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The Wheeling daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1865-1903, July 08, 1869, Image 4

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RIB BO NS
AT ADLER'S.
FRINGES
AT ADLER'S.
SATINS
AT ADLER'S.
SUNDOWNS
AT ADLER'S.
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TUCKfiUAT JIOK.M.VCi, Jl'LT ?.
I*?nr Advertisement*.
Dividend.
Main street vs. Haltic B. B. C.
Washington flail?Theatre.
Anniversary Festival.
Admiralty Court.?Judge Jackson
will commence a short term of a Court
In Admirality in the U. 8. District
Court room in this city, to-morrow. It
Is thought it will not continue longer
than through Saturday.
Off fjr Camp Meeting.?Revs. F.
Ball and K. A. Arthur left the city, yesterday,
over the Cleveland and Pittsburgh
road, for Round Lake, N. Y.,
where a national cainp meeting, participated
in by nearly all Protestant
denominations, is now in progress.
Correction,?11 was the liarmonle
and Mannercbor Singing Societies
which held the plc-nic at Walters1
grove, Monday laBt, and not the Turners,
as we stated in yesterday morning's
paper. The last named society
proposes to go out to the Fair Grounds
next Saturday, and a cordial invitation
in extended to everybody. Arrange*
m rnents are completed that will Insure a
pleasant time.
Good Appointment.?We are gratified
to learn that Mr. John Hailie has
been appointed ticket agent of the
Cleveland A Pittsburgh Hail Koad in
this city. Mr. B, has had charge of,
the office for several years, and is,
therefore, thoroughly conversant with
Its duties. We congratulate the Kail- j
road company on having secured the1
services of one who is in every respect
qualified for (he position, and whose
character is without reproach.
IIiver News.?The river continued
to recede rapidly, yesterday, the marks
allowing last evening, a decline ot at
least three feet during the preceding
twenty-four hours. In reply to our
question, "How many feet in the channel?"
the wharf master answered:
About ten feet six inches," At Pittsburgh
yesterday afternoon, the stage
was six feet six inches and tailing.
There were no arrivals or departures
outside the regular packets.
Principal Elected?Yesterday, the
School Commissioners of Washington
township elected Z. G. Bundy, E?q.,
principal of the First Ward School.
Mr. 15. brings to the position several
years' experience as a teacher, having
been lor a considerable period connected
with the public schools in
Washington county, Ohio. lie is represented
to have superior qualifications, I
and we doubt not under his supervis-|
ion the schools iu the First Ward will
soon rank with the best iu the District,
Police Court.?The following business
was transacted in the police court,
yesterday morning: Alexander Craig,
assaulting Joseph llinely, dismissed
at the costs of the city; Kobert Kyle,
disorderly, continued uutil this morning;
William Gray, same charge, same
order; Erastus Kathburn, drunk, one
dollar and costs; Fred, Morgan, disorderly,
five dollars and costs; Geo. W.
Eckhart, selling liquor on Sunday,
continued until this morning; Geo. E.
Wlckham, assaulting Thomas Powell,
one dollar and costs.
Teachers' Examination.?We made
a note several days since that the examination
of applicants for teachers'
certificates was in progress and would
continue a day or two. We were told
by Prof, Williams, Superintendent of
the schools in this district, that twentyeight
persons appeared before the Committee
appointed by the Board of EJucatiou
tocouduct the examination. Of
that number only two received No. 1
certificates; thirteen, No. 2; nine, No.
3; two, No. 4 and two were rejected.
Kleven were applicants for Grammar
school certificate?, tive for Intermediate
and twelve for Primary.
The course for the Grammar schools
embraces common English branches,
History, Physiology, Natural Philosophy,
Chemistry, Botany, Astronomy,
Algebra and Geometry; for the Intermediate
schools, common English,
History and Physiology; and lor the
Primary, common Knglish only.
All the applicants wore examined in
the Theory and Practice of Teaching.
About fifty who had been previously
examined had their certificates renewed.
It was determined by the committee
that the following gradation of certificates
should be observed: Where an
applicant answered correctly eighty
per cent, of the questions propounded, j
a No. 1 certificate should be issued; ,
sixty to eighty, a No. 2; forty to sixty,
a No.3; thirty to forty, a No. 4; twenty
to thirty, a No. 5. A candidate who '
answered less than twenty per cent, of <
all the questions submitted, should
not be entitled to n sertificate of any
grade. A number five certificate is re- ,
garded as about equivalent to none at
all?a number four but little better. '
The questions submitted to the ap- ,
plicants were of extensive range and
calculated to test thoroughly the
capabilities of those proposing to teach.
The Committee ol Examination consisted
of Prof. Williams, Rev. J. T.McClure
and Dr. George Balrd. In the
organization of the Committee Usv. Mr.
McClure was made President, and Prof.
Williams, Secretary.
We append a list of the applicants:
W. H.Anderson, Z. G. Bandy, Alex.
C. Smith, D. j. McDaid, U. N. Mertz,
A. M. Stevenson, J. B. Crenshaw, Mrs.
W. L. Parkinson, Georgianna Snowden,
Mary Stont, L. J. Moore, Sadie
Stout, Emma Burt, A. V. Oxtoby,
Lucy H. Hoxworth, l,'.?ie Downs, E.
Ralston, Maggie Harbaugh, Sarah
George, Sallle Robinson, Lou. McMechen,
Alice Cunningham, Jennie Greer,
Car. D. Agnew, Louisa G. Scovern.Wm.
T. Mitchell, A. V. Hazzard and John
W. West (colored).
ADDKK89R8.?In our notice of the
Fourth in Bridgeport, yesterday morning,
we slated that the addresses delivered
on the occasion would appear
in to-day's paper. The following is a
synopsisof that delivered by Rev. Geo.
U. Cbalfant, in the M. K. Church last
Sunday morning:
If thou tarn away thy foot from
the Sabbath, troin doing thy pleasure ou my
holy dny; and call the Sabbath a delight, the
holy *?I the lx>rd, honorable; and shall honor
blni, uo' doing thine own ways, Dor tludlng
ihy own pleasure, nor sneaking thine own
words. <JSc. Isa. iS: 13, 14.
This year, the annaai festival of our
nation's birth, coincides with the
weekly festival of our Lord's resurrection.
To day the laurels are entwined
with the lilies ; the flag of our country
is draped around the cross. To-day we
celebr.ae the inauguration of two great
cunlfsts, the achievement of two victories,
the founding of two governments,
yet not rivat governments.
The two associations of the day are
not incompatible. The Sabbath includes
the 4:h of July. Our American
Independence is one contribution
to the emancipation of the world
under the administration of Him,
who Is exalted to be the bead of all
principality and power. The notes of the
nation's thanksgiving make no discord
in the diapason of the world's jubilee.
As a nation we have resolved that the
secular shall give place to the spiritual
observance of this day. We will recognize
the paramount authority and
claims of that Christian religion which
stood sentinel over the cradle of onr
liberty, nursed our childhood and has
spread the mantling shield of divine
protection over our mature years.
The lesson of the hour seems to be,
thr relation of the Christian Sabbath to
the growth anil perpetuity of our free institutions.
A sanctified Sabbath is important?
even necessary to the stability of our
government.
By a sanctified Sabbath, we mean such
an observance of the Lord's day as Is
enjoined in the text.
Not a day of idleness and recreation,
of sensual pleasure and dissipation,
not merely a day of cessation from ordinary
cares and avocations, bnt a- day
wholly given to God; a day of religious
study and meditation; a day of public
and solemn woranip01 uoa m lue use 01
his own divinely.appointed ordinances
and in works of piety and mercy; a
Sabbath consecrated from a secular to a
spiritual uae, according to the letter and
spirit of its divine appointment. Such
a weekly Sabbath we bold to be essential
to our country's welfare.
It Is not uncommon to hear the reverence
of our forefathers for the Lord's
day ridiculed as puritanical and bigoted.
It may appear that they were
both better christians and wiser patriots
than their children.
1. The influence of a sanctified Sabbath
has surrounded the origin and growth of
our free institutions thus far.
Sabbath desecration has been and is
increasingly prevalent in all parts of
the land. Still we are relatively, as
compared with many other nations, a
Sabbath keeping people. We are so
regarded by foreigners. Our rulers
have often disregarded the claims of
the day, but they have generally recognized
them. Respect for God's day is
the public sentimen' of the country.
To a far greater extent this was true
in the lormative period of our institutions.
The stern old patriots of provincial
times feared God before the
king.
Moreover, Sabbath desecration is
more prevalent in (owdb and cities?in
rura*. districts the day is more sacredly
observed. The mass of our popnlation
has hitherto been agricultural. Our
great ruling minds have not grown up
amid the artificial influences of towns
and cities. Grand old forest trees are
not growii in hot houses, but out in
God's free.airand sunshine. Our great
statesmen, orators and jurists, our
Presidents and generals, have been,
almost without exception, born and
reared in the tielda Mud forests?the
mountains and valleys of our rural
districts. They have known the hallowed
Influence of the Cotter's Sabbath.
Who can tell, then, what a sanctified
Sabbath has already done tor our
country. And if we shall now give up
our regard for the day and become
henceforth a Sabbath desecrating, as
we have been hitherto a sabbath keep??
ing people, it will be an cxperiment?a
dangerous experiment. Are
we .prepared to hazard the consequences?
2. A secular Sabbath?a weekly day
of rest and refreshment has been generally
considered needful to man.
Incessant toil degrades the man and
diminishes at once his happiness and
his productiveness.
Macaulay says-: "If the Sunday had
not been observed as a day of rest, but
the axe, the spade, the anvil and the
loom had been at work every day during
Ihe last three centuries, I have not
the smallest doubt that we should have
been at this moment a poorer people
and a less civilized people than we
are."
Says Edmund Barke: "They who
alwftvfl labor can have no true iudor
merit ; tbey exhaust tbeir attention,
burn out tbeir candle and are left in tbe
dark."
And Adatn Smith, tbe father ol Political
Economy, (entities : "Tbe Sabbath,
as a political institution, la of
inestimable value."
These testimonies accord with the
general result of enlightened observation
and experience. If such a weekly
day of rest is needed by every man and
every community, it must be vital to
tbe welfare of a free country. But can
we not have sncb a day or rest and
recreation without the sanctions and
observances of religion?
This is what we demand, say the secularists,
a day of pleasure, a day to get
out from tbe crowded city to the fields
and woods and enjoy our freedom.
Tbe idea will prove an illusion. Show
us tbe land br community that enjoys
the secular benefits of the Sabbath and
we will show that there tbe ruling
public sentiment respects tbe divine
authority and sacred uses of the day.
Ureal Britain and America have a Sabbath
of rest for the toiling millions.
They recognize the sacredness of tbe
day. France, Italy and Spain do not
sanctify the day and their workingmen
have no weekly rest.
A day ot sensual pleasure seeking
will degenerate Into a day of debauchery
and crime. The Sabbath re creations
of a beer garden will lit a man
neither for the duties of a christian nor a
patriot. Even the form of such a day
of rest will soon vanish. The demands
of Mammon will overrule the claims
of pleasure; without tbe shield of divine
authority tbe poor man will soon
be robbed of his property in the weekly
day of rest.
3. The influence of the Christian religion
depends upon tbe general sanctification
of tbe Sabbath.
Our pulpits, our bibles, our Sabbath
schools, must have such aday for the
exercise of tbeir elevating and beneficent
influence upon tbe community.
The distinguishing feature and central
idea of American Freedom Is the
divine right of individual liberty. The
Independence of tbe State is only in
order to the Independence of the individual.
Tbe sovereignty of the people
is in order to the security of tbe rights
of the individnal. Everything here is
subordinate to personal freedom. Now
the very Idea is christian in its origin
and can only be worked ont successfully
under the pervading influence of
a pure religion.
Jesus Christ first authoritatively
announced that God has rights which
man is bound to respect?rights in
the Individual which neither despots
nor majorities cau rightfully or successfully
usurp, "Kender unto God the
things that are God's," is the corner
stone of modern liberty. And it is the
key note at the same lime of revived
Christianity.
The liberty of the individual can be
successfully maintained and safely exercised
only under the controlling inlluence
of a sense of this personal responsibility
to God. "The bird that
skims the earth may lose its liberty at
any moment, but we cannot ravish It
from tbe eagle which soars among the
clouds."
Protestant Christianity alms to arouse
and educate tbe individnal conscience
to Its rights and its duties, and the public
conscience through the individual.
However far it may have come short
as yet of its high aim and destiny,
a comparison of the different nations
and communities of the world will show
that where it has prevailed the people
better know their rights and more sue
i?Lb n n aim
oeasfully defend them. Under Llie lm |
pulse of ita teachings our fathers fought f
and won the battle of our freedom, and i
the convictions it has produced upon I
the minds of their children have i
hitherto maintained the institutions !
they fonnded. !
The pulpit, the bible, the domestic I
altar and the Sabbath school are the i
great moral educational implements of I
religion. The Sabbath is the opportunity
afforded lor their exercise: the |
weekly silence God has made that His '
own Supreme voice may be heard. I
Dispense with the general sanctifica- 1
tion of the Lord's day and you may, I
nay, must, tear down your churches, i
seal your Bibles, disband your
Sunday Schools, and it will speedily I
appear that the nation that has no Sab- I
bath can have no God. Says John <
Foster: "The Sabbath is a remarkable I
appointment for raising the general I
tenor of moral existence." Says Black- |
stone; "A corruption of morals usually i
follows the profanation of the Sabbath;" i
and again: "The keeping one day in i
seven holy, as a time of relaxation and i
refreshment, aa well as for public wor- I
ship, is of admirable service to a State. ;
It enables the industrious workman to i
pursue bis occupation in the ensuing i
week with health and cheerfulness; it
Imprints on the mind of the people I
that sense of their duty to God, so ne- i
cessary to make them good citizens, i
but which yet would be worn out and i
defaced by unremitted labor, without
any stated times ol recalling them to
the worship of their Maker." A nation i
which depends for ita order and security
upon the intelligent and conscientious
exercise of his freedom by the
individual, eannot dispense with so
potential an Institution for the restraint
of selfish impulses and passions.
4. To the devout Christian the affirmation
that a sanctified Sabbath is essential
to the perpetuity of this nation
needs no proof, for the mouth of the
Lord hath spoken it: "For the nation
and kingdom that will not serve thee"
(I. e. the Kingdom of Christ) "shall
perish; yea, those nations shall be utterly
wasted." The kingdoms of this
world must be tributary to Christ?
must acknowledge the paramount
authority of Him who ia made Head
over all things to the Church. His interests
they must subserve?His commands
they must obey, or fall to make
fr\<r that narinH of Moaaionio rnla
and glory wheu from Sabbath to Sabbath
all nations shall come up to worship
before God.
We have said nothing of Sunday
laws-nothing about enforcing the precepts
of religion by civil law. Our appeal
is to the individual conscience of
men as patriots and Christians. We
ask in the name of liberty that the Sabbath
shall be redeemed from the usurpations
of business and pleasure to the
holy ends for which it was made. We
are becoming a nation of pleasure seeker*.
Our pulpits, our prayers, our
praises, our Sabbaths, our schemes of
religious benevolence, are all exhorted
to bow down and worship this new God
of pleasure, which folly has set up.
Wo to the minister whose sermons
weary by their length or fail to please
and gratify by their adornments. Wo
to the sanctuary whose praises are not
executed in the most exquisite style of
art. Wo to the Christian object of benevolence
that does not introduce itself
to public lavor with the smiles of fair
ladles, and a board well spread with
all that can gratify the eye or tempt
the appetite. We say, woto that people
whose God is their belly?who mind
earthly things.
We submit to an Intelligent community
that duty is a better rule of
conduct than pleasure^ both for a Christian
and a patriot, and thut the fear of
God is a stronger bulwark of freedom
than the applause ol infidels.
In the evening the united congregations
assembled in the Presbyterian
Church and were addressed by liev. A.
B. Castle, as follows :
He called attention to the various
sources of danger heralded from platform
and pres3, the one man power
vested in the executive, the few men
power of Congress, the all men no?womau
power of the ballot box on which
the changes rung are more various
than the tones of a seven octave, ten
stop, double bank organ.
We are warned upon one side against
the tampering with the Constitution
which will destroy its sancity and our
reverence for it ; on the other side,
against too profound a reverence for a
huinau, therefore, imperfectdocumeut.
We are warned that personal liberty
is so broad it borders license?"per contra"
agaiust the Infringement or liberty
which must end in revolt.
We are warned agaiust a military
despotism, and implored to increase
the army. We are assured that our
country is too bulky and becoming
more and more unwieldy with every
added acre ol territory; then that we
are uusafe while any foreign power
has foot hold upon the cjutinent.
The speaker said we might pronounce
them all croakers and pass on in at least
fancied security; but that our shrewdest
strongest minds of all political and religious
faiths apprehended danger
from some source.
Physicians may differ in diagnosis
and prescriptions, >ei if there is disease
there may be danger. The most
alarming feature of our case Is that the
doctors of this Kepublic agree there is
disease, but cannot agree upon its nature
or remedy.
The speaker was glad he could claim
nooritrinalitv?for then, standing alone.
he would be hopeless?in affirming that
all danger must be traced back to immorality
among the masses. Not oven
the Executive chair, or spacious Legislative
hnlls, could hold badness enough
to rulu this country unless in their badness
they represented the people. That
an upright people would survive the
total destruction of their constitution
and while upright were not likely to
ruin themselves by amending it. That
the breadth or our laud involved no
peril "per se;" the bond that will hold
a single neighborhood in permanent
fraternity will hold a continent of just
such neighborhoods. If the body politic
be sound, the centripetal force will
increase with the centrifugal. That
we can hardly apprehend danger from
the military or lor want of military
while we have more and better soldiers
out of the army ihau in it. That which
ruins us most come from the vitals,
not the extremities; from the masses
who select the office-holders and lawmakers,
whose moral sense gives tone
and shade to the laws, and imparts the
force that executes them.
The speaker called attention to the
fact that there Is a necessary connection
between the form of Church and
State government in any land. He cited
Persia, Turkey, Kussia and France,
where absolate monarchy in Church is
attended with absolute rule In State;
to China, where the philosophy of Confucius,
which is all summed up in the
family relation, where the} father is
'jure diviuo," the absolute head of the
family, has ever prevailed. Meanwhile
the Emperor has been the father or the
empire, his will, law unquestioned over
the property, person and life of his empire
of children. That during the
twenty-live huudred years this philosophy
has been dominaut, the Imperial
sway has been unmodified,
The speaker referred to Spain, lately
ignoring the rights of the Pope to exclusive
sway, and in the same time her
government has toned down from Absolate
Monarchy to Mild Regency; to
the causes of failure in the attempt to
found a Kepubtic in France, and Mexico
and portions of South America.
He alluded to the only actual Repub
lie of Europe, Switzerland, the foundation
of whose free institutions was laid c
by Zwine, the cotemporary of Luther. e
He claimed that whatever may be said
of Mohammedanism, Catholicism, the
philosophy of Confucius, Ac., a Protest- i
ant uncentralizsd Christianity was the 9
foundation and is the hope of our Re- t
public. ,
He alluded to the emigration to this
country,?that there are now 5,000,000 i
of Chinese; and China could furnish us (
200,000,000 more and then have a surplus.
rank, stark "idolaters; that they r
have their idol temples in California, (
are building one in St. Louis; that
the Catholip Irish here? the best friends
the Pope "has?equal the population
of Ireland, and more are coming; that I
there is swarming toward us from Eu- f
rope, Asia, South America and the Isles ,
of the Sea, a masa who will soon outnumber
the native born of the country '
and who agree in hating the religion i
which is the vitality of our republic, i
Meanwhile, Protestantism is cordial :
and generous,inviting the world and ac- '
cording them the privilege of worship- e
ing God, Virgin Mary or idols. She ]
isu Lniauuiaanvwi x
Jivegj money lo convert beatben, and
fives the gronnd al botue for their tem- i
pies. 0;t^er lands are dyed with her ,
alood at the hands of C atbolics; here 1
the patronizes their schools and fairs. I
if Brigham Young should visit these t
states soliciting funds to enlarge his _
401110 to the capaolty of fifty more
ivivei,Protestantism would furnish the "
Money and the wives. 1
The speaker said these adult emi. i
{rants as a class cannot be reached. ^
We may blow the gospel trumpet in
their ears till Qabriel blows bis, but,
imbued from childhood with faith in 3
their own and hatred of our form of t
religion, they are spiritual Gibraltars,
He accorded to Sabbath Schools the F
"oner of most that has been done, but s
that the "has been" is nothing compar- ?
3d with the " might be." We ^
have been comparatively content
to gather our own children to- t
{ether and keep them moored to tbe '
2reed of our church. We are able and .
aught to go through our community
and rake forth the chlldien as with a f
fine tooth comb, who are growing up to 1
heathendom in Christendom, or twenty t
years hence may rise up and slay our j
children in the interest of popery and a
monarchy. '
The speaker then proceeded to show s
bow inimical to our national safety are t
all who dislike or discourage pure morals,
truth, temperance or industry;
all who countenance a licentious press,
riotous Sabbaths, Jtc.?They Mave
votes?live count a tally?and on the
dame principle mice would unanimously
elect the cat with the dullest eye and
bluntest claws. They favor officials
who will be a shield not a "terror to evil
doers." Proprietors of grog shops, <
dance houses, <frc., have votes and tbe ;
means of buying thirsty voters. The ,
Bode gives magistrates latitude, say
from live to one hundred dollars. The
magistrate who has a penchant for the I
minimum tine, is one whom the
"rowdies" aud "roughs" have an in- (
tense desire to see re-elected. Hence, all
else being equal, we have only 10 see
Immorality in the majority to see our ]
places of power filled by men who would >
countenance and protect instead of lerrify
law breakers. Unfortunately, bad
men have better lacilities for getting 1
into office than good ones. Tbe less 1
fitted a man ia for an office tbe greater
bis assurance in claiming tbe nomination.
The salary which is no compensation
to an upright man, is ample for
a dishonest one, tor the perquisites (the
name for stealings, bribes, &c.) are independent
of the nominal salary. The
entire strength of immorality can be
polled; unfortunately the entire
turengiu ui uiumiuj uauuui uc, ouuio
love whisky more than others love
country. Some get too pioua to
vote. They stay at borne and
pray and trust to Providence, as 1
though Providence would do the
unlawful thing of "slutting" the ballot
box for us. Others shrink from mingling
even ten minutes; with the set
that crowd around the ballot box, for- '
getting that for good men to retire in
disgust is just what the vicious desire.
Others conscientiously reiuse to vote
for either of two bad candidates, forgetful
that ot two impending evils
any mau his a right to choose the
least. i
Meanwhile the evil never become
too evil to vote. Votes are counted
not weighed. The lust and
gain of otlice impels the unprinci- '
pled all over the land. Immorality
is struggling for the sway that will unchain
all passions, turn the Sabbath
into a Bachanal, pervert humanity, de- :
fy God and reenaot the scenes of the
ruinous past Our need, our safe guard
is an all pervading, all dominant
moral sense among the masses in private
life; an ever-heard, ever~ascendant
call for good laws aud their firm
execution.
Demand regulates supply. Pay a
premium for weak knees, and limber
backs and false hearts in places of
power and we shall nave them to our
sorrow. Demand firmness and rigor;
they will be in the market.
.Limber backed Congressmen will gird
themselves with a ''zone and stays"
to meet the demand. Loose judges
will become rigorous, Near-Bigtited,
never there pollcemeu, will be lynx
eyed, and omnipresent official integrity
is not in demand, therefore not in the
market. We need, first, manhood in
private life, the full measure of immeasurable
manhood, meu who believe
in God aud will glorify him, who
love their country and will work for
it, who comprehend the devil and will
oppose him. Men who carry their
manhood to the polls aud then demand
manhood in the otlicer they elect, or his
political "head iua charger,"
We need moral sense out of office, and
that will control men in office. We
must not ask every office filled by a
man who cannot be bought, (perhaps
there are not enough of that kind of
men to go once around) but we can put
the price eo high that lew can pay it.
Wheu a bribe or theft disgraces practically
.disfranchises politically, irrem- i
edilessly damnslan official,then few will
be bought. Our laws read well now;
the penalties read strong. When publie
opinion demands it the penalties
will be enforced. But if publicopinion
Is that a rich murderer shall be ndquitted,
a poor one commuted to imprisonment
till he can crawl out;
if public opinion demands five dollar
tines of "roughs" and hush money from
"snobs," prize tights and the "Black
Crook" week day?theaters and beer
gardens for Sabbath day amusements,
whisky for parents aud minors, we
shall have them and theirconsequences.
This is created so soon as enough pattronize
to make them pay and the .
moral and religious community stead'
lastly mind their own busiueas.
The speaker made, at the close, a
personal appeal, and prayed that God's
blessing might rest on the land but
ninety-three years of age to-day;
that her errors might prove but the
i ? . j : Ir, ^ .1 ? r
IUU1SUI CUUU3 Ui JUUIU, 1 CJJCUICU Ui
audforasken in riper years; that wide aa
the world might tie. ever associated tiie
stars of the Republic and the cross of
Christ; the iormer reminding ot, the
latter lifting to Ueayen; and if human
baud Cctu build that which time canuot
destroy, that America might en
Jure forever true to her children, her
mission and her God.
Man Shot.?Tuesday night, at what
liour we did not learn, a man named
ijamuel Morrison, residing on Caldwell's
Kun, three or four miles from
:he city, was shot by officer Honecker,
Df South Wheeling. The facts in the
jase are substantially the following:
Mr. Morrison was arrested on Tuesday
afternoon and brought before Kicjr.
Sehultz, charged with the theft of a
nrugon belonging to Mr. Juergens, of
[South Wheeling. The case was fully
leard by the Justice, and Morrison was
required to give bail in the sum of |300
For bis appearance at the November
erni of the Circuit Court, or go to jail. '
iVhile on his way to North Wheeling e
n search of a triend to go on his bond,
n charge of officer Honecker and an
tssistant, Morrison broke away from
hem and ran down Mulberry alley,
between Quincy and Monroe streets.
Ie was ordered to halt or he would be
ired on, but giving no heed to the
>rder, the officer sent a ball after him
roui his revolver. The shot took effect
n one of the fugitive's lower limbs, bat
lotwithstanding that circumstance, he
lontiuued his flight and made good his
scape. He received shelter somewhere
ind medical aid was sent for. The
round is a painful one, but 1s not conildered
dangerous. Yesterday morning,
lis attending physician went before
Ssqr. Sehultz and made affidavit that
Morrison is insane, and of course furher
proceedings against him are ar ested
until a favorable change takes
ilace in his mental condition.
Bask Ball.?We direct attention to
;he advertisement in another column,
innouncing a game of base ball on the
aland to-morrow afternoon, between
Lhe Baltics and the Strlc (t) nine, comjosed
of Main Street amatenrs. A
ligh old time is anticipated. Fun will
3e the order of the day, and we wonld
tdvise all who want to have a hearty c
a ugh to go over, 8
??
A Screw Loose Somewhere.?There
a a screw loose somewhere la the mill
ransportation between this city and
iellaire. The following was mailed at
he latter point last Saturday and
eached us yesterday, only about four
lays making a trip of 88 many miles.
?his is not the first instance in which
etters from that point directed to us
lave been a long time on the way.
Our friend writes, under date of tne
d Inst., that "the celebration of Indetendenoe
Day has passed off quietly in
icnicing on the hill. Althoagh the
aloons were alt open, very little
Irunkenness was observed and no
listurbance on the street. The Mayor ?
lad one case this evening. "Jimmie"
Murphy complained to the police that
had assaulted and beaten him,
ind alter having procured the party's
irrest, refused to file affidavit or appear
igainst him ; whereupon ("Jimmie"
>eing under the influence of "mountain
lew") His Honor fined Aim five dollars ind
costs. In default of the need/ul, ^
limrnie sleeps In the lock-np?the
ables turned on him. Bad luck to
Jimmie."
SIWIKO .MACHINES.
Methodist Book Concern, )
200 Mulberry Street, N. Y. J
Being in constant receipt of inquiries Q
from our brethren respecting Sewing k.
Machines, with requests to recommend
ind purchase, we have la conjunction
wilh some lady friends, carefally and
thoroughly examined the varloua
machines of practical value for family
sewing and find those made by the
Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company,
to fully combine the essentials of
a good instrument, and such as we can
oonfidentiy recommend. Having seen
so favorable results from their use in T
our own and the households of our i
friends, we are desirous that their
benefit should be shared by all our
brethren, and hence have interested
ourselves in their behalf.
Abel Stevens, James Floy,
Daniel Wise. David Terry,
1 hos, uarlton, j . rortbr,
J. B. Edwards, Wm. A. Cox.
eod.
A Ready Writer.?A friend of ours
Bays he never was a "ready writer"
before lie obtained one of those cele- 1
brated gold pens sold at Oxtoby 4 J.
DulHeld's Jewelry Store, 103 Main
Btreet. Full stock of gold pens and
pencils, watches, clocks, jewelry, spectacles,
solid silver and plated ware, at
'103." Call and see.
The Arctic Regions will be found
during the warm weather at .Logan, T
List A Co.'s, Bridge Corner Drug Store. X
Mineral Water, flavored with the rich*
est syrups, Sows from a miniature Iceberg.
The Quest photographs in the city are
made at Partridge's. r
Don't fail to look over the large
stock of Ladies',Misses' and Children's
wear at 107, and compare prices with
those of other of the leading Shoe firmi.
Partridge is prepared to take a few
more orders for portraits in Oil or
Pastel.
Fine French Lasting Button and
Lace Oaiters at Blond A Bachman's
corner Sprigg Alley, Main Street;
The North Pole has been discovered
and is on exhibition at the Bridge
Corner Drug Store.
Blond & Baohman have received a
Que assortment of the Spring Style of
Lasting Balmorals and Button Gaiters.
Why will you buy and use other ff
Wines when you oan depend on the
purity of Perkins, Stern A Co's. California
Wines and Brandy, for sale by Edmund
Booking and Booking A Carroll. ai
For anything and everything in the
way of Boots or Shoes go to BloBd A
Bachman's. Tt
. _ . k<
"Ju.vii'BK Tab Soap" cures chapped hands '
lalt-rheum, pimples, and all cutaneous affections,
rendering theafclu soft and smooth.
Manufactured by _J
CASWELL, 11&ZAK1) AGO.,
New York. M
Hold by all Drugglsti. my21-Mo.Th.dAw "
-goots & ghott.
* ? Oi
Bt
KstabllMliod In 1837*
bo
(
1869. SPRING TRADE. 1869.1
A
bfl
SAMUEL M'CLELLAN. CHESTER D. KWOI f?!
oo
(
M CLELLA.N&KNOX.
Knanritrturerii and Jobbers of
BOOTS & SHOES, I
St
NO. 65 MAIN HTRKET, Ba
j
J
WHEELIfiG, W. VA. gjj
Ja
WK INVITE THE ATTENTION OK ?
Cash Bayers to oar very large assort- |J?
nent of BOOT* ANI) BHOE4 for the ai
Spring and Snmmer Trade, ^
Which, for extern, variety and freedom
from all irregularity, Is not surpassed.
Our stock Im larger than any other in this **n
;lty, and in prices,
CB
We can Successfully Compete Mi
with any Shoe Houbo is the ja
Kaat or West. Ji
for the proof of which, we invite you to an
txainlualion of oar stock. ?
All goods warranted uniform in quality. n.
HI
JOf
mar2l M't'LELLAN A KNOX. ]
grot. r
mt
For Rent.
A HOUSE ON THIRD BTREET, WheelfV.
iug Island, containing four (4) rooms, j
: lichen and garret, suitable for two faxnlles.
Possession given immediately.
Enquire of WM. H. IRWIN,
Jull'lw* Custom Houae.
For Bent, ><>
WARE ROOM OPENING ON QUINCY ?
street, over Hubbard A Bros*. Btore.
Ipply to Hubbard A Broe. aprQl-tl
For Bent. 0
JEVERALNKW BD8INBJ8 ROOMB IH "?
3 Hilt HouSe Block?new addition.
J a? It LBWIB A WOODMANBEE.
OCKINQ'S UNKIVALLED BAKINB J
POWUKK. The best In the market and J
tlway. give. walUfactina torf q
r STELLIOK.K'EB JOB OPriCIS,
[ No, 16 Qolncy street. j
IAKIW AND BILL HEADS neatly printed. r_
? Bi
tANUKACTOKERS' LARKIJi.
H8DRANCE POLICIES AND BLANKS.
)KAY TICKETS AND BILLS OF LADING ?
HOGRAMMBB AND POSTERS. ^8
I HECKS, NOTES, RECEIPTS. gf
I HOW BILLtf, tor Country Merohanla.
OODS THE L
S
PRICES R
BLACK &
jAMA lac
BLACK &
JRENADIN]
WHITE Sc
lEETLANB
EMBROIDERED
IN BLACK AND CO
>ARAS0LS, SU]
zpihstik:; blue
Percales an<
*EW STYLE DB
WHITE LIS]
larris' Seamle
.A.
ro wls,
NAPS
?AN
LiUN-IEUsT HANI
AT HALF TH
GEO. TA"
lan25
^itwoctai.
atlonal Saving's Bank of Wheeling,
Incorporated J a no ary 131b, 1869.
CAPITAL, ... 8100,000.
SONEY RECEIVED ON DEPOBIT
Interest paid on Special Deposits. No let
Bills discounted. Exchange bought and
Id. Collections made on all points and pro
eds promptly remitted,
Disoonnt day?Monday.
DIRECTORS.
lomas H. List, Robert Pratt'
Dbert Ulbeon, K. A. M'Cabe.
0. Thomas, James MoCluney.
J: Lt. Biifel.
THOfl. H. LdBT, President.
J? McCLUNEY, Vice President,
3. P. HILDKETH, Cashier.
FIRST
tATIONAL BANK
OF IfHMLIllO.
DMlrnated Depository (J. N.
i PITAL...MMMM ~ 1200,000
r&PLUB 69.U00
Money received on deposit; Exchange
tight and sold.
Jolleclions made and prooeedi promptly
mibted.
Lnterest on Special Deposits at the rate of
ius per cent per annnm where the desit
remains six months, and rum per
at, if for one year.
Accounts or Merchants, Manufacturers,
inkers and others solicited.
Revenue Stamps for sale in sums to salt.
h ?on Riant supply of New Fractional Curucy,
and 1,2,81 5c coin, kept for the acmmodatlon
of depositors and the public.
JEO. K. WHEAT, Pros'L
GEO. ADAMB. Ossh*r.
ERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANE
Of West virfisla.
apltal Paid In, 8500(000.
IH1B BANK BDOOEED8 TO THE BUHIueaH
of the "Merchanta" and Mechanics'
ink of Wheeling." It Is a designated Desi
to ry and Financial agent of Use United
Atee, and 1a prepared to do a legitimate
nklng bnalnw.
President?Jaa. Nelaon Vance.
Director*? Tbomu Sweeney, L. B. Dela- i
kin, Jas. C. Acheeon, John Donlon, Robert
ingle, A. Alien Howell, Wm. B. Him peon,
mea Daaell. 8. BRADY, Cashier.
itional Bank of West Virginia,
AT WHEELING.
ipltal paid in 1200,000
f ON ICY RECEIVED ON DEPOSIT. INI
terest paid on special deposit*. No ten and
1h diBooonted. Exchange bought and sold. i
llectlona made on all points and proceed!
Dmptly remitted.
Directors:
ISPIlf OOLKBAT, THOMAS HUGUKS,
[ohail Kkil.lt, A. h Todd,
tTHUX Littlk, Jo Hit K. HubbAkd
MB8 MoCLUKKT, M. POLLOCK,
MSB MAXVKLL.
URIBP1N OOLKBAT,
OHN WAGNER, PresklenU
Cashier.
O. LIST. HOBKBT MOBBlJtOK.
SWBT K. LIST. GIBSON LAMB.
ucph bxtmold.
Bank of Wheeling,
WH?ELQia, W. VA.
IKALH IM BILLS OP EXCHANGE,
r Uoiemmenl Bond., Blocks, Uold, Coin- i
trclaj fitper, and all Negotiable BecurlUe.. j
I pedal attention given to oollecUona.
nterest allowed on Bpeclal Deposits: (oar 1
r oeut per annum six months, and live per
it If left one year.
D. C. LIST, president. (
BSON LAMB, Caller. I
UEPH BKVBOLU, Ain't Uaahler.
oarS-ly
The People's Bank.
lFFICE, No. m MAIN ST., WH?ELiN8,
' W.Va. Money received on deposit. Inest
paid on pedal deport la. .
jots hUla ^ Inrm n . Ifrrhanp
aghtand sold. Collection, at bom? or frmx>
road promptly .tlwried to.
DIMCTOBa.
ahn Bald, Christian Ham, 1
nhn Hannlan, John Vockler,
lam'l J. Boyd, Richard Garter.
Andrew Wilson. ]
JOHN HELD, PraX
OBIAH F. PPDBeBAfy. Oaah-r. my,
lokets, Tuba and Washboards. i
\/v DOZ. BUCKETS. J
Ml SO dos. assorted Tabs.
26 do Washboards.
UHt received by i
?ya? LIST. MOBBIBONfcOO. !
irgains in New Orleans Sugars.
{ BALA DO. (
I Uali and see them at .
LIST. MOBBISOH *00-8.
ADIES WANT!
ED IT C ED t
!
; "WHITE
E POINTS,
5 WHITE
E SHAWLS,
COLORED
I SHAWLS,
GRENADINES
LORED GROUNDS,
d UMBRELLAS,
I A1TD BUFF
I Jacconets,
LESS GINGHAMS,
LE GLOVES,
ss Kid Gloves.
Li LOT OF
zjn&,
DOYLES!,
DDKERCHIBPS,
EIR VALUE.
?LOR &c CO.
-L
Sransportauoa.
BALTIMORE ft OHIO R. R OOMP'Y
WHOLmo, May 8th, law.
1JAMHKNUKK TRAINB WILL RUN BY
I the following schedule on and after tbe
loth day of May, 186V?Wheeling time.
UK A. (TON AOCOMMODATIOS.
kast-lbavffl wut-liivk
Wheeling Patkersbnrs
dally at 6:85 a. m. dally at 10.80 a. m.
Cameron..?...7:80 " Urafton _4::io p. to.
Mannlngton.8:?5 " Fairmont 5U)0 "
Fairmont #:4'J ** Mannln gton.6:15 '*
akkivi.no at Cameron 7:50 "
Urafton av... 10:15 a. m. arriving at
Parkereburg.4:4s p.m. Wheeling at.8:55 p. m.
dandaya excepted. Sundays excepted.
KXPKKMH TRAIN.
*ajbt? lkavk8 wk8t.via g. o. d.
Wheeling 'Leave Wheeling
dally at?10:40 a. m. dally at 3:25 p.m.
arrives at Bell air .4:45
Urafton 4.10 pjn. ARRIVES AT
Cumberland ..9 ?6 ** Cambridge 7:20 11
Harper's F'y.2:56a.m. ZaneBvUTe.._8:'!5
Baltimore. 6:56 ' Newark 10:10
Waah't'nClty 8:48 " Columbus 11:S0 p.m
Kxoept Sundays. Cincinnati 41XJ a.m.
Except Buuday.
FAST LINK.
RAflT?LlAVDI WMT, VIA C. O. D.
Wheeling Leaves wheeling
dally at? 4:50 p.m. dally at 6:00 a. m.
ARBiYts at Belialr 8.63
Urafton _.a20 p.m. axbivbi at
Cumberland-8:10 a.m. Barntnvllle _8rtj5 "
Winchester?ftSS " Cambridge ...9:00
Baltimore 8:40 " Zanesvllle.....tt:53
Waah'n City 10:10 " Newark 11.-00 "
Philadelphia 13.-00 m. Columbus ._12:l& p.m.
New York....4110p.m Cinclnnatl....4.15 "
MAIL TRAIN.|
,.?A9r-LIAVI? WIST, VIA C. O. D.
Wheeling 'Leave* Wheeling
dally at... 10:50 p. m. dally at 2.-05 a. m.
akk1vjb at Belialr 3;is "
Urafton ?:15 ajtt. ARRIVBs A*
Parkernbnrg...7:*j " Barnesvlile..4?5 "
Cumberland...8:15 ? Cambridge..ASo "
Winchester ...&t6 pan. Zanesvllle 7:iMJ
Hagerstown_.2io Newark 8:35 1
Baltimore 5:?0 " Col am bus... 1010 "
ITMU u v?jr. qILa " I^IUCUIIWU ...13JU p. in.
duntlays excepted. |*Bumlayn excepted.
Trains on the Main Line make connections
at Baltimore wltn iralas for Phi lad el?hla,
New York and Beaton At Relay
Louse, Tla Washington City, tor all polnu
South.
Central Ohio train* make direct connection
at Columbus for all points West and
Northwest.
Tickets to all principal points can be pro- I
cared at the office.
JOHN 1? WILBON,
Master of Transportation. Baltimore.
U. T. DEVRI124
may 11 General Agent. Wheeling.
Cleveland fc Pittsburgh Rail Road. /
ON AND AFTKK APRIL i8TH. 1MW.
Trains will ran as follows:
Express. Mixed. Mall.
L"ve Bridgeport. 5.66 am 8 40 a m INpn
Steubenvllle 7.00 a m 11.30 a m 8.06 p m
Wellsvllle 8.15 a m 1.40 p m 4.50 p m
Alliance 11.15am 5 35pm 635pm
A_rv Cleveland.... 1.50 p m 7 ai p m 7.JU p m e
OrmtllriB 4.15 p m 10 00 p m 10.00 p in
Fort Waynell.au p m Warn 8.15 am
Chicago H.tt> a m 8 aj a m ? 20 a m
PlUaburgh_lu 35 a m 2 40pm 8.56 puj
Harrtsburg_.10.3upm 2.15 am 6 00am
Baltimore. 130 a m 9.00 am ilUau
Waahlngton S.15 a m 4.50 p m 4.B0 p m
Phll'delphla 8.00 a m tt.40 mm 9 45 a m
New York via
AUentown_ 6.00 a m 8.45 a m 11.45 a m
New York via
Philadelphia 8^0 a m 110pm 1.10 pm
Tickets to all principal points un the Kant
rod Wtatcube procuredat the Union omc?
II Mcl.aro House, and at the Htatlon at
irklgeport. J. M. KIMBALL,
aprHU General Ticket Agent.
RF.MPFIELD ROAD, [
r\N AND AKTKK MONUAY. MARCH
L/?. usea, the train on the Hempfleld Kali oad
will ran aa follows:
Leave Washington. 7:30 a. m.
Arrive at Wheeling *30 a. m.
RETURNING;
Loave Wheeling .S.-00 p. m.
Arrive at Washington &ou p. m.
Prt W. D. BURTON, Supt.
C. B. BOOTH * OO., "
WJor.ni.i Airs utail Duua in
FAMILY GROCERIES,
Boat Store*, Proda?e,
fRJK??l <* CURED MKATH, LAKE ICE ? P
CANNED FRUITS, Ac., n
Oornei Monroe and Water Btreeta, T
WHEELING, W. VA. K
[N CONNECTION WITH THE HOUSE Si
there la a Wharf Boat, and It la the design U
if the Orm to do a Forwarding ilmmT^.
Ion and Btorage bnslnsM, act aa 8teamboa
tgents and furnish all deniable Information
lertalnlng thereto. ]ji4
Common Lime. ?
>00 WHEE"N?
P. O. HTT.nRKTH * BBO.
gthrttol ?ifl ?i?WM.
DAILY INTELLIGENCER
BOOK AND JOB
t
Printing Office
45D
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTORY
16 QUINCY BTHKET.
We beg to call Uh attention of oar rrtsnJi
and the public to our arte naive
Book and Job Office
Oar facilities In TYPE. HTJC A M
POWER PREoSKB and MA
IEK1AL, are each that me feel
confident we can jgeCQteall de?
crlptions of PRWT1WO at a&
Low PRIUEH as any house in
the State.
CARDS,
BUSINESS. VIBITIWQ A FANOY
COLORED CARDS, In every variety.
at prices from 0I OO per
1,000 upwards.
POSTBB8,
or KVKST 8IU.
BILL-HEADS.
HAND BILLS.
OH AWT QUALITY OF PAPK8?PKICKS
ACOOKDIWOI.T 1
CHECKS,
DRAFTS,
CIRCULARS,
BILLS LADING,
DRAY TICKETS,
And all descriptions of Mercantile Printing
BOOK PRINTING
Our BOOK l'JOM Is well
locked with NEW TYPK; and
our facilities for executing all
kinds of BOOK and PAMPHLET
PRINTING are complete.
Fancy Show Cards
PLAIV CARD8,
HAND-BILLS,
BLANKS,
<Jkc., Ac.
Printed 1 n ttoebest sttijcand with dlapatcn
STEAMBOAT PRINTING
W? have made; special provision
for b team boat Printing. and
liav e Borne fonts of BKAOTIFtJ L
TYPE FOR COLORED BILLA. afi
well as bo me of the KINb-HT
COLORED INKHtobe had.
Printing for Country ^Merchant*
We woo Id respectfully say to
onr friends In the oonntry, that
any orders for Printing forwarded
uh, by letter or otherwise, will be
carefully attended to.
m connection with oub lakgi
Job Printing Office,
w* hav a rai vom oomplktb
3LANKB00KIANDFACTORY
n illili BXATi;.
We are prepared to Execute all kludii of
BLANK BOOKS
ros
bounty and State Officers
With promptness, and In a manner
that wlllwanant to give enure
satisfaction.
IANKKKS.
M.KHCH ANTH,
and MANUFACTUKKK
Are requested to examine oar
LAKUK HTOCK of FAPKKH,
which we warrant to be of the best
material In ma.
Ruling
ONE TO ANY DKSIRKD PATTERN
All Rnslne?ai Men nslng LARGE
BLAUK BOO KB. are requested to
examine oar stock, as we feel
satisfied that we are manufacturing
the BEST BOO KB made in
the State.
In tendering oar acknowledgment* forihe
Mnue we nave enjoyed in the past. *
Bspectmlly solicit a oontlnuanoe of the tuors
of oar friends.
Our prices lor even article have been low.
ad we shall use our best endeavors to give
ktlefsctlon to All who may favor on with
lelrordecB.
AIJDHJhXMj
'REW, HASANS A HALL,

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