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Shepherdstown register. [volume] (Shepherdstown, Va. [W. Va.]) 1849-1955, May 02, 1890, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026824/1890-05-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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Chesapeake J
Guano Company'sl
STANDARD
Fertilizers,
MANUFACTURED AT
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.
We point to a record of 25 years
before the people. When once used j
our goods have never failed to please, j
We sell to the fanners only our pure
goods ? the lower grades go to manip- 1
ulators, and are sold under their own
brands. Our analyses are always
what they are represented to be. Our
Dissolved Bone Phos
phate
I
Has no Superior. Our
Special Preparation
for Spring Crops,
Corn, Oats and Vegetables, has only
to be tried to satisfy one of its great
merits. It not only gives you a great
er yield, but will mature the crop
much earlier, and will hold moisture
? a preventative from firing the crops
during a drought.
We refer you to a number who have
used these goods, who are elassed
among our best and most responsible
farmers, abiding their decision as to
qualities, etc., etc. Many more uames
could be'produced if space permitted : j
John Aglionby,
Presley Marmaduke,
Win. 3i. .Blackford,
A. S. Dandridtfe,
Win. J. Moler,
Daniel Link.
Win. R Cost,
Allen A. Staley,
Thos. H. Byers,
Thomas Strode,
John W. Hollida,
Thos. S. Williams,
Charles F. Byers,
Jacob V. McQuilkin.
l>r. E. C. Williams, Jr.,
John W. Hill,
Thos. H. Wvsong,
W. W. Myers,
Daniel Cook,
C. D. Wysoyg,
W.,N. Leiuen,
A. T. Unsold,
Co?. Morgan,
John H. Snyder,
George Show,
Win. Rightstine,
Robt. L. Billmyer,
Peter Mongan,
Murphy Tabler,
John Kenlinger,
Win. A. Thompson,
M. B. Leuien,
John J. Byers,
David Bi iinyer,
Samuel Huyett,
Harry C. Rush,
J. T. "Kearney,
Wui. J. Foutz,
Wm. T. Hoffman,
Charles Huyett,
J. H. Smith.
Dr. E. C. Williams, Sr.,
Win. Osbourn,
Mrs. Virginia Williams,
Richard H. Morgan,
Major Henry Hagan,
W. L. Cook,
T. H. Davis,
R. Domer.
Jos. L. Walper,
T. F. Osbourn,
Mrs. Helen M. Pendleton.
Miles W. Starr,
J. M. Stipp.
R. D. Lamar.
R. N. Leuien,
Frank Billmyer,
(George Cross,
Charles Lemen,
Wm. N. Leiuen, of M.,
Win. M. Shepherd,
Win. A. Marshall,
George Coftinbarger,
W. H. Byers, of jT,
W. H. Byers, of G .,
C. A. Line,
Henry Selbv.
Adrian C. Miller,
John Miller,
E. I. Lee.
Lemuel P. Daudridge,
William Weis,
John L. Rickard,
William Adams,
J. Fox Koontz,
J. S. Bragouier,
William Rightstine,
M. B. Baker,
Allen Entler,
Capt. M. J. Billmyer.
William Rice,
Morgan Stanley,
Win. T. Lemen,
I). F. Billmyer,
('apt. E. G. W. Herr,
Mrs. Mary V. Lemen,
Jos. W. Bitner,
Allen Baker.
Charles D. Keplinger,
Dr. Tanner.
Charles Coflinbarger,
P. P. Mar-hull.
George W. Hall,
Moses Trussell,
Wui. R. Alder.
Capt. Joseph T. Hess,
John B. Hendricks,
Walter Herr,
John Moler,
Adam Gift,
S. C. Haines,
George R. Sigler,
T. Homsher,
R. M. Lucas,
R. E. Moler,
E. S. & C. B. Williams,
C. W. Show,
Robert Johnson,
James M. Small,
Joseph Strine,
Capt. J. H. L. Hunter
John A. Link,
Daniel H. Moler,
W. S. Myers,
Jas. E. Maddox,
Win. Turner,
Robert Huyett,
John Turner,
B. F. Graves,
Berry C. Carter.
Thanking my friends for the re
newal of their orders from year to
year, I ask a continuance, promising
you that I will furnish you nothing
but the best brands.
Respectfully,
TOWNER SCHLEY,
AGENT FOR
Jefferson and Berkeley Counties, W.
Va., and Washington Co., Md.
All orders left with D. F. Billmyer
at Billiuyer's Mill, N. 8. J. Strider at
U villa, or C. A. Line, Sharpsburg, Md.,
will receive prompt attention.
Shenandoah Valley Railroad.
S. F. TYLEK, Receiver.
Nchedule la effect Feb. 9th, lMttO.
LEAVE SHEPHERDSTOWN? SOUTHWARD.
8.05 A. M. Daily? Memphis Express. Ro
anoke and Intermediate stations
and all points South and South
west. Through Pullman Sleeping
cars from New York and Phila
delphia toChattanooga aud Mem
phis.
11.48 P. M. Dally? New York Express from
New York, Philadelphia and
Baltimore and with day coaches
to Roanoke, making connection
through to tne South. Carries
through Pullman Sleeper from
Philadelphia via Harrlsburg to
New Orleans.
LEAVE SHEPHKROSTOWN? NORTHWARD.
2.28 P.M. Dally? Baltimore Express, from
all points South, for Baltimore,
Washington, Harrlsburg, Phila
delphia and New York. Carries
through Pullman Sleeper from
New Orleans to Philadelphia via
Harrlsburg.
3.23 A. M. Dally? New York and Philadel
phia Express, from Memphis,
Chattanooga and all potntsSouth,
for Philadelphia and New York.
Sleeping cars through to New
York via Harrlsburg.
Ticket Agents will furnish all Information
and through schedules upon application.
O. HOWARD ROYER.
Roanoke, Va. Genl. Pass. Agt.
Western Maryland Railroad.
? CONNECTING WITH?
H. A P. R. It. at Shlppensburg, Shenandoah
Valley and B. A O. Railroads at llagerstown
Penna. R. R. at Frederick Junction and
Hanover. N. C. R. R. at Hanover Junction,
G. A H. R. R at Gettysburg, and P. W. A B.,
N. C. and B. A P. Railroads at Union Station,
Baltimore, Md.
M A I N L I N E A N D Co N N ECTI <>NS.
Schedule taking effect l>lt. 1?. 1*00.
Read
Down ward.
a.m. p. m l*. m. Leave. Arrive .a.m. p. m. IP. m.
7 15 1 to * Willlamsport, - jl. 33 8 20
7 312 oo 3 85 [llageistown, 12jl2 lrt| 8 05
7 412 16 Chewsville, 12 <?? 7 49
7 51 2 [siulthsbnrg, Jll 52. 7 il
8 U0 2 35 Edgetnont, I Ml |5 7 .'15
8 152 53 illightleld, f(i 33 11 2m| 7 20
8 423 22 Fairfield. n i>2{ 1 0 53! 6 17
8 523 32 < trrtanna, r 4010 10 0 35
9 13 3 52 Gettysburg, t'J 20 10 22 6 17
9 58 4 .?? .... |Ar. Hanover. Lv.! 5 9 .4' 5 .'44
8 00 2 35 . ... Lv Edgetnont Art 6 14 11 45 7 35
8 1(4] 2 54 4 .i Blue Kldge, ti jjftll 23 7 15
8 11,3 2*? 4 i Median icslowti.j 6 05
8 35:3 31 ? n; Rooky Ridge, |
9 07 3 11 l 5oi Frederick lunc.
9 18 3 56 l 5? Union Bridge, 5 41
9 22 10" ... iLitiwood, ! |
9 28jl ot? 0 iNew Windsor, 5 33]
9 17' 4 21 1 I Westminster, 5 2o
10 21 5 01 . .. Glyudon, 4 51
39. ...[Arlington,
]0 SO
11 11
A.M.
tf 00 3" liallimore, *4 lo
'Arrive, heave, a.m.
10 51 > 6 16
10 88 6 :?
10 25
lo Itij
10 09
10 u.<
9 1.4
8 59
6 22
t> 12
6 06
6 01
5 41
1 59
8 25 4 22
8 00 4 00
A.M. P. M.
I
1 1J 7 05 8.15 Washington 6 35' 2 10
2 '.'ijll 0 )'. Philadelphia, 11 5?! 3 50, 12 35
4 11 00 New York. 9 Oo 1 12 15 Li 00
p.m. I 'p m. Arrive. Leave.p.M.|A.M.|A. m.
Waynesboro, Chambersburg, Sbippensburg
and Intermediate Points.
~A.1T. aTmT P. M.
) Willlamsport, 6 25 10 53 6 45
Leave } llagerstown. 6 10 11 08 7 00
) Smithstiurg, 7 06 11 32 7 21
Edgetnont, 7 15 11 45 7 35
1 Waynesboro, 7 35 12 02 7 53
Arrive J Chaml>erstnirg, 8 12 12 3!) 8 32
) Shlppensburg, 8 40 1 06 9 00
A. M. P. M. P. M.
) Shlppensburg, 6 30 1 09 4 13
Leave j Chambersburg, 7 01 1 39 4 45
1 Waynesboro, 7 85 2 13 5 20
Edgemont, 8 00 2 35 5 37
1 Sinitbs!>urg, 8 06 2 41 5 46
Arrive? llagerstown, 8 30 3 05 0 in
__ ) WIHimusport, 8 45 3 20 6 25
Leave WHliamsport for llagerstown, 6.25, 7.15
and 10 53 A. 11., 1.45 and 6.45 P. M.
Leave llagerstown tor Willlanispoi t, 8.30 A.
M? 12.18, 3.05, 6.10 and 8.05 P. M.
Leave Rocky Ridge for Emm Its bur*;, lo.tu a
m., and 6.3 > r. M. Arrive at Kmnutts
liuri; tl.lOa. id., antl 1 . o: > and 7.05 p. m.
Leave Emmitsburg for Rocky Ridge, 8.20 A.
M., 2.32 and 5.50 P. M. Arrive at Kooky
lii'lvje 8.50 a. in., anil and 0.20 p. in.
Leave Frederick Junction lor Frederick, 1')..'52
A. M., 5.02 P. M.
Leave Frederick Juuctlon for Taneytown,
Llttlestown, York and Columbia, y.58 A.
M., and 8.42 P. M.
H. A P. K. K. leave Shlppensburg, 8.50 A. M.
and 1.20 P. M., arrive Shlppeusburg, 11. .12
A. M.. and 6.55 P._M _
?Dally, f Monday. All others Dally, Except
Sunday.
B. H. GRISWOLI), Gen. Paw. Agent.
J. M. HOOD, Pres. and Qen'l. Manager.
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.
The following Is the time of trains stopping
at Shenandoah Junction:
WEST-BOUND.
No. 1.? Clnclnnattl Limited Daily, 4.51 p.m.
No. B.? Clnclnnattl and Wheeling Express,
Daily. 1.21 a. m.
No. 9.? Pittsburg Express, Daily, 10.28 p. m.
No. 13. ? Baltimore and Keyser accommoda
tion, Dally, ".21 a. m.
No. 15.? Baltimore and Grafton accommoda
tion, daily except Sunday, 12.15 p.
in.
EAST-BOCNI).
No. 8.? Express for Washington, Baltimore,
Philadelphia and the East, 9.55 A.
M.
No. 2.? Clnclnnattl Limited, Dailv, 12.05 p. m.
No. *6. ? Chicago and Pittsburg Limited, Dal
ly, 2.21 p. m.
No. 10.? Pittsburg Express, Daily, 5.11 a. m.
No. H.? Baltimore and Piedmont accommo
datlon. Daily except Sunday, 11.06
a. m.
No. 16.? Grafton accommodation and Pitts
burg. Washington and Baltimore
Express, Dally, 1.42 p. m.
No. 40. -Martlnsburg and Harper's Ferry ac
commodation, dalty except Sun
day, 6.35 a. in.
* No. <! stops only to let olF passengers hold
ing t Ickets from Cumberland and other points
west.
For information, tickets. Ac., call on J. s.
FLEMING, Shepherdstown, Agent for B. & ().
Cumberland Valley Railroad.
Timetable in etfect Feb. 16, 1890.
|M?'l.*Ex.y Acc.jm.,1.
AM AM AM. P.M.
J iv. Winchester... i 0 :>i> 10 2 l">
Martinsburg 7 30 11 35 t 10
Hagerstowu I 4 15 S 20 12 51 '*4 00
Greeucastle 1 I 85 | 8 40 [12 51 | 4 28
Marion 1 , 1 <?2 4 39 9 50
Cnambersburg...1 4 35 9 15 1 17 5 no lo 05
Shlppensburg ... 5 14 9 3S 1 jo 5 21 10 30
Newvllle ! 5 35 10 iM 2 00 5 4"> ilo 50
Carlisle 5 57 10 23 2 2"> 6 10 11 13
Mechanic burg .. 0 21 11 50 2 ">1 ti 38 11 37
Harrisburg 6 40 11 10 3 10 7 oo 11 55
A M A M , P M P.M. | AM
Philadelphia 10 15 .5 15 t> .">0 10 55 1 25
Baltimore 10 20 3 15 6 50 10 55 4 35
P. M. P. M. P. M. A. M. A. M
N'gt
Ex.
P M
5.00
0 35
9 15
9 40
PM AM AM Am p.m.
Lv. Baltimore ... 11 30 4 35 9 10 11 55
Philadelphia 11 25 4 30 8.50 11 40 5 50
??Ex.iMall.;.Ex.|E}^
A M A M I P M ! P M
Lv. Harrisburg,.., 4 35 7 45 ,12 30 4 00
Mechanlcsburg ..! 4 53 8 09 jl2 50 4 22
Carlisle i 5 It j 8 36 1 15 , 4 49
Newvllle | 5 85 I 9 00 < 1 40 | 5 14
Shlppensburg i 5 55 9 22 2 00 5 37
Chambersburg. ..i ti 20 9 47 2 30 6 05
Marion j 6 31 | ! 2 43 j 6 12
Greeucastle.
Hagerstowu.
Martmsbnrg 8 10 ill 25
Ar. Winchester..! 9 10 |12 25
6 11 |10 10 , 2 54 , ? 28
7 d", 110 40 8 20 ! 6 55
' " 38
P. M
9 (6
9 20
9 39
H 57
10 14
10 33
10 51
11 10
8 30
?Run dally. AllothersdallyexceptSunday.
Timetables slving time of local and branch
trains can be hail on application to S. \ . R.
R. Agent at Shepherdstown.
J. F. BOYD. Superintendent.
H. A. RIDDLE, Gen'l Pass. Agent.
AGENTS WANTED by an old reliable firm;
large profits, quick sales. Sample free.
A rare opportunity. Geo. A. Scott, 842, B' way,
ntr a
Mlj, til Sr'dwij, So lark. WrlU fc* ^ ?' '***?
PARKER'S
, HAIR BALSAM
Cleanses and beautifies the hair.
Promote* a luxuriant growth.
Never F?il? to Reitor# Gray
| Hair to its Yosthful Color.
.-JPrcvonH Pan?1ni(T and hair failing
^^^Oc^nd^MjOaU^^
MADE WITH BOILING WATER.
EPPS'S
GRATEFUL-COMFORTING.
COCOA
MADE WITH BOILING MILK.
63 ^Mitchell's Kidney Plasters
J < --/J Absorb all disease In the.Kidneys and
/ I 'i f restore them to a healthy condition.
/,'^M Old chronic kidney sufferers say
[ / \ they got no relief until they tried
) MITCHELL'S KIDNEY
PLASTER*.
Sold by Dqaggists everywhere, or sent by mail for 50'.
Novelty Plaster Works, Lowell, Mass.
FOR CHICKEN CHOLERA.
419 Hnron St.,
Sheboygan,
Wis., Not. 12,
188&
I hir? nsed
Bt.JacobsOilfor
chicken cholera
with great suc
cess. Ercry fowl
affected with
^ . the disease waa
cured by it, and
I recommend it as a sure cure. It has saved
me many dollars. H. A. CUENNE,
Breeder of Pine Fowls.
1THE OREAT
2DYf*\
For Stablemen and Stockmen.
CURES
Cuts. Swellings. Bruises. Sprain*, Calls, Strains,
Lameness, Stiffness, Cracked Heels, Scratches,
Contractions, Flesh Wounds. Stringhalt, Sore
Throat, Distemper, Colic. Whitlow. Poll Evil,
Fistula, Tumors, Splints, Ringbones and Spavin
In their early Stages. Directions with each bottle.
At Druggists a?>d Dbai.ers.
THE CHARLES A. VOGELER CO.. Baltimore. Ml
THE GREAT
Cheap Stove House.
H . C. MARTEN,
S1I K1MI ERDSTO \VN, W. VA.,
manufacturer ok
TIN AND SHEET IRON WARE,
AND DKAI.KR IN
Hardware, Stoves, l'umps, Wondenware,
Cutlery, Stamped and japanned Ware,
Planished and Plated Ware, I<atiipH
and Burners, Tin and Sheet-Iron
work, and General House-Fur
nishing Goods.
Prioos to Cotfors to tie linos? Tory Low.
i invite t tie especial attention of all per
sons In need of COOKING STOVES to the
following list of necessary Furniture which
1 slve with each stove, and which I guaran
tee to he tlrst-class in every respect : 1 wash
uoilei 1 cotree boiler, 1 sauce pan and lid,
1 Iron tea-kettle, 2 Iron pots, 2 pot lids, 1
long gtlddle, 1 skillet, 3 sheet-iron pans, 1 lid
liftei ,1 poker, I stove scraper,3Jolntsof pipe
anu 1 elbow; 1 large tin bucket, 1 bread pan
1 cullender, 1 wash basin, 2 pudding pans, C
patty pans, 12 pie plates, 1 milk strainer, 1
milk skimmer, 1 plain ladle, 1 pierced ladle,
1 soup ladle, 1 iron spoon, 1 cake turner, 1
egg whip, 1 pie crimper and trimmer, 1 fancy
tea-pot, 2 sad-irons, 1 tea-pot stand, 1 sad
iron stand, 1 pepper box, 1 nutmeg grater,
1 candle stick, 1 eake mould, 0 tin cups, 1 dip
per, 1 biscuit cutter, 1 rolling-pin, 1 potato
inasher, 1 butcher knife, 6 knives and 0 forks
worth 81.25 per Bet, 6 albata table-spoons,
6 albata tea-spoons, 1 coal-shovel, 1 flesh
fork, SJelly-cake pans, 1 pound of stove pol
ish.
I sell the celebrated Excelsior Cooking
Stoves at t lie following prices. I will deliver
stoves and furniture free offrelglitln Bridge
port, Md., at any station on tlieS. V. R. It.,
also at any station on the B. & O. K. It. ns far
west as Cumberland or south to Ktaunton:
EXCELSIOR.
No. 16, $20.00; No. 17,822.50; No. 26,822.50;
No. 27. $25.00 ; No. 2s, 8iS.H0; No. 86, 825.00; No.
37, 828.00 ; No. 3H, $32.00; No. 39, 836.00.
Prices nuoted on application and repairs
furnished forall patternsof stoves. Return
ing thanks for the liberal patronage of the
past, I hope to merit a continuance.
H.C. MARTEN.
WASHINGTON & ALEXANDER,
INSURANCE AGENCY,
Office In Gibson Building, Charlestown.
Represent the following companies:
Jefferson Count; Mutual Fire Insurance Co.
iETNA, of Hartford, the largest and mo
popular company in America.
EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY,
of U. S.
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., of N. Y.
HARTFORD LIFE AND ANNUITY, of Hart
ford.
HOME, of New York.
PHQ5NIX, of Hartford.
GERMAN, of Freeport, 111.
CONTINENTAL, of New York.
JEFFERSON, of Wheeling.
PEABODY, of Wheeling.
GERMAN, of Wheeling.
LIVERPOOL A LONDON & GLOBE, qf En
gland, the largest foreign ccn..tnpy doing
buslnes In America.
AGEMS
J. S. FLEMING, Shepheidstown.
C. L. BARN 1IA RT, Duffields.
JAs. W. LEAGUE, Mldaleway.
CHAM. 11. TRAIL, Harper's Ferry.
A sworn statement of the conditions of all
foreign insurance companies represented In
this agency will be found at the Clerk's Of
fice, In compliance with .State laws. All
losses promptly adjusted and paid at our
office.
I represent all the above companies, and
will furnish good insurance at the lowes
rates. All business prompt ly attended to.
J. S. FLEMING, Agent.
Fire Insurance Agency
? AT?
SHEPHERDSTOWN,. W. VA.,
REPRESENTING THE
FIRE AND MARINE
AND THE
FRANKLIN INSURANCE COMPANIES
OF WHEELING, W. VA., AND THE
NIAGARA
I nsurance Company of the city of New York,
three sound and reliable companies. I have
acted as agent for the two tirst-named com
panies for years, and have promptly and
equitably adjusted a nunfiber of losses, and
can confidently recommend these companies
as trustworthy.
AGENTS:
N. S. J. Strider, Uvilla, Jefferson county.
Frank Homsher, KearneysvUle.
D. F. Billmyer, Billinyer's Mill.
James H. Myers, Snyder's Mills.
Rates liberal. Policies written at Shep
nerdstown
B. F. HARRISON,
Mar 29, 1881-ly Agent.
The Jefferson County Mutual
FIBE INSURANCE COMPANY.
- ESTABLISHED 1878. -
OFFERS to the people of Jefferson Count)
Insurance in a safe company at tl* actual
cost of Insurance, which is much cheapei
than the rates usually charged, and keeps the
money at home. Good risks from response
ble partiesare Invited.
Executive Committee meets every Friday
Directors? N. S. White, Henry B. Daven
port, Jas. Oarland Hurst, John W. Rider. \V
H. T. Lewis, R. Preston Chew, Wm, L. Wil
son, Eugene Baker, S. W. Washington, Jamet
Logie, Chas. P. Wilson, John H. Zittle, Jacob
S. Melvln, E. G. W. Herr, Isaac H. Strider. ?
N.S. WHITE Presiden
H. B. DAVENPORT Treasure
Executive Co*m ittee? N. S. White, W. H
T. Lewis, Eugene Baker, Isaac H. Strider, R
P. Chew, S. W. Washington.
Local Agknts ? Middle way, John G. Shir
ley; KearneysvUle, J. C. Bitner; Harper's
Ferry, Chas. E. Trail ; Shepherdstown, J. s.
Fleming; Duffields, C. L. Barnhart ; Charles
town, Washington & Alexander.
*?~The Secretary will be found at the Com
pany's Office, Gibson Building, Court- House
yard, in Charlestown.
R. A. ALEXANDER, Sec'y.
rpHE HfcrfJl' COOK BOOK.? The Presbyte
X rlau ?'ook Book gotten up by the ladies
is the itest, simplest and most practical book
yet published. Price one dollar. Can be bad
at MCMURRAN'S DRUG STORE.
Large and Small Swine.
Large white pigs have always been
very popular in England, where
bacon and hams are largely con
sumed. We have imported into this
country good pigs of some of these
breeds, which have made a good rep
utation, and among them the best
known is perhaps the large York
shire. This name however, is not
absolutely distinctive, for the large
white breed is not peculiar to any
special country in England, where
the large Yorkshire, Lancashire, and
Lincolnshire pigs are all clasped as
the large white breed. These three
counties adjoin each other, and there
is really no essential difference be
tween the pigs of the several locali
ties, eicept as individual breeders
take pains with their herds. This
race of swine, which is popular in
that part of England, has be?-n muoh
improved in late years, although the
writer, when in that country as long
as thirty years ago, met with many
animals which weighed from seven
hundred to nine hundred pounds, and
these were considered as nothing un
usual as to size. A good deal has
been said and written of late of early
maturing pigs; animals which will
reach a profitable weight at nine
months old. But it is altogether &
matter of fancy, whether the animal
should weigh three hundred pounds
in nine or ten months or three times
that weight at three times the age.
Certainly there is something in the
uses to be made of the pork, which
has an influence upon the manner of
feeding the animals and it would not
do to have all the pigs of a veryllarge j
size. For some uses, large sides and
hams are desirable, and it is beyond
question that the meat of a fully ma
tured pig has some qualities, which
make it preferable to that of a pig
forced to great weight before its mus
cles have been matured. For some
purposes fat is more valuable than
lean, but generally "a streak of lean
and a streak of fat" in pork, makes it
most desirable for food. The large
English breeds have this peculiarity,
and on that account are preferred by
many feeders.
When and How to Feed Horses.
A horse ought to be fed when he is
hungry every day. What makes him
hungry J The constant waste of the
system. The muscles when brought
into use waste somewhat, especially
exercise or labor is a draft upon the
muscular system. After the system
has been taxed, and if the tax is suf
ficient to partially exhaust or fatigue
the animal, rest is more important
than feed ; hence the horse should
stand and rest awhile before he is fed
Digestioil demands a flow of blood to
the organs when at work, and as the
blood has been drawn away from
them to sustaiu the muscular exertion
during labor, it should not be sud
denly withdrawn and turned in upon
the organs of digestion? hence let
him rest, and after an hour or so, he
will be found keen and "sharp set."
There is probably no food so good
for recuperating exhausted muscles
than good' sound, heavy oats. They
are easily digested, nutritious, mus
cle-building and blood-making in
a high degree. They are little heat
ing, do not tend to making horses
sweat, and on the whole are the best
food a horse can have. Harley is
very good, not equal to oats. Indian
corn is a poor substitute, not so eas
ily digested, heating, and causing the
animal to sweet. As to system, a
horse should have hay first, then
grain, and water when these are di
gested, or water should be given half
an hour at least before feeding.
Horses often have dyspepsia, induced
by being fed when warm, or being
worked after a full meal. The prac
tice of feeding hard-worked horses at
noon and working them immediately
after, is of doubtful utility. Horses
will go eight and probably ten hours
without food if properly fed at even
ing and morning. They should have
water more frequently, but never
when hot.
Feeding Pigs.
In pig feeding there are many
things to consider, says Mr. liebout.
The foods which are used for the pur
pose are numerous and in many sen
ses of the word extremely good, but
in order to obtain remunerative and
rapid results a feeder should make
himself acquainted with their constit
uents and the relative quantities re
quired for the purpose of sustaining
the animals, for maintaining their
growth and putting on proper pro
portions of fat. There are certain
foods admirable in their way and
when given judiciously are useful to
pigs, but which without the addition
of other substances would not only
fail to increase their weight, however
large the quantity given, but would
prove insufficient to maintain a
healthy condition. Almost all kinds,
however (milk perhaps excepted) lack
some important elements in their com
position. For illustration, use com
and water alone in a short time the
pig would become costive, feverish,
skin dry and appetite bad.
A well-known dentist tried hard to
collect a bill, after many ineffectual
efforts, said to the doctor : l,I do not
intend to send you any more bills,
and intend to sue you; but there is
one thing I want to tell you. Every
time you cut off a piece of beefsteak
and pass it to your wife I want you to
remember that she is not chewing
that beef with her teeth, nor with
your tee'.h, but with my teeth. '' In
two or three days he received a check
Theruotionof these doubly-false teeth
in his wife's mouth was too much for
him.
Baggs ? Do you and your wife ever
quarrel. Uncle Ephraim ? Uncle
Ephraim? >To, sah, we neberquarrels;
we jes fights.
Gus De Smith? How do you like
your new horse. Miss Fanny? Fair
equestreinne ? He does not ride as
easy as I expected. He tugsat the bit
and acts as if he wanted to run away
with me. Ctus De Smith ? I dontblauie
, him. If I had the chances I'd do it
j too.
FOR DYSPKIMa
UK Brown's Iran Itinera.
Physicians recommend St
All dealers keep it. 11.00 per bottle. Genuine
I tuts trademark sad crossed red liner on wrappes.
Nature's Dress.
In Axtio regions white is the color
which best protects, by making an
animal of the saihe hue as the land
scape. Accordingly, we find the
polar bear white. The alpine hare,
the ermine and the Arctic fox turn
white in the snowy season. Among
birds, the ptarmigan in winter loses
its summer plumage, which harmo
nizes so well with the lichen-covered
tones among which it hides, and turns
white, so very white that one ma)
tramp through a flock lying on the
snow without perceivinga single bird.
If the common raven, which even in
midwinter goes as far north as any
known bird or mammal, remains
black, it is because it feeds on carrion
! and has no need of concealment to
| get near its prey. The Siberian sable,
like the raven, does not change color
in winter, because its habits are such
that it does not need to become white ;
it often lives on berries at this season,
and is so nimble on the trees that it
easily catches small birds. The wood
chuck of Canada also stays brown in
winter. But it then burrows in river
banks and subsists on fish. We know
that the lion, by its sandy color, eas
ily conceals itself by crouching on the
desert land ; while the strips of the
tiger assimilate well with the vertical
stem of the bamboo and tall, still
grass of the jungle. Almost all the
other animals of the cattribe frequent
tret\ and these have often spotted
skins, which help to blend them with
the background of foliage. A marked
exception is the puma, whose ashy
brown fur, the color of bark, and its
habit of clinging very closely to a
limb as it waits for its prey to pass
underneath, making "it uncommonly
hard to distinguish. It might be
thought that the conspicuous stripes
of the zebra, in a country abounding
with lions and leopards, would be a
danger to it. But zebras go in herds,
and are so wary and swift that in the
day time they have little to fear. It
is at dusk, when they go to drink,
that they are most exposed. But
Feancis Cialton, who has studied this
animal in its native haunts, declares
that in the twilight the zebra's black
and white stripes blend so well into a
grayish tint that at this hour it is
not easy to be seen at a short distance.
Even an animal as big as a giraffe is
said by travelers to be admirably con
cealed by its form and color when
standing perfectly still among the
dead trees often found on the out
skirts of the groves where they feed,
lis spots, its long neck, the peculiar
shape of its head and horns appear
altogether so like broken branches
that even the natives have been
Known to mistake a tree for a giraffe
and a giraffe for a tree. In regard to
the coloring of birds, the better opin
ion is that the dull colors of the
female have been acquired for pro
tection while sitting on the nest. To
this rule there are exceptions, as the
kingfishers, wood-peckers, toucans,
parrots, starling*, and houguest, in
which both sexes are equally conspi >
uous. But these birds either nes* ' in
holes, or build dome-shaped nests
which hide the sitting bird. In tli*1
very few curious cases where the
female is asualjy more conspicously
colored than the male, it is found that
the relation of the sexes in regard to
nestling is reversed? the male bird
sitting on the eggs, while the more
astracttive but pugnacious female
stand k exposed to the enemy's eye.
Such are the dotterel, an Australian
creeper, and one or two others. In
the tropics, where leaves are always
green, we find whole groups of birds
whose feathers are green ; while
many tree-snakes in that part of the
world, comprising both harmless and
venomous genera, are usually of a
beautiful green color, and so perfect
ly does it conceal them that their prey
comes within ^y reach uconseious
of danger. The only true arboreal
snake whose color is seldom green is
the genus I)ip*as. which takes various
shades, black, brown, olive. But the
snake of this genus are all nocturnal,
and by day hide in holes, so that a
green disguise would serve them no
useful purpose. Among the smaller
marine animals, many are protected
by being so transparent as to be al
most invisible, those that are brightly
colored generally having a special
protection, either in stinging tenta
cles or in a hard crust like the star
fish. In some rare cases, as in the
chamelon, a lizard-like animal which
turns to from dull white to a variety
of tints in harmony with surrounding
objects, the change of color is bought
about by a reflex action; dependent
on sensation : and it has been discov
ered that this curious power is due to
several layers of movable pigment
cells buried deep under the skin,
which, when the helplesscreaturesees
an enemy, are capable, through the
emotion of fear, of being pushed up
to the surface. There is a shir nip
culled the chameleon shrimp which
has the same power of taking a pro
tective tint, seemingly at will. It is
! of a sandy hue when swimming over
a sandy bottom, but as soon as it gets
among sea-weed in changes to gret?n.
An experiment shows that, if deprived
of sight, this shrimp, not knowing the
color of its surroundings, will not
change color. Sometimes a conspic
uous color adds to an animal's safetv.
Perhaps the best example of this is
the skunk. Its bushy white tail,
cu rled well up over its black aud
white body, is * signal to attract at
tention. In the dusk this white sig
nal Is pretty sure to be seen, and pre
vents the skunk, a bjld, presuming
creature, from being bounced upon
by any of the night-prowling carni
vora. who turn away the moment
they recognize it.
Backlen'n Arnica Halve.
The Best Sal vein the world for Cut*, Bruises
Sores, Ulcers, Salt Rheum, Fever Sore*. Tel
ler, Chapped Hands. Chilblain* Corns, and all
Bfcln Kruptlons, and positively cures Pllea
or no pay required. It ts guaranteed to glva
Perfect satisfaction, or money refunded,
price 'irt cents per box. For sale by J. G. Gib
son.
A man is known by the company he
keeps, and by the company he keeps
away from.
A man must be pretty sick of work
when he throws up his job.
The man who is right is seldom left.
L*niK?
Need;:.? a tonic, or children that want buildlt%
up, should take
BROWS'* IKOS BITTKRS.
, Tt is nleanant to take, cures Malaris. Indige*
- tlou. sa l Biliwsnw. All dealers keep it
GOOD BOARDS AT S1.15T
100 feet of Good Virginia Boards at
1,000 ft. of Bright Y. P. Boards at $11.50
These are good N. C. Boards, bright, dry, even thickness, and l(j.ft
lengths, such as are sold elsewhere at 815.00 per
thousand. Our price is $11.50.
o
ALL KINDS OF MILL WORK VERY Low,
Write us for an estimate. Lumber delivered to all points in Virginia by the B. ?!* 0. Railro i j
o
v BUY YOUR LUMBER FROM v
LIBBEY, BITTINGER & MILLER,
SIXTH STREET AND NEW YORK AVENUE, WASHINGTON. IV C.
J\ E!nD"\Ar^_^ID LIBBEI
JSto. 3018 Water St., Georgetown, 13. O.
fttf" OLDEST ESTABLISHED LUMBER YARD IN THE DISTRICT.
From our location we are at iess expense and can sell lower than any yard In tlie District
Lumber delivered to canal or cars free of charue.
Contractors and Builders !
CARPENTERS, MERCHANTS, FARMERS.
Everybody intending to build or reuiodd can save time and money by leaving
| * or sending their orders for
DOORS, SASII, BLINDS,
I)i ?essed and Undressed Lumber,
l Brackets, Cornice and Mouldings,
| Fencing, Callings, Flooring. Maaiels, Plastering Laths, Palings, Shingles,
&C., TO THK
I Charlestovvn Steam Saw and Planing Mill.
Satisfaction will be given as to prices and quality of work. Hills for Barn
Lumber a Specialty.
TERMS REASONABLE.
Wm. Phillips & Sons,
CHARLESTOWN, W. VA.
! LEE & DANDRIDGE,
SHE PHE RDSTOWN, W. VA.
GENERAL DEALERS IN
Agricultural Implements.
I The Cyclone Fan, all kinds of Farming Im
plements, and Repairs, always on hand.
EMTAHLINIIEU l*?J
DIEHL & BRO.'S
OLD RELIABLE CRARLESTOWN
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS.
Manufacturers^ Monuments.Tornrmtones
rtlatuefiaud all kinds of Marble and Granite
?rork In their line. All orders promptly filled
and natlsfactlon guaranteed.
DIEHL A BKO.,
pt..r?-81-ly Charlestow*. W. Va
"WANTED
Everybody to know I have received
luy Spring Stock of
WALL PAPER.
LATE.ST STYLES. FIRST-CLASS, HICH
AND ELEGAXT.
Good paper at 8c per piece of 8 yards
Better still at 10c " "
Gold Paper 12 1-2, 15, 16, 18. 22, 25 and
30c per piece of 8 yards.
Send for or call and examine them.
Estimates for painting solicited.
T. H. MILLEK.
wanto'l to V"V\ 't * perfect i
?ell I'inless Clothes \ J winter line, sam
lines; no more pie line ?u*nt by
clothespins need- T) r V"c2matl for tOc.,
ed. It holds the JL JL ?. 1 O also ft. line
heaviest ana finest by iniil tlJXi '
fabrics without pins. prepaid. Forclrcu
Clothes do not freeze lars, price ll?t and
to It and cannot blow terms address the
Off. PI3*I.EM? ClxiTHES |
Like Co.. 17 ll?r- \
man St., Worces
ter. Mass.
? T APANE8E GOLD PAINT ? The best cold
#J paint In the market forall klndsof artlmic
and decorative gliding. A cheap and dura
ble liquid eliding for woodwork, artificial "
flowers, fancy basket*, picture frames and
mclAlIc ornaments, at McMl'KBAN'M.
NOW
For Winter Trade.
$30,000 WORTH OF
Clothing, Boots and Shoes,
Hats, Caps, Gloves, Under
wear, Neckwear, Trunks
and Satchels,
ARB NOW IN STOCK AT
Hagley's Temple of Fashion,
CilA KLK-STO W N, W. VA.
LL STTLES AND PEICSS!
ALL A3S3 AND SIZE3!
Hull* from 1 1 ?<*> Ut overcoats from
ll.'W to iii.'tK I , p ur* of (tool*. M-'ii ?
from U.Z> to ti.'H. Boot* for iiifii
commence Ml t2. n Everything lo to ike a
a flrst-clas* *lore. It ?sp'-ctfully,
OKO. H. HAOLEY. J
Important Notice !
IINVITK yoursttention lo as'jrc***fulsul>
*lltul? for scraping ?vull*r- *?t*iie.l wa.is. 1
wilt put paper on whlte-waalied walls vim
out scraping the wall* If the lime is tight and
will guaranty it lo st ay on as loriK a* II wdl
If scraped. If It coines off. I will furulah pa
per and will put 41 mo al luy expanse. 1 can
get reliable parties to vouch lo this where 1 I
have put paper on. Also will hang paper as
cheap as any one. I can furnish paper as
as cheap as you can gel II anywhere, suitable
for decorating ceiling* ami walls of any Kind.
Will do any kind <f house and sign painting.
Furniture done up lo style.
WM. K. MILLER.
SALT' SALT! SALT!
J L'HT received a <^r load of freah Halt In
cluding Fine. Liverpool. O. A., L>a?iy and
ttoakftalt. W.N.LKMKN
Notary
TO THE
PUBLIC!
pi K undersigned reep-cttally tnfcm.iv.
1 public that he haapurchaaed the tm. ?. '
I ofilr. J. N. Truaaell and wltlrondurt it h#t?
I after at the warehouae near tin
Uon. He will ke??p on haml ? fUu ?tivk Jj
LUMBER
of every description, which he will aellatt* l
torn price*. Thoae whodealre t ? hoy tniar*.
or small <|uantllt<'N are *ake<t to rnVrti'm ?
call and obtain a bid. lie wlllalao *
hand a complete supply of
COAL and WOOD.
Hard and Soft Coal of all klnda, w0,?t
the cord or by small toftda. delivered to
part of the town at lowent prlci ?. H*tt*far.
tlon guaranteed to purchaaem. Will . ?
deal In
Grain, Hay, Lime, Millfeed, &c.,&c..
and will keep up a Rood atock at all tinir* a
ahareofthe public patronage u reapectialt
aollclted, and every effort willl* run)* w,
please.
J AS. W. KKUNEY.
TO THE
FARMERS
AND THE
PUBLIC GENERALLY.
Tue underalgned, ha v lute enlarged liliN ?
tlea for bualneaaby having creeled ? n??
warehouse, la now prepared tohu>
WHEAT AMI CORN
In the greuteat quantities, ami will alwayi
pay t In* hlKheat market prices Kir mm
will find It to their advantage t? ? iMitalnal !
from me Itcfore dlnjM>?liiKof thelrcr<i|>?. Itn
alao prepared to furiilah
ANTMKACITK AND Hil l MIMtl H
COAL,
iil prWa to milt tin- t liucn. will h*
promptly dtdlv<<rtHl to any part of tht town.
All vnrl<-tli-N kept on huml. The )&?
vlted to give a trial of the cflthmtcd
MINNESOTA PATENT FLOUR,
the lilKhrMt Krnde of flour made. Tin*' ">i?
have already tried It pronounce It
Call ami Ret nwu'k. It la my Intention i<
keep on hand hereafter a
Full Line of Feed
of all kln<l?, and the pntronnicof the public
la Mollcltt'd.
W. i. l.r.MT.*.
"$50"
KEWAK I).
The undfr* ik n?><! hereh) ofT?r* ? ?inMi' i
reward of Fifty Dollar* for Information ? <
i evidence* that will oerure the arreot an?l<?>*
, vlctlon of any peraon Kullty of any a?*t !?'
c?ny or theft on any of hla premiaea,
HKNKY HIIKI'IIKHU.
Autfiiat I, HWI? y
At Hodges'.
CHOICEST (iROCKRIF-S,
DOMESTIC DKV HOODS,
ALL KINDS HARDWARE,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Ql/EKNSWARK
AM)
GLASSWARE,
A l lowest priced for Cuh or
Country Produce.
G. T. HODOKS.
r/mvcorr
?* -'"d ex e ?,'
// let' i Jt
ntire ?? ?:/. / ,
A'tff ,1 I u,rf
yom tre t i /
&// <r A> e
A 'oi Of r / '
liuH.f ,.t t
t good m rj
It do.t ??!/-. t
?? tuy h. , '?
'*d fit u.mt .
fh* riitfi ,
fitew.y j tr ?
>?t /*r t*n 1 1 /
time tttmdt t.t >t>< ;r ' ' '
i*d u the /?/ i ' n ?/>'{? e ' '
of tti ti d m t e ? v ' ?'/ ' ' *' 'Vw<
Ctrcu *r a J J fft
L/pp/vcot: 9 .!/ // ' /' ' "P f
?- - ?Vr.
Tkt .
mburiptUm.
5300 ,<rr?r -f*
, fuhlnher tf tkh f *'U '*
rtflwH.
ONJUMf

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