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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, December 16, 1876, Image 1

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MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 16, 1876.
NO. 51.
VOL. IX.
Sumber and Hardware.
LINDLEY & KEMP,
—DEALERS IN—
HARDWARE,
AND
Agricultural Implements,
OPPOSITE NATIONAL nOTEL,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE.
Hardware Department.
iron and Steel, Horse and Mule Shoes, Horse
Naila, Blacksmith Supplies, Chain Traces,
Hames. Trowels, Nails, Spikes, Locks, Hinges,
Bolts, Files, Chisels, Levels, Planes, Bevels,
Wrenches, Picks, Mattocks, Hubs, Bims,
Spokes, Shafts, Long and Short Arms, Clips,
Springs, Enameled Cloth, Gum Canvass, Äc.
A complete stock of TOOLS and Supplies
for Carpenters, Builders, Masons, Sadlers,
Shoemakers and others, with many House
turnishing articles. We invite the public to
call and txamiue oar prices.
Paints, Oils, Turpen
tine, Glass and
• Putty,
CHEAPEST AND BEST.

Agricultural Department.
In
As
He
A
As
'Thy
Farmer's Friend, Heckendorn, Wiley,
Concave and Moore PLOWS; Plow
Castings, Grindstones, Pumps, Scales,
Corn Sbellers,Churns, Shovels,Forks,
Spades, Hoes and Rakes,
^^■*No trouble to show goods, [mar 18
NOW IS THE TIME TO
IFA-IIsTT.
AVERILL CHEMICAL PAINT,
HARRISON'S 'TOWN ft COUNTRY' PAINT
PURE WHITE LEAD, pure Linseed Oil,
and tbe best Coloring Material,
For Sale at CITY PRICES by
Gr. E. HUKILL,
Opposite Rail Road Depot,
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
sep 23-tf
Lumber § Hardware.
Or. E. HTJKXLL
Successor to
As
A
Or
So
The
No
The
A
The
All
And
Four
Are
Soft
Nor
With
Into
J. B. EENIM0RE & CO.,
Opposite ths R. R. Depot,
MIDDLETOWN, DELAWARE,
DIALaa IN ALL KINDS Or
Lumber, Hardware, and General Building
Material, Sash, Doors, Shutters, Blinds,
and Mouldings, Paints, Oils, Var
nishes, ^GUass and Putty, Bricks,
Building Lime, Hair, Etc.
Constantly on hand.
—ALSO—
AVERILL CHEMICAL FAINT
TOWN AND COUNTRY PAINT
ï
And
And
As
I see
1 see
As
Out
A
Forth
Like
And
And
Eager
In
Of
Tbe
Tbat
O
O
The
And
( Read jr- nixed. )
"Blatcbley's" Celebrated Cucumber Wood
Pumps aDd everything in tbe building line.
Having made arrangements with large
wholesale dealers, I shall be prepared to fur
nish lnrge bills of Lumber for buildings, such
as I may not have in stock, direct from whole
sale dealers, thereby securing the lowest prices
possible to be obtained.
Oive me a call, and get my prices, before
purchasing elsewhere.
Feb 5-ly.
HARD TIMES
WOULD SOON BE OVER
if everybody would buy and sell on a SMALL
CASH PROFIT and thoroughly look up tbe
market on one or two selected articles and
REDUCE THE PRICES
0NBOOTS,SHOES* HATS,
4n MIDDLETOWN and SMYRNA,
where you can get tbe genuine Kip Boot, full
top 19-iDch leg, for $4. This is our highest
S riced heavy Boot, and the best domestic Kip
oot we can oifertbe public, after having been
through all tbe principal shoe markets of the
country.
We sell a side lined Kip Boot of medium
weight and good quality for $3.15. An 18
inch full or Russet Top Wax Kip, which is
generally sold and taken as the best and wears
first-rate, for $3 SO. 16 inch Wax Boots from
$2 .50 to $3 Boys' and Youth's Boots in pro
portion, We sell nothing but solid leather
goods and guarantee them against rips or
bursts until nextSpriog.
Messrs. GuirriNBUBO and Hobhabick will
Repair for ut in a neat and prompt manner.
The
And
In
Ruos
The
And
That
With
Till
Tbe
I see
The
Its
Have
To
One
In
Or
And
Mid
And
see
With
Disabled
Or of
On
To
Anxious
Above
And
Lest
She
TOWNSEND HOUSE,
Opposite Rail Road Depot,
TOWNSEND, DELAW ARE
I
I am prepared to accommodate permanent
and transient guests at reasonable rates.
The Bar is at all times stocked with the
choicest Wines, Liquors, Tobaccos ind Se
gars.
A fine Livery is also attached to the Hotel,
where teams are to be had at reasonable rates.
Come and See Ble.
WM. B. HOLLIS,
Proprietor.
April 8—tf
After
And
T HE undersigned respectfully informs the S?' 1
citizens of Middletown and vicinity that Vl ea
he is prepared with excellent horse,- cart and rops
wagons, to do all kinds of Bauling at lower What
rates D>an ean be obtained elsewhere. Coal The
and Lntnber hauled at short notice. Sand of The
all kinds on hand at low rates. All orders The
will receive prompt attention. Give mea call. The
JOHN W. HAYES, It is
Successor to L. O. Vandegrift, Tbe
Middletown, Del. i Quick
LOOK TO YOUR INTEREST.
aug 19-6m
The Hanging of the Crane.
BY HENRY W. LONG YELLOW.
"Pendre la Crimaillere*' to Hang the Crane, ia the
-French expression for a house wanning or the first
party in a new house.
I.
The lights are oat, and gone are all the
guests,
That thronging came with merriment and
jests,
To celebrate the Hanging of (he Crane
In the new house—into the night are gone,
But still the fire upon the hearth burns on
And I alone remain.
Oh ! fortunate, O happy day,
When a new household finds its place
Among the myriad homes of earth
Like a new star just sprung to birth
And rolled on its harmonious way
Into the boundless realms of space 1
So said the guests in speech and song,
As in the chimney burning bright
We buDg the Iron Crane to-night,
And merry was the feast apd long.
II.
And now I muse on what may be,
And in my vision see, or seem to set,
Through floating vapors, interfused with
light,
Shapes indeterminate (bat gleam and fade
As shadows passing into deeper shadows
Siuk and elude the sight.
For two alone there in the hall
Is spread tbe table round and small,
Upon tbe polished silver shine
The evening lamps, but more divine
The light of love shines over all ;
Of love that says not mine and thine,
But ours, for ours is thine and mine ,
They want no guests to come between
Their tender glances, like a screen,
And tell them tales of land and sea,
And whatsoever may betide
The great forgotten world outside,
They want no guests, they needs must be
Each other's own best company.
a
a
My
no
you
able
this
HI.
The picture fades, as at a village fair
A showman's views dissolve into the air,
To reappear transfigured on the screen,
So in my- fancy this, and now once more
In part transfigured, through the open door
Appears tbe self-same scene.
Seated, I see the two again,
But not alone ; they entertain
A little angel unaware,
With face as rouud as is the moon :
A royal guest with flaxen hair
Who, throned npon his lofty chair,
Drums on the table with his spoon,
Then drops it careless upon the floor
To grasp at things unseen before.
Are these celestial manners?
These the ways that win, the arts tbat please I
Ah, yes, consider well the guest.
And whatsoe'er be does seems best;
He ruleth by the right divine
Of helplessness, so lately born
In purple chambers of the morn,
As sovereign over thee and thine,
He speaketh not, and yet there lies
A conversation in his eyes ;
The gulden silence of the Greek,
Tbe gravest wisdom of the wise,
Not spoken in language, but in looks
More legible than printed books,
As if be could bnt would not speak.
And now, O monarch absolute,
'Thy power is put to proof, for lo 1
Resistless, fathomless and slow
Tbe nurse comes rustling like tbe sea,
And pushes back the chair and thee
And so good-night to King Canute.
IV.
As one who walking in a forest sees
A lovely landscape through the parted trees,
Then sees it not for boughs that intervene,
Or as we see the moon sometimes revealed
Through drifting clonds and then again con
cealed,
So I beheld the scene.
There are two guests at table now
The King, deposed and elder grown—
No longer occupies the throne—
The crown is on his sister's brow,
A Princess from the fairy tales,
The very pattern girl of girls,
All covered and embowered in curls,
Rose-tinted from the Isle of Flowers,
And sailing with soft silken sails
From far off Dreamland into ours,
Above there bowls with rims of blue
Four azure eyes of deeper hue
Are looking, dreamy with delight;
Limpid as planets that emerge
Above the ocean's rounded verge,
Soft shining through the summer night.
Steadfast they gaze, yet nothing see
Beyond tbe horizon of their bowls
Nor care they for the world that rolls
With all its freight of troubled souls
Into the days that are to be.
has
fore.
Y.
Again tbe tossing boughs shat out tbe scene
Again tbe drifting vapours intervene
And tbe moon's pallid disk is bidden qnite
And now I see the table wider grown
As round a pebble into water thrown
Dilates a ring of light.
I see the table wider grown
1 see it garlanded with guests,
As if fair Ariadnes' crown
Out of tbe sky bad fallen down ;
Maidens within whose tender breasts
A thousand restless hopes and fears,
Forth reaching to tbe coming years
Flutter awhile, then quiet lie,
Like timid birds tbat fain would fly
And do not dare to leave there nests_
And youths who in there strength elate
Challenge tbe van, and front of fate,
Eager as champions to be,
In the divine knight—erranty
Of youth tbat travels sea and laud
Seeking adventures, or pursues
Through cities or through solitudes
Frequented by the lyric muse,
Tbe phantom with the beckoning band
Tbat still allures aDd still eludes,
sweet illusions of tbe brain I
sudden thrills of fire and frost I
The world is bright while ye remain
And dark aud dead when ye are lost I
VI.
The meadow-brook that seemeth to stand still
Quickens its current as it nears the mill,
And so the stream of time, tbat liogeretb
In level places, and so dull appears,
Ruos with a swifter current as it
The gloomy mills of Death.
And now like the magician's scroll
That in the owner's keeping shrinks,
With every wish he speaks or thinks,
Till the last wish consumes the whole,
Tbe table dwindles, and again
see tbe two alone remain.
The crown of stars is broken in parts ;
Its jewels, brighter than tbe day,
Have one by one been stolen away,
To shine in other homes aud hearts.
One is a wanderer now afar
Ceylon or Zanzibar,
suDny regions of Cathay ;
And one ia in the boisterous camp,
Mid clink of arms and horses' tramp,
And battle's terrible array.
see the patient mother read,
With uchiug hear I, of wiecka that flou t
Disabled on those seas remote,
of some great heroic deed
battle-fields, where thousands bleed
lift one hero into fame,
Anxious she bend9 her graceful head
Above those chronicles of pain,
And trembles with a secret dread,
Lest there among the drowned or slain
finds the one beloved name.
nears
VII.
After a day of cloud aDd wind and rain
Sometimes the setting sun breaks out again,
And touching all the darksome woods with
light
1 ".« 1 ,he fi u e,d r 8 ' ^ey laugh and sing
ea '* ke B r . ub y . f [ om , th ® honzon 8
rops down 111,0 tbe Dlgbt '
What see I now ? tbe night is fair,
storm of grief, the clouds of care,
wind, the rain, have passed away,
lamps are lit, the fires burn bright
bouse is full of life and light_ '
is the golden weeding day,
guests come thronging in once mi
Quick footsteps sound along the floor,
The trooping children crowd the stair
And in and out and everywhere
Flashes along the corridor
The sunshine of their goldea hair.
On the round table in the ball
Another Ariadnes' crown
Out of the sky has fallen down ;
More than one monarch of the moon
Is dreamiag with bis silver spoon ;
The light of love shines over all.
0 fortunate, 0 happy day I
The people sing, the people say,
The ancient bridegroom and the bride,
Serenely smiling on the scene,
Behold well-pleased on every side
Their forms and features multiplied,
As the reflection of a light
Between two burnished mirrors gleams
Or lamps upon a bridge at night
Stretch on and on before the sight
Till the long vista endless seems.
the
first
the
AN ENCOUNTER WITH AN
INTERVIEWER.
AY HARK TWAIN.
The nervous, dapper, "peart" young
man took tbe chair I offered him, and
said be was connected with "Tbe Daily
Thunderstorm," aod added,—
"Hoping it's no barm, I've come to
interview you."
"Come to what?"
" Interview you."
"Ah! I see Yes—yes. Urn! Ye»
—yes."
I was not feeling bright that morn
ing. Indeed, my powers seemed a bit
under a cloud. However, I went to the
book-case, and, when I had been look
ing six or seven minutes, I found I was
obliged to refer to tbe youDg mau. I
said,—
"How do you spell it?"
"Spell what ?"
"Interview."
"Oh, my goodness! What do you
want to spell it for?"
"I don't want to spell it; I want to
see what it means."
"Well, this is astonishing, I must
say. I can tell you what it means, if
you—if you"—
"Oh, all right !
and much obliged to you, too."
"I n, in, ter, ter, inter—"
"Then you spell it with an If"
"Why, certainly!"
"Oh, that is what took me so long!"
"Why, my dear sir, what did you
propose to spell it with ?"
"Well, I—I—I hardly know. I had
the Unabridged ; and I was ciphering
around tbe back end, hoping I might
tree her among the pictures. But it's
a very old edition ."
"Why, my friend, they wouldn't have
a picture of it even in the latest e_
My dear eir, I beg your pardon, I mean
no harm in the worjd; but you do not
look as—a*—intelligent as I expected
you would. No berm,-I mean no
harm at all "
"Oh, don't mention it! It has often
been said, and by people who would not ra
flatter, and who could have no induce
meDt to flatter, that I am quite remark
able in that way. Yes-ye. : they
always speak of it with rapture."
"I can easily imagine it. But about
this interview. You know it ia the
do
That will answer,
custom, now, to interview any man who
has become notorious."
"Indeed! I had net beard of it be
fore. It must be very interesting. What
He was always a |
do you do with it ?"
"Ah, well—well—well—this is dis
heartening. It ought to be don* with
a club, in some cases; but customarily
it consists in the interviewer asking
questions, and the interviewed answer
ing them. It is all the rage now. Will
you let me ask you certain questions
calculated to bring out the salient points
of your publio and privat« histery ?"
"Oh, with pleasure,—with pleasure.
I have a very bad memory ; but I hope
you will not mind tbat. That is to say,
it is an irregular memory, singularly ir
regular. Sometimes it goes iu a gallop
and then again it will be much as a fort
night passing a given point This is a
great grief to me."
"Oh! it is no matter, so you will try
to do the best you can."
"I will. I will put my whole mind
to it.
"Thanks. Are you ready to begin ?"
"Ready "
Question. How old are you ?
Answer. Nineteen in June.
Q. Indeed ! I would have taken you
to be thirty-five or six Where were
you born ?
A. In Missouri.
Q When did you begin to write ?
A. In 1836.
Q. Why, how could tbat be, if you
are only nineteen now ?
A. I don't know. Itdoes seem curious
somehow
Q It does iodeed. Whom do you
consider the most remarkable
ever met ?
A. Aaron Burr.
Q. But you never could have met
Aaron Burr, if yeu are only nineteen
years—
A Now, if you know more about me
than I do, what do you ask me for?
Q. Well, it was only a suggestion ;
nothing more. How did you happen to
meet Burr.
man you
A. Well, I happened to be at his
funeral one day, and he asked me to
make less uoise, and—
Q. But, good heavens ! If you
at his funeral, he must have been dead;
and, if he waz dead, how could he
were
care
whether you made a noise or not?
A. I don't know.
| particular kind of a man that way.
j Q. Still, I don't understand it at all.
I You aay be spoke to you, and that he
■ was depd.
A. I
didn't say be was dead.
Q. But wasn't he dead ?
A Well, some said he was, and some
said he wasn't.
Q. What did you think?
A. Oh, it was none of my business!
It wasn't any of mÿ funeral.
Q. Did you—. However, we can
never get this matter straight. Let me
i ask about something else. What was j
the date of your birth ?
A. Monday, Oct. 31, 1693.
Q. What! Impossible! That would
make you a hundred and eighty years
old.
How do you account fur that?
A I don't account for it at all
tbe
to
I
A ' 0b - no! No " bat ' He wa. dead
eDOn gh.
Well, I confess that I can't under
itand thi *' « buried bim, and you
knew he was dead
A No ' >o! We onl J tbou « bt he wa8
Q Oh, I see. He came to life again?
A I bet be didn t.
Q ' Wel1 ' 1 never heard of aD J tbiD *
like tk ' 8 - Somebody was dead. Some
wa8 ? buried ' Now, where was the
ra 7 ster Y •
Æ Ab * tbat ' s j U8t il ! Tbat ' 8 il ex *
ao, ^' ^ ou see ' we were t*' 08 —defunct
andI '- and we « ot mixed in the bath *
tub wben we were onl 7 two W8eks oId <
and one of u * drowned But we didn't
know wbiob ; Somo think il was BiI L
some think it was me.
Q. Well, that is remarkable. What
Q. But you said at first you were only
nineteen, and now .you make yourself
nut to be one hundred and eighty. It
is an awful discrepancy.
A. Why, have you noticed that?
(Shaking hands.) Many a time it has
seemed to mo like a discrepancy ; but
somehow I couldn't make up my mind
How quick you notice a thing!
Q. Thank you for the compliment, as
far as it goes Had you, or have you
any brothers or sisters?
A Eb ! I—I—I think so—yes—but
I don't remember.
Q. Well, that is tbe most extraordi
nary statement I ever heard.
A. Why. what makes you think that?
Q How could I think otherwise ?
Why, look here ! Who is this a picture
of on the wall ? Isn't tbat a brother of
yours ?
A. Oh, yes, yes, yes! Now you re
mind me of it, that was a brother of
Tbat's William, Bill we called
mine.
him. Poor old Bill! !
Q. Why, is he dead, then ?
A Ah, well, I suppose so. We never
could tell. There was a great mystery
about it.
Q. That is sad, very sad He dis
appeared, then?
A. Well, yes, in s sort of general
way. We buried him.
Q. Buried him ! Buried him with
out knowing whether he was dead or
not?
of
of
the
is
the
and
his
is
the
that
will
do you think ?
A. Goodness knows! I would give
whole werlds to know. Tbii solemn,
this awful mystery has cast a gloom
over my whole life. But I will tell you
a secret now, which I never have re
vealed to any creature before. Oue of
us bad a peculiar mark, a large mole on
tbe back of his left hand ; that was me.
That child was the one that was drowned.
Q Very well, then, I don't see that
there is any mystery about it, after all.
A. You don't? Well, 7 do. Any
way, I don't see bow they could ever
have been such a blundering lot as to
go and bury tbe wrong child But,
'sh ! don't mention it where the family
can hear of it Heaven knows they have
heart-breaking troubles enough without
addiug this.
Q. Well, I believe I have got material
enough for tbe pieseut; and I am very
much obliged to you for the pains you
have taken. But I was a good deal
interested in tbat account of Aaron
Burr's funeral. Would you mind telling
me what particular circumstance it
that made you think Burr was such a
remarkable man?
-4. Oh, it was a mere trifle! Not one
man in fifty would have noticed it at
WbeD the sermon was over, and
the procession all ready to start for the
cemetery, and the body all arranged
Dice in the hetfrie, he said he wanted
to take a last look at the seenery ; and
he he got up, and rode with the driver.
TheD the young maD reverently with
drew. He was very pleasant company,
and I was sorry to see him go.
pleted, indicates tbat the population of
tbat city is about 407,661.
was
all.
A certain pompous judge fioed several
lawyers $10 each for contempt of court
After they had paid tbeir fines, a steady
going old attorney walked gravely up to
the bench, aDd laid down a ten dollar
bill. "What is that for?" inquired the
judge. "For contempt, your Honor."
"Why, I have not fined you for con
tempt." "I know that," said the attor
ney, "but I want you to understand
tbat I cherish a secret contempt for this
court all the time, and I am willing to
pay for it."
Tho Chicago school census, just com
CRIME IN*THE SOUTH.
Negro Government a Failure.
How the Prevalent Disorder la Magnified
Into Political Outrages—The Negro
as an Oath-Taker and as an
Officer or the Peace,
New Orleans, November 30th.
I bave uot thought it worth while to
fill The Times with copies of the intim
idation affidavits on file with the Re
turning Board, and which will never be
read by the members of the board or by
j anybody else, for the reading would
consume years, if not a lifetime.—
Wherever the Democrats have a major
ity, the Republicans swear there was
riot, tumult or intimidation, aDd the
Democrats bring testimony to disprove
the charge. The leading cases, how
ever, upon which the Republicans rely,
those of Pinkston and James, both
located in the parish of Ouachita, have
been investigated by me very fully and
reviewed in my telegraphic correspon
dence. The shooting of Ben James
was the act of Democratic desperadoes,
and bad a political object, although it
does not seem to have been premedi
tated The killing of n«nry Pinkston
md his child had no more to do with
politics than the Nathan murder in New
York or the Probst murder in Phila
delphia. There are several cases very
much like that of James in which the
Democrats have not cleared their skirts
to my satisfaction, but if the number of
these cases were increased a hundred
per cent, and multiplied by ten the Re
publicans would make a mere beginning
in a plausible attempt to prove that the
vote of Louisiana was secured for Til
den through violence or intimidation.
There is no evidence whatever to ebow
that aDy considerable number of colored
men voted the Democratic ticket from
this cause, or that this campaign has
been conducted by the Democrat* with
any reliance upon such improper politi
cal methods. On the contrary, it is
beyond question that the platform aDd
nominations of the State Convention in
the summer were an abandonment of
the white line policy and that under the
constant admonition of General Nicholls
and the Democratic Conservative com
mittee that peace must be maintained,
tbe efforts of Democrats throughout the
State were, as a rule, directed to this
end.
THE SOUTHERN NEGRO.
*
*
*
<
THE SOUTHERN NEGRO.
In forming an opinion upon the value
of the testimony upon which the charge
of intimidation rests tbe bluutness
the average Southern negro's moral
perceptions must not be forgotten.
is less bis fault than the consequence
the barbarism from which he spriogs,
and tbe state of slavery in which he and
his fathers have lived, that his veracity
is an unknown quantity. He is a firm
believer in tbe idea that the end justifies
the meaDs, and tbat evil may be doDe
that good may come. It is rare that
negro of the uneducated laboring class
will tell the same story twice in the
same manner, and to make him believe
that a thing is true it is only necessary
for ODe in whom be has confidence,
who is in authority over him, to say so.
Here is an illustration. In Texas, im
mediately after the war, a planter was
arraigned before an agent of tbe Freed
men's Bureau to answer for the viola
tion of a contract with a freedman. He
was adjudged guilty, and ordered to
pay the aggrieved negro the sum of fifty
dollars. "What!" said the irate plan
ter, "do you decide against me on the
testimony of that nigger?" "Yes,
plied the arbiter; "I would have you
to know tbat his word is as good as
yours now that he is a freeman."—
"Very well," rejoined the Southerner.
"Here is tbe money ; but I would thank
you to give me my spurs—I see you
wear them," and he pointed to an ele
gant pair which adorned the officer's
boots. "Yourspurs!—you, sir! What
do you mean ? I wore those spurs all
through the war.
taken," was the quiet rejoinder; "they
are mine, and I will prove it. Come
here, Sam " In came Sam, the plant
er's groom, who had stood at the door
during the conversation. "Sam, can't
you identify those spurs as mine ?"—
Sam advanced with serious face, took
hold of one of the spurs, examined it
critically for a moment, and then
claimed : "'Fore God, Massa Charles,
I reckon I do. Why, I'd cognifv dem
spurs anywhar.
'em fo' or five yeahs, and wan't I in de
stob in Galveston when you bought
'em ? Why, I could go dar now and
jhU my hand on de very shelf you tuck
'em from." The Freedmen's Bureau
man saw tbe point and rather than sur
render his spurs on such testimony com
promised by remitting the fine which be
bad just imposed.
AN IMAGINATIVE BEING.
The negro is also imaginative. Who
tbat bas attended tbeir religious meet
ings in tbe rural districts of tbe South
has Dot heard tbe preachers and exhor
tera tell stories of their experience with
out wondering alike at tbe exhuberant
flowering of their imagination aDd their
wonderful audacity in taxing the credul
ity of the audience. I have met many
an apparently sensible mau of deep re
ligious feeling, who would describe in
or
re
"You are mis
ex
Ain't I seed you w'ar
most minute details, with grave face
and solemn voice, his conversations
with the Almighty, the Saviour and the
Angel Gabriel, calling upon the Lord
to witness the truth of every word of
the story. Mental hallucinations are
not confined to the colored race by any
meana, but the ingenuity displayed by
negroes in the manufacture of such
stories serves to explain in some degree
the manner in which they can be made
to construct a fearful story of political
intimidation, with attendant horrors
which make the blood run cold, out of
any case of violence that may come un
der their observation. If a man is shot
while stealing chickens, or visited with
violence by personal enemies, it is aa
easy matter for a United States Com
missioner or any one claiming to repre
sent the United States Government,
which the negro believes the embodi
ment of all that is great and good, to
convince him that be is a victim of
political persecution, and nobody will
assume the airs and honors of martyr
dom with more complacenoy than the
man thus tutored.
CRIME ENOUGH IN THE SOUTH.
There is crime enough and political
rascality enough in the South, and espe
cially in the Gulf States, to sicken the
heart of any lover of peace and respecter
of law. But the lowest depths of polit
ical rascality are reached by the men
who, largely responsible for this crime,
make this crime their stock in trade as
politicians This depravity is mani
festly chargeable upon Kellogg and his
tribe, who now hold the government of
Louisiana under the protection of Fed
eral bayonets, and glory in a usurpation
whose corner-stone was cemented with
blood and whose overthrow would open
the shortest road to the suppression of
crime and general peace and proaperity.
The prevailing insecurity of life is due
in part, perhaps, to a public sentiment
which has become callous to the enor
mity of the crime involved in the shed
ding of man's blood, but it is even more
a consequence of a government which
shows neither the ability nor the dis
position to maintain the peace The
people are not protected eitbejt in "life,
liberty or the pursuit of happiness."—
The executive department of the gov
ernment is administered by a man who
is weak, indecisive, oorrupt, and withal
a mere political trickater, with no am
bition except individual jenrichment and
political advancement. The judiciary,
with few exceptions, is sheer rottenness.
Its higher branches are devoted to par
tisanry, and its lower branches are most
distinguished by ignorance and incapac
ity. There are parish judges who can
scarcely read their own names and who
could not spell the title of their office.
The juries in the rural districts are
made up of illiterate field bands, who
cannot speak intelligibly, much less fol
low a legal argument, and who do not
know the difference between "guilty"
and "not guilty." A School Commis
sioner who ever saw the inside of a
school-house or who believes that the
world is round is a pleasing novelty in
certain districts. There are sheriffs who
cannot spell the name of the State;
Commonwealth's Attorneys who never
read a page of law; Justices of the
Peace who know no difference between
an affidavit and a distress warrant ; Con
stables who could not call a letter of the
alphabet by name; Overseers of the
Poor who are the worst vagrants in
their parish, and Parish Clerks who
must hire other men to keep their re
cords. The police juries, to which is
confided the general supervision of
every parish, are generally composed of
illiterate men, without a dollar's worth
of property.
to
be
by
of
At
to
—a
the
at
of
to
the
tbe
hand
ing
tain
in
A PATTERN OFFICIAL.
A PATTERN OFFICIAL.
Here is an amendment to tbe police
code, as recorded by the president of
tbe police jury of West Feliciana parieh,
embracing within its limits as large a
proportion of people of culture and
wealth as can be found in any territory
of the same size in the United States.
It is taken from an official report of a
meeting of the jury, held Maroh 5th,
1875:
Be it Resolves by The Police Jnry in Regnlar
Seshion Convean That The Treasue from ft
after This Day shall Propotion The amouDtof
money Payed over to him By The Tax Cor
lected in Three Days from tbe Date it is
Passed oVer To him and be must mak The
•xact Proportion Payed out—
The money on the Proper Youchous of tbe
Person or Persuns and That
no person shall
be alond To Carlec no money on a nother
Person Youchous uulest autharyed B.v him
To Do So Without Principal Person Ts dead
or sick and cant get There him self and if
Treasue shall Yi O late This act be shall be
find in a Sun of not Lest Tbe $50.00 and no
more Then $20.00.
With the State Government in such
bands is it SDy wonder tbat ao respect
is paid to rights of person and property,
and that justice is a stronger to the peo
ple of Louisiana ? It is hard work té
get a jury to convict a criminal or a
judge to sentence him, and, even if he
is convicted and sentenced, tbe Gover
nor steps in to gain a vote or votes by
a pardon. Men come to New Orleans
iu the hands of a Sheriff, under couvie
tiou of felony, and return to shake a
commission ts a State officer in tbe faoe
of an outraged people. A large pro?
portion of the minor officials in this
State, including the supervisors of
gistration and commissioners of elec
tion, are under indictment for felony
re
or
misdemeanor aod have secured immu
nity from pnnishment and political ad
vancement by subserviency to Kellogg
and Packard. Comprehend these state
ments with all their terrible significance,
and yon will no longer wonder that
crime flourishes in Louisiana and that
the people are often driven to that last
resort of an outraged community—
"taking the law into their own hands."
Then, remember that whenever they
take the law into their own hands they
are oharged with political intimidation
by the Republicans, and you begin to
realize the complications with which the
political situation in Louisiana is be
clouded.— M. P. H., Correspondence
of the Philadelphia Times.
face
the
Lord
of
are
any
by
such
made
of
un
shot
with
aa
to
of
will
the
as
of
of
f
by
a
the
do
ing
easy
THE WOIDEBFUL CLOCK THAT WAS
MADE BY A POOH SlIMER.
What a Man of Genius can do with a
«Jack-knife.
Karl Ketter, a poor German miner
of the Excelsior Colliery, which is
situated within a few miles of Sbamokin,
Pa., has exhibited a clock there recent
ly of a most remarkable character. He
bad been three years constructing it—
the first two years at intervals of time,
and the last year he worked at it day
and night, scarcely taking time enough
to sleep and eat. He became almost a
monomaniac on the subject. The clock
was in his mind during .hi« waking
hours and in his dreams at night. He
occupied alone a small wooden shanty,
where he worked, slept and cooked his
food. Whatever sleeping and cooking
he did, however, was but little It is
thought he would have nearly starved
but for the kiBdly interest which his
ucighbors took in him and his clock.
They took him food and encouraged him
in his labors. Tbe olook, which was
made with no other tools than two com
mon jack-knives, is eight feet high and
four feet broad. Its frame is of the
Gothic style of architecture. It has
sixteen sides, and is surmounted by a
globe, on top of which is attached a
small goldea cross. Ou tbe front of
the clock there are four dial plates;
one shows the day of the week, another
shows the day of the month, another
shows the minutes and fractions of a
minute, and the ether the hour of the
day. These dials are osrved in a-most
unique manner, having emblematic
figures upon and «round them of al
most every imaginable description.—
Above the dial plates is a semi-circular
gallery, extending around about half
the width of the fraiffework of the clock.
Immediately ia front, iu the centre
of this semi-circular gallery, is the
carved wooden figure of our Saviour.
At tbe ends of the gallery, on either
side, there is a small door opening in
to the body of the clock. Over the
door, on the right hand side of the
clock, as you stand facing it, is an
eagle. Over the door, on the left hand
side, is a cock. Twice a day—that is,
12:05 in the day, and at 12:05 at night
—a sweet chime of bells begins to play,
the small door oh the right hand side
opens, and the email door on the right
hand side opens, and tbe email wooden
figures, admirably carved, of the
Twelve Apostles, appear and walk out
slowly and gravely in procession, Petsr
at the head. Advancing along the
gallery until they get opposite the figure
of Jesus, each in turn, except Judas,
slowly turns round and bows his head
to the Master, then recovers his former
position ; as Peter does this the cook
crows ! They continue to advance to
the other side of the gallery and enter
tbe small door on the left. Ae Judas
(who is in the rear,) with bis right
hand shielding bis face and his left olasp
ing the bag which is supposed to
tain the thirty pieces of silver, comes
in full view of the oloek, tbe ooek
again ! By a similar arrangement this
procession can be made to come out and
pass around the gellery at any time
desired. On pedestals, at the extreme
oorners of the front of the clook,*are
carved wooden statues of Moses and
Elias In the rear are two obelisks of
ble.
in
kind
cess.
and
tions
with
great
ly
as
tbe
its
that
ernor
army
con
crows
the Egyptian style, upon which
carved hieroglyphic oharaoters to repre
sent the ancieBt periods of the world's
history. The clock will run thirty-two
hours without winding. Mr. Ketter,
who is a native of Freiburg, iu Baden,
is very proud of bis workmanship. He
can scarcely bear to be away from it
long enough to eat his meals. He has
been offered $10,000 for It by a person
from New York, but he refused it. Mr.
Ketter says he bad often beard of the
oelebratcd clock in Strasburg, but he
never saw it, and he has no knowledge
of how it was constructed ; neither has
are
pie.
this
it
who
for
where
value,
it
with
fae uver had aDy i n stru c tio n in meohan- -Boater^
ics of any kind. His purpose is to
exhibit it for a few months in this
country, and then take it with him to
Germany.
It
getaius
name
pass
their
lingly
you
evil
though
"Why are your cheeks like
ponies ?" said a country beau to his
talkative sweetffeart, as soon as he
could get a word in edgewise, after
they hed set eut on their ride. "Is it
because they are red ?" said the blush
ing girl. "No, it is because there's
one of them on each side of a waggin'
tongue."
Let tha man with squeaking boot* go
early to ohnroh.
my
periods,
tion,
why
when
ad
that
that
last
they
they
to
the
be
ttorietwa.
Who knows not love in sorrow's night
he who knows not love in light.
A great heart is as quick to find an
other as the world is slow.
Wo are only really alive when we
enjoy the good of others.
The best flax grown in the United
States comes from Oregon.
A difference of taste in jokes is a.
great strain on the affections.
Maine claims to have raised 2^500,
000 bushels of potatoes this year.
The most laudable ambition is to be
wise, and the greatest wisdom is to be
good.
Idleness is the stupidity of the body,
and stupidity is the idleness of the
mind.
It is considered etiquette at a western
funeral to 'exclaim "what a beautiful
corp !"
The receipts at the New York plaoes
of amusement on Thanksgiving foot up
$65,000.
One hundred thousand cans of toma
toes were packed last season at San
Jose, Cal.
To think kindly of each other is good,
but to act kindly toward one another is
best of all.
f That is the great happiness of life—
to add to our high acquaintances.—
Emerson.
The idea of protecting is always a
strong incentive to manliness in a boy,
however youthful.
If ths best man's faults were written
on his forehead, he would draw his hat
over his eyes.
If you would pass for more than your
value, say little. It is easier to look
wise than talk wise
It was Addison who, as many quoters
seem to forget, said that "the woman
who deliberates is lost."
The integrity of men is to be measured
by their conduet, not by their profes
sions.— Junius.
Alphonso Karr says women guess at
everything. They never make mistakes
unless they think.
Who supposes that it is an impossi
ble contradiction to be superstitious and
rational at the same time.
The Italians do not say the author of
a dictionary, bnt the compiler, and that
appellation is the truest.
Take things as they are, and make
the best of them. That is the only
true.and practical philosophy.
There are persons who would be pros
trate on the ground if their vanity
their pride did not hold them up.
They who do apeak ill of themselves
do so mostly as the surest way of prov
ing how modest and candid they are.
How few are our real wants, and how
easy it is to satisfy them 1 Our im
aginary ones are boundless and uniatia
a
is
a
is
a
.
or
ble.
Some goodness is like the glowworm
in this, that it shines most when no eyes
except those of heaven, are upon it.
The first step to self-knowledge is
self-distrust. Nor can wa attain to any
kind of knowledge except by a like pro
cess.
The value of exports at the port of
Boston thus far, this year, exceeds the
importa by upwards of $7,000,000.
There are no leai than one hundred
and sixty different religious denomina
tions in the United States.
Ennis county, Texas, oast a solid
Democratic vote.Vid then had a jubilee
with 3,000 men in line, cannon* and a
great ball.
"He who laughs,can commit nodaad
ly sin," said the wise and sweet-hearted
woman who was tbe mother of Goethe.
Evil speaking will cease jnst as
as evil hearing does. In this business
tbe tongue depends npon the ear and is
its servant.
The Springfield Republican notes
that "Chamberlain ia tbe second Gov
ernor of a State that Grant and the
army have eleoted as against the peo
soon
pie.
There are two ways of going though
this world. One is to make the best of
it and the other the worst of it. Thoae
who tako the latter course work hard
for poor pay.
The church-yard is the market place
where all things are rated at their trna
value, and those who are approaching
it talk of the world and its vanities
with a wisdom never known before._
-Boater^
It is an argument of a candid, in
getaius mind to delight in the good
name and commendations of other« ; to
pass by their defeots and take notice of
their virtues ; and to speak or hear wil
lingly of tha latter ; for in this indeed
you may be little leaa guilty than tha
evil speaker, in taking pleasure in evil
though you speak it not— Leighton.
Prof. Huxley may know all about
globigerinon, and Pterodactyls, and
Fetrosauria, and tha Jurassic and other
periods, and be able to explain «volu
tion, bnt we don't believa be can tell
why a woman always shuts both
when she fire« off« pistol.
eye«

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