. Vandegrift is an
honest, industrious man, dependent on his
own exertions for the support of his family,
which makes' his affliction doubly unfortu
nate. Ho has the deepest sympathy of the
entire community in his misfortune.
the
are
the
the
of
George G. Evans, Secretary.
Wednesday. He was
Reported Finding or Money.
A circumstance occured in that portion of
our town called "Whoppin," last Saturday,
that caused its superstitious residents consid
erable mental exertion and our local notaries
to grab their pens and sharpen their minds in
the expectation of a legal fee. All were dis
appointed, as Ihe following statement will
show : Mr. John Kilpatrick purchased a lot
from Mr. Harry Eiiason last week. On Sat
urday Mr. Kilpatrick's two sons were digging
in the lot and unearthed a cigar box contain
ing a pair of spectacles. The report was cir
culated that the box contained $27,000, and
that the initials "L. R." were engraved on
the top. Mrs. Ryan heard it with surprise,
and concluded that the spectacles were the
property of her deceased husband, but was
willing to relinquish the claim on the money
if the spectacles were handed her. The whole
thing turned out to be a joke, as the presence
of the box in the place it was found was ex
plained by some boys who buried it there last
fall. Still many persons believe the money
was exhumed.
the
the
the
«s
Commencement Exercises.
Galena Seminary, at Galena, Md., Miss
Benny preceptress, held its annual commence
ment this week, the exercises on Thursday
evening in the Town Hall closing the same.
A large audience was in attendance and as
soon as the opportunity was afforded shower
ed hoquets to the students. Music was fur
nished by the Unicorn Band of Millington,
and the scholars, all of whom are females,
acquitted themselves creditably in vocal and
instrumental music, and recitation. "A man's
a man for a' that," was recited in a truly fine
style, and received great applause. All of
the recitations were good. Miss Parrott, of
Ohio, was the only graduate, and was award
ed a medal, which was placed around her
neck by Rev. Mr. Watson in an appropriate
speech. The evening's entertainment closed
with an address to the scholars by the resident
minister who drew the following beantiful pic
ture, "Woman was not taken from the head
of a man to be made his superior, or from be
neath his feet to be his inferior; but she was
taken from his side to be held as his equal
and receive the protection of his strong arm
—from near his heart to be loved." Numer
ous presents were made to the scholars from
the preceptress, and were a pleasant surprise.
[Communicated.]
Dramatic Entertainment.
"The Drunkard's Warning," a temperance
drama in three acts, was produced at the
Town Hall, Middletown, on Tuesday evening
last, by ladies and gentlemen of Galena, Md.,
where its first production was acknowledged
a success. A good audience was in attend
ance ; prominent to a fault were those on the
raised seats in the rear of the room—iu fact,
noisy and disagreeble. The prominent char
acters were acceptably taken, but those of
"Tipton," "Smasher," "Louisa Mordaunt"
and "Emma Granville" were more credit
ably impersonated, showing that they had
been studied well by the performers. There
was too much of the wild style of sympathy
introduced by the wife "Louisa," besides
which the drama was quite interesting. "Tip
ton," by J. BurgosoD, was rendered in such
a manner that the audience was continually
convulsed with laughter. One of his droll
remarks was this: "I love any kind of gas.
Tbere'8 hydrogen, oxygen and Holland gin ;
in fact every kind of gin. O, my eye! it's
dry, and so am I." The evening entertain
ment was concluded by the roaring farce,
called the "Dancing Dutchman." Music was
furnished by Price's Orchestra, of course,
and between some of the acts a young lady,
from Galena, sang three serio-comic songs,
and received therefor thunders of applause
from the rear of the room. The scenery used
was very creditable to the company, and we
confess that we were agreeably surprised at
the display of taste iu its arrangement.
Alexis.
he
of
Strawberries—An Estimate of the Crop.
Strawberries are giving place to raspber
ries and the latter are now begining to come
into market. Blackberries are also appearing
\ n small quantity. The strawberry season
has been a little longer than last year and
has been of some profit to the growers. There
have gone into market from the Delaware
Peninsula, over the Delaware Railroad, about
4,710,000 quarts of strawberries since the
opening of the season on May 29. In the ID.,
transportation of these berries three daily
trains were required the greater part of the 1
season. Of car loads there were about 785,
of which 552 were consigned to Jersey City,
35 to Boston and 198 to Philadelphia, the
latter being estimated. The others are offi
cial. Reduced to quarts, the quantities de
livered to these cities were : To Jersey City,
3,312,000; to Boston,2,100,000 ; to Philadel
phia, 1,188,000. New York was also largely
supplied by the Old Dominion Steamship
Company from Lewes,which carried probably
not less than 1,000,000 quarts, giving 5,710,
000 quarts entire marketable product of the
peninsula, exclusive of the quantities sold in
the local markets. Seven cents per quart is
thought to be a fair average of the prices
obtained, and if we deduct from this four
the estimated cost of the cultivation
and marketing of the crop, we bave left a
margin of three cents as the net profit to the
growers. Applying this figure to the quantity
shipped, we have as the net profit of the
strawberry yield for the season now closing
$171,300. In other words, the strawberries
bave brought to the peninsula farmers this
the effect of which has
cents as
quantity of money,
been perceptibly felt in all the rural districts,
as the crop was abundant everywhere. Wilm.
Commercial.
(Communicated.)
Appoqnlntmlnk Democracy.
Pursuant to a call made by Mr. Samuel
Townsend (through virtue of power resting
in him as member of the New Castle County
Executive Committee) to the Democratic
of Appoquinimink hundred, a large
voters
and interesting meeting of the said voters
was organized on Saturday, June lith, at
half-past 2 o'clock, by appointing Mr. Joseph
Wm. R. Roth well was
Roberts Chairman,
called, by motion, to act as Secretary, but
objected to by Mr. Samuel Townsend ;
the objection was overruled by vote of the
was
meeting.
On motion of Mr. Samuel Townsend, the
Chairman was authorized to appoint a com
mittee to be designated "The Hundred Cen
tral Committee." Whereupon the appoint
ment consisted of the following gentlemen :
Wm. Weldon. Francis T. Perry, Colin Fer
guson, Daniel Clayton and James C. Town
send.
Considerable discussion arose in regard to
the extent of power and privilege of this
committee. The controversy, however, was
amicably settled by the meeting adopting the
following resolution :
Resolved, That the Hundred Central Com
mittee of Appoquinimink hundred be and
are hereby instructed to appoint convassing
committees of not less than two members
from each school district in the hundred,
whose duty shall be to canvass the respective
school districts in which they reside and re
port result of said canvass to the Hundred
Central Committee on or before the first Sat
urday in September now next ensuing. And
that the sense of this meeting be and is that
the dutv aDd privilege of the Chairman of
the Hundred Central Committee be, after due
consultation with the other members of said
committee, to call all hundred meetings
of the Democratic voters of Appoquinimink
hnndred.
On motion the meeting adjourned.
Joseph Roberts, Chairman.
Wm. K. Rothwell, Secretary.
Horse and Carriage Stolen.
About three weeks ago a young man named
Charles Watrons arrived in Middletown in
the search of hay, purchasing the same for a
Philadelphia firm. Uis actions while at the
National Hotel were sufficient grounds for
suspicion, but no one was made acquainted
with the circumstances. Charles traveled by
carriage through the country, and patronixed
the livery stable of l. T. Wilson, returning
the horse after the first trip in good, season.
And it was then that he liked the horse, a
very dearly and wanted to purchase it
roan,
and a Jenny Lind carriage. A bargain was
struck, which necessitated the payment of
$10 cash and the balance was to come by
check through the firm Charles represented
inside of a week. The horse and its new
started for Bombay Hook, from whence
owner
they proceeded down the State. From
town the check was sent, bnt on being pre
sented for payment was found to be worth
less. This caused some anxiety to Mr. Wilson
«s to the course he should pursue to obtain
some
the horse and carriage or the pay for them.
The first of this week he received a letter from
Philadelphia, stating that he (Charles) was
going west on urgent business, and that when
he returned the money would be immediately
Well, it wasn't sent, so Mr. Wilson
sent.
went to Wilmington to see if any information
could be obtained of Watrons, and there
learned that he had been out of Georgetown
jail but a short time, being sent there for
stealing a horse from Mr. George Millington
of New Castle. This fact confirmed the idea
that the horse had been stolen, and on bis
return to Middletown, Mr. Wilson drove
down in Thoroughfare Neck in the hope of
recovering the horse which he believed had
been traded off to some one in that vicinity,
but nothing was heard of the team. Informa
tion was gleaned from many that told plainly
Watrons was a common thief purloining
everything he could get his hands oa. An
other plan he adopted ts keep Mr. Wilson's
confidence was to write and say thaï he had
sent the carriage home by rail, but it hasn't
arrived. The case offers a good field for the
operation of a detective, and should he
prove successful, the jail wardens can con
clude that a room will be occupied.
Delawnre College.
The Commencement and attendant exer
cises of Delaware College, at Newark, were
held this week beginning on Sunday, with
the delivery of the Baccalaureate Sermon
by Rev. James Wilson, D. D., a former presi
dent of the college, and closing on Wednes
day evening with the anniversary of the
Delta Phi Literary Society. On Tuesday
morning the Board of Trustees held their
annual meeting, thirteen being present, with
the president Col. H. S. McComb in theebair.
The late Legislature having refused to con
tinue the appropriation, made two years
before, for the support of the college, the
Trustees found it necessary to curtail the
running expenses, and to do so reduced the
number of the faculty, by one, and the sal
aries of all those retained. The course of
studies was also slightly modified. The
honorary degree of LL. D. was conferred
upen Hon. Thos. F. Bayard and Rev. Robt.
P. Fuirbairn, D. D. The degree of D. D. was
conferred upon Revs. J. P. Conkey and T. S.
Savage.
On Tuesday evening the Athecæan Literary
Society celebrated their anniversary, the
oration being delivered by Prof. James T.
Johnson, of Macon, Ga., of the class of 1857.
Addresses were also made by Mr. George
Balderston and John R. Martin, graduating
members of the society, Mr. Wm. L. Heisier
acting as chairman of the evening.
The commencement exercises proper took
place on Wednesday morning, Hon. J. W.
Crisfield, of Md , making the annual address
to the students. Fifteen students were grad
uated, receiving literary degrees as follows :
A. B.— W. J. Ferris and John R. Martin;
Ph. B.—George Balderston, W. L. Heisier,
Thos. Jaquett, J. Albert Reinhart : Belles
Lettres— Annie M. Evans, M. Estelle Porter,
Kate P. Porter, Lizzie H. Purnell, Clara
Springer. The remaining graduates were
pupils of the Normal Department. The degree
of A. M. was conferred ou P. D. Keyser, M.
ID., of Philadelphia,
The girls took all the honors—the valedic
tory having been awarded to Lizzie H. Pur
nell and the Latin Salutatory to Annie M.
Evans. Miss Purnell also received the $25
prize awarded by the Alumai to the most
proficient scholar.
A meeting of the Alumni was held in the
afternoon and a resolution adopted to offer a
prize of $25 to the student who shall write
the best C 3 suy on a subject to be selected by
the Faculty
The Delta Phi Anniversary was held in the
evening, the orator of the evening being P.
D. Keyser, M. D., of Philadelphia. Society
addresses were also made by Thomas Jaquette
and W. J. Ferris.
The exercises were well attended through
out, the oratory being crowded on every
occasion.
Maryland Affairs,
In Kent county, where the hoik of the
peaches are said to lay, the fruit is falling
rapidly from the trees.
A son of Mr. John Bonner, of Cherry Hill,
died of lock-jaw Friday morning. He had
taken cold from the effects of bathing while
overheated — Cecil Democrat.
The body of a white male infant was fished
up out of the canal at Chesapeake City on
last Tuesday week. It was sewed up in a
coarse sack and was evidently purposely
drowued.
A child of Hiram Spence, of North East,
Cecil county, swallowed a quantity of con
centrated lye, a few days ago, but was saved
by remedies promptly applied, although it
suffered terribly.
About twenty gentlemen of Easton went to
the Ceotenuial in a sail vessel last week.—
They sailed up the Chesapeake and through
the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal. They
"lived" on the boat during their stay.
No Camp.— The Methodist Protestant con
gregations of Kent circuit have decided to
hold no camp-meeting this year. In all pro
bability there will be no camp in the county
this summer.— Chestertown News.
J. Charles Lamb, formerly a compositor in
the Citizen office, died in Baltimore on Mon
day last, after a lingering illness of consump
tion. His remains were brought over on last
Tuesday, and interred in the Centreville
cemetery.— Centerville Citizen.
Dr. W. W. Tuck, of Annapolis, a delegate
to the Cincinnati Convention, was robbed of
$55 in money while iu Cincinnati. His
money was in a roll in his vest, which he left
lying on a chair in his bed-room while he
was in the bath-room, during which time
somebody robbed him.
The days of old-fashioned Peninsula camp
meetings bas past never to return. The parade
and show, together with the increased ex
penses of modern days, has driven those of
moderate means from the tented grove, while
others whose financial means will justify it,
seek the resorts on the sea coast for relaxation
from life's anxious cares and the hum drum
scenes of daily strife.— Denton Union.
Lusus Natdræ.— Galestown, in the upper
part of Dorchester county, has discovered a
great living curiosity in the shape of a nest
containing a half dozen double beaded terra
pins. They were found by a daughter ef
G. W. Jones, near a mild pond and only one
out of the six was alive. It has two perfectly
shaped heads and is considered quite a curi
osity. Joe Pennington, of Seaford, wants to
fatten it and take it to the Centennial.— Ex.
Trial of Speed. —Trials of speed will take
place ou the Millington Trotting Park, on
July 4th, 1876. There are four purses. No.
1, purse of $30, two in three to harness, free
for all colts on the Peninsula four years and
under. No.(2, purse $40, 2 in 3 to harness,free
for all horses owned on the Peninsula that
have no record. No. 3, purse $50, 2 in 3 to
harness,free for all horses owned on the Penin
sula that have no record better 2:50. The
committee are Messrs Edward C. Coppage, C.
P. Lopen, Benj. Johnson, H. C. Pennington
James Johnson. The track is located in Queen
Anne's connty, abont 1 mile from Millington.
Bitten by a Hog. —On Tuesday week a
man named Charles Harris, a gardener and
trucker, living in the Fourth Election District
of Aune Arundel, near what is known as the
Piney Woods, was bitten by a hog while en
gaged in feeding it, from the effects of which
he went mad, and left his home and took to
the woods, where he bas since been roaming.
He can be heard at intervals howling and
barking in a terrible manner. The hog is said
to have been bitten by a rabid dog a day pre
vious, but up to the time of attacking Mr.
Harris had exhibited no symptoms of being
inoculated with the poison. Harris is a mar
ried man, and formerly lived in Baltimore
county.
A Singular Pet. —An elderly lady, resid
ing in the vicinity of Charlestown, Cecil co.,
has a queer pet. It is a common size laud
terrapin, which has during the summer
months for five or six years past paid her
regular daily visits, and at each time receives
some food. The creature climbs the porch
steps, and with head protruding, patiently
awaits the appearance of its guardian, and
receiving its allowance immediately takes its
departure. The lady first discovered it about
six years ago, while it was perambulating
about the yard, and she gave it some crumbs
and since that time it has continued these
annual visits to her domicile.— Cecil Whig.
Horrible Murder and Suicide. —On Thurs
day morning last, a young lady, Miss Almira
Street, daughter of Mr. Roger Street, of Cler
mont Mills, Harford county, was brutally
murdered by a young man named Christian
Koltz, whom Mr. Street had takeu from the
House of Refuge, and had employed as a farm
hand. As Miss Street approached the cellar
on some errand, Koltz seized an axe and cut
her head nearly from her body. He after
wards confessed the deed, and gave no mo
tive but "deviltry." He was taken out by
an infuriated crowd, and with a rope around
his neck, was strung up to a tree. The rope
being cut he concluded to hang himself, and
climbed the tree, adjusted the rope and jump
ed off.— Cecil Democrat.
Sensible Advice.
You are asked every day through the col
umns of newspapers and by your druggist to
use something for Dyspepsia and Liver Com
plaint that you know nothing about, you get
discouraged spending money with but little
success. Now to give you satisfactory proof
that Green's August Flower will cure you of
Dyspepsia and Liver Complaint with all its
effects, such as Sour Stomach, Sick Head
ache. Habitual costiveness, palpitation of the
Heart, Heart-burn, Water-brash, coming up
of food after eating, low spirits, Ac., we ask
you to go to your druggist, Dr. Cbamber
laine, and get a sample bottle of Green's
August Flower for 10 cents and try it, or a
regular size for 75 cents, two doses will re
lieve you. __
THINK FOR YOURSELF.
Thousands lead miserable lives, suffering
from dyspepsia, a disordered stomach and
liver, producing biliousness, heartburn, cos
tiveness, weakness, irregular appetite, low
spirits, raising food after eating, and often
ending in fatal attacks of fever. They know
they ark sick, yet get little sympathy. The
unfailing remedy, which is yearly restoring
thousands, is DaCosta's Radical Cure, sold by
C. Anderson, Drnggist, Middletown.
A 25c. bottle will convince you of its mer
its. Don't delay another hour after reading
this, but go and get a bottle, and your relief
is as certain as you live. Will you do it, or
will you continue to suffer ? Think for your
self !
Professor Parker's Pleasant Worm Syrup
is perfectly safe and extremely palatable.—
No physic required. Costs 25 cents Try it.
S. M. Reynolds, Middletown, Del, is selling
MORE GOOD SHOES than any two dealers
on the Peninsula south of Wilmington, and
challenges any manufacturer or dealer to
pass his shoes in quality, style, or prices,
lall amd see them.
sur]
Schibnrr fob Jolt, though not entirely
giren over to Centennial topic*, contains
much, the publishers claim, that will just
be of peculiar interest to the American public.
The accounts of the signing of the Declara
tion (even those by the signers themselves)
very conflicting, and Col. Higginson's
"Story of the Signing," in this number, is a
concise and reliable review of the subject.—
The illustrations of this paper are quite strik
ing. Recent research has shown that some of
our most orthodox and cherished legends of
the Declaration will not do "to tie to." But,
if we must give up the "Ring I Grandpa !"
story, as Col. Higginson seems to think, we
shall find, by way of compensatjon, plenty of
authentic legends about Washington in the
next paper : "A Little Centennial Lady," by
Mrs. Constance Cary Harrison—a delightful,
illustrated sketch of Sally Fairfax, General
Washington's pet and friend. This is a rare
piece of magazine writing, and embodies por
tions of Sally's journal, written in the quaint
est of language.
Miss Jane Stuart writes racily of her fath
er's celebrated portraits of Washington, and
gives new anecdotes of both painter and pre
sident. Accompanying this is an engraving
of Stuart's portrait, from the original in the
Boston Athenaeum.
In a paper on "Harvard University,'' by
Mr. H. E. Scudder, there are other glimpses
in type and picture of Revolutionary times
and people, including the Washington Elm
and Washington (Longfellow's) House. This
is pronounced the best popular review of the
University that has ever appeared.
Other interesting papers are : the first of
Col. Waring's illustrated series on the Mosel
River, entitled "The Bride of the Rhine; "a
notable defense of Webster's course on the
Compromise Measures of 1850, by Prof. W.
ilkinson ; a story of bell-pulling by
Edward Bellamy, entitled "A Providence,"
now
are
C.
etc.
St. Nicholas for July makes a feature of
the national holiday. Its tribute to it in
cludes several contributions,—stories and
sketches, poems and pictures, puzzles and
paragraphs. All the American flags of his
tory, from the "Rattlesnake" and the "Pal
metto" of 1776 to the Stars and Stripes of the
present, wave oat at us from two of the
pages ; the "Boston Boys" who gained their
right to the "Common" are remembered in a
poem and shown in a drawing ; and on the
"Centennial Page," the events of the Century
that are most worthy of record are duly re
corded, and Borne of them pictured.
In its miscellaneous contents, the number
includes many other attractive and interest
ing articles. Mrs. Oliphant has one of her
most charming "Windsor Castle" papers;
and Susan Coolidge a romantic story of hum
ble life in Germany. There is "The Vikings
in America," in which" those adventurous
pirates of Norway are credited with the orig
inal discovery of the New World; "Turret
Ships and Torpedoes" a well-illustrated arti
cle, full of information regarding naval
armament inventions, and warfare; "The
Boy Emigrants" begin digging out their gold
under circumstances of excitement and inter
est ; and Mr. Aidrich's story of "The Cat and
the Countess" ends in a very happy and en
tertaining manner.
Jack-in-the-Pulpit, and the other depart
ments, have their nsual store of good things ;
and chief among the numerous illustrations
is the frontispiece—an excellent engraving of
"A Wooden Pulpit in the Church of St. An
drew, Antwerp."
SusiitfSB Sorak
Fine 18 and 20 thread coarse and French
Kid foxed button Boots ready for Saturday's
trade. Several pairs engaged already. Call
early. Johnson Bros., No. 1 TOWN HALL."
Home made shirts, made of the Best Wam
sutta Muslin and No. 2100 Linen and perfect
fit, for $1.00. For sale by
S. M. REYNOLDS.
Neat, Llain Pebble Slippers, 2 to 7, solid
insole, made and for sale cheap at the Shoe
Factory, No. 1 TOWN HALL.
S. M. Reynolds will open this day a fresh
invoice of the genuine Baltimore Mackinaw
Hats and will sell them at Baltimore prices.
Also a fresh stock of children's, boys', young
and old men's straw and felt Hats at less than
jobbers' prices.
A large stock of LINEN CLOTHES at the
MIDDLETOWN CLOTHING HOUSE.
A fine lot of Glove Calf low Jeffersons for
elderly ladies' summer weav, just through at
the Shoe Factory, No. 1 TOWN HALL.
Opened this day, a new case of CALICOES,
warranted fast colors, at 5 cts. per yard, at
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
New line of White Piques, V. Lawns, Per
cales, Cretonnes, Ac., just opened at
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
STRAW HATS 1 Straw Hats ! at the
MIDDLETOWN CLOTHING HOUSE.
Ladies call at S. M. REYNOLDS' and look
at the new assortment of Hamburg Edgings
and Ineertings, in all widths and prices from
10 cents and upwards.
A large assorment of Linen DUSTERS at
MIDDLETOWN CLOTHING STORE.
Guns and Locks repaired at
LINDLEY A KEMP'S.
If you want a suit of Clothes from $5.00 to
$30.00 call at the Middletown Clothing Store.
The best Coal Oil in the market at 5 cents
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
per quart, at
Paints, Oil, Glass and Putty at
LINDLEY A KEMP'S
New Hardware Store.
Ladies in need of a nice Silk Dress, call at
S. M. REYNOLDS' and look at those Guinet
Black Silks at $1.50 and $1.75 per yard, just
received direct from the importers.
Winslow's and Mountain Com, Asparagus,
Tomatoes, Cherries, Blackberries, Pears and
Peaches, at S. M. REYNOLDS'.
New Orleans and Porto Rico Molasses
Choice Sugar Loaf Drips and Sngar House
Syrups, at S. M. REYNOLDS'.
20,000 lbs. Iron just Received by
LINDLEY A KEMP
Rnmford's Yeast Powder the best in the
market, for sale by
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
WHITE VESTS for $1.50 at Middletown
S. R. ESTES A CO.
Clothing Store.
5,000 lbs. Nails just received,
LINDLEY A KEMP.
Large assortment of Paint Brushes at
LINDLEY A KEMP'S New Hardware Store.
Raisins, Prunes, Citron, Dried Fruits, Lem
ons, Oranges, new and fresh, at
S. M. Reynolds'.
The Best and Cheapest Cucumber Pumps
for sale by
LINDLEY A KEMP.
Cheap Shovel, Spades, Rakes and Forks at
LINDLEY A KEMP'S.
An elegant Two-Button Kid Glove for 75
cents cash, at S. M. REYNOLDS.
Granulated Sugar 12 cents; A 11 cts, and
B 10 cts, cash, at S. M. REYNOLDS'.
No. 1, 2, and 3 Mackerel in bairels, half
barrels, quarters and kitts ; New Split Labra
dor Herring in barrels and half barrels, just
received and for sale by S. M. REYNOLDS.
A choice Rio Coffee, green, 25 cents, roast
ed 29 cents, cash, at S. M. REYNOLDS'.
Clark's best Spool Cotton, 6 cents per Spool
or 70 cents per dozen Cash, at
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
Star Skirt Braids 7 cents Cash, at
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
Hams, Shoulders, Sides, Beef (smoked), at
S. M. REYNOLDS'.
The best 121 cent Hose in the market, for
sale by S. M. REYNOLDS
A good Black Tea for 50 cents. Green 90
cents, at S. M. REYNOLDS'.
Jrg êoods and êrowriea.
Spring Ming I
SPRING CLOTHING!!
We have just brought from the city a large
assortment of
MEN S AND BOYS' SPRING A SUMMER
CLOTHING,
which we would like you to call and examine
before buying elsewhere.
Just call and examine our
$10 SUITS
and our *5 PANTS and VEST. We know
that they will surprise yon, as they are all
wool. We manufacture our own goods, and
sell them at reduced prices for the cash
Clothing is cheap, but we are selling ours
CHEAPER ! What do you think of a good
suit of Clothing at
can
$6, $7, $8 and $10 per Suit?
We have, also, a large assortment of
Https» Trunks,
>•
VALISES, Ac,,
and you will find that they are cheap as the
Clothing. Come one ! come all ! and give us
a call, at the Miidletown Clothing House,
S. R. ESTES & CO.,
Middletown, Del.
TO THE PUBLIC.
The subscriber would call the attention of the
pnblic to his
LARGE AND WELL-SELECTED STOCK of
GOODS,
Consisting in part of
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS
}
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Hats, Hardware,
Queensware, Wood and Willow Ware,
Earthen and Stone Ware.
FISH, MEATS, &c.
Give us a call before purchasing elsewhere ;
And everything usually kept in a
First Class Country Store,
All of which have been selected with
care, and will he
SOLD AT PRICES IN ACCORD
ANCE WITH THE TIMES.
No Charge for Showing Goods.
Charles Tatman Jr.
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
Jan X, 1876—tf_
;
HORSE POWDERS !
HORSE POWDERS Î
EVERY KIND, EVERY VARIETY, IN LARGE QUANTITIES, AT
ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE
FOUTZ'S HORSE AND CATTLE POWDERS,
TOBIAS' DERBY CONDITION POWDERS,
All patent Medicines are to he found at
ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE.
LINIMENTS. ROBERTS' EMBROCATION, H. H. LINIMENT, TOBIAS' LINIMENT, LOW'S LINIMENT.
BULL'S COUGH SYRUP, BOSCHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP, MORRIS' SYRUP OF
TAR, JAYNE'S EXPECTORANT.
„ . TX -» nnrvn A T> A rnTfi'WTCJ AYER'S HAIR VIGOR, HALL'S HAIR RENEWER, MONTGOMERY'S
HAIR PREPARA llOJNb. hair restorer, iYON'S katharion.
In addition to the above catalogne we always have in stock
ROBERTS' HORSE POWDERS,
HARVELL'S POWDERS.
JOHN'S CONDITION POWDERS,
SHERIDAN'S CAVALRY POWDERS,
COUGH REMEDIES.
HAIR DYES, COD LIVER OILS, DYE STUFFS, LAMPS, LAMP CHIMNEYS, SPONGES, Ac., Ac. Remember the place,
Middletown.
BARR'S OLD STAND.
ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE.
Jtaltaouss.
1876.
Cheap, Cheaper, Cheapest.
1876.
Spring and Summer
o-ooids
Just Received,
AND TO BE SOLD AT VERY REDUCED
PRICES FOR CASH.
DRESS GOODS— of nearly all kinds, very
cheap.
NOTIONS.— Ties, Gloves, Hosiery,
Jewelry, and all Fancy Goods, very low.
CLOTHING.—Men'a and Boys' Ready-Made
Clothing, fine Dress Suits and common
Suits, from $5 to $20.
CARPETS.— 30 pieces of Carpeting, consist
ing of Cottage, Hemp, Rag, Ingram,
Stair, Venetian and Brussels, at the fol
lowing prices : 25, 30, 35, 45, 50 cts.
to $1.50. Also, White and Plaid Mat
tings.
BOOTS A SHOES. —Men's fine Boots from
$2.50 to $5 ; Men's Gaiters from $1.75 to
$4- Men's Centennial Buckle low cut
Shoes from $2.50 to $4 ; Ladies' Slippers,
Bals, and Gaiters from 75 cts. to $3. Ail
styles of Children's Shoes from 25 cents
to $1.50.
SEWING MACHINE NEEDLES.
GUNS A PISTOLS. —Double and Single
barreled Guns; Single, Double and 7-shot
Cartridge Pistols from $1 to $6. Cart
ridges, Ac.
All persons wishing to get the worth of
their money will do well to give us a call.
8. R. STEPHENS & CO.
M. L. HARDCASTLE.
LOAN STOCK.
FIFTY SHARES 4th Series Mutual Loan
Association Stock for sale. Third payment
due May 16. Apply immediately to
jun 3-2t A. G. COX, Sec'y.
FOR SALE.
Two Bnilding Lots on Lake street, Middle
W. W. WILSON.
town, 40x150 feet each.
aprl5-tf
JOB BBINTI3STO
Of Every Description
NEATLY EXEGUTED AT THIS OFFICE.
Ehvrlopes of all sizes, and letter heads with
business cards, furnished, very cheap at the
Transcript office.
.pättHaneona ^d^rtiacment».
A MATTER OF POPULAR INTEREST.
Lehigh Register
substance of a/onvenation about 0<uc Hall, In
Wanamaker A Brown's " Largest
■e in America.'' A visitor and
attendance the speakers :
Viator. " What comer Is the Building on 7"
Attendant "South-East comer of Bath and
Harket Please note the SIXTH, for some
strängen seeking Oak Hall, have been misled
by designing persons. 1 '
V. "It Is perfectly colossal I
its dimensions?"
A. "12,000 square feet—06 on Harket, and
180 odd on Sixth, sbp stories high, has over
three acres a4 floor
occupied bys
ness places."!
V. "Doyon
A. "A
for the ft
the
We
the
Cl
in
Do you know
, and coven space once
l twenty different buat
steam-power?"
it young engine furnishes power
t and passenger elevators, and the
bollere steam for heating, and the other opera
tions of the house."
V. " What order do yon
A. "They are first
the basement on Ion
thence on the âffig
tor's room on theWi
V. "Is inspectin^he first operation'
A. " No, nr, measuring. The goods are first
measured In the piece, then Inspected. The
cloth passes over rollers In the face of a strong
light and two men sit one before and one
behind the goods, watching with the eye of a
hawk for the least pin-hole Imperfection, and
markin g every flaw, so that the cutter may see
and avoid it when he comes to cut the gar
ments."
V. " You must employ !
A. "Come to our filth
keep 70 hands all the thffie
into garments,—besides
a dozen men's work eacre _
V. "Do you manufacture all your own
goods ?"
A. " We do, and most carefully. Our ex
aminers inspect every stitch and «earn, and
certify to every garment as extra-well made
before we put our ticket on it, and become
responsible for it."
V. "Your system must save you a groat
deal?" /
A. " In every direction, sir. It is
and economy we practice all tlte wi
that enables us to put our prSs À
people as we do."
with goods?"
in
and
fe counters, and taken
elevator to the inspec
floor."
of cuttere?"
floqf and see I We
coning np the cloth
■0 machines that do
it a stroke."
to
an
through,
m to the
After inspecting the work, what becomes
of it?'
A. " Before It goes Into Stock it is ticketed.
Every single garment has Its number and
other points noted on it, so that Its entire his
tory can be traced without fall, upon our
books."
V. " Yon must have 30 or 40 salesmen?"
A. " Why sir, on busy days yon ma 1
In the varions rooms and suites o
selling to the throngs of enstomen."
V. ' Do yon do an order buttesi
and express ?"
A. "Verygreat
100
rooms,
f, by mail
All over the country. Our
1776. OEISTTEN'N'IA.E YEAR. 1876.
■O
EDWIN HALL,
28 South Second Street,
BELOW MARKET STREET, PHILADELPHIA,
Would respectively invite ladies visiting the city to examine our stock, consisting in part of
BLACK SILKS of the best makes, which we guarantee.
COLORED SILKS of the newest and most desirable shades.
FANCY SILKS at very low prices.
DRESS GOODS, embraoing all the new fabrics.
SHAWLS, COATS, LACE GOODS, &c.
DRESS MAKING in all its branches.
White Ml Mroiin, Gloves, Hosiery, Underwear, Heel Ties, &c,
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES k LINENS FOR MEN'S AND BOYS' WEAR.
Talle Linens, Napkins, Towels, Irish Linens, Muslins, Ac.
(THE STORE IS ACCESSIBLE FROH ALL POINT8 BY STREET CASS.)
ONE PRICE, AND PRICES GUARANTEED.
may 6—3mos
JOHN A. REYNOLDS,
1STotary Public,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE.
CD
|s
a §
DR TH0S.R GILPIN,
3
2*o
g-K
►>
3
4 "
s-t
Sa«
NS'S
£ is
«»3
0o S
5 o £
o Zb
» Sff
So 3
PS I
Is
DENTIST,
§
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE,
Feb 14-ly.
er
-3 6
REYNOLDS & CO.,
No. 832 Market Street,
WILMIlIGTOll, DELAWARE.
Conveyancers, Surveyors, Real Estate Agents,
Collectors of Accounts, Bills, Ac.
Houses and Lands rented, and rents collec
ted ; Loans negotiated ; Titles examined ;
Deeds, Bonds, Mortgages, and other Legal
papers carefully drawn, and supervised by
counsel permanently retained. Correspon
dence solicited.
Reference furnished.
REYNOLDS A CO.,
No. 832 Market Street,
Wilmington, Del.
Jan 11—ly
Independent in everything! Neutral in Nothing!
Opposed to all Corrupt Rings
In Municipal, State and National Affairs !
A FIRST-CLASS HORNING NEWSPA
PER.
Is publiished every morning, Sundays ex
cepted, and delivered in the City of Philadel- ;
Ç hia and surrounding Cities, Villages and
owns, for TWELVE CENTS PER WEEK,
payable to the carriers. It contains all the
News of the Day, including the
Associated Press Telegrams,
Special Telegrams
And Correspondence
from all points of interest, full and accurate
Local Reports, and Fearless Editorial Discus
sions of all current topics. It is a first-class
newspaper in every respect.
ADVERTISEMENTS
Are tastefully and attractively displayed.
^®"Thecirculation of "THE TIMES" is
mach larger than that of any other daily pa
per in this City or State, with the single ex
ception of the Ledger, and is constantly in
creasing.
perfect system jjt
make itoosrihfe
away jSweri
9 people 2,000 miles
if they were here In
to
y as
' I suppose yon have at least half a dozen
different departments T
" Hy dear sir I we have more than twenty,
each charged with Its own business, and each
thoroughly organised, a ne ces sa r y wheel with
in the great wheel."
V. "will yon name a dozen
A. "With pleasure. The Custom Depart
ment, for those who prefer custom-made to
ready-madje T)re Furnishing Department,
with its AaShse stock of all underwear.
The ShlrtPfcto
making our own
V. '
A.
or so of them f
rv, with its busy machines,
nret-claas shirts. The Trim
ming Department, itself as big as many a regu
lar store. The Garment Stock Bonn. The
Receiving Room. The Order Department,
named before. The Special Uniforms Depart
ment. The Delivery Department, with its
score of messengers. The—"
V. "Hold, hold I sir, enough!"
A. "I'm not half through I The Advertising
Department, with Its bULand sign distributors,
editing and publishing* business and popular
journal, circulsifttg Jree, 50,000copies monthly
(tell all your frieffijrto send for It). The Hen's
ent,witnti many rooms. The Boys'
ent. The Youths' Department The
's Department with ltl
entrance for ladlea. The Telegraph Depart
ment The Chief Clerk's Department, with
its book-keepers and assistants. General
s Office, and
all busy as bees
' buying, mak
a
Departmi
Children
special
ager's Department;
other offices of the
thinking, planning,
ing, registering, reca
and in a thousand
to carry on a boslnereVlth
ing to between 12,000,000
nually."
V. "S-t-u-p-e-n-d-o-n-s!"
A. "Indeed it is I. I forgot to mim the
Cashier's Department, which handles its 125,000
of retail sales on some single days I"
Y. "125,0001 Immense 1 Thafs.what enables
the house to bny cheap and seUrcheap
A. " Exactly I Yon ljpve jjsst hit ii
people throng here
on low prices and 1
V. "What
,sen<
,000,000 an
?"
are the 'fo
rules' I hear so
much abont?"
A. ' ' Our system of business dealing—1. One
price, no deviation ; 2. Cash for everything: 8.
A guarantee protecting the purchaser; U The
money returned if the bayer can't otherwise
be suited."
V. " Nothing could be fairer."
A. " Nothing. And the people see It"
V. " Well, 1 thank yon, sir, for yoor polite
attention."
A. " Not at all. It's a pleasure to
Call again; and be sure eft'
maker & Brown's Oak tTaIIS
ner Sixth and Harket"
V. "Thank yon I I shall be
Good morning."
__ .jyou.
fie—Wana
i-East cor- •
ippy to do so.
MIDDLETOWN
Nursery and Fruit Farm.
• A large and varied assortment of
General Nursery Stock
For Sale at low rates.
PEACH TREES A SPECIALTY.
E. R. COCHRAN,
Middletown De.
Oct.l7-tf
J. MEIER & BR0 m
MERCHANT TAILORS,
S. E. Cob, Second and Arch Sts.,
PHILADELPHIA,
Have in Stock a full line of
Fine Overcoating*! Suitings, Casiimei e «,
and Testings
Of the newest designs for FALL and WIN
TER wear, which will be made to order in
the latest styles and best manner. Special at
tention given to Dress Suits.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK,
oct 10-tf
Having erected a convenient and commo
dious Green House, and PlaDt Nursery at the
rear of my dwelling on North Broad street,la
short distance above the Academy, in Mid
dletown, I have now and will continue to
keep on hand a Urge and)varied assortment of
GREEN HOUSE & BEDDING PUANTS,
which I cordially invite the ladies of Middle
town and vicinity to call and examine. My
stock has been selected and propagated with
mach care and I respectfully ask the patron
age of all lovers of flowers of the community.
B. F. LIPPINCOTT,
Middletown, Del.
feb 20—tf
MIDDLETOWN
Iron Foitrj and HacUne Slop.
P LOWS and Plow Castings, Machine Cast
ings of all kinds on hand or made to
order.
Particular attention given to Repairing
Machinery. Cash for old Iron.
WM. L. BUCKE A SON,
Founders and Machinists.
Jan 1-tf
FOR SALE.
1 r fk Cords ofiOak and Maple WOOD, ei
Xt/U ther in the woods or delivered in
quantities to sait purchasers. Apply to
JOHN A. REYNOLDS,
' Decl2-tf.
Middletown, Del,

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