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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, August 19, 1876, Image 1

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NO. 34.
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 19,1^6.
VOL. IX.
t + t
- r;
f
—DEALERS IE—
HARDWARE
* -*• • • AN J,.- . y : (
Agricultural Implements,
»
i i
V !
OPPOSITE NATIONAL HOTEL,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE.
Hardware Department.
Iron and Steel, Horse and Male Shoes, Horse
Nails, Blacksmith Supplies, Chain Traces,
Harnes, Trowels, Nails, Spikes, Locks, Hinges,
Bolts, Files, Chisels, Levels, Planes, Bevels,
Wrenches, Picks, Mattocks, Hubs, Rims,
Spokes, Shafts, Long and Short Arms, Clips,
Springs, Enameled Cloth, Gum Canvass, Ac.
A complete stock of TOOLS and Supplies
for Carpenters, Builders, Masons, Sadlers,
Shoemakers and others, with man; House
furnisbifig articles. We invite the public to
call and examine our prices.
Paints, Oils, Tnrpen
j tine, G-lass and
51 Putty,
CHEAPEST AND BEST.
I
Agricultural Department.
Farmer's Friend, Heckendorn, Wiley,
Concave and Moore PLOWS ; Plow
Castings, Grindstones, Pumps, Scales,
Corn Shelters,Churns, Shovels,Forks,
Spades, Hoes and Rakes,
^5#-No trouble to show goods, [mar 18
I
Lumber t Hardware.
t t» vm-ivTTurrvn-n e r\r\
J. B. FENIM0RE & CO.,
Î, W// ' 10
good
80
her
arp
nrlsp
P

tifnl
vonr
m n
men
if
>9
Successor to
Opposite the R. R. Depot,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE
i
val
DRALKB IN ALL KINDS OF
Lumber, Hardware, and General Building
Material, Sash, Ooot9, Shutters, Blinds,
ward
of
secret
the
she
aod Mouldings, Paints, Oils, Var
nishes, Glass and Putt;, Bricks,
Building Lime, Hair, Etc.
_ Consta ntly on band. _
4T
* r
—ALSO—

AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT
TOWN ANDOODNrat PAINT
( Ready-Mixed. )
"Blatchle;'s" Celebrated Cucumber Wood
Pumps and everything in the building line.
Having made arrangements with large
wholesale dealers, I shall be prepared to fnr
nish large bills of Lumber for buildings, such
as I ma; not have in stock, direct from whole
sale dealers, thereby securing the lowest prices
possible to be obtained.
Give me a call, and get m; prices, before
purchasing elsewhere.
Feb 5-1;.
PAINTS and BRUSHES
for marking Baskets, Crates, «c.
READ.YjCUT ADJUSTABLE STENCIL
'plates,
"does
might
remain
tes
An; name arranged in a few minutes. Sev
eral sizes of letters.
' / /poaSALS BÏ lt<
Or. E. HUKÎLL,
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
Dealer in Lumber and Hardware.
Jul;22d. '
her
petuous
been
should
her
her..
large
had
She
had
vellum.
One
aside
'
ous
The
family.
Spain
self,
enough
a very
publicly
her
A
bowing
"will
of the
The
services."
Medina,
me
"You
"No;
"But
"But
think
"I
you
The
THE MILD POWER CURES
HUMPHREYS'
HOMOEOPATHIC SPECIFICS.
Been In general use for twenty years. Everywhere
proved the most SAFE, SIMPLE, ECONOMICAL and
EFFICIENT medicines known. They are just what
the people want, saving time and money averting
sickness and suffering. Each single specific the well
tried ffrescription of an eminent physician.
Nos.
Cures.
Cents.
v*Rg. Congestion; Inflammations, 25
W9^mj|«vf r . Wdrtrç Çalic, 25
viMo-CoLic,'6r Teething of Infants,
4. Diabbhœa, of Children or Adnlts,
5. Dyssntibv, Griping, Billious Cholic, 25
6. Cholera-Morbus, Vomiting,
7. Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis,
8. Neuralgia, Toothache, Faceache,
. Headaches, Sick Headache, Vertigo, 25
10. Dyspepsia", Billious Stomach, 25
11. Supprissrd, or Painful Periods,
12. Whitks, too Profuse Periods,
13. Croup, Cough, Difficult Breathing,
14. Salt Rheum, Erysipelas, Eruptions, 25
15. Rheumatism, Rheumatic Pains,
16. Fever and Ague, Chill Fever, Agues, 50
17. Piles, blind or bleeding,
18. OphTHAlmv, and Sore or Weak Eyes, 50
19. Catarrh, acute or chronic, Influenza, 50
20. Whooping-Couch, violent coughs,
21. Asthma, oppressed breathing,
22. Ear Discbabges, impaired bearing,
23. Scrofula, enlarged glands, Swellings, 50
24. General Disability,Physical Weakness,50
25. Dropsy and scanty Secretions,
26. Sea-Sicknes 8, sicknsss from riding,
27. Kidney Disease, Gravel,
28. Nervous Debility, Seminal Weakness
or involuntary discharges,
29. Sou Mouth, Canker,
30. Urinary Weakness, wetting the bed, 50
31. Painful Periods, with Spasms,
32. Disease or Heabt,
33. Epilepsy, Spasms,
34. Diptheria, ulcerated sore throat,
35. Chronic Congestions and Eruptions, 50
3.
25
ed
2:5
25
25
9
25
25
bbe
palace
as she
knocked
He
25
25
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
1 00
50
50
palpitations, etc., 1 OO
St. Vitus' Dance, 1 00
50
# FAMILY CASES.
Case (Moraeco) with above 35 large vials and
Manual (Jf directions, $10 00
Ca se(M orocco)of 20 large vialsand Book,?;
These remedies are sent b; the case or
single box to an; part of tba country, Tree of
charge, on receipt of price. Address
HUMPHREYS'.
>
oo
IWEli
"For sale b; all druggists.
CLABfMCB ANDERSON, Agent,
Middletown, Del.
mh25-l;
frtijrf flottrj.
THE ITNKNOWN.
f
Should'st chance to fall in with the throng
Up Broad, some fair evening, you'll meet
A picture of sorrow and wrong
That sends a strange thrill through
street.
A form frail and slender, scarce grown,
'Mid the gay crowd of fashion and boast,
Gliding by unobserved and alone,
Pale, noiseless and fleet as a ghost.
(
Her garb, though without stain or dirt,
. Is so quaint, old-fnshioned and poor
That voii'a deem it the very same skirt,
Bell and bodice her grandmother wore.
And yet there's a "charm in her air
The courts of the noble wonld grace ;
And a shadow of grief and a prayer
Are wrought in her classical face.
Horse
Traces,
Hinges,
Bevels,
Rims,
Clips,
Ac.
House
to
That face you can never forget,
Whatever bright eyes on you beam ;
Day by day you will think of it yet,
And catch its strange look in your dream.
You'll wonder full often, I know,
What troubles that bosom have wrung,
As you watch her flit by to and fro,
So^ye*! %o^ad a.d so_yopnj: ! ; j
Are father and mother no more?
No brother no sister to greet ?
No eyes at the half-open door
To welcome Hie wandering.feet 1
No arms to encircle t6e form
In a loving and tender embrace ?
No bright smiles to scatter The storm
That shadows that beautiful face ?
not to know
I know not, I neeA
The drift of hersorrowfnl years—
Enough that wherever I go
That face lingers by me in tears,
And forth from my heart springs the prayer,
Pure, fervent as mortal e'er prayed,
That God. vopld vouchsafe her His care
When beside there is no one to aid !
That His right arm may shelter and guide
Through tbe dark haunts and kennels of
sin,
And keep her, whatever betide,
Untainted and holy within !
And when the frail form we see now
Shall be "missed from the thiongs of the
town,
God grant that the care-woven brow
May be clothed with a radiant crown !
C. C. C.
Plow
18
.... ,
j , en , ln J> kbarles the bourtb as
cended the Spanish throne, he w«s a
A" ^ 6 ^j Ung raa , n ' J* ut be
bada s.ster DonnaLarga, whose beauty,
10 ,hat C0UDtry D0ted ' or, ' 8 handsome
women,, was so grea -hat most ot the
unmnrmd grandees .sol,cited her hand
before she was twenty years old. Her
brother s wife was an Italian woman,
good looking enough, hut utterly dis
80 u e '
One asy v m-'1784, the princess met
her royal sister-in-law under suspicious
the quee "' 8n hoar
nÄnWT nr«. A k 4 r
* me ' b ?' wâ8 88 fr, 8 ,d
-Tarait* her '. .l
be.JSnft.t; t q Ik °
arp wi«t!na ^ 'j?"
Th^nriUp«/lnnknH d be " Utÿ '
nrlsp anH aalrsH ■ a er in sur
P -what do ton mpan ?"
• -Pan nnvfkin» k" i,; n „ u
tifnl darling ? Wh*f T m * " fk U f
vonr hrntkfr J ?
Sïïwïâ riSS JSll Ti y r
m n in Madrid won!d £ * f h ™ is0 ™
men in Madrid would be only too glafo
if you should smile upon them."
"But why," asked the
ROMANCE OF HISTORY.
The first thing she did after her arri
val in Madrid was to hunt up a lover,
whom she found in the handsome
guardsman Godoy, who played after
ward so wretched a part in the history
of the Iberian Peninsula.
Their criminal intimacy remained no
secret to the members of the royal
family, and pupppinlly indi gn ant was
the queen's sister, whose life until then,
despite the many temptations to which
she had been exposed, had been blame
of
princess,
"does he not want me to get married ?"
"Pretty little goose," said the queen,
"because, under our laws, here,
might become his successor if I should
remain childless."
The two women parted a few minu
tes later, and the princess went to her
boudoir.
you
What her royal sister-in-law bad told
her had set her to thinking. The im
petuous blood of the Castilian
coursing through her veins
The homage of her admirers had not
been lost upon her. The idea that she
should uot get married on account of
her brother's political jealousy provoked
her.. So, laboring under intense
citement, she took from her desk the
large bundle of love-letters which she
had received during tbe past few years.
She read the tender missives, which
had been written upon the smoothest
vellum.
One letter after another was tossed
aside by her tiny hand, until she open
' Jthe.foHowing. brief
M<if l btnMailc, Beautiful and TYrtt(
ous Donna La:,ga Tabla, Senora de Bourbon —
The writer is the head of tbe Sidonia-Medina
family. He would be the happiest man in
Spain if Donna Larga would become his wife.
Ssnor Don Garcia Sidonia ds Medina.
"And I," said the princess to her
self, "in my vain pride, was foolish
enough not only to refuse this offer from
a very handsome man, but to insult him
publicly in the pardo."
Suddenly she jumped up and rang
her bell.
A very handsome duenna entered,
bowing deeply.
"Estrella," said the princess to her,
"will you go for me ou a secret errand
of the greatest importance ?"
The duenna bowed and replied :
"Your Highness may command my
services."
"Then go to the Count Sidonia de
Medina, and tell bim to come, and
me without delay."
"But, your Highness—"
"You refuse to go, Estrella?"
"No; but—"
"But what ?" cried the princess with
eyes.
"But you know what people would
think of such an interview."'
"I order you to fio my bidding ! If
you refuse, you shall suffer for it."
The duenna bowed and went out.
race was
ex
ed
le
this
.
to
tun
"ts
her
bave
"but
to
.
bbe did not go straightway -to tbe
palace of the young grandee, but, spy West
as she was like the most of her ilk, she
knocked at the king's door. said
He was lying on his lounge, and 1
see
when the handsome Estrella entered the
room, he sprang to his feet and seized
her hand
"And what have you to tell me now
'Trella?"—the Spanish abréviation of
Estrella
"Sire," she replied, "nothing about j
"I would not have liked you half so I
well if you had brought me any tidings |
"They are shocking, your Majesty." I
"Who knows it better than I?" he
exclaimed bitterly. "But what brings
you here?"
"My august mistress, Donna Larga,
bas intrusted me with a very strange |
mission, your Majesty.
"What, my sister ?"
"Yes, sire, she has commissioned me I
to ask the young Count Sidonia de Me
dina to see her without delay."
ThftkiBg looked Estrella full in the
face. I
throng
meet
the
boast,
her Majesty.
about her infidelities.
dream.
j
" 'Trella," he said to her, "when I
was a mere boy I liked you. You did
not repel me. Now swear to me that I
you tell me the truth."
"Your Majesty, I do swear that I
tell you the truth. Shall I go and de
liver the message to the Count Sidonia
do Medina ?"
She took one of the royal carriages I
and rode to the palace of the young
head of that proud family, whose very
indicatcs that they have both
Spanish and Moorish blood in her veins,
When the young count was told by the is
handsome duenna that Donna' Larga
wanted to see him, he could hardly re
strain his joy.
"What !" he exclaimed, "the Donna J
Larga wants to see me !"
"In her boudoir, Senor Garcia.
"Go !"
prayer,
name
of
the
C.
"In her boudoir? And she is Dot I
angry with me ?"
"Angry? Not at all, Senor ; on the j
contrary, I am sure she loves you.
"Are you joking ?"
"I am in dead earnest, Senor."
And then the grandee, with the I to
proudest name in Spain, took Estrella
and danced around the room with her.
Fifteen minutes later he knocked at
»be door of the princess. She opened
as- it to him, and asked him to sit down
a opposite her.
be "Count," she said, "here is my the
hand. You may kiss it-I beg your the
pardon."
the He was not slow to do so
hand -Princess-" he said. the
Her -One moment," she interrupted.— but
-Look at this note. It is yours, is it
dis- not ?" ever
"Certainly, Princess—"
"And you still mean what you say
in it, Count?" .
"Mean it! To the last day of my
^
"Then you may bave this Princess
for a wife."
There was a long outburst of tender
and
te y. a t. la s t s at down aide^hy
side, with their hands clasped together, the
the princess said : B ]
"Now, Garcia, my beloved, I will and
confess the whole truth to you. My
met brother does not want me to marry, Tbe
because he is fearful lest, in such an
event, I should become a happy mother, gled,
then ascend the throne. I have wild
,d acted once meanly toward you, and I down
h °P® t0 maka you n0 ' only kiDg of »nd
hearf ' but - Kîng of S P ain ! " - of
Il 18 needle ss to dwell any longer on R
^ curiouB in »erview, which had an She
interested eavesdropper, who was none
other than the kiDg. civil
He left th ? r0 °® adjoining the prin
f ce8S S ^ ou ^°i r » with a seemiugly calm
air ' aDd remaiDed for along hour buried to
iD thought in his own room " Then he »he
»ent for Donna Larga. She came un
hesitatingly to him. 1 V
.. Dear e brotber .»
arri
no
was
life !
ness.
Gaul,)
she said to him,
'will you congratulate me ? I am going
to become the wife of Garcia Sidouia de and
Medina !" magne
He kissed her on the forehead. The V.
sinister smile with which he bestowed I
his caress upon ber she did not noticu. I
_ "Now, Largita," he said to her, in 18th
his sweetest voice, "you must go down discord
with me to the wine vault, and there the
drink with me in honor of your eogage- as
ment a glass of wine from the old tab turn.
of Alicante which our ancestor Philip session
the Fifth bought, and which is finer of
than any wine which can be bought in
Spa*"-" and
They went down to the cellar. The crushed
tutler disappeared upon a heck from the every
king The celebrated wine tub of Philip name
the Fifth was. found to be open at the After
top. Tbe Princess Larga, Doticing it, of
said to her brother : and
"But,^ Carlos, who bad the tub feet
opened ?" became
"Who ." he cried in a terrible rage. 0 f
"Who? I did it. And what for ? To
drown you . I But
So saying he pushed her into it. She listened
uttered a single scream, and then all tempter
was silent.
?"
of
more
Next day the royal herald passed entered
through the streets of Madrid, crying : winter,
"Puton your mourning clothes!—
The sister of his royal Majesty is dead !'
A curious feature in connection with | 000
this horrible affair is that the Count
Garcia Sidonia de Medina became Min
~ ficent
' I seen.
tions
. . sway
ister of Justice under the same king the
who murdered his betrothed Through
---
This, from the Mobile Register, is marched
tough, but we can stand it : "I kuow'd gates
it—I know'd it," remarked a colored the
politician, sitting on the Custom House ed.
steps the other day, discussing the out- one
look, "dat de Democrats had done French
ebery kind ob wickedness, but fur dem were
to go now an' denominate dat man Til- some
tun arter all the big lies 'bout Brudder Suddenly
Beecher, is jes simply owdashius." parts
___ revealed.
_ had
"Eliza said a clergyman to one of cify .
"ts parishioners, whom he saw with SoUnde
her hair m curling papers, "ifGod had canie
designed y°»r hair to curl, He would f or t
bave curled it for you.' "He did, sir, r j b j e
when I was a child, was the reply, froeen
"but be thinks I am old enough now t]ri 8
to do it myself. j tongue.
* Napoleon
A speaker at a stump meeting out scarcely
West declared that he knew no East, out of
noWest, no North, no South. "Then," with
said a by-atander, "you ought to go to His
1 school and learn your geography." 1 climax
the THE fulfillmekt of pro^bkct.
seized 1. The Assyrian Empire,
2. The Babylonian Empire.
now 3. The Greek Empire.
of 4. The Roman Empire.
5. The French Empire.
about j 6. The British Empire.
7. The Russian Empire.
half so I As in the order above given, so has
tidings | each great empire been swallowed up
by the succeeding one. First—we see
Majesty." I Assyria with its vast capitol, Nineveh,
he on whose walls several chariots could
brings ride abreast and requiring a day's jour
ney to be traversed. This mighty em
Larga, pire yielded to the all conquering Bab
strange | ylon. and behold Nineveh covered with
me I of the earth bowed down and worahip
Me- ped, ruled with a rod of iron. Her
great Ring Nebuchadnezzar, lifted up
the with pride in his boastful spirit, ex
I claimed : "Behold this great Babylon
" Mournful words.
he
ing
and
this
two
ner
fire,
of
ter,
lenly
road.
men
called
band
these
once
more,
tered
drovo
to
pieces,
then
firing
this
time,
After
few
The
work.
caped.
killed,
ported
the
nearly
with
the
fortune
friendly
little
ago,
Seventh
by
been
house,
of
rude
than
carved
swayed
rable
feeble
across
colors
do
an
the
to him
August.
the sands of the desert. Babylon, be
fore whose queenly splendor the uatious
I which I have built,
did for as Holy Writ informs us, he was
that I punished for his presomptuousness in
making himself a God by being hurled
that I from his throne, becoming a maniac,
de- and eating grass like a beast of the
Sidonia field. Restored at length to his throne
and his reason returned, he was con
strained to confess, "There is a God
I who overruletb all things." This great
young Babylon was weighed in the balance,
very and, alas! found wanting. The'down
both trodden and oppressed nations were at
veins, last enabled to say, "Babylon the Great
the is fallen," for in the fulfillment of pro
Larga phecy the splendid and imperial city,
re- which showD with dazzling brilliancy,
succumbed before Greece, who Mape
Donna J doDian phalanxes, led by the great
Alexander, overcame every opposing
obstacle. Nothing could withstand him.
Dot I At length, having conquered every
thing that could be conquered, from the
the j frozen wilds of Scythia (modern Rus
sia) to the torrid plains of India, it is
related of him that he sat down and
wept because there was no other world
the I to conquer. Alexander having died
childless, in the orgies of a midnight
her. debauch in his Babylonian palace, his
at Empire was subdivided among his Gen
erals, who held power until the Roman
down eagle made its appearance. Rome, des
lined mistress of the world, was now
my the rising star on the horizon, and in
your the fulfillment of prophecy, soon to
shine with unrivalled splendor in the
zenith. Julius Csesar having crossed
the Rubicon, the Roman Republic fell,
but on its ruins was reared the mag
it nificent fabric of Caesars. 'Onward,
ever onward!' became the watchword
until the Roman legions, having over
say thrown the wild and barbarous, but
brave and heroic tribes of Britain, Gaul,
my Germany and Spain, and having estab
lished therein the Roman polity, with
system of Proconsuls, Procurators, etc.,
these legions now turned their eyes
eastward. Greece, Asia Minor, Egypt,
and in fact all the countries of the then
Icivilized worlds one by one, fell before
the conquering banners of Rome. But,
B ] as ; ; n t be climax of her prosperity
will and power, corruption, like a canker
My worm, was wagning at her very vitals
Tbe story is soon told,
an Weak, and effeminate Rome, strug
gled, but struggled in vain, with the
wild tribes of the North, who poured
I down upon her. Huns, Alans, Vandals
»nd Goths, reveled amid the luxuries
of the now fallen mistress of the world,
on R ome , however, had not ruled in vain.
an She left to the world hor priceless and
invaluable system of jurisprudence and
civil government, her arts and elo
quence. The Roman Empire, like the
Grecian, became at last divided up in
to various independent powers, of which
»he roost iodaential were Grea Britain,
(Roman Britania) France, (Roman
1 V J V
Gaul,) and Germany, (Roman Ger
mania.) At times one power would
become ambitious and would conquer
de and rule over her neighbors. Cbarle
magne in the 10th century, and Charles
V. in the 16th century, founded great
I empires, but not equal to those already
I described. In the latter part of the
18th century, the bloody fires of civil
discord having exhausted themselves,
the mighty upheaval, known in history
as the French Revolution, took another
turn. A mania for conquest took pos
session of the French mind. The armies
of France poured forth, and, under the
leadership of that incomparable warrior
and statesman, Napoleon Bonaparte,
crushed with sledge hammer blows
every opposing army. Bonaparte's
name became synonymous with victory,
After the great and brilliant victories
of Marengo, Wagram, Austerlitz, Jena
and Eylan, Europe lay prostrate at the
feet of the conqueror. His brothers
became Kings and hia Marshals Satraps
0 f once powerful kingdoms but now
provinces of the great French Empire
I But in an untoward moment Bonaparte
listened to tbe syren song of that oruel
tempter Ambition,
He longed for a
more thorough conquest of Russia. He
entered that country in the depths of
: winter, at the head of the most magoi
| 000
The
of July
of the
while
formed
ward
found
him
where
feeling
oar
was
car,
erly
to
while
was
body
manner
would
whip
had
ficent martial display which was ever
I seen. A splendid army of nearly 500,
men, representing the various na
tions of Europe, acknowledging the
sway of the French Empire, stood at
the beck and nod of the great Emperor,
Through gory fields, victory ever
crowning his pathway, Bonaparte
marched onward until he reached tho
gates of Moscow. He entered and found
the vast city empty, swept aod garnish
ed. Its vast population bad, as 'with
one consent, abandoned tbe place. The
French thought themselves safe, and
were resting themselves after their toil
some march and bloody victories.—
Suddenly flames burst forth from all
parts of the city. The secret was soon
revealed. The retreating Russian army
had applied the torch before leaving the
cify . Explosion after explosion re
SoUnde d and the walls of Kremlin be
canie nearly red hot. The French fled
f or t be j r Jives, and now began the hor
r j b j e and disastrous retreat through the
froeen wi j dg of Russia The horror« of
t]ri 8 retreat can never be told by human
j tongue. Suffice it to say, the Emperor
Napoleon emerged from Russia with
scarcely 30,000 in an organize state
out of nearly half a million who entered
with him. Disasters crowded upon him.
His reason was for a time shaken. Tbe
1 climax was reached at Waterloo. Bona
A
taken
amine
tree
at the
it three
punched
twice,
and
he
when
head
has
up
see
could
jour
em
Bab
with
Her
up
ex
E arte was there totally defeated, and
e was assigned by the Allied Powers
a captive to St. Helena. While there
he made the prediction that if ever
Russia should gain possession of Con
stantinople the Russian Empire would
•then become supreme. The British
Empire, with its vast
nearly 250,000,000, would then be a
thing of the past.
Richmond, Va , 1876.
a
in
ion of
G. Brooke Dogoett.
LORD STIRLING AT THE BATTLE! OF
LONG ISLAND.
The situation was terrible, but Stir
ling did uot lose in any least degree his
self-possession. His titular lordship
might be denied him by English peers,
but he would prove this day that he was
one of nature's noblemen. He saw that
if he could hot drive Cornwallis back
beyond the Porte Road, or at least bold
him where he was, his whole command
would suffer death or capture. He re
solved upon a oostly sacrifice, if haply
one more costly might be prevented.
Changing his front and taking with him
less than 300 of the Maryland regiment,
he ordered the remainder of it and all
hi* other troops to retreat across the
marsh and creek, which the rising tide
was making moment less and less pas
sable. He knew the quality of the
young men whom be had ohosen for a
perilous duty. They were indeed young,
lardly more than boys, sons of the "first
families" of Maryland, bright, ardent
spirits, eager to do something for lib
erty ; eager, too, to win distinction for
themselves and for their beloved State,
Stirling invited them to no hardship
Which he did not mean to share. Tak
ing bis place at their head, he led them
rapidly along the Gowanua Road, which
made quite a sharp bend three or four
hundred yards from theCortelyou house,
and till they reached this point the steep
road-side with its brambly hedge
cealed them from the enemy. Turning
this bend, they came at once upon their
advance guard and with impetuous
courage drove them back upon the
house Whereupon Cornwallis brought
two field-pieces into position at the cor
ner of the house, from whose doors and
windows his grenadiers poured a steady
fire, while from the adjacent hills the
Hessian riflemen sent many a messenger
of death The slender column was
lessened every second. At last it halted,
closed up its ranks as the field-pieces
thinned them out with grape aad canis
ter, stood for a moment, and then sul
lenly withdrew beyond the bend in the
road.
Looking across the marshes and the
mill-dams, Stirling saw hundreds of his
men in fall retreat. Once more he
called upon the remnant of his chosen
band to interpose themselves between
these fugitives and the advanoing foe ;
once more he found them ready ;
more, turning the bend, they encoun
tered the same dreadful fire of rifles,
musketry, and cannon ; once more they
drovo back the adv a nced guard, quite
to the botfse this time, reached the house
themselves, drove the gunners from their
pieces, seized them for a moment, and
then reeled again under the incessant
firing frouf the house, and again slowly
retreated. Again, again, and yet again,
this little band of heroes, smaller every
time, rallied around their leader, and
returned with him
''Into the jaws of death,
Into the month of bell.''
After the fifth encounter there were too
few remaining to make another rally
possible, and, indeed, it was not needed.
The vicarious sacrifice had done its
work. The fugitives had pearly all es
caped. Two hundred and fifty-six
killed, wounded and missing, were re
ported by the colonel of the regiment.
Apparently the prisoners were few. Of
the whole number the tradition is that
nearly all were killed outright or pierced
with mortal wounds. Considering what
the prisoners were obliged to suffer, the
fortune of the dead was happiest. Their
mangled forms were gathered up by
friendly hands, and laid to rest under a
little monnd, which, only, a few years,
ago, was visible in the vieinity of
Seventh Street and Jhird Avenue. Now
by the grading of these streets, it has
been hidden. But the old Cortelyou
house, which still stands at the junction
of Third Street and Fifth Avenue, is a
rude and crumbling monument, better
than any that could be oast in bronze or
carved in marble, of the heroism that
swayed back and forth before its vene
rable walls on that eventful day. A
feeble remuant of the regiment struggled
across the creek, beariog their tattered
colors with them. Stirling, unable to
do more, but disdaining to surrender to
an English officer, spurred away across
the hills until he found De Heister, and
to him be gave his sword.— John W.
Chadwick, in Harper's Magazine for
August.
be
too
np
I
was
in
the
con
God
great
at
pro
city,
on
We
only
the
as
or
and
by
hoss
but
end
his
1
ly A
up
tation
the
down,
to
ble
she
again
of
which
Sir
telling
shipmsn
tain
gone
a 1
at a
they
. ,
without
to
and
The
"I
must
b.
do not
that
you
atanced
business
contrive
or, at
duce
only
free
marry
it is ;
I will
all go
OU U
The
entreated.
no
agreed
to be
speedily
nearest
The
gave
of wine
wherry.
proposed
marriage
he wss
forever
The
tlemen
of
drawing
mHahin
and
and
above
above
the
haiired
b ' Dged
the
is
and
his
in
to
the
COD
fire.
once
made
calling
A TIMELY RESURRECTION.
The Sacramento (Cal.) Record Union
of July 13 says : The conductor of one
of the Central Pacific passenger trains,
while making a trip recently
formed that a man had died i
ward sleeper. He proceeded to tho car,
found the man, and concluded to have
him removed to one of the rear cars
where there were but few passengers,
feeling that the presence of death in a
oar filled with people would cause great
uneasiness, to say tbe least. The body
was accordingly transferred to the other
car, the conductor saw that it waa prop
erly placed, and went forward to attend
to his duties. Some time afterward
while going through the rear car he
was not a little astonished to find the
body sitting up. and swearing in a
manner that any well regulated corpse
would be ashamed of that he could
whip the conductor and all hands. He
had only been dead drunk.
, was m
iu the for
A gentleman from New Jersey was
taken by a friend the other day to
amine tbe place where the Penn treaty
tree onoe stood The Jerseyman looked
at the place for a while, walked aronnd
it three or four times slowly, and
punched his cane in the ground onee or
twice, and said: "H'm!" and "Ha!"
and "Very interesting—very!" Then
he thonght for a few momenta, and
said:—"But where did the son stand
when William shot the apple off his
head !"
ex
A FAULT WHO WERE »JOGGLING.
and
Powers
there
ever
Con
would
British
be a
A wretched old horse, blind, spav
ined and lame—an old covered vehiole
with every wheel "dished" and every
joint creaking like Chinese machinery—
a family of five who looked as if they
had been shaking with the ague and
wrestling with a whirl-wind—that was
the sight in the Third street Grove
yesterday. They had turned off the
street to cook dinner. They sat around
a small fire waiting for the coffee to boil,
and the old horse leaned against a tree
and looked longingly at the thistles
across the ditch.
" Whar' we bound for?" repeal
the father cuffing one of the chijtflK
for poking into the coffee with a stick,
"We are on the joggle, and if that'ere
boss don't fail us we'll land in the Blaok
Hills some time next fall."
"You seem to have had hard luck."
"No seem about it," replied the wife
in a shrill voice. "We've had the
of
OF
Stir
his
peers,
was
that
back
bold
re
haply
him
all
the
tide
pas
the
a
"first
lib
for
four
the
and
the
his
he
;
lankiest luck of any family ever strung
together, and it's all the old fool's
fault !"
She pointed at her husband and there
was no question but that she referred to
bim. I
"She's a little riled, stranger," ex- 1
plained the man, "and puts it a little
too strong. We've been living way off
np North, and times has been hard. I
tried to make something catching wild
cate last winter but we got down to
corn and 'lasses fore spring spite of all
I could do."
"He's a brazen liar!" shouted the I
woman.
"And now," continued the husband,
"we are joggling along for the Black
Hills, and it seems to me as if we was
on the road to wealth and happiness. I
We are all gittin' fat, feel good and the
only thing I want is a dog to run under
the wagon."
"Dick Thurber, yon are lying to the
gentleman when you say I'm fat and
happy !" shouted the wife.
"Öh, well, you soon will be."
"No I won't !"
"Oh, yes you will."
"I say you are a brazen liar!" she
replied, heaving a fire brand at him.
The ohildren all turned aronnd at one
moment, got under the wagon at another
as if trained to it, and the husband and
father smiled a sickly smile »Dd said:
"Stranger, sass is sass, no matter I
whether you find it in the pine woods
or in the city. She's achini for a row,
and I spcct you'd better git over thar'
by the wagon and kinder see that the
hoss doesn't run away and break up
things !"
'Stranger' sought to bridge the chasm
but it was no use. The wife took off her
breast-pin" and dropped it into the hind
end of the wagon, and the man placed
his old plug hat on a knoll far from the
husband, "but I can t stand sass when
1 ÄÄ- . h
ly A crowd KomeVandlS P °' 1
up at that moment, and aftei Jome hes^
tation the row was declared " off" for h
the time being.
difference," remarked the man as he sat
down, "though when I'm sassed I want
to have the row over as soon as posai
ble » r
"All I ask is one minute's warning!" J
she replied, putting on her breast-pin b
again and the family sat down to a feast
of dry bread and black coffee, finishing
which the "joggle" was resumed.
'
a grateful widower. I *
Sir Walter Scott used to be fond of .
telling the following story of his cousin ! D
"Watty." Watty aforesaid was a mid
shipmsn in the British navy. Onaoer
tain occasion he and his messmates had ,
gone on shore at Portsmouth, and had L t
overstayed their leave, besides spending
a 1 their money and running uj> a bUl
at a tavern at the Point. Their ships j ei
"J I
... ,, , .,, the
they wouM have started the landlady said
. , No ' £. etneD ' J 0 " oannot escape <aw
without paying your reckoning " And jost
to confirm ber words, she called a bailiff de
and h,s posse to teke charge of them. w
The midshipmen felt they were in a
bad.crape and begged to be released.
"No no," said the resolute matron,
"I must be satisfied in some way. You
must be aware, gentlemen, that you will v
b. ..ui,, ™hj «a ?i . g r .j if
do not go ou board in time. «
They groaned bitterly, for they knew bi
that she spoke the truth
•WeH, she continued, "111 give tnd
you all a chance. I am so circum
atanced that I cannot well carry on my fou'
business as a single woman and I must tbin
contrive somehow to have a husband, with
or, at all events, I must be able to pro
duce a marriage certificate. Now, the tM
only terms upon which I will set you ont>
free are that one of you shall consent to
marry me? I don t care a snap which
it is ; but by all that is holy, one of you
I will have for a husband, or else you
all go to jail, and your ship sails with- the
OU U OU '' , pew
The vixen was not to be coaxed nor and
entreated. Tears and prayers were of
no avail. After a time the poor middies
agreed to draw lots. Watty drew the
matrimonial slip of doom. No time was
to be lost. A marriage license was just
speedily procured, aod they went to the
nearest ohnrob, where the knot was tied.
The bride, on her return to her tavern
gave them a good dinner, with plenty '°
of wine and then sent them off in her 8 »®P
wherry. Of her own accord she bad
proposed to her husband that, aa the m8be
marriage certificate was her chief priie, r . e P"
he wss at liberty to live apart from her
forever if he so chose. "Om
The ship sailed, and the young gen- bat
tlemen religiously adhered to the oath 8 ,8 *
of secrecy they bad made previous to
drawing lots. A year after, atJama.oa,
mHahin 0 m.n , « g h«il. P, «A g loTe
Wh ° »«er
^^»?J 0W kiü"
and mnr A»r .n A «fin to ?
and murder and the execution of the interest
oolpritsatprtimonth. Suddenly leap
above hi's head ?ü P " " for
above his head, forgetful of his oath in g ]
the excitement of his ecstasy, he eried 8
haiired I" hank He * Ten ! wife " „
b ' Dged ' I
fire.
made signal for sailing, peremptori
calling all hands .on board, but «hi
lumormu.
spav
vehiole
every How Two Parrots Confused a Poa-1
ter.—P arrots that have learned to talk
they »eem to have a spioe of old Adam in
and them, and to find pleasures in bothering
was people and in saying wrong or wicked
Grove things. But they sometimes on twit, by
the the mere force of training, without
around design.
boil, They tell a story in Newgate street,
tree London, of a parrot—or two parrots
thistles rather, a gray and a green one—belong
ing to Morley a tradesman in the old
I Bailey, just opposite the prison, which
chijtflK is vouched for as true in the striotest
stick, sense. The man had a wonderful
"bird sense," and his power ef train-1
Blaok ing birds became famous throughout I
the metropolis. He had taught his 1
luck." green parrot to speak whenever a I
wife knock was heard at the street door ; I
the I but when the bell of the same
strung | was rung be had taught the gray par-|
fool's rot to answer. The house, still stand-1.
ing has one of those projecting porchea I
there »bat prevent the second story from be-1
to ing seen from the pavement. One day I
I a person knocked. I
ex- 1 "Who is there?" asked the green !
little pnrrot. I
off "The man with the leather," was
I the reply.
wild- "All right," the bird answered, and
to then became mlènt.
all After waiting aometime, apd not |
finding the door opened, the man again
the I knocked.
"Who's there?" again asked the
parrot.
Black "Who's there?" oried the porter,,
was outside. "It's I—am the man with the]
I leather. Why don't yon open the I
the door ?" J
under "All right," repeated the parrot, I
which so enraged the man he furiously I
the rang the bell.
and "To the gate !" shouted a new voice, |
which proceeded from the gray parrot.
"To the gate ?" repeated the man.j
seeing no gate-"what gate «'
"Newgate, Newgate,*responded the
she gray parrot. I
The porter was enraged : but step
one P* n g across the street, the better to
answer what he supposed to be the in-1
and »olanco of the housemaids, he saw that 1
he had been outwitted and teased by a,
I couple of parrots. I
a ~ -- . IT*
row, Th ® 8am * 0l ? Fashion.-T here u
* J»°>* «» Lebanon of some
the , *» bashful temperament who visits I
up fre,oent y 1 R * ,din * widow, and, in I
00urM pf time, there will doubtless be
s »»dding : but it all depends upon
her whether or not the widow encourages
h,m ** . 818 * night or t.wo ago. Hej
was sitting on the soft beside her ad- j
the mi " n 8. J|? r 80 . oheeks and red hpe,
'■nd wishing with two-horse pewer, I
"V JJ, - " * ood 0,d fa,h,0M
.a.,****..I*•
1 ^WhyîbT^oMY.ÏÏÔnsof our I
hes^ Î'^ T°
for h » m ^ r , ed b / ^ ,« «
80 08,d * nd I " bwd "J
sat * million itimm before they
7®" even «"ff 8 ** 1 5 bnt »bat isn't the
wor f- I
The widow leaned over toward the
J 0 ™« ■"». « d ber eyes seemed to
b ® »»oussnd feet deep as she an
8we, ^. : ,
VWhy you foolish fellow . Yon can
nfl^ead the newspapers, or yon d know is
' that kissing was never, never so fahion
I * b J? 88 n0 * "
of . * 8ub * e q a0 nt P r °oori
! D f* baahfnl young man eannot be I er
,Bdue8d 0 **? * w8rd " J fui
p iMIH0 Through :—"Have , on I
, ny excuse for hollering on the street I
L t midnight?" inquired the court of P
Tim Johnecn. 'be
.. No exonfei > oept d .t I didn't hol
j ei . ( » rep ] ie< ] tb< prisoner. bim
I "Do you stand up there and deny
.,, the allegation ?" of
. . NOi iir ; bat I denies hollering. I
<aw gen Lewis on de corner, and I
jost „marked : 'Ho, dere, Ben !' when hie
de oome| >nd grabfl me . Dere
w .s no yelling or hollering-bope to be for
8truok detd d , t obeer 8 if de^was!"
.. Tba offioer mtks ont .
Bt ^ bi , Honor uid . I
-Tim or Timothy Johnson, thi. has
v- an . _ er _ „„n. for van
« .e „„.L r u.ku k- ki b _. 811
bi be * r tb , P n Qildwoy'. kite by rate- ?"«'
ward incident. You may go home, 'T
tnd do „. t boU#r Ben or _.
, M tgtin . Thi. i. a big world,
fou' of Btr * peop|et , nd ^ he ^
tbin g you Mn ° do K u iHde aoftl tIon and
with your month ahnt '
.p,*., wbat I sbon ld purceed to do,'
tM wered the prisoner, and he backed burg,
ont> «ghed a deep sigh for his lost nm- P 8
brella ? Dd me.ndoref away. »even
--.-I the
Recently at Lowell, Mass., a col- tion
leotion was being taken op at one of
the eharches. As the box reaehed a at
pew occupied by a lady, her daughter
and little son, the two former found -ilk
themselves without a oent of money, thread
Master Hopeful reaehed over and de
posited a cent in the box. and then A
whispered to his sister: "There! lL U
just saved this fcmily from being'white- u
washed.' " 1)6611
--- over
" Rochester Dntehman, oomplaining I femes
'° »be Mayor that if the boy« didn't
8 »®P »wimming in river where hia food,
daughters could see them, he would »»«t
m8be trouble. "Ah Shermerhorn,"
r . e P" 0 d the Mayor, "if I remember of
"gbtly, your house is over a half a mile I
"Om the river." "Yaw, that is so ; And
bat dea^yoa «ee, my gals dey got spy demon,
8 ,8 * Be »- lowers
ODoe np on a time the Dean of West- !*'
minfter g^ing to the Abbey, pat his ,nt0
g loTe « into his hat. On returning home A
»«er hi. discourse he .aid to his wife: 'or
"Somehow the congregation seamed f»»!
to ? ,IB u P on " e '»-day with a peeuliar lov e,
interest «hile I was preaohing." *"
„j do no t wonder," .be wplW- heart,
" for dori "* 7 ° ur eBtir ® 8#r,n# " your
g ] oveg re ,ted on the top of your hmd." Iw8,w
8 _ _ v 3 died
„ Mook-turtle-Kieaing in company aad »he
fighting afterward- < until
fttritto.
Poa-1 A New Jersey sexton, who died re
talk roently, had buried 3000
in I Prairie chickens are unusually no
bothering I merous in M i unvtff t u i rtt s ir n
wicked I nr e owe .l t j. ht .
twit, by tude to tho|e wb f£Jlu g the trut
without I „ A ,
\ W"* ******
street, I "® m *2.50 per day in Minnesota,
parrots I A mao in Pike oounty Indian», rais
1 ed 700 bushels of wheat on 20 aeres of
old | ground.
which J The Turks haven't murdered bat
striotest 125,000 Christians daring the last six
I months.
train-1 About the only th»f a —n can
I borrow in these suspicions days with
his 1 0Q t giving security is trouble . 3
a I .bn rviifn.-i.—
door ; I ; .. . . °V ^ n '
^0^5"®^^^""^^ ^ °'*
persons.
r'"
par-| _ .
stand-1. California landlords oharge for firea
porchea I *? room * * n * nmBn * r > no matter whether
be-1 ' be r008B eTen ■** ■ chimney,
day I Rubbiahy novels fine hud »♦ good
I deal to dp with the preeawt tendency
green ! toward suicide among youpg persons,
I Of the Gatholies in this country,
was 11,800,000 were born in Ireland and
4,200,000 are natives of this country,
and Bostonians now alaep wHh one ear
open expecting every moment to bear
not | tbe g rat brickfall from the Old San Hi
again
momsnt to hew
first briok fall from the Old South.
Young Bennett, of the Herald, in
herits his love of society from his
pother. The old men mi almost a
recluse.
the
porter,,
the] "Come down and treat," waa the
the I ho*pi»able invitation tendered the Phil
J adelphia balloonists by some New Jer*
parrot, I «rangera the other day.
I The generality of men expend the
earlier part of their lives in eontriha
voice, | tions to render the latter put miser
man.j The Moravian Seminary at Beth
l e hem, has been in exiatenee ninety-««#
the years, and fn tint Time has had 6772
I pupils
step- ». -t. „ ....
to gba ii v. trngtB J a . ,.
in-1 _u. :__ 0 «.»». .u.ii u. *«. ,... , i
that 1 - m r nvm 8 " ** tr "* ed
a, ,, .. ...
I .Hon i * Single hour iu your life
. IT* ought to
u be done in it and going straight
some- »rough it from beginning to end
visits I Owing to the concentration of me
in I ohanicafinterests at the Centennial,"the
be exhibition of the Newark Industrial
upon Institute will be omitted this yew.
the youth, who stands at a bar,
Hej with a glass of liquor in his band, am
ad- j aider which he had hatter throw away—
hpe, the liquor or himself.
I . . . .
well satisfied with himself aa if he had
««a..*.», .b™..
our I A .«uible writeradviw. thorn who »
tl' J JgPJSS
"J ***
they Real estate is frlliUg in'»»ton, ae it
the ought to. TheVendome Hotel, which
I „
the was sold
to 000.
an- It cost the owner five dollars to ^i»
oove * that the holder of an excursion
can ticket, the time for which haa expired,
is not entitled to a passage on the
Pennsylvania Railroad.
There n a d lfcf S mM between oon
Lecmion and sanetifiostjnn. The form
be I er belongs to us r the jatipr tojonr faith
J fui God. We cannot have the latter
on I "'»bout the former. .
I The Dutch eure a laay paupar by
of P Bttin 8 bim into a deep cistern, let in
'be water and piovide him with »ramp
»bat, with hard work, will juat keep
bim from drowning.
A Ginoinnatian drank three glasses
of bnllook'a blood for his health, and
I went blind. He could have eaten fried
I onions the year rennd without hurting
hie eyes.-Detroit Free Press. 8
A ' Bofton „„ u H hu .
be for a remedy for hot wîîth." He
wants something to prodîw V' mow
. 8torm just a. the* sun UabouT tobl'tter
I Zy'î eln
r t u „id hat th. hiu «f .
tb ® b,U ot 8 blackbird
811 twngu considered
?"«' dooï JETwÄThii ' ^ " d h " *
'T h .
_. B,rob " 81,11 »be »witch of authoritv.
Three L J ,T * r P®° 1 b ®ya were reeendy
aentenced to three day.' impriaonment
and twelve strokes of a birch rod for
throwing atone« at a pairing tram. .
The Presbyterian Chureh ofMereers
burg, Pennsylvania, ha« had but three
P 8 »tors in the laat one hundred and
»even years Rev. Dr. Thomas Creigh.
the present pastor, haa field the noai
tion for over forty yean
a ooatuma wan in ik. ---* .»..a
at Saratoa» rtJl hv
Murn, SS of Jferi 'JÎ
-ilk nndJnkaiK? ^
thread laoe wta'rimnlt
Latlieat di„îl«H th?. 7 f.r * ' d th ®
A , J
lL U " r htt " dr ~ *TV" the
u B * 7 *" lrd J 7 ,td * T#lk >' h * re
1)6611 CÄ P kore ö polio« sad turned
over to the public pound. Thiir -of
I femes consisted of congrcgatwg on the
aidewalka overturning pails iw ueareh of
food, and annoying residents by inees
»»«t «creaming,
Economy is the parent of integrity,
of liberty and of ease , and the sister of
I temperance, ofoheerfulnesu, and health,
And profoseneto is a erud* and crafty
demon, that gradnalij involves ber fol
lowers in dependence and debt—that
!*' H*®" th ®" wi,h "»wm that enter
,nt0 thm ,<mU "
A man recently died in Zttrieh who
'or 80 year, made a remarkably big
f»»! of himmlf. When yOnng he fell iS
lov e, and then became jealous While
*" **»»■ condition he offended his aweet
heart, who to parish him nude him
»•»* be would not «périt for
Iw8,w moBtha. He «wore. But she
died before twelve moètba .«j
»he lover concluded to remain dumb
< until ba rejoined bsr ia tbe ne^t world.
able.
with much.
cost, with the land nearly É400.000,
by auetfonihtU'watklorf240,*
, no man is safe

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