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Shepherdstown register. (Shepherdstown, Va. [W. Va.]) 1849-1955, August 30, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026824/1889-08-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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?|jc Sljcjiljcr&stoum Ucgistcr.
ESTABLISHED 1849.
montani semper liberi.
TWO DOLLARS PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
H. L SNYDER, PUBLISHER
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W. YA., FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 1889.
NEW YOL. 24? NO. 49.
DANIEL B. LUCAS,
.ATTORNEY at law,
Chaklestows W. Va.
.???U. practice In aLt n? Courts of Jeffer
)\ son anda^oluiug ountles.
The Entier Hotel,
sHErilERDSTOWN, W. VA..
Has Been Re-opened
Cniler a nrw management and with new fur
niture throughout. Every effort for
the comfort of guests will
be made.
jt v 'rRl'WKI'lt Proprietor.
Sample Room on First Floor.
AVE HAVE IX STOCK
-THE LARGEST LINE OF
SUITINGS
-AND?
PANTALOONINGS
,1, ? wt> have ever shown. All NEW GOODS
-ni> old stock? and complete In every
particular. We do our own cutting
and make our store expenses
by discounting every bill,
which enables us
To Meet Lowest Prices
i
AND UNDERSELL MANY.
I;: tots' Furnishing Goods Department
is f::ll of nice thing*. We get novelties In this
depart inent just as tliey come out and are ac
knowledged to l>e headquarters for these
jj us. We are told by many that our line '
equals Baltimore city furnishers. You are to
he the judge in this case and we patient'y
it.i t your decision. We will be pleased to
iI.mu- you our goods and will not Insist on |
wii u so you can feel perfectly easy ingoing
out without buying.
(i HOVE BROS.,
Under Baldwin House,
HAG E 11ST( ? W N. M A R Y LAN D.
WANTED
Everybody to know* I have received
my Spring Stock of
WALL PAPER.
LA I KsT STYLES. E I RST-C LASS, RICH
AND ELEGANT.
Good paper at 8c per piece of 8 yard?.
Better still at 10c 41 " 44 44 44
Gold Paper 12 1-2, 15, 16. 18, 22, 25 and
30c per piece of 8 yards.
Sf nd for or call and examine them.
*#- Estimates for painting solicited.
T. H. MILLER.
Spring 1889 Summer
The TEMPLE OF FASHION is
again tilled with NEW
GOODS !
CLOTHING!
HT Boots, Shoes !
H' 'Hats and Caps.
^Neckwear ud Motes.
: Furnishings !
Trunks, Satchels, Umbrellas aud
Canes. Two iJoors full of goods.
Easy stairway and plenty of light.
Geo. 11. Hag ley,
CHAKLESTOWN, W. VA.
NOTICE
TO THE PUBLIC!
We the undersigned having pur
chax-il the Undertaking Business of
R. M. Billniyer have removed to the
>t ? ne Store " Room, up stairs, where
we are prepared to furnish at short
notice ,
Burial Cases, Caskets, Robes,
Crepes, Gloves, &c.,
ainl all goods kept in a well furnished
Undertaking Establishment. We
I l>e I iy strict attention to business to
"?? riia .-hare of public patronage.
We will continue the Painting and
Papering business a* usual.
Ivespectfully,
J. FEU HELL <fc SON.
All orders left with Mr. Bill
?yer will receive promp* attention.
GREAT
SLAUGHTER SALE!
I will from this day sell uiy entire
Stock, consisting of
CLOTHING
For Men, Boys and Children,
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
Boots, Shoes, Hats, &c.,
AT AND BELOW COST.
0,u** *urly iind get your bargains, as
ttl' >uust be sold before September
l!>t. 18SU. Now is your time.
J. H. MYERS,
HAKl'EH S ferhy. w. VA.
FOR _S ALE.
\\ *1 !litve for 8ale about 7% acres of good
?m?ii ne8lone Laud on which there U a
U hi.'"c'"ir<J- K?od dwelling and kitchen at
eu and om. building. The property lain
Uii? . * [County, abouiT milestrom Martins
iloha?1 Smiles from Scrabble. Fosses
l. ?lv?n Aj.rll 1st, 1?!W. Terms reasonable.
,url'ier Inioriuatlon apply to
FLEMING A SNYDElt,
Ki-al Estate Agents,
^ Shepherdstown, W. Va.
SEEDS.? A? the season Is ad
"Jen Li" 1 otler the remnant of my gar
? Uit iM er>' cheap. All fresti anU many of
Ul Used next year without any risk.
il (.ML' KUAN'S DRUG STORE.
THE
HAS
STRUCK US
And We are Ready to Meet It
with an Immense Line of
Dry Goods, Millinery,
Ribbons, Carpets,
Notions.
Oil-Cloths, Mattings,
Fine Shoes and
Jewelry.
F you want Corsets from 20c up to
. 81.25, eall on
M. S. HITESHEW.
I
I
F you want Silk Ribbons cheaper
. than you ever paw them, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
F you want Challies from (5c to 20
cents, call on
M. S. HITESIIEW.
F you want Dress Goods from 5c
. to ?1.00 per yard, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
F you want White Goods of any
description from 8c to 25c, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
IF you want a nice Bonnet or Hat
at prices that will surprise you,
call on M. S. HITESHEW.
If you want any Jewelry, such as
Breast Pins, Ear Kings or Cuff But
tons, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
If you want any Ladies', Misses' or
Children's Shoes at Bottom Prices, call
on M. S. HITESHEW.
If you want Mattings at 12i, 15,
l?i. 1* or 20c, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
If you want 30-cent Rag Carpets
or a uice English Ilemp Carpet, call
on M. S. HITESHEW.
Call and see us. We discount ev
ery dollar's worth of goods we buy and
give our customers the benefit of -it.
We can't be undersold. Our motto:
Quick Sales, Small Profits. For
Cheap Goods in our line, call on
M. S. HITESHEW.
M.B.
M.
-IS XOVV RECEIVING DAILY?
Dry Goods,
%/
Fancy Goods,
%j 7
Motions,
Hats,
Shoes,
Straw Goods,
Carpets,
Rugs,
Oilcloths,
Groceries,
Provisions,
&e., &c.
Call and see what a complete stock
of j?oods lie lias. Learn the low
prices at which he sells. Observe for
vourself the tjood qualities.
M. B. BAKER
Mrs. M. L. Herring'toii.
At J. P. Welshans' Old Stand, has
now a Fine Stock of
Summer Millinery,
White Dress Goods,
FANCY ARTICLES
? AND ?
NOTIONS,
Which can be bought CM EAPERthan
elsewhere. HATS received
every week.
CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF.
Important Notice !
1 INVITE your attention to a successful sub
stitute for scruplng while-washed walls. I
will put paper on white-washed wails with
out scraping the walls if the liuie is tight and
will guarantee It to stay un as lung as It will
If scraped. If It conies oft. 1 will furnish pa
per and will put it on at ray expense. I can
get reliable parties to vouch to thh? where I
have put paper on. Also will hang paper as
cheap as any one. 1 cau furnish paper as
as cheap as you can get it anywhere, suitable
for decorating ceilings and walls ol any kind.
Will do any klud of house and sign painting.
Furniture done up in style.
WM. It. MILLER.
Notice to Trespassers.
ALL persons are hereby warned from
trespassing upon the lands of the under
signed. The law will be strictly enforced
against those caught (without permission)
hunting, tishlng or in anyway intrudiug upon
the premises of
v JOS. L. COOK US,
HAMILTON DAVIS,
W. T. LEMEN.
W. H. HILLMYER,
DAVID BILLMVER.
March 2Jth, 1389? tiro.
THE BEST PLACE
ON EARTH
?To Buy Men's, Boys' and Children's?
CLOTHING
And Gents' Furnishing Goods
IS AT
Jacob Wintermoyers,
The Boss Clothing Man, Shepherdstown.
HIS first word Is Bargains. He is now ready
with oneof the Finest Lines of SPRING
CLOTHING that has ever been brought to
this market, and he deties Hagerstown or
Martlnsburg to compete with him iu Prices,
Quality and Style, as he contends that there
never have been better goods shown and
greater varieties ollered and prices never
have been so low. There is no room for im
provement in the ISargaliiH he otleru thlssea
son in Men's, Boys' and Children's Clothing
and Gents' Furnishing GooUs. His line of
NECKWEAR
Is something nice and large; so much so that
every man can have plenty ol styles to make
a selection from. Remember, he carries a
large line of SHIRTS, dress and overahlrts.
also WORKING SHIRTS of all descriptions.
HOSIERY and UNDERWEAR. Remember,
we can save you money on all of these things.
TRUNKS and VALISES. He lias a large line
ot them. COLLARS and CUFFS, all the lat
est shapes and styles, and, In fact, everything
that man needs in I iothlng and Furnishing
Goods, hecanflndat the ISoss Clothing House
of Jacob Wintennoyer. Now all I ask of my
friendsand customers Is tocomeand see these
goods and their prices and be convinced that
you can do bettor In buying your goods at
home than elsewhere. I wish to return my
thanks to all of my friendsand customers for
their past kindness and hope a continuance
of the same in the future. I shall try my b?*?t
to please you. Remember the old stand, Col
lege Square.
J AC< >B W I N'T E B MOY ER,
The Boss Clothing Man.
Attention !
We have received our Spring
Stock of Merchant Tailoring
Supplies, also the
BEST
stock of Gentlemen's Furnish
ing Goods in town, consisting
of Gauze Underwear, Hosiery,
Neckwear, Umbrellas, Grip
sacks, etc. We would call at
tention to the following: In
tending to
QUIT
the Ready-Made Clothing bus
iness, we are now offering our
ENTIRE STOCK AT COST
to close out. Special Induce
ments in Overcoats, balance of
stock in Spring Weights.
CUSTOM CUTTING a
specialty. Hoping to merit a
fair share ol patronage, we are
Yours Respectfully,
SJ\ HUMRICKHOUSE & SON,
ESTABLISHED IN 1868.
JKFFERSON
Sash, Door and Blind
FACTORY.
CALL FOIl YOl'K
Framing, Skiing, Sheathing, Floor
ing, Frames, Sash, Blind:?, Doors,
Mantels, Mouldings, Newels and
Stair Work, Plastering Lath,
Brick Tiles, Arc., itc.,
-AT?
John McKnight's,
CHARLESTOWN, W. VA.
Having put in new machinery ami a
force of skilled workmen, we are pre
pared to furnish material with expedi
tion and satisfaction to all at the most
reasonable terms. Factory opposite
B. & O. Depot.
Successor to C. 11. McKnight <i* Co.
HAQZBSTOWN STEAM
GRANITE AND MARBLE WORKS!
Stouffer& Darner,
MANUFACTVRKKS OK
Granite am! Marble Monuments, Sarcopha
gus, Headstones, Tombs, Statues, Vases,
L'rns, <Sc.. of Every Description, from
Qulncy, Harre, Concord, Westeily, Oak
Hill, Clark's Island, Woodstock and all
the Principal Eastern Granites; also
Ked .scotch Granite.
l'artlcular Attention Given to Lettering In
all Its Forms. Original Designs Fur
nished on Application.
Also, Slate Mantels and Building Work of
Every Inscription In Marble. Granite and
Sand Stone. Cemetery Coping, Ac.
Workscorncr Jonathan and Antletaiu Sts.,
opp. B. A O. Depot, llugerstown, Md,
H. L. HOUT,
Agent at Shepherdstown, W. Va.,
Has a full line* of Designs and will
show them upon application.
FARMS FOR ~SALE.
IttO acres of land in Clark County, Kansas,
6 miles from Ashland, the county seat, and
railroad depot, and In sight of the Cimarron
River. Good soil, tine grass. Mr. Kobert N".
Engte, formerly of this county, lives on the
adjoining quarter section, and pastured 60
head of cattle on the two farms last year.
Land, rolling prairie: wire feuce all around
tarin. Price 81, &*?? one-half cash, balauce in
1 and 2 years.
FLEMING A SNYDER,
Heal Estate Agents.
Shepheruslown, W. Va.
COAL! COAL! COAL!
HAVE reduced prices on all grades of Coal
and 1 have been especiallly careful In
Eurchaslngonly the very best quality, entlre
r free from slate. Don't ;fall to examine my
Block and prices before purchasing.
G.T. HODGES.
1. S. FLEMINGJIotary Public.
\\rlLL take acknowledgments of Deeds
J | Power of Attorney, Ailldavlts, Depoel
tlons. ani attend to all business oonnected
with the office.
VW
The Chief Rrnnoa for the great suc
cess of Hood's Karsaparil'a Is found in the
article Itself. It Is merit that wins, and the
tact that Hood's Sarsapariila actually ac
complishes what is claimed for it, is what
has given to this medicine a popularity and
jale greater than that of any other sarsapa
Mprit Win <5 rllIa or bU)0(X purl*
r?l C I I L V V 1 1 1 o flPr before the public,
flood's Sarsapariila cures Scrofula, Salt
| Rheum and all Humors, Dyspepsia, Siclc
Headache, Biliousness, overcomes That
I Tired Feeling, creates an Api>etite, strength
ins the Nerves, builds lip the iVliole System.
Uood'i Snrwnpnrilln is Soldbyall drug
lists. $1; six for $5. Prepared by C. 1. Hood
6 Co., Apothecaries, Lowe'l, Mass.
GO and SEE
FOR YOURSELF
-THAT
R. S. M. HOFFMAN
lias opened rooms opposite the S. V.
Railroad Depot, where you ran find
F U R N I T U RE!
of the Latest Patterns always on hand,
such as |
Parlor and Chamber Suits Complete!
B K I >ST EA I)S, WARDROB KS,
WASH STANDS, MATTRESSES,
BUREAUS. BUFFETS, |
Extension and Marble-Top Tables,
Single and Bed Lounges,
Chairs and Rockers.
Also Agent for the DAVIS SEWING
MACHINES.
i All articles sold at priees that will
compete with the lowest sold
any where. In the
Undertaking
?YOU WILL FIND
CASKETS, FLOWERS,
COFFINS, SLIPPERS,
ROBES, CREPE,
j Gloves, and all pertaining to the bus
iness. Personal attention giveii in
every case. R. S. M. HOFFMAN.
WE WISH TO
INFORM YOU
?THAT WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED?
OUR NEW SPRING STOCK
?OF?
Suitings and Coatings
?AND?
P A NT A L O 0 N I K G S ?
This stock is the largest ever shown In 11a
gerstown, and prices range from the cheapest
to the liner grades, made up in first-class
style, and with
Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed.
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS!
In Gents' Furnishing Goods we show a large
' line of New, stylish and Han Jsome Goods,
i our line of Fancy Flannels In Plaids ami
i stripes, Percales, Pique, Pleated and Plain
I Dress shirts, cannot l>e excelled.
In Neckwear, we show all the latest novel
ties In Tecks, lMfls, Four*ln-hand and t'lul>
House Scarfs, from 25c to SL20. We have all
the new shades in
Gents' Kiel Gloves
I for the early spring. These goods must be
I seen to be appreciated. Call and examine
i and he convinced that we have the largest
stock ever shown 111 llagerstown.
Respectfully,
JOHN 1). SWARTZ,
Merchant Tailor and Gents' Outfitter,
No. 21 W. Washington St , Hag ers town, Md.
A Business Notice.
A CHANGE of tUnes causes a change In the i
Way of conducting business. Hence, some
merchants ate adopting the cash system. We
1 have uot yet, strictly shaking, but continue
to sell on short or reasonable time to good
am) tried customers, and sell as low as those
who claim to be selling strictly tor casti. For
a tew quotations we submit to your consider
ation: Yard-Wide Straw Mattlngrrom locts.
up; Home- Made New Hag Carpet, pretty
styles. 40 and 50c ; Table and Floor ( >11 Cloths,
4-1, 5-1 and 6-1 wide, ut prices troui 30 to 50 c is.
Beautiful Dress Giugbains. 0 to 10c per yard.
Salines (nice, new goods), 10c; calico, 5 to 8c;
Lawns, l to loc; India Linens, W to 'Me; La
dles Corsets, 2??c to fl.; Handkerchiefs and
Hosiery ranging from 5 to So; Hats, 5c to {2.
Sugats, Syrups and Co flee at as low prices as
coin pell tors are selling. Shoes, Queensware,
Tinware and Hardwaie to suit ail. at HOCK
1 BOTTOM PRICES. Tobacco to suit most ail
who use the weed in prices ranging from 35c
per pound up to 60c. In lact, my stock is full,
and 1 am coustautly in receipt of New Goods.
My aim Is to do a lair and square business
and to treat all alike. And don't you forget
. it, if you want a flrst-ciass Hour, second to
none, come right along w ith your wheat or
cash a nd call ior the Mill\ 11K- Sunlight Flour,
and when you lake it home your wife or
daughter will be pleased and furnish you
with nice bread. My Motto Is UU1CK SALES
AND SMALL PROFITS. We want to live
and see our fellow men do likewise. Our
aim will be tony to accommodate ourselves
to suit all who may call upon us, audit any
| mistakes occur please give us an opportunity
I tocorrect them. We hope by tairand honest
! dealing, in connection with the fact of selling
goods as low as any other arm, to merit n
share of the trade, so come right along and
take away one dollar's worth oi goods for ev
ery hundred cents yon leave with us.
Very Respectiully,
N. S. J. STRIDER.
BRUSHES.? Just received a ?pply of l?ln
Brushes and Dusters, \\ hUewaah Brusht^
Scrubbing Brushes. Kalaomine Brushes, Shoe
Hrusiu'6. 11 v.a^?P;?g DRCQ BI0RJE
GRADATIM.
Heaven is not reached at a single bound;
Hat we build the ladder by which we rise
From the lowly earth to the vaulted skies.
And we mount to its summit round by
round.
I count this thing to be graudly true;
That a noble deed is a step toward Uod,
Lifting the soul from the common clod
To a purer and a broader view.
We rise by the things that under feet ;
liy what we have mastered of good and gain
By the pride deposed and the passion stain.
And the vanquished ills that we hourly
meet.
We hope, we aspire, we resolve, we trust.
When the morning calls us to life and liglit.
But our hearts grow weary, and, ere the night
Our lives are trailing the sordid dust.
We hope, we resolve, we aspire, we pray.
And think that we mount the air on wings
Beyond the recall of sensual tilings,
While our feet still cling to the heavy clay.
Wings for the angels, but feet fer men.
We may borrow the wings to find the way?
We may hope, and resolve, and aspire, and
pray ;
But our feet must rise, or we fall again.
Only in dreams is a ladder thrown
From the weary earth to the sapphire wall"
But the dreams depart and the vision fulls.
And then sleeper wakes on his pillow of
stone.
Heaven Is not reached at a single bound :
But we build the ladder by which we rl?e
From the lowly earth to the vaulted skies.
And we mount to its summit round t>y
round.
LOVE IN A LOG CABIN.
"And this is home!"
Ruth Delano gazed about her with
a mingled feeling of wonder, joy ami
disappointment. Three thousand
miles had she traveled across the con
tinent to reach the home her hus
band had prepared for her, and this
was what she found:
A lonely ranch among the foothills
in (Southern California, with a plain
log cabin for a home. Not a vestige
of a plant or a flower around it, not a
suggestion of comfort or beauty with
in it. hills stretching brown and ban*
under the July sun. and not a shade
tree in sight.
'?One might know there never had
! been a woman near this place, " j
sighed Kutli, her eves slowly filling I
with tears. It seemed so comfortless
and barren after leaving her mother's
old-fashioned farm-house in Maine* I
full to overflowing with inviting, com- !
fortable things, and surrounded with
flower-gardens and orchards, and
where every nook and cornt r sug
gested the deft hands and delicate
hands of women. She felt her very
heart sinking within her.
Then seeing the eyes of her hushaud
fixed upon her she forced back the
tears'
Had she not said. like the Ruth of
old, "Whither thou goest, I will go:
and whither thou lodgest, 1 will
lodge?'1
Would any place, no matter how 1
full of comfort it might be, ever be
home without him. Had she ami her
baby Ruth not wept tears of joy when
the lettercame telling them that papa
was coming from California to take I
them home? And had not every foot j
of the way been h joy to think she !
was once more with him and that
they were to have a home.
Sh ^stroked the hand of her hus
band, who held their little Ruthie in
his arms, smiling through her tears.
"1 know, dear, it is a new country,'' |
she said cheerfully, "and you have
done the best you could."
It was the truly wifely spirit, and
in his heart lie blessed the true woman
who said it.
"All the ranches look kind of deso- '
late," he said, "when there's no one j
but men about; but now we've got a
little woman here, things will soon be j
looking different."'
Inside of the house she found every- !
thing neat, at least, and that was a
gr^at comfort to her. and if the parlor
was barren looking with no carpet
upon it, the kitchen was full of con
trivances which woman like, and she ,
knew that John had thought of them
for her.
After supper they sat down on the
little porch in front of the cabin to
talk of plans for future work. It was
just at sunset, and as Ruth sat placidly
looking at the view in front of her ?
which, after all. was a fine one, tak
ing in a glimpse of the blue Pacific,
and a background of purple moun
tains?she began to lose the under
tone of homesickness which had so
marred her becoming. She thought i
how beautiful a home might really be
under the shadow of the lifted pines
and she resolved with John's help she
could make her's one to be proud of.
As if in answer to her thought John
went into the house and returned in a
moment laden with two parcels which
he dropped in her lap.
"There, Ruth," he said, "you can't
guess what these are, can you?"
"1 am afraid not." Ruth said, eye
ing the mysterious looking packages
wonderingly.
"Well, you know the house isn't
very beautiful yet." John said, his
good face fairly shining with the lit
tle secret he had in store for her; "but
I guess you'll find something in each
of those parcels that will help you
beautify it."
What could he mean? Ruth took up
the lighter but larger one first. To her
surprise it was full of garden seeds,
small packages of every kind. almo*t,
she could think of.
"Well, how lovely!" she said. "Now
we shall raise all the vegetables we
need, and our garden will rival dear
mother's at home."
"Yes," John replied, "And go ahead
of it. for California beats the world
for flowers and your garden will be
just as lovely in winter as in summer.
There are twenty varieties of roses
among that collection of seeds.''
"Isn't wonderful to think of?" cried
Ruth, as delighted as a child over her
treasures. "And what can be in here?"
she continued as she opened the sec
ond parcel. "Wonders will never
i cease?" she exclaimed the next mo
ment, as she poured a whole bag of
silver into her lap. "And what is this
for?" , *
"To buy your parlor furniture,*1 he
replied, laughing at her amazement.
"Honest?" She looked at him. her '
brown eyes sparkling.
"It is for Mrs. Delano to do with as
she pleases." he said. "I saved the
money to furnish the cabin with, and
thought to have it fixed up before you
come but concluded on second thought
that you could do better than I: so
there's the money. Buy what you
please, and fix up the place to suit
yourself."
"Well, if you ain't the best John in
the whole country," Ruth >aid. almost 1
laughing and crying in the same
breath. How could she ever be home
sick again?
And that night, instead of crvinjp
herself to sleep, as she had thought
that afternoon to do, she lay awake
from very joy, thinking of the pretty
things she could buy and make for the
cabin, and imagining how picturesque
it would look covered with lady banks
roses, and how sweet the violet beds
would be in the spring-tiiue.
And so the very next day she set
the hired man to work laying off a
garden, and all that week and the
next she spent her spare time in dig
ging and hoeing and spading. The
following week John took her to the
nearest town, and she selected the
various articles she desired for the
house. She managed to furnish it
quite comfortably, and under her left
fingers all thing began to bear a
homelike air. The place lost its bar- i
ren and shiftless look, and even the
dog Harold seemed to feel the change. ;
He no longer wandered aimlessly .
about, as though seeking a coinfor
table spot, but went to sleep, a pie
ture of contentment on one of the
soft rugs in the sitting-room, keeping i
one zealous eye always half open upon
his playmate. Hut hie.
The mouths sped by, in spite of all |
the hardships she had to endure? for
life is hard for a woman in a new
country? on light wings for Ruth
She made the best of all her trials*
and was as sweet and contented as if
she had been in the fair home they
had owned and lost. Though often
her limbs ached and her head was
weary with the weight of work
which fell to her share, she never
complained. Not once did she grow
fretful or reproach her husband for
taking her so far from all that she
loved.
"He is doing the best he can," she
always said to herself, "and what
would a palace be without his love?
Resides, how much I have to be grate
ful for." And somehow the remem
brance of their first evening in the :
log cabin would always bring the
tears to her eyes, It was such a
real proof of his love and thoughful
ness for her.
When the next spring lengbened
into the summer, and her sweet face
begun to wear a tired look that he
did not like to bee, he came to her
one evening, saying gravely:
"Knth pack yonr trunk to-night.
To-morrow I want to take you with
me to San Diego. Important business
calls me there, and you and Ruthie
both need a change."
"but how can you leave the ranch?"
Ruth asked. just now when you are
most needed?"
"Oh, Redly will tuke charge of the
place and the men will work for him
as well as for me."
If Ruth iiad noticed .him just then
very carefully she might have seen h
twinkle in his eye that would have
made her suspicious as to this "busi
ness trip" to San Diego: but like a
dutiful wife she packed up and asked
no foolish questions.
When they reached San Diego,
much to her surprise her husband
did not go to a hotel. He gave the
coachman some directions aud they
were driven to an elegant looking
house in the suburbs.
?Why, I didn't know you had
friends here!" exclaimed Ruth in sur
prise.
"Oh, yes," said John, "I have a
number of them. This is the home
of the best friend 1 have in the world."
"Why!" John nearly took her breath
away. She thought of her shabby
traveling-dress and Ruthie'* shabbier
cloak with dismay, but she made up
her mind to make the best of it for
John's sake, anyway. A lady could
always be a lady, no matter how she
dressed
A neat Chinaman opened the door
anil ushered them into a handsome
reception room. The house was beau,
tiful inside, and everything was new
and of the latest fashion. Rath sank
into a finely uphoistered easy chair
with a feeling of momentary content.
For a moment she almost wished she
might be the possessor of such a home,
and then she put aside the envious
wi?h.
'"Make yourself at home, dear.
John said, "while I see the master of
the house. He is probably in hi*
duty. I will return when I have
spoken with him privately. I know
he will be delighted to know you are
here and will welcome you.
"How strange John never told me
of this" friend of his," Ruth said to
herself looking at the handsome en
gravings on the table near her.
Presently be returned, but not, as
she expected, with the master of the
house, whom she was feeling a little
in awe of.
"Where is hef* she asked.
"Here."
'"Here? Why John, have you lost
vour mind? There is no one with
you. You and I are alone." She be
gan to look frightened. What if
John had really Ioet his senses? He
had certainly acted queer about this
San Diego trip.
To her further amazement he borst
into a loud laugh, and taking a stand
in the middle of the room, said with a
polite bow:
4*I>ear Mrs. Delano, allow me to in
troduce to you the master of this
house. John Delano, Ksq., your hum
ble servant. 1 am mouarch of all I
survey.''
"John, you are surely going mad
ami 1 with you. For heaven's sake."
she entreated, "tell me what you
mean!"'
"I'd tell you what I mean, little
wife,' he said. "I mean that 1 came
to San Diego this year during the
land, and have been in real estate
business and cleared a small fortune.
This is your home, and all that is in it
belongs to Kuth and John Delauo.
The ranch and the log cabin were
siuiply a trial of your love. 1 wautvd
to find out what kind of stutT my wife
was made of."
"And did you find out?" she asked
of hiiu, woman like, not knowing
whether to laugh or cry over this
great joy.
"indeed I did. She was weighed in
the balance aud not found wanting.
1 know now that her love was strong
enough to brave aii trials for me.
Henceforth she shall be queen of my
prosperity."
"It was a very pretty little drama
you choose to have me take the princi
pal part in," she *aid. "but I forgive
you and I am satisfied if you are."
"Completely," he answered, with a
lover's kiss.
"Do you know, dear John," she
whispered that uight as she held
Kuthie up for her papa's good-night
kiss, "that 1 doubt if 1 can ever be as
happy anywhere as 1 was in that lit
tle log cabin of ours, in spite of all
the hard work 1 did. Love never
seemed before such a sweet compen
sation for all of life's trials."
"Well, if that isn't just like a wom
an," laughed her husband. "Like
Lot's wife, forever looking back. (Jive
her heaven, and two to one. she'll be
sorry she ever left earth."
Rut h only smiled and held her peace.
She knew that he would ever hold
their log cabin days in sweet and
sacred remembrance.
His Faith Shattered.
i lie small boy had only been a tiny
or two at the kindergarteu when he
approached his lather, showing a
great deal of indignation.
"Papa, that isn't a good school. I
don't want to go to that school any
more."
"Why, my hoy?"
"Well, do yon know what the boys
at that school sav?"
"What?"
"Well, papa, they say they ain't
any Santa C'laus, that it's not true;
they ain't any ouch thing. Papa,
tilers is a Santa Clans. isn't there?"
The father thought a moment.
Then he concluded to tell the child
the truth, the whole truth and noth.
ing but the truth. So he took him
on his knee and told him how it was
a pretty fabrication made up by
fathers and mothers who loved their
children to make them happy, ami
the fathers and mothers were the real
Santa Claus. The small boy listened
in silence. This was a shock to him,
because, I suppose, like other and
more inexcusable people, he felt h?
had been making a painful exhibition
of his ignorance. He slid down from
his father's knee and walked across
the room to the door. He o|>eued i^
and stood holding the knob for a mo
ment in a kind of deep thought. Then
he turned and he looked at his father.
"Say. paper, have you been filling
me up about the devil, too?"
Pat Equal to the Occasion.
"You printed a story about an Irish
man who was threatened by a priest
with being turned into a rat unless
he quit drinking and bating his
wife," said a frjend who gathers up
anecdotes of that sort. "Let uiv tell
you one. It isn't new, but I have
never seen it printed. M
I squared myself and he proceeded:
"Patrick Maginis went to confes
sion, and. among other sins, confessed
to the good father that he had stolen
Mrs. Muicahy's pig, the Ion* of which
had been a great blow to the |?oor
woman.
"Stole Airs. Muicahy's pig. did ye?
That's very bad, Patrick? very bad.
Don't ye know Pat, that to steal Mrs.
Muicahy's pig is worse? What will
ye say on the day of judgement when
Mrs. Mulcahy pig is worse? What
will ye say on the day of judgement
when Mrs. Mulcahy confronts you lie
fore the Lord an" charges ye with
stealin' her pig ? what'll ye say?"
"Pat looked rather glum at this on
slaught. but at this point he {>erked
up and said:
" 'Sure, ye river inoe, Mrs. Mulcahy
won t be there.'
" 'Indade; and why not, Pat Ma
ginis? Mr. Mulcahy will be there an1
the pig'll be there, an' when yer a*ked
why ye stole the widdy's pig what'll
ye say. I'm wantin to know?
" 'Will Mrs. Mulcahy be theref
asked Pat. a great idea illuminating
his face.
" ' She will.' said the good father
severely.
" And will the pig be there?"
" 'Certainly.'
"Then, begorra,' said i'at. triumph
ently, 'I'll say: "Mrs. Mulcahy, there's
your pig.' "
">'o. Mr. Jones, I cannot be your
wife.'1 "But you'll be a sister to me.
Promise me that." "It is unneces
sary. Your brother proposed to me
last week and I promised to be his
sister. I have been your sister for a
week."
Miss Gotham ? "I adore traveling.
Where you ever in Greece, Miss Loin? '
Miss Loin (of Cincinnati)? No, I nev
er was, but papa was in that lard
trust, you know."
The men who wouldn't be found
out should stay at home.
About the Ksttlesnake.
I^t us observe what happens when
the rattlesnake means mischief. He
throws himself into a spiral, and
about oue-third of his length, carry
ing the head, rises from the coil and
stands upwrigtat. The attitude is fine
and warlike, and artists who attempt
to portrav it always fail He does
uot pursue ? be waits. Little animals
he scorns unless he is hungry, so that
the mouse or toad he leaves for days
unnoticed in his cage. ur
uoisv treat ures alarm him. 1 hen his
head and neck are thrown far back,
his mouth is opened very wide, the
fang held firmly erect, and with an
abrupt swifftness, for which his ordi
nary motions prepare oue but little,
he Strikes once and is back 011 guard
again, vigilant and brave; The blow
a stab and is given by throwing
the head forward, while the half coils
below it are straigtened out to length
en the neck and give power to the
.notions which drive the fangs into
opponent's flesh. As they enter the
temporal muscle closes the lower )a?
on the part struck aud thus force*
the sharp fang deeper in. It is a
thrust aided by a bite. At this mo
ment the poison duct i? opened by the
relaxation of the muscle which sur
rounds it ami the muie muscle which
ghuts the jaw squeeies the glawl and
drives its venom through the duct
ami hollow fang into the hitteu parl^
In s<? complicated a series of act
there is often failure. The tooth
strikes on tough skin and doubles
hack or tails to enter or ^ serpen
misjudges distance and falls short
and may squirt the venom 4 or ft feet
in the air, doing no harm 1 had a
curious experience of this kind, iu
which a M?ake 8 feet ? Inches long
threw a teaspoonful or more of poison
athwart my forehead. It missed my
?-ves by an inch or two. 1 have had
many' near esca,*.. but this was
the grimmest of all. An inch lower
would have cost me my sight ami
probably my life. A snake will turn
ami strike from any posture, but the
coil is the attitude always assumed
when possible. The coil acta an an
anchor and enable* the aniuial to
shake its fangs loose from the wound.
A snake can rarely strike beyond
half its length. If both fangs enter
the hurt Is doubly dangerous, because
the dose of venom is doubled. At
times a fang is left in the llesh, but
this does not trouble the serpent s
powers as a poisoner, since number
less fangs lie r.ady to become firmly
fixed in its place, and both fangs are
never lost together. The nervous
mechanism which controls the act of
striking seems to Im? in the spina,
cord, for if we cut off a snake s head
and then pinch its tad the stump of
the neck returns aud with some ac
curacy hits the hand of the ox|?eri
menter? if he has the nerve to hold
on. Few men have. 1 have not. A
little Irishman who took care of my
labratory astonished me by cooly ??us
tabling his test. He did It by closing
his eyes and so shutting out for a mo
ment the too suggestive view of the
returning stump. Hnakes have always
seemed to uic averse to striking, and
they have been oil the whole much
maligned. Any cool, quiet peraon,
moving slowly and steadily, may pick
up and handle gently most venomous
serpents. 1 fancy, however, that the
vipers and the copperhead! are un
certain pets. Mr. Thompson, the
snake keeper at the Philadelphia too
logical handles his serpents with iui
punity, but one day, having dropped
some little moccasins a few days old
down his sleeve while he carried their
mamma In his hand, one of the tobies
hit him and made an ugly wound.
At present the snake staff Is used to
handle snakes. 1 saw one In October
in Tangiers what I bad long desired
to observe? a snake charmer. Most
of his snakes were harmless, but he
refused, with well acted horror, to
permit me to take hold of them. He
had also two large brown vipers.
These be handled with care, but I
saw at once that they were kept ex
hausted of their venoiu by having
been daily teased into biting on a
bundle of rag* tied to a stick. They
were too tired to be dangerous. I
have often seen snakes in this state.
After three or four fruitless acts of in
stinctive use of their venom they give
give up and seem to become indlffer
ent to approaches and even to rough
handling.
The Drummer'i Ruae.
A short time ago a drumme r from
abroad railed at a Hangor liv*ry ?ta
ble and wanted a double t*am for a
ten day* trip into the country, and
the stable man refuted to let him one
on the ground that he wan a it ranger.
There wan much disciiMiion over the
matter, and finally the drummer Mid;
"What is your team worthf
"Four hundred and fifty dollar*.'
wan the reply.
"If I pay you that sum for it. will
you buy it back again when I returnf '
a-krd the customer, and upon re
ceiving an affirmative reply, he
promptly put up the cash. Ten day*
later he returned, aud driving into
the *table, he alighted and entered
the office, saying. "Well, here is your
team, and now I want my money
back."
The Hutu was pas?ed to bim aud he
turned aud wax leaving the place
when the liveryman called out, "Look
here, aren't you going to settle for
that teaiuf1
"For what U-atuf' aeked the drum
mer, in a surprised tone.
"For the one you Jost brought
baek."
"Well, now," drawled the drummer,
"you aren't fool enough to thisk that
I would pay anybody for the use of
my own property, are yonf and h#
shook the dost of the place from hit
feet.
- iim

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