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The Wheeling daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1865-1903, October 03, 1898, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026844/1898-10-03/ed-1/seq-5/

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I?
MgN'ft auiTa-M.
"The Bi
Style?QualityAii
combined make our displ
At $7.80, $10.00,
we show you more styles and
town. Well tailored and perfw
make and style. We ask you i
i cannot show you a positive sav
for your trade.
Boys' Short Pant:
Strictly All Wool, warranted
knees. Compare these with t
Some New Mai
just in?exclusive styles. "Very
M. Gutm
TVCmln Artrt Tw
THE FOURTH 2M&JXE8
Will Leave for Cuba Between October
15 and 20.
From Our Soldier Correspondent
CAMP CUBA LIBRE, JACKSONVILLE,
Fla., Sept. SO.?On Sunday,
Secretary of War Alger was here and
spent all of his time in reviewing the
troops,inspecting the hospitals and condition
of the camp. He arrived here at
8 o'clock Sunday morning, end was saluted
with seventeen guns. All day long
lit: was ousily engaged on the inspecting
tour, and he reviewed the Rough
Riders just as the moon peeped from
behind the clouds. A reception committee
of Jacksonville's representative people
received the secretary and conducted
him over the town. A banquet and
Informal reception were hold at the
Windsor hotel. Camp Cuba Libre Is the
largest and the secretary said it was
the finest camp he has visited. He said
the hcspltal^were in good condition and
the men looked well and healthy. The
camp of the Fourth Imraunes was In
special good condition. He was very
well, pleased with his visit and left for
Savannah on the evening train.
Permanent hospitals will be built
here and the quartermaster general of
the army asked the citizens here If they
thought the men could live in teots the
coming winter here In Jacksonville.
This looks as if troops will be kept here
all winter.
Wednesday evening. Captain J. D.
Treadwell, of Company K, Fourth United
States Volunteers. passed away. His
death was caused by'pneumonia, and he
wa? alek only three days when the summons
came. Before the war broke out
he was a prosperous traveling man. He
represented a New York commercial
house and was widely known. When
the oall for volunteers came he sacrificed
all to serve his country; he has
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GEO. E. STIFE
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POTMAN * 06.
g Four...
-Make?Price,
ay of/Men's Suits "unequaied.
$12.00 and $15.00
better goods than any store in
i fitting, absolutely faultless in
to compare with others. If we
ing on every suit we don't ask
5 Suits it $3.50.
not to rip, double seat and
he $5.00 suit of other stores.
ihattan Shirts
warm." Don't fail to see them.
an & Co,
'olTtlx Stroef.
served her well and has been acting
quartermaster of the first division, and
major of our battalion. A fine military
career was before blm, but death was
near and extending its long, naked
arms k folded him In its embrace. Captain
Tread well was forty-two years of
age, and he leaves a wife and two children.
His body will be sent to his home
In Bayonne, N. T.
Our regiment will be brigaded with
several regiments of regulars and we
expect to leave here some time between
fh ir.fh nnH th?? Mfh nf (Irlnher
Company G is still on provost dutr
and (hey are getting fine training as
policemen. Many ef fliem are going to
apply for positions on ths Wheeling police
force when we get home. We will
stay here in town doing duty until we
leave here.
Sergeant Harry Bodley sars he likes
provost duty and is having a good time.
Private Charles Snider spends all his
spare time in Ashing for alligators in the
St. John river. Up to this writing Snlder
Is still alive. ' Private
Ed. Cook, the old-time center
of the Wheeling Tigers, Is on provost
duty In the business part of the town,
and he is a terror to evil-doers.
Private Smith Calvert has recovered
and is once more on duty.
Several of the boys will be home on
furloughs before we leave for Cuba and
they are overjoyed at the thought of
seeing mother, home and perhaps sweethearts.
B. S. H.
ELLET HEIRS' PHOPERT*.
Public Sale at Martin's Farry, Moadajr,
Octobers,1808, at 1 o'clock p. m., at ttoo
Corner of Fourth and Hauorer llrnti.
HctNtlhl lot* in Ellet'a Addition to
HIGHEST U1I1DKR. Title guaranteed.
Hee tii? property before ulr, Term*, one
foniih ca>li| one, two and three years,
with inlcrnt. Good discount far all cash.
XVH. D. CABELL, 045 Mala ML
A. NOORK. Jr., Trustee,
J. C. HERVKY, Auctioneer.
:::::::::: ttmtxt
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? Our s==
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tjfi <j? iJt *35 M
The ph
the pas
' ^ as well
ZX55*mbi3B3 %
Gl
!L & CO.
I
"1878"-"18P8."
Twentieth Anniversary of the
Firm of G. E. Stlfel It Co.
WILL BE CELfiBRATIU) THIS WEEK
i :>
SKETCH OF THE CAREER OP A
FIRM THAT HAS PROSPERED
EXCEEDINGLY SINCE ITS MODEST
START IN 1878?NOW ONE OF
THE MOST COMPLETE ESTABLISHMENTS
OF ITS KIND IN
THE OHIO VALLEY?THE FIRM'S
GENEROSITY. _
.
Twenty years ago to-day, Messrs.
George E. Stifel and Fred C. H.
Schwfertfeger began business undertne
Arm name of O. E. Stifel 8c Co., in a
store room at 1065 Main street* a building
that has since been demolished and
replaced by the structure now occupied
by the Arbenz furniture establishment.
81nce then the Arm has grown steadily,
making progress that Is indeed remarkable
even In a city where many mercantile
undertakings have prospered exceedingly.
To-day the firn) does a very
largo and a most satisfactory business
and even If It hasn't come quite to Its
majority In years, it has reached a
growth of which any house of twice Its
years would feel proud to a high degree.
"When G. E. Stifel & Co. began business
in 1878 the patronage was nearly if
not entirely local, and In volume did not
reach anything approaching the figures
of to-day. In 1880 the firm moved across
the street to the rooms now occupied
by Snook & Co. The vigorous young
firm was compelled to seek the larger
quarters. There they remained during
ten years, all of which were years of
uninterrupted growth and prosperity. In
IfiOrt thn Arm nnrohniiml th? irrOlind At !
1154, 1156 and 1158 Main street, where
the firm of Jacobs & Isenberg ha<l been
doing business for some time. On this I
ground was raised (he imposing flvestory
granite structure which forms the |
larger part of the Arm's home to-day.
Two rears later, the firm purchased
from the Exchange Bank the ground j
adjoining on the south, 1160 Main street,
upon which an addition was erccted,
twenty-six feet In fcidth. The enlarged I
building is one of the finest retail j
stores lji the Ohio Valley. The frontage
on Main street Is seventy feet and the
depth 135 feet and 90 feet. All of the
latest Improvements and furnishings for |
retail stores are found in the equipment
of the establishment, and It is not to be
wondered at that visitors in the city
express their admiration and surprise
when shown through the store. It is indeed
a mercantile emporium of which
Wheeling people generally feel proud.
Last May the firm admitted Mr.
George H. Schmidt as a Junior member.
The business, as stated above, has
grown uninterruptedly. The amount of
business done now per year Is 600 to
700 per cent larger than that at the close
of the first year. Messrs. Stlfel,
8chwertfeger and Schmidt can
point with a feeling of entire satisfacn?"
?a ?hl? ranrtrrl rtf onfnrnrlsp anil
popularity. During the first year, six
persons were employed;now sixty-seven
persons are employed. The business, at
first lopal, has expanded and customers
now come from the three states of West
Virginia, Pennsylvania atod Ohio, within
a radius of fifty miles or more. Of late
years an Important department has
been that of mall orders, which come
from the territory mentioned. The firm
issues two fashion periodicals, both
OCTOE
). E St
ITIETH I
and to fittingly celebrate it
PDF
ADE AT OUR ST
enomenal progress and succ
t twenty years is due mutua
as our own efforts; therefor
tual Benefi
BY MAKING A
Tw<
on every purchase, 1
from our stores thi
md stocks in prime conditic
d we cordially invite all to
U. t. SI
TWENTIETH 7
1 >
monthly, which clrcnUte Uriel*. On? U
the "American Queen." and the other
The Fashions." The quality and quantity
o( their contents are surpftsingly
high and extensive respectively.
At the beginning. dry Roods was the
only line handled, and mostly domestics.
To-day. the line of dry goods,
both domestic and foreign. ! a* large
and as complete and of a* high quality
as the stocks of many of the well known
establishments of larger cities. The Ann
Is its own importer of foreign stuffs, the ,
business being done through a-commission
roan at New York. In addition, a
department of upholstery and rugs has
been added, and other lines expanded.
fflk. a ..Itk *r\ t ho 1
ine unu i'uiiiuj nun fiiu? >w quailty
of the patronage it serve*. Persons
who formerly bought expensive
stuffs in the larger cities now find they
are equally as well served and at as low
prices as is possible In Pittsburgh or In
other large cities. This firm shares in
W-heellng's reputation for possessing retall
establishments in many lines that
are seldom found In cities of Wheeling's
slse.
Beginning to-day. the flrcn celebrates
its anniversary week, and the form
which the celebration takes makes it of
direct interest and benefit to the public.
On all sales this week, the Arm gives &
discount of 20 per cent, no matter In
what department and without regard to
the very small profit made on some
lines. As the Arm has just laid In Its
fall stocks, this generous offer will
without doubt And a ready appreciation.
Although members of -the firm modestly
deprecated aw publicity being
given to their benevolence, the Intelligencer
learns that they have not forgotten
"Sweet Charity" on this gladsome
anniversary occasion. George E.
Stlfel & Co. have sent their checks to
the following charitable institutions:
City Hospital, $200; Wheeling Hospital,
jiuu; vvneeung c?enevoieni oocieijr, ?wi
Day Nursery, $50; Weit Virginia Home
for A Red and Friendless Women, 9200:
at. John's Home for Boys'and Girl*,
Elm Grove, <200; Altenhelm. 1200; Children's
Home, 1200. Such bouteous generosity
will meet the grateful thanks of
the community.
.Do yon need CarpcUl Bead Stone 4b
Tlioma*' ad*
DIED. ~
McCAFFERY?At his residence, at 8herrard.
Marshall county, W. Va., on
Sunday, October 2. Ifc98, at 8:30 a. m.,
JAMES McCAFFERY, aged 65 years,
10 months and 5 days.
Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
Interment at Allen Grove cemetery.
(Philadelphia papers please copy.)
DAVIS?On Sunday afternoon, October 2,
189S, JACOB DAVIS, aged 38 years, 8
months and 26 days.
r unrrui i rum ma ia(u icoiucucc, ivow ,
Wood street, on Tuesday afternoon at
2 o'clock. Friends of the family are
invited. Interment at River View ;
cemetery. Martin's Ferry. Ohio. *
UNDERTAKING.
[ PUIS BERTSCHY*
Funeral Director an I
Arterial Embalmer.
1117 M?!u fttre.t* Treat Sid*.
Calls by Telephone Answered Da*
or Night Store Telephone 6S&
Residence, 806. Assistant's Tele
phone. 698. *ni> ,
ALEXANDER FREW.
(Funeral Director and Embalmer,
12UB MAIN 51,
Under Competent Management
Telephones?Store. C9: Residence. 750.
BRUEMMER & HILDEBRAND,
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS,
Corner Merfcet eptf 224 Streets
Telephone 297. Open Day and Nlfht.
ntt::?:::?:?::::::
5ER 3d
:ifel &
=?
VNNIVER:
with the public we will give
I
ORES THIS WEEK
ess which has been attained
lly to the appreciation of the
e we make our anniversary
?
t
DISCOUNT or
enty Per Cc
arirp nr email itiadp
ui vi giiiuii) iiimuv
s week.^-**fc^
in to receive our friends, ol
our anniversary sales this
IFEL & C
ANNIVERSARY.
FAX.L CLOTHINQ-gBAUB BBOfl.
Admired By All
Is Our New Fall Clothing.
There Is * certain exclusive new, a certain rich new abotjt "Kraut
Broe\ clothes that wins us the trade of painstaking and careful
dreeeers and At less cost to you than other stores ask for the ordinary
kind. ' S
m
Our Line of Suits
M
A * " > r- 4 4 e* r\ 11 _
At JU, \l, J Sand jo uoiiars
. |
arc unsurpassed. We display by far the largest line we have ever
shown. The success of our efforts are nowhere more apparent than
In the line shove mentioned. In Children's Clothing mothers always'And
superior values here. Our line of Vestee Suits cannot be
equaled. They are the other people's J150 kind. Come In and ses
them and be cqpvlnced.
KRAUS BROS.,
WHEELING'S FOREMOST CLOTHIERS,
Strictly One Price. 1319 Market Street!
MBN'S OLOTHWO-D. OONDLINO & OO.
It is a Man's Duty
To Dress Wed.?
'I
Every consideration?social, business, home, .
family and friends?suggest that a man dress as well
as his means will allow. ^Costly thy habit as thy
purse can buy" was shakespeare's advice?and it was
good advice.
The well dressed man has more respect for him
self, and so is more respected.
The well dressed man has confidence in himself,
and so inspires confidence.
The well dressed man looks successful, and ' that
often assures his success.
THEN?Why not dress well?
WHEN you can buy elegantly made Suits,
trimmed and made up to date, at such low figures as 2
$8 00, $10 00. $15 00 and $20 00, and back of it
have the guarantee of our good name.
=_ ' m
D. Gundling & Co., ;J
Star Clothiers, 34 and 36 Twelfth Street.
1SSO
I?????,1
, < H ? 9
< 4 s
NT ON ALL PURCHASES j |jj| |
< * > '. 1
,? *Sf ?<}8 ?<Sf fcjf <Jt \!? <<58 tS? i k ' ' i|
, h .
iH > / V"
during | -. S h ? cjffl
0 I;
GEO. E STIFEL & CO.
; 1 I
. :, J

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