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The Wheeling daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1865-1903, June 15, 1866, Image 1

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VOL. XIV.
WHEELING, WEST VA., FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 15, 1866.
NO. 2a0.
WrtUrnl.
LKSTDSEY'S
improved
BLOOD SEARCHER
AM)
Medical Discovery,
For the cur? of
n ImiTi Arising1 from an Impure
c state of the Blood.
rnne question paramount to all
_L others is, How can health- be restore*! 11
1 oaf? And how preserved In a perfect siate?
The po?v*?or of untold wealth, without
health, is a miserable man; but the poorest
peasant, wlih toil for his dally portion, pos
sessed w.th brawny arm and
PURE BUOYANT BLOOD.
gushing through every vein, la blessed, in
No one can enjoy perfect health whilst the
c'rculatlon Is Impeded aud ttie blood thick
with Impurities.
To remove tlieso is not only the aim of
LIND8EY'?
Improved Blood Searcher
AND
HED1CAL DI8COTERT,
but when renovated to keep it so. Thmtls
a compleix 8UCCESH In the curing O' BLOOD
DISEA>KS,num? r? us certlflcat'-s fully attest.
We recommend It with contldeuce.
II. K. HELLEItS A CO.,
sole Proprietors,
Corner of Wood and Second Streeta,
pittsburgh.*
JOHNSON'S
RHEUMATIC
COMPOUND.
No Medicine for the cure of Rheumatism ;
has ever attained to su< h a hluh decree of
favor and universality as John?on's Rheu
matic Compound. Although liut one year
before the public, tlih medicine hu- Justly
ga ned an unbounded popularity. When the
orijdnntor flrxt n trod need It he was convlnn
e j of Us elhcacy. hut he If> tie thought it
was destined to ? rove su h an IneMlrnit le
bleaKlng to the afflicted; but true merit can
not he suppressed. The attestation of hun
dreds who have been cured by It must piove
the truth of the asuertjon that It is
A RADICAL CURATIVE
Inflammatory and Acnte Rhonmatlim
Gont, Xouml^lH
and kindred diseases. We recommend It
With, confidence as the Orent- Internal
Remedy for the speedy and positive cure of
the abo\ e oomplidms.
R. E. SELLERS A Cft.,
Pittsburg, Pa., Proprietors.
FOR A FAMILY MEDICINE
SELLER'S
CELEBRATED
LIVER PILLS
ARE INVALUABLE.
Have yon Depression of Spirits and Low of
Appetite?
Areyou Nervous and 'rrltable?
Are yon of Opsttye Habit?
Have you Pain In theSldeaud Headache?
Have you Sallow I 'omplexlon?
If so, rest aasuied there Is ^ome derange
mentor tho Liver whlcli calKior Immediate
attention. I'erformlnaaH I doesbuch Impor
tant functional ? the bo<ly. It 1? highly neces
saiy that It should be preserved In a' state of
perfect health. To Insure speedy action and
Immediate relief
MAKE USE OF
Sellers* Celebrated Liver Pills,
which have stood nnrlva'ed for thirty years.
For the cure of
Liter Complaint and Costlvenes*
and all Bllloua Dlseasm, we recommend them
to the public. Proprietors.
iL E. SELLERS & CO.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Sold, Plain and Sugar Coated, uy all Drug
gists.
mr27
worm; s i
SELLERS'
VERMIFUGE,
This Worm Medicine
Has NO Superior, If An Eqasl,
In this or any other country.
Every year thousands of children die from
this hori ible evil. Tills alarm!nu mortality
loudly calls for Increased watchfulness, and
for
Greater Care in the Selection of the
Remedy*
LET ptvyhicIaxs SPEAK.
Sellers' Vermifuge
The Bent In Use.
HERE IS THE PROOF:
Licktno Station. Ky.. Dec. 17,1845.
ME.R. E. bELLERs.?Your Vermiru^e pos
se Rsen more vtttne than any I evpr used. I
will stain a cane where t gave one Vial.' My
brothers' child wa* pining and ioaxlina to a
mtre skeleton. In thirty-six hours alter I gave
the Vermtfuae, the enormous quantity oi
upward of six hundred worm* lorre pasted. The
child thatwasglven up for lost, is now as well
as any In the nelghtiorhood.
AMBROSE ARNKTT, M. D.
R. F. HEI.LE IS A- CO.,
Sole Pproprletore,
. . Pituburgh, Pa.
mr27
1ICW Pint FYS'
Homoeopathic Specifics.
TTA^E PROVED, FROM THE MOST AMPLE
dnu perfectly adapted to popular n*c??o simple
that mlitskM cannot be mnile In uaing thorn; to
lurolw as to be ftue Tr-m diuigor, ami eo efficient a*
Oeata.
No. i. Cores FfT?r?, Con mat ion, Inflammation*... 25
" *,? ** Wornu, Wonr Vcrer, Wtirm-Collc... 25
? 3. " Cryinx-Colic. or Teethlnjr of Infanta 25
* 4* . 44 ? Diarrhea of children and adults. 25
!. U Dysentery, Griping. Billons Colic^.. 25
" S, Obok-ra-Slorbu.,Nausea, Vomltins^. 23
" " >Oolda,Bronchlrta^J...^^.>.
Cr>?i*h?,
2L
30, *' Biwmnm.vguia,
Nerroin Wbiljtjr 8cm 1 on] KmWiuna! ""
-3 ?
-a ^|ks5e^2
ft " -UAsra"?Th~"?? ?
|!oot5 antl ?Uons.
PROCR ASTINATIO N
Is the Thief of Time.
Farmers & Working People
Day after day you are neglecting your best
INTERESTS
When you do not call at
"159" Main Street,
And secure the great eat 'Bargains,' 'Bargains,'
?Bargains' lu
BOOTS & SHOES
Ever offered to the citizens of this city and
vicinity.
This Li a Hpoclal dispensation for the
Working Classes
Of this City.
$3.50 GIVEN FOR $1.25.
The only "Merchant" In the City that was
on hand to "gobble up" these elegant
Spring Boots and Shoes
with the money. All new, nice, fresh and
periecl goods ut
"159" Main St.,
?THE?
Model Shoe Store
?OF?
WHEELING.
DELAYS ARE DANGEROUS AT
GARDINER'S
Mammoth Shoe Bazaar
NO. 169 MAIN 8TEEET.
THE CHEAPEST SHOE HOUSE IN THE
Wh8T.
JnS
SPRING STOCK!!
Boots and ShOGSftr H Million!
Blond & Bachman,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Boots, Shoes and Gaiters,
107 Main Street,
Corner Sprlgg Alley,
HA VE JUST R EC-EIVED THEIR
Spring stock or Boots and Shoes,
Complete In Every Particular;
and calculated to meet the wants of all,
YOUNG AND OLD, MALE AND
FEMALE.
CALL AMD BEE.
BLOND ft BACHMAN,
107 Main street.
mr!7.1y Cor. Hprlgg Alley.
GEO. KDWARDS. B. B. 8TONE. MAHO. F. STONE.
HEW WHOLESALE
BOOT & SHOE STORE
EDWARDS, STONE & Co.,
No. 29 Main 8L,
WHEELING, W. TA.
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED OUR
first stock of
Boots and Shoes.
Having purchased for cash and our stock
being all
NEW AND FRESH,
we feel sntlsfied that we can give entire satis
faction to any who may give us a call.
The attention of Country Merchants Is re
spectfully solicited before purchasing else
where.
mart EDWARD**. STONE & CO.
New Goods.
A CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF
CLOTHS
Fancy Coatings,
AND
C ASSIMERES,
JUST RECEIVED BY
W.D.Sawtell&Bro.
Merchant Tailors,
Ho. ft MONROE ST;,
WHEELING, W. VA.
flsbH
P. C. HILDRETH & BRO.,
ment, Mazyland LOme. Common Uroe, Floor,
Shanghai Matches, Halt, Wooden Ware, Ac.
Agents fbr Ho weV-Improved Counter and
? flMfecm <MIh.
7s
ALvHtt'd PILU5 FOR SALS BY OD
Kj iitCRT, Kn.l ot Stone Bridge. myifl
rate OP SUBSCRIPTIONS.
DAILY, by mall, one ye?r?. **
... Hix roontlw. ?
three months,
*" one month, ..
*" by City Carriers, i>er week 1&
ITU-WEEKLY, one year. g w
... Kix montluv - - f S
three months, - i ?J
w^-rsfc?1 <*
rates op advertising.
One .Square, one time, (10 lines or less to con
Ktltute a square,) ?'
each additional time, ou
"" ... one week, 5
;;; -
The Case of Jeff. Davis.
A Writ or Ilnbm ?-orptiM Desired??
Davis Holding a Levee? III* Friends
Visit Hliu III llie rort-V"" ,>"1 n
Blockade Huoner?Visitors Very
Numerous---1 he Movement for 111"
Kelei.ne?Vl??? or OHrf Justice
thase?A Search for Judge ruder
wood?Whnl "Tbe Coverntneot'
"Would dolu tbe Matter.
Washington, Juiib 1H.?There is no
dnubt thai the Government would at
any tluie transfer Jell. Uavis to the
jurisdiction of the District Court of Vir
ginia. if a writ of Habeas wri>iM sbbtlld
be issued to briug him belore thut tri
bunul.
JKFF. DAVIS RBOKIVI.NO HIS FRIENDS.
Fortress Monroe, June 12.?Mr. and
Mrs. Jell'. Davis appear to have 110 lack
Ot visitors, whom 1'iey receive in the
newly tilted up quarters in one of the
casemates Inside the lortress, wtliotl
were assigned to Mrs. Davis shortly
after her arrival here, but which, until
uow, she has steadfastly relused^ to oc
cuuv. making renewed demands daily
upon the patience of the
General lor rooms in Carroll Hull,
where her husband is imprisoned,
which demands have been as porsist
eutly relused. Ohyesterday, J. L.oren
ehaw. of the wellknowu tirui ol block
ade runners during the war, was clos
eled with both Mr. and Mrs. Davis, le
uiaining iu tho fort till this morning,
when lit- left lor Richmond. The object
of his visit, rumor says, was in reier
ence to pecuniary matters, In view ol
the anticipated release or Jeff. Davis.
Mrs. Davis accompanied bun to the
wharf, and, judging lrom her live y
conversation, she appeared to be.in
good spirit. Visiting mends "nd syn -
pathizers uow often call and hiuve in
terviews with Davis and his wile,
always tendering assurances of their
esteem, and oilers ol assistance us lur
as it may be in their power.
VISIT OF MESSRS. OBEELEY AND SHEA
TO JUDGE UNDERWOOD.
The Alexandria Journal of Monday
afternoon says: ,..?h the
Without being conversant with the
inside workings of the manoeuvres ot
the counsel and others for the release
of Jell'. Davis on bail or parole, we
have to state the following rumors,
some of Which, we have good reason to
believe, are founded on tact. It is well
known that immediately upon the ad
ioiirnineut of the Uuited Stales Circuit
Court at Richmond, on Ihursday last,
the ."nnsel of Mr. Davis at once re
Dai red to Washington to consult with
Mr. Johnson in regard to the?release'
Ti'fF Davis on parole. Judge Under
wood didnot arrive here until Satur
day afternoon, but it appears, from r -
mi'^ifor^^h^Tjudge Onderwoi^^SSt
botne, and he immediately started, on
the reception of this news, in company
with Hon. Horace Greeley, for this city.
The counsel and ' his distinguished
friend in rived here by private convey
ance about teu o'clock on Saturday
uieht. What transpired between them
and Judge Underwood, after their arri
val here, is more than wei.oaO tell, buf
lice It to,say that they had a lengthy in
terview with him, which rumor says
was chiefly devoted to an argument in
favor of Davis' parole or release.
Early yesterday morning it was nois
ed about that Mr. Ureely was
city, and was stopping with our distin
guished fellow-citizen, Judge Under
wood The consequenco was that many
ol our loyal citizens during the morn
ing repaired to the Judge's residence,
where thev were met by the host ol the
distinguished visitors; to^hotnthey
were atonce introduced, hovwil hours
were pleasantly spent hero
Greeley and Shea, and at the hour ol
their departure they were accompanied
to the ten o'clock bunt by a number ol
""in" the meantime, it "ferns that a
rumor was prevalent in Washington
the effect that these gentlemen had vis
ited Alexandria in the Interest. of Jeff.
Davis, and tbo consequence was that
great excitement ensued among certain
members of Congress. ,
Another rumor was started early
yesterday morning. In the Capitol, to
fhe effect that Judge Underwood, ac
comoanied by Messrs. (Ireeley and
Shea, had repaired to Washington for
tbe purpose of having some consulta
tion wilh the President. The city was
thoroughly scoured, but no trai-e what
ever cSulU be found of the gentlemen
on whom seemed to centre such great
Interest. This led to the appointment
or a deputation to visit AlexuniMa to
learn or the whereabouts of Judge Un
derwood. This deputation consisted of
two prominent members of Congress,
who- upon their arrival here, lound
that Judge Underwood had actually
accompanied Messrs. Greeley nndSbea
m Washington. They arrived here at
12 o'clock, M., but found the object ol
Iheir search absent. However, they
did not have to wait long the return of
Judm Underwood. The Judge It
seems, accompanied Messrs. Greeley
and Shea to Washington lor the pur
nose of attending service at one of the
many churches of thatcity, and lmme
diately after service returned to Ibis
oity without wititiug upon Ireaident
Johnson or any one else.
As to the conference between tu??e
distinguished gentlemen we know noth
ing We give all we know in the above
ah Judire Underwood has for
thirty years been abused and villified
for bis tirm and unaltered adherence to
liberal and correct principles wo are
satisfied that the arguments they were
finable ol bringing to bear were not
antfloient to swerve biro from bis pur
pose While not brave in the sense in
".asSS th:rri .as*
was made to assassinate b"?1.dur,"l'
ihoHPsslon of his court In Richmond,
aud while other attempts ot a like?kar
bfsecourt taresaUs^JbatTothinK
hands of those who commit so great a
outrage.
JDDOB UNDERWOOD'S DECISION.
The following is the decision in full
ofJudge Uudirwood in
waagHeu in our edition of this morn
'Thave considered the application
made hy Mr! Shea, of counsel. to ad
m^nJdeeTtrenci~um^n^; the .ppll
CiButunder.he K'may doubtless
be made also in vacatia* ,W?U
brieflyn?J views. ?rit B Y
tbe 1&tatee which were lately in
active rebellion, mUitary Jurisdiction
is still exercised aud martial law en- f
forced.
The civil authorities, State and Fed
eral, have been required or permitted
to resumo partially their respective
functions, but the President, as Com
mander-in-Chief, still controls their
action so far as he thinks such control
necessary to pacification and restora
tion.
In holding the District Courts of Vir
ginia, I have uniformly recognized thfs
condition.
Jefferson Davis was arrested under a
proclamation of the President, charg
ing him with complicity in the assas
sination of the late President Lincoln.
He has been held ever since, and is now
held, as a military prisoner. He is not
and has never been ill the custody of
the Marshal for the District or Virginia,
und he is not, therefore, within the
power of (he Court.
While this condition remains, no pro
position for bail can be properly enter
tained, and I do not wish to indicate
any probable action under the circum
stances.
John C. Underwood, District Judge.
Alexandria, June 21, 1S0G.
CHIEF JUSTICE CHASK'S VIEWS.
A Washington correspondent tele
graphs, under date of Monday evening:
It is true that on Saturday last Attor
ney-General Speed and Mr. O'Connor
and others of counsel for Davis called
on Judge Chase and talked the matter
over, with a view of learning whether
the Judge would issue the writ and de
termine the question of bail under the
indictment. No formal or technical
application for the writ of habeas cor
pus and for bail was made. Judge
Chase Ireely gave these gentlemen his
opinions 011 the subjects discussed. He
intimated that ho did not regard the
offense a bailable one, and he says that
he stands now as he did some weeks
ago, when, after the promulgation of
the Peace Proclamation, he stared (hat
lie would not preside in a court in Vir
ginia until he could have assurance be
yond a peradventure that martial law
is abrogated in that State. Believing
that there is yet a doubt upon that
point, notwithstanding he is inclined
to interpret the Peace Proclamation as
Mr. Johnsou does, Judge Chase will
not entertain any motion or proposition
relative to the case of Mr. Davis, and so
he expressed himself to the gentlemen
above mentioned, but he suggested that
Judue Underwood might possibly en
tertain the motion.
JEPF. DAVIS AND HORACE OREEI,EY.
The New York Times?which cannot
be accused of being "radical" in its
views?in its issue yesterday has the
following editorial on the case of Jeff.
Davis and the exertion of Mr. Greeley
in his behalf:
Jetrerson Davis was the head and
front of a rebellion, in the progress of
which a quarter of a million of oursona
fell, and lor which the nation is carry
ing a debt of over three thousand mil
lions of dollars. While JelTersou Davis
was in bis glory at Richmond, Uulon
prisoners?soldiers?were dying in
Rebel prisons of "pestilence and fam
ine," by thousands. Undertheauspices
of Jefferson Davis, and with the money
of the Confederate Government, agents
were employed to introduce contagious
diseases into our cities. Under the
s-nne auspices, and with the same
money, Confederate agents in Canada
hatched conspiracies and raids to rob
our banks, murder our citizens, burn
our cities and assassinate our President.
These multiform and atrocious crimes
were approved by Jefferson Davis. He
has never even denied his responsibil
ity or complicity in them. When any
of the guilty agents were arrested they
produced a commission from Jefferson
Davis.
When this traltor-in-chlef was arrest
ed, outraged humanity demanded his
trial and punishment. But the Tribune
objected! Mr. Greeley was opposed to
the "death penalty." Mr. Greeley is a
philanthropist! Mr. Greeley's sympa
thies warm to the man who struck a
blow at the life of the Republic; who
deluged our country in blood; who
sauctioued piracy, arson and assassi
nation! This craven, white feathered
spirit, from influential sources, occa
sioned delay, aud delays end iu a de
nial or justice. Jefferson Davis should
have been promptly tried, convicted
and sentenced, after which, if the Pres
ident had commuted the sentence on
conditiou of his leaving the country
forever, we should have been rid of a
bad subject. And now, while Davis is
living upon the fat of the laud iu Fort
ress Monroe, Mr, Greelev rushes to
Washington tooffer bn\\, so that not even
punishment of the mildest character should
be inflicted upon a man whose head in any
other country toouldhave come offfor any
one of his many treasons.
In an editorial in yesterday's Tribune
Mr. Greeley demands, in behalf of "uni
versal amnesty and universal suffrage,"
that Davis "shall have the'full equal
rights secured to him by the Constitu
tion and laws of the land," and urges
his release on the ground that harsh
ness towards him tends to engender new
bkterness between the North aud the
South; and to indispose the latter to ac
cept his plan of reconstruction ubove
given?universal suffrage aud univer
sal amnesty.
? ? ?
A Jewl*h Divorce.
The New Haven Journal and Courier
has the following:
Yesterday a divorce, according to the
practice in the Hebrew Church, took
place at the residence of the Rev. J.
??abriel. At the present term of the
Superior Court a divorce was obtained
by Louis Roihscbild. One or the par
1 ties desired that a divorce should be
granted after the manner of the He
brew custom. Yesterday It was accom
plished. As it is somewhat interesting
to know what the ceremony consisted
of, we give it. It was as follows : The
wife, dressed in black, with a black veil
over her face, appeared with her hus
band before a council often men, mem
bers of the synagogue. There were
also present three rabbins, one of whom
acted as the petitioner, and wrote on
parchment a petition in Hebrew, ask
ing for a diverce, and also wrote out
the decree of divorce; the second acted
as the respondent or defendant, and
?he third as a kind of judge, the coun
cil of tea acting as a jury.
The man and wife having appeared,
they stood side by side before the coun
cil. The rabbins and council then took
an oath, all shaking hands?the oath
being to the effect that they would al
ways consider the divorce legal aud
binding. The wife then removed her
veil, and the rabbi who acted as peti
tioner read the petition in German and
stated the case to the council, who,
having heard it, decreed the divorce.
The divorce, folded up, was banded to
the husband, and the wife, raising her
open bands, the husband dropped the
paper Into them. The rabbi who acted
as judge then took it and cut the ends
like a fringe. He theu handed it to the '
president of the synagogue, telling bltn
to pluce it among the records of the so
ciety, to be preserved as evidence of the
divorce. This having, been done, the
ceremony was finished, and the parties
departed, no longer man and wife.
Et tu Brute!?The Democratic par
ty, so-called, has not been modest in
expressing the belief that if had a sort
of Divine right to rule the country.
But like Ciesar, who also aimed at
empire, it seems likely to receive its
stab at the hands of those it has most
trusted. This is the ungrateful manner
in which the Norfolk, (Va.) Old Do
minion returns the flatteries and fawn
ings to which it stoops for power:
The old Democratic politicians of the
North seem to be wedded to the mem
ory of tbatorganization, and hopeful of
its resurrection. If they would do the
South, especially, and the whole coun
try generally, a lasting service, .they
could do it by dropping the dry bones
of the Charleston Convention, and ad
mit the fact, that tb& old Democratic
party, squatter soverelghty and fotjr
veara of bloody war, are tilings of the
past.
A Political Panic.
From the New York Port of Tuesday.
Mr. Ancona, of Pennsylvania, acop
f>erhead, yesterday caused what travel
ers on the western plains call ? ?'stam
pede" amongst the politicians of the
House of Representatives. He offered
a resolution repealing the Neutrality
laws, in order to let the Fenian9 freely
into Canada.
At first sight one would sav that so
disreputable an attempt could not find
a dozen supporters in the House. Cer
tainly when the Tribune the other day
blamed the President for taking meas
ures to guard our neighbors, with whom
we are at peace, from being attacked by
men armed and organized within our
border, and setting out from here, we
did not think that oue hundred and
thirteen members of Congress could be
induced to give their votes lor a resolu
tion to the same general purpose.
One hundred and thirteen members
of Congress voted against the motion
to dismiss Mr. Ancona's resolution.
Does it then follow that Congress?or
this part of it?would have Canada In
vaded I row Buffalo and Cleveland? Is
it to be supposed that these one hun
dred and thirteen would, as the Tri
bune the other,day suggested, treat Eng
land with the same evasion with which
she treated us, and thus themselves
commit the flagrant wrong of which
we all for four years so bitterly com
plained? Wo do not suppose anything
of the kind. Wo suppose only that
members were thinking of "the Irish
vole," and they voted, as some of them
speak, lor Buncombe.
Politicians fear that the Fenians will
revenge their defeat in the next election;
and so they act a part which is prudent,
even if it is despicable. But we advise
Republicans and Union men not to be
led away by their fears. We do not
know what dreadful thing the Fenian
monster may do to those who do not
timely propitiate it, or what important
favors ii may grant its friends or adula
tors, But, one thing is certain?the
copperheads can afford to bid higher
for its favor than any respectable Union
men; they have more to gain and less
to lose: their antecedents, as the sup
porters of filibustering against Cuba
and Central America, as the palliators
of New York riots, ihe defenders of the
rebel leaders, and the would-be de
stroyers of the very principle of law
and order on this continent?these an
tecedents will of themselves recom
mend them to the more lawless and
desperate of the Fenian leaders. Mr.
Ancona had a better chance of securing
itie Feniau vote, in his district, tban
his Republican opponent; for the sim
ple reason that they know Mr. Ancona
to have but little respect or regard lor
law and order, and they presume the
opposite of any member of the other
party.
But if any Republican politician is
really desirous or securing a very im
portant vote, let him lake ground with
Sir. Hale in support of the President,
of law and order, aud of the good repute
of the nation. Mr. Hale's resolution,
which could not even get a reading un
til Mr. Ancona's had been referred to
the Committee on Foreign Affairs, is
right and pointed. It is
"Hesolvcd, Tnnt the honor and good faith
of tue United estates Imperatively ueinand a
Jutland vigorous enforcement or the neutral
ity laws, ami thai this IJou*e will eutertaln
no proposition looking to their repeal, re
vision or violation."
That is what the mass of the Ameri
can people hold ; they believe in honor
and good faith, and good refute, in law
and order, and they abhor violence and
lawlessness. The people universally
approved ot President Johnson's procla
mation ; and a glow of gratification
was felt by the whole country on read
ing General Grant's order, recommend
ing the State authorities to **call out
the militia on the frontier, to prevent
hostile expeditions from leaving the
United States, aud to save private
property from destruction by mobs."
There are many "votes" which poli
ticians are tempted to court; the "Irish
vote," the "liquor-drinking vote," the
"southern vote;" but it will be found,
in the long run, that the heaviest vote
in this country Is* that of the people
who desire their country to deal fairly
and honestly with all nations, aud who
love liberty and equal rights, and sup
port law and order at home.
The Weeping Mur(ler*~A ftiirgJeal Lec
ture Over die Deiul ffudy of Probst.
From the Philadelphia North American,
June 10.
An autopsy of the body of the exe
cuted murderer Probst was made in
the clinic room of Jeflerson Medical
College on Saturday afternoon, in the
presence of as many persons as the
apartment would contain, all of whom
were present by invitation, and most
of whom were members of the medical
profession.
The occasion was the subject of a
lecture by Prof. Pancoast, son to the
veteran Professor, now unfortunately
suffering badly from inflammotion of
the eyes, and not able to be present.
The lecture and ihe operation lasted lor
two hours, und was to the medical stu
dents aud pysicians assembled an oc
casion of special interest.
The body, dark and discolored at the
extremities, was placed upon a revolv
ing table on the centre of the amphi
theatre. The professors occupied the
nearest seats, aud up to the highest
bench every inch of room was filled.
The result of the examination showed
that, aside from its ignominy, the man
ner of Probst's death produced but one
single pang. He died not from conges
tion, from asphyxia, or from the frac
ture of the vertebrae of the neck; he
died from an immense shock, that
shattered In an Instant the entire nerv
ous system. There was a livid mark
around the neck made by the rope.
Wheie the knot had been, there was no
discoloration whatever, and this show
ed that the constriction was only
around a portion of the neck. There
was no laceration of the structures or
the tissues discernible when the neck
was opened. The jugular was distend
ed with blood. Tue weight of the man
was J7(J-pounds, and the surgeon ex
pected that a fall of his body three feet
and a half would have sundered every
part in this locality. Not even the
delicate vein9 were injured.
The cavity of the chest being exam
ined, showed muscular development to
a high degree, and the presence ot strata
of fat. Death was not caused by want
of air, for ihe lungs were fully distend
ed, and eveu perfectly healtny in ap
pearance; and the right side of the
heart, usually congested uuder these
circutnstanoes of death, was found in
its natural condition. The digestion
was perfect. Though the prisoner had
breafciast upon bread and butter, with
two boiled eggs, the whole were found
to have been absorbed, and the stomach
absolutely empty.
The brain was healthy, but of less
than average size. Its weight was thir
ty-six ounces; that of Green, the Mai
den murderer, was four ounces less.
Looking over the whole ground, the
young Professor pointed out the inev
itable conclusion that Probst died from
the effects or the nervous shock result
ing from the fall, and from the com
pression of the nerves and arteries.
The demonstrator took occasion to say
that he considered the size of the brain
as having no bearing upon the question
of intelligence or its opposite.
The skeleton will 6e mourned and
wired, and will be preserved forever in
the anatomical museum of Jefferson
College.
Claims Against Venezuela,?1The
House of Representatives some weeks
ago passed a resolution requesting the
President to cause to be furnished a list
of the claims of American citizens now
pending in the United States Legation
at Caraccas against Venezuela. The
Secretary of Slate reports that a con
vention providing for the adjustment
of these claims is understood to be un
der the consideration of fhe Senate, and
this, it is presuo)e4, makes it unneces
sary, as it is believed to be inexpedient
with reference to the national Interests,
to publish the information called for
by the resolution.
Guy Romance soil Mad Keallly.
Correspondence erf the Xew York lie, aid.
? Santiago dk Cuba, May 19.
-In a Spanish theatrical oompany,
lately here, was a lady, young, hand
some, and talented. She has smitten
many they say, and in return accepted
pro tiered hearts innumerable. This
kind of thing is called love, by cour
tesy o_uly; but tbe course of such runs
oftentimes with as little smoothness as
i"*!!*! true ?ve" A 8en"emaii, who
shall be nameless, was smitten by this
lady, and paid her unremitting atten
tion, so much so, that there were
strangely enough, rumors of marriage
?for the lady, though very fair, is very
j?6 'JJ"' as the gentleman
ir not matrimonially iuclined, was an
accepted lover of liie strongest tyi>e
In course ot time a rival appeared.
One day the rivals met; the one glory
iug iti his triumph, the other envious
and devoured by chagrin ; by no means
in a temper to endure each other. They
met at dinner; but no wine was need
ed to excite men already excited bv
Cher's presence. The seen/,
though testive, was not gay; nor did
the presence of the lady tend to make
matters more agreeable. When she
rose, the foitunate lover escorted
ThI . .I , d9or? an<1 returned to
the table in time to hear a bitter
remark from his discomfited rival. To
make a long story short, a chal
lenge was sent and accepted that very
night. A duel to the death was agreed
on?just think of two men, one a Colo
nel in the army, the other a younglaw
yer in good practice, one with a family
to take care of, both in good positions
in society, agreeing that one or the
other, or both, should die for a woman
who-cared for neither. I think that tbe
old Creole hatred of tbe Spaniards had
something to do with the immovabie
determination of the young lawyer to
accept no apoiogy from tho Colonel,
did tt,l Jn hjs power to avoid tbe
frighttul alteruauves of murder, sui-,
ude, or disgrace. His adversary was
, inexorable and they fought. At the
second fire the successful lover fell.
mortally wounded, and in three days
more was buried. The Colouel, of
course, has left the island. The lady
dines tranquilly every day at tho table
where tho dispute occurred, not yet a
month ago. She sits opposite me, and
we talk about it as we do of theatres or
any other commonplace matter. Shej
is sorry in a commonplace way. "It is
such n pity ho was killed; he was such
a /ine-iookingyoung fellow. Would I,
be kind enough to give her a wing of1
that chicken, with a little of the breast?
Poor lellow, he lived not quite two
? yf' ?if8 tbat P?rkst*"k ? Thank you:
don t like pork. The ball passed clean
through his stomach." And so we gos
siped till dinner is over.
The Ku rope an Crisis Culminating.
?Thesteamship Hibernian, with Euro
pean dates io the 1st inst., brought
news most important and interesting
in regard to the European complica
tions A congress of powers had been
agreed upon and would shortly meet,
probably at Paris, with Louis Napoi
iHon as presiding officer. The objector
J^Sw?P?lere,,CG' uocording to the note of
invitation sent to the federal diet by
the trench government, is to secure a
r|! d1'"I1110 settlement of the questions
ot Schleswig-Holstein, Venecia and
,^n ^L? ?,r,nVso fur "s they each and
all affect the European equilibrium.
I he several powers will be represented
by the ministers of foreign affairs, with
the exception of Austria, who will
probably send Prince Metternich
But there Is very little expectation or
prospect that this Congress will be able
to a vert a war. Austria will not listen
to the giving up of Venetia. She had
already 000,000 men raised; she had
?f"!?" e,n&aged in building |
fortihcatious; the headquarters of her I
army were about being moved to
Jtrrague, and the commander of the
? issued orders to his troops
relative to their conduct in a hostile
country. And besides, she had levied
a forced loan or twelve millions florins
In Ltombardo, Venitia, and was report-1
VT1?* to. ?et a distinguished
Polish chieftain to head a revolution in
, I russiau Poland. Of course, while the
Congress is pending she drops active
preparations for war, as do Prussia and
Holy, where there has been hardly less
warlike activity than in Austria; Out it
is easily to be seen that they all alike
regard the proposed Congresses a mere
form, and mean to be ready for vigor
ous bghting as so .n as it is declared a
failure. Napoleon will call Into play
all his resources of diplomacy, but it
looks now as though there would be
war in spite of him?if indeed he roall v
wishes to avoid war, which is not cer
tain, though his words and actions just
now are peaceful.
ErtfiLUiR Statistics.?A parliament
Ary return just published shows tliat
the estimated population at the middle
aifl flw! year 1866 was, in Eugland, 21,
fl0,020; in Scotland, 3,153,413; in Ire
; and tho total of the
united Kingdom was 29,935,404. The
aggregate amount of revenue derived
?"!" '"*"tloI\'n the two ye?r8 ending
^ in England,
ilfti,839,622, in Scotland, ?17,305,325:
and in Ireland, ?12.821,817; making for
J.K1"S'J?"i a total amouut of
?122,766,664. A table is given in the re
turns whichshows thenumberof repre
sentatives which each division of the
United Kingdom would have if the 058
memben. or tho House or Commons
were allotted to them proportionately
lo.:. *"?> 'he estimated population in tbe i
middle or the present year; 2d to tbe
amount of revenue in the two years
ending 31st or December, 1865; and 3d,
to the mean ol the numbers allotted
proportionally to population and to
revenue. Under the first head, 467
21ld? England. 60 to Scot
il.,11?,^0 rrelMnd: under the sec
ond, England Wjuld have 508; Scotland
??' frel!,n<' and under the third
England 587; Scotland 78; Ireland 93 '
a *tiprf?"t England has 500 members;
Scotland 56; and Ireland 165.
1*?? Bkttish I>ooa'?The amount ex
pended for the relief of the poor in 655
unions and parishes of England and
Wales during tho half year ending
Michaelmas, 1865. was ?2.116,216, being
nCS?,ase of *12,261 as coinpated witfi
1864. The population of those unions
and parishes was 12,886,104 according
to tho census or 1861. 8
Thr report tbat a Fenian privateer Is
at sea, has caused some excitement
among New York shippers of goods by
British vessels. On Iriday a premium
of one and a half per cent, to cover the
war rHK, was paid to one or tbe great
insurance companies of this city. Eng
lish merchants do not generally be
| lieve there is any Fenian privateer.
Celebrated Smoking Tobaecos.
We have just received from
* odooSS1;UaCtUmS th? foUowln* Smok
LONE JACK,
BROWN DICK
and REOALrA.
RHODES A SINGLETON.
my 17 Wholesale Dealers. 83 Main ?t.
Fine Virginia Chewing Tobaccos.
A ^THEJIOST CELEBRATED Makes
drf Toba??" ft" ?!? cheap.
_ __ RHODES ?fc arNGLETON*,
niy!7 Wholesale Dealer*, 83 Mainst,
Maryland Lline.
Zfift BARRBLS FBE3H BURNT, BN'OW
Ol/U white, Maryland Lime. Jnst received
aud for sale by
n*r31 JOS. A. METCALF.
Seed Buckwheat.
500
PorIS^bV? TIJ,OT,,r
V (mart) PRYOR BOYD 4 OO.
gnsurancr.
National Insurance Company
OF WHEELING.
CAPITAL ? - - 8lOO.OOO. I
President.GEORGE K. WHEAT,
Vice President, JAMES McCLUNEY.
DIRKCTOBS:
John E. Wilson, A. 0. Quarrier,
Sam'l Harper, Jas. C. Orr.
George Adams, James McClnney,
I. F. u pdegratT. George K. Wheat.
Christian Smith.
mHIS POyPANY HAVING BEEN FUL
I iy organized, la prepared to transact busl
nejwand asks a liberal share of public patro
nage. Kates a* low as any llr*t-class company.
Office No. 26 Monroe street, np stairs, next
door to First National Bank,
mra JOHN BISHOP, Sec'y.
iETNA
OF WHEELING.
CAPITAL, - - ?8100,000.
DDOCTpRS
James C. Acheson, William B. SImnson,
Augustus Pollack, Thos. J. Qtmpbell,
J no. K. Botoford, Wm. C, Handlan,
T. M. Dodson.
mHIS COMPANY HAVING BEEN FUL
I ly organized, Is now prepared to take
risks upon
Bnlldinsr* or nil lclnda. Merchandise,
Slannfftctnrlnjer Establishments,
Fninllnrennd t'nntoi h of Ml
UlndN on the U'wleru
WatCK.
Applications for Insurance will be' prompt
ly attended toby the Secretary.
Office at the National Savlugs Bank, No. 63
Main street.
8. P. HILDRETH, Sec'y.
H. G. HARDING, Ass't Sec'y.
JAMES C. ACHESON, Pres't. _
WM. R SIMPSON, Vice Pres't. mr22
I N8UKANCE.
Fire & Marine Ismme Compaoj
or WHUUBO.
INCORPORATED IN 1831.
mAKES RISKS AT THE LOWEST RATE
L on Buildings of all kinds, Steamboats.
Furniture and Merchandise, and against all
dangers attending the transportation of good*
on rivers, seas, lakes, canals and railroads.
H. CRANGLE, President*
JOHN F. HOPKIN8, Secretary.
directors:
Robert Crangle, John ReId,
Robert Morrison, J. Da'sell,
S.Brady, Wm. B Ba'telle,
John Donlon, J. D. Du Bote.
iHTTlie company has removed to the office
?up staiR'?In the "Insurance Building,"
next door to the Merchants National Bank.
Applications for Insurance willbeprumpll
attended to by the President or Secretary.
W. T. PETERSON, SEN. W. r. PETKKSON, JR
PETERSONS'
Fire, Marine, Life and Accident
INSURANCE AGENCY,
Representing
The oldest, largest mid moat snbstan
tlal Insnranoe Compnnlea In the
Vult?d State*, havlnsrnn atrcrre
irate Cash Capital or aver
TWENTY-FIVE MILLION DOLLAK
Merchandise, Business Buildings,etc.. Insur
ed at the lowest current rates. Dwelling
and Farm Property Insured for a term
of years at much more favorable
rates than arc charged by so
called Mutual Companies,
and no Premium Notes
in the case.
Losses Favorably Adjusted, and
Promptly Paid, at this Agency.
Office, MAIN STREET, next door to M. and
M. Bank,
WHEELING, W. VA.
Mutual Life Ins. CO.. New York,?412^00.000
Home Insurance Co., New York, 3,750j000
Continental Ins. Co., New York,. LW.ttfl
Underwriters' Agency, New York,... 3,n00,C?iO
Security Insurance Co., New York... I.s0ft,000
International Ins. Co., New York,... 1,300,000
Accident Ins.Co. of Columbus, Ohio,
Chartered Capital, .. 1,000,000
Jan 13
Home Insurance Company,
OF COLUMBUS, OHIO.
Capital - 8300,000.
E. P. HUBBARD, Aeent.
Wheeling, W. Va.
Office, Main street, Horn brook's Block, sec
ond floor. nov30 tf
Franklin Insurance Company
OF WIirKLISO.
Capital, ?150,000.
directors:
T. H. Logan,T. P.Shallcross.Geo. K. Wheat,
Geo. Menuel, John Zoeckler, HamL McCIel
lan, G. W. Franzhelm, J as. N. Vance, Alex.
Laughlln
mHIS COMPANY HAVING BEEN DULY
I organized, are prepared to take risks at
fair rates on buildings of all klnos, merchan
dise, manufacturing establishments, furni
ture, steamboats and cargoes on the western
rivers and lake**, and also on the Iiyes of per
sons for a term of years. This Company of
fers superior inducements to formers, wnere
by they can be Insured for three years, at re
duced rates. This being a home institution,
composed of some ninety-four stockholders,
most of whom are among our nest business
men, recommends Itself to the favorable con
sideration of the Insuring public, and solicits
"App^cnSons for Insurance will be prompt
attended to by the Secxeta/y.
Office, No. 1 McLure House, being the same
formerly occupied by Adams' Express Co.
N. C. ARTHUR, Secretary.
BAM'L McCLELLAN, President.
GEO. MENDEL, Vice President.
N. C. ARTHUR, Agent for paying pensions.
Office, No. 1 McLure House, being the same
formerly occupied by Adams' Express Co.
SPEIDEL & ntnuN,
Wholesale Dealers In
CAN FRUITS,
TOBACCO,
Cigars, & c.
Have in store and for sale
1,500 dox Can Fruits, assorted.
300 " Brandy Peaches and Chen lea.
75,000 Fine Cigars.
150 Caddies 1 obacco, Bright and Dark,
J4*s and 10*s
80 Boxes aud Half Boxes Tobacco,
Bright J4's and l's.
75 gross Smoking Tobacco In Paper
Packages. Smoking Toi?acco in bbls. and half
bblK Snuff*, Raisins, Nuts, Candles, Pickles In
half bbls. and glass. Sardines, Ac.
No. 51 MAIN ST.
Jan27
CRACKERS,
CRACKERS,
CRACKERS.
Marvin's celebrated Oyster, Sugar and Wine
CRACKERS, in store and lor sale at
MANUFACTURES' PRICES,
BY
SPEIDEL <* I.\DEBBIEDE5,
61 Main St.
Jang
NATIONAL EXPHE33
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
THE NATIONAL EXPRESS A TRANS,
portation Company, having Anally com
pleted Its southern through connections from
NKW YORK and PllILADBLPHiA to
BALTIMORE, WASHINGTON HICH
MONO, SAVANNAH, CHARLESTON, and
all intermediate and adjacent towns as far
south asGEoRGlA, and also having perfect
ed its Western connections, va the Baltimore
and Ohio Railroad over main roads to
CINCINNATI ANDST., LOUIS,
Is now prepared to receive Freights. Mer
chandise. Valuable Package*. MONEY and
BULLION.and to transfer ?ej?me tnor
from the pfaces designated and all Interme
diate points as efficiently, expeditiously and
cheaply as can be done by any other Lx
P Offloes'areaLo opened In Mobile and New
Orleans, and in a few days the Company will
run through, via Montgomery, to these pla
??' J. E. JOHNSTON, President.
B. F. FICKUN. Oenertl BnpeilDtemlMiS.
my IS
9 GROB8 RING'S AMBROSIA JUhT RE
9) eelved and warranted to restore pay hair
by C. H. ODBERT, End of stone Bridge. 16
^inanrial.
FIRST
NATIONAL BANK
OF WHKSLINO.
Designated Depositary U. S.
CAPITAL PAID TJT .. .SJV.Ona
CAITAL AUTHORIZED,
M
ONEY RECEIVED ON DEPOSIT. IN
tere*4 pnld on Special Deposit*. Collec
tions made, and proceeds promptly remitted.
Exchange bought and sold.
director-?:
Geoige K. Wheat, Jacob Horn brook.
John K. Botsford, Joseph Bell,
Jacob S. Rhodes, chwter D. Knox,
Geo. W. Fnuirhelm, Jotm L. llobbs.
A. W. Campbell.
GEORGE K. WHEAT, President.
GEORGE A DA MS. Cashier. dAW
MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK
or Went Virginia.
Capital I*ald In, 8."?oo,ooo.
mHIS BANK SUCCEEDS TO T1IE BUSI
X ness of tlio "Merchants* and Mechanic^
Bank of Wheeling." It h a deafgnntrd IV
poedtory and Financial aueut of the ITuiled
states, and Is prepared to do a legitimate
Banking business.
J*resutcut? Robert Crangle.
Directors?Thomas Sweeney, L. S. Delaplnln,
Jas. C. Acheson, John Donlon, Jacob Berger,
A. Allen ilowell, J. Nelson Vance, James
Dalzell. 8. BRADY". Ctalilor.
Janl7-ly
National Saving's Bank of Wheeling.
CAPITAL, - 9100,000.
Money received on deposit
I uterestpald on Special Deposit.*. Notes
and Bills discounted. Exchange bought and
sold. Collections made on all points and pro
ceeds promptly remitted.
Discount day?Wednesday.
DIRECTORS.
Thomas II. List, A ugnsx us Pol lack,
RolterrGibsou, R. A. M'Cabe,
J. C. Thomas, T. M. Dodson.
J. L. StlfeL
TFOS. H. IJHT, President.
8. P. HILDRETH. Cashier. noV21
The People's Bank.
OFFICE, No. 09 MAIN ST., WHEELING.
W. Va. Money received on deposit. In
terest paid on HtH-cial deposits.
Notra and bills discounted. Exchange
bought and sold. Collections at home or >uu
abrojul promptly attended to.
DIRECTORS.
John Reld, < "hriat lan Hem.
J. T. Scott, John VockJer,
Sam'l J. Boyd, Richard Carter.
JOHN RlTlD, Pres't.
JOSIAH ITPDEORAFF. CashT. royfl
gUfllrat.
II U It If J2 JU ? a
CELKURATSD
GOLDEN _BITTERS !
A PURELY TEtiFTABLE TONIC 11
INVIGORATING AND STRENGTHENTN Q
Fortifies the System Against the Evil
Effects of Unwholesome Water,
mHE BEST TONIC IN THE WORLD.?
1 They invigorate, strengthen and give new
life to the system. They work like mnele,
and will cure all can* of I)yspe|*da, Debility,
Intermittent Fever, Diarrhea, Scrofula, limit,
Gravel, Jaundice, Nervous Affections, Liver
Complaint, Loot of Appetite, Heartburn.
Billions Colic, Cholera Morbus, Fever and
Ague, Rheumatism, Salt Rheum, Sea-sick
ness, Ac.. Ac.
They Contain no Poisonous Drug.
PURELY VEGETABLE.?HubbeIYi celebrated
Golden Bitters are composed of Gentian, Cal
amns Root. Wild Cherry Bark, Anise, Orso^a
l'eel, Calisaya Bark, Colundio, Bark of Hssa
ftiis Root,Slieny Wine, Butternut Bark, Car
away Seed, Yellow Dos, Dandelion, Ac.,?nil
preserved in Jamaica Rum.
Ttae Great Cure for nil DlftrnficM of tli?
Mtouineb, Liver unci lioweKl
The sick and suffering have always felt the
necessity for a safe and trustworthy medi
cine, free from calomel aud other corrosive
minerals, which, while acting gently and
without producing nausea or pain. would so
thoroughly cleanse, strengthen and regulate
the Internal organs as to enable them to i?er
form their proper functions without a con
tinual resort to medicinal aid.
HUBBEL'S SUPERIOR OLD
CABINET BRANDY, (Medicated.)
UNKQUALED REMEDY FOR
Diarrhea, mimmer Complaint, Cholera Mor
bus, Griping Pains In the Bowels, Cholicaud
Chronic Diarrhea. It is highly approved by
the Medical Faculty for chanae of waUrand
diet. Used with great success in the artujr
hospitals In violent cases of Chronic Diarrhea.
This preparation Is simple and harmless, un
ad tillered, expressly for medicinal use
For Male In all Par la of the World.
?^"Central Depot, American Express Build
ing, 55 Hudson Street. New York. Manufac
tory Corner Water and Ferry StieetB. Hudson,
N, Y. GEO. C. 11UBBKL A CO
Proprietoz ?
McCABE, KRAFT A CO., Wholesale Drug
gists, Wheeling, Sole Agent for West Vir
ginia; also, proprietors of Kraft's Diarrhea
Compound, Iteed's Cough Syrup, Improved
Nerve and Bone Liniment, Dr. Stahl's Ger
man Relief and Oriental Hair Oil.
dec23-4imd<fcw
The Greatest Medicine 01
the Age.
KRAFT'S
Diarrhea Compound.
mnE ONLY SAFE AND CERTAIN CURB
1 of Dtrrhea, Dynenterry, Klux, Summer
Otmrplnint, and all diseases of the stomach and
bowels, incident to a change of Diet or Cli
mate.
It has stood the test of time?has cured In
thousands of cases where all other remedies
have/ailed, and is pronounced by the i-dbljo
the
ONLY RELIABLE REMEDY
of its kind now in use.
Many prominent Physicians now use It in
their practice, and unhesitatingly recommend
Keep It in your house, and be prepared for
any sudden attack of
"CHOLERA,"
or Its kindred diseases?during the coming
lammer.
The following are a few of the certificate-*
which have been voluntarily given to the
Proprietors, by persons w ho are well know n
WHBELI50, Apri^Stb, 1885.
Messrs. McCabk. Krait A Co., i/entlemat:
Havlntrused Krall ** Diarrhea Compound, for
Camp Dmrrhea, with which I have been deep
ly afflicted for almost one month. aU other
remedies tried having failed, and finding It not
only a prcumt reiitf but a vrrmanent cure, 1
Twfr- pleasure In recommending it to the fci
vorable notice of all yvlio may be alike Afflict
ed. G. MARTIN,
Chaplin 15th W. Va. Infantry.
Pitts bubo, July 5,1865.
Messrs. McCabe, Kraft ?t Co., UmUemrnz
Allow me to add my testimony to that ot
others, in reganl to your celebrated "Diarrhea
Compound. I have been for a long time
sni'Jei t to the dLsea.se for which it Is recom
mended. I have tried various remedies; but
never found one that so completely erudicaie
the disease as your medlciue. A short tinu.
ai(o I was suffering terribly with Diarrhea I
procured a bottle of "Kraft's Diarrhea Com
pound." I experienced Immldiate relief from.
one dose, and >ifler a third dose felt on well as
ever. I regard it as an invaluable medicine,
and would not be w)tUou{J VbTEWAJ&
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Dec. 1st, 1865.
Messrs. McCABE, KbaITA Co., Gentlemen:
I have been using your "Diarrhea Compound'
in my family for some time, and can say with
much pleasure, that it Is the Bt>. r xruioxs
of the kind I have ever used, and do cheerful
ly recommend It to my friends.
With much respect, I am your Mend,
V. H. MKTCALKH.
Of Metcalfe, Bro. A Co.
McCABE, KRAFT A CO., WhoU#ale Drag
glsts. Wheeling, W. Va- sole I'roprietom, to
whom aU orders should be addremo.
For sale by REED. KRAFT A Co., Centre
Wheeling, WEST A MITCH KLL, Bridgeport,
Oft'P. ?na by Healers in
Loitlnviile Uine.
aaa BARRELS JUST RECEIVED AND
mS '***" ^ JOa ^fKTCALF.
niHE itpi-EHHATED BOSTON COOKING
j_ Kansee, circulating Boilers, Bath Tuba,
amm, ac, A pp.
TIB EES, HHKUBBEHY, BUJJU AJtB
Ksr-'-^J0*tre?BY^yBon? *00

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