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The Wheeling daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1865-1903, September 11, 1900, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026844/1900-09-11/ed-1/seq-8/

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I crn*rF. Kr. 'THOMAS."
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VK-ntlior Torbciwtt IbrTo-auV-rolr.
I STONE & THOMAS.
The Delineator for October is Now Ready.
i
?
Strangers j '
?N THE CITY
During Pair Week are cordially invited to make this store
their headquarters. We're not quite ready to throw, open
the doors of our enlarged home, but everything in our
present abode iis as neat, and cozy ns you can wish for.
Then, too, we're going to offer special inducements all this
week in values r which we're sure will interest you. KEEP 1
YOUB EYE Oil THIS SPACE and you'll find something
new every dayj, probably tho very thing you've been looking
for at the Qowest possible price.
!
1 I
DRESS GOODS.
50 pieces of celetirated Jamestown Dress Goods in /jr
fancy mixtures and novelties, 40 inches wide,
Begular selling price 50c a yard. This week..
. 25 pieces of Scotch Plaids, medium and dark effects,
excellortt wearing texture for school p
I OA ?I - T* '1 "
w-z utuaoD wtuc. x urmux price XUC a I 111.
yard. This week
20 pieces of All "Wool Venitian Cloths, rA
in grays, tans, castor*, blues and JJBir
"browns. This week per yard
58-inch wide Repellant Cloth, CAr*
in navy and black, jjiflQ
per yard this week
Seasonable Silks.
i
24-inch wide Liberty Twill Foulard Silks, in rose.
blue, green, violet and tan. Formerly sola at / r
$1.00 and $1.25 a yard. Your choice of 50 styles ftr)C
this week per yard vl/v
24-inch wide Polka Dot India Silk, suitable for pa
fancy waists, also used extensively for hat
scarfs. Per yard this week t/W
24-inch wide Black Taffeta Silk, very rich and np
heavy. Every yard guaranteed not to break. I
Regular dollar quality. This week flfv
21-inch wide Black Taffeta Silk, p/\
soft or heavy finish.! The 75c quality. Kiln
Per yard this week e/ / v
STONE & THOMAS.
GEO. H?. SNOOK & CO.
^8^ Snaps j
ft For Fair Visitors. .J
L Fan Sale 2
!at prices that will make it pay to buy for future -|
wants, if not needed now. These are fine White J
Austrian Fans, bought enough below value to |
permit of prices like these: -I
Lot 1,25c each. Lot 2, 39c each. ^
Lot 3,59c each.. Lot 4, 15c each.
Lot 5,98c each. Lot 6, $1.25 each. -4
Are worth about one-half more. ^
Laces Again, 5c yd., j
worth two, three and tour times as much. Our j|
last purchase contained 3,600 yards?about one- "H
|k. half of these are unsold. To" these we add a
new purchase of 2.860 yards. These Medici and J
Torchon Laces are pretty, wear well, and you "w
- can have narrow, medium or wide at only' 5c -Jl
yard.
" Sterling -J
- Brooches 25c. 4
A special collection of real Sterling Silver g
>- Brooches, consisting of Hearts, Butterflies,
8l Horse Shoes, Wish Bones, Fleur de Lis, etc. jj
EAI1 at 25c each. Finer ones also.
Look at our five
show windows for J|
elegant novelties
of all kinds! J|
? ? A J i U.I UV> 4JX1 V
NORTH END
REPUBLICAN
MEETING
At Sixth Street an Enthusiastic One.
Addresses by Eminent
Speakers.
DELIVER STRONG ARGUMENTS
r? ~p
ut vuo xvupucuican x'iatform
and* Candidates?One Thousand
Persons Present
" Prom a platform Improvised for the
occasion citizens of the North End
beard the principles of Republican faith
expounded by eminent speakers last
evening. About 1,000 persons gathered
on Sixth street and a more enthusiastic
crowd could not well be Imagined. All
the speeches were punctuated with applause
and every mention of McKinley
was the signal 9f handclapplng and
cheering.
' Jacob Snyder, secretary of the congressional
committee, in a neat speech,
Introduced Will Caldwell as chairman
rtf the meeting. He gave a "brief talk
on imperialism, ilustratlng the Inconsistency
of the Democratic party in opposing
that doctrine and in a few words
of eulogy Introduced Congressman B. B.
rv.
: The captain said he did not come
there to Indulge In any eloquent platitudes.
He Invited any person to challenge
any statement he made If they
thought they were not true. He read
some culllngs from the Register and
easily disposal of them. This paper
had said that Judge Freer and Senator
Burrows In their speeches at the Opera
House had said nothing of imperialism,
but were content in discussing the tariff
and money questions. The question In
1896 was how to restore prosperity. After
the people had ferreted it out they
voted for William McICiniey. the advance
agent of prosperity. The question
now was how to retain prosperity.
Bryan was the last man on God's green
earth that should light Imperialism.
No Dodging.
The speaker said he was not going to
dodge the issue of imperialism and
trusts, but would discuss them from the
point of fact and experience. There
was no such thing in this country as
Imperiuiism. It was simply a blind of
the Democrats to covpr nn nnnthPf nh.
Ject In view. If elected they would
bridle 16 to 1 on the country.
Continuing, Captain Dovener Bald
there should be no law against trusts.
The first trust we ever formed in this
country was the sugar trust, made possible
by tlio Wilson bill. Bryan was a
member of the ways and means committee
that framed that document. This
committee, he said, ought to have been
called the committee on mean ways.
This bill had spread ruin and distress
throughout the country and created
militarism. Three millions of men were
thrown into idleness,starving and hunting
work. Bryan had the impudence to
tell the worklngmen what a wonderful
stagnation of business there was in this
country and at the same time lloore
Jackson declined to run for Congress on
the Democratic ticket because there
was too much nrosnerUv and htiRino?!?
In this country and he did not have the
time. We wanted more money instead
of Moore Jackson.
Bryan's Inconsistency.
Captain Dovener then showed up the
Inconsistency of Bryan denouncing the
Republican policy in the Philippines
when he, by lobbying in the senate, hud
Influenced the Democratic senators to
vote for the Paris treaty that provided
for the purchase of the islands and was,
therefore, himself directly responsible
for our possession of the Islands. The
Democrats pretended to B&- warm about
trusts when they had a great ice trust
to keep them cool. The speaker referred
to the Democratic cry of ruling
without the consent of the governed and
explained how Florida, Louisiana and
all the western states had been purchased
and otherwise acquired without
the consent of the governed. New Mexico
and the District of Columbia had
representatives in Congress, but they
had no vote. He asked if they were being
governed with their consent. He
also referred to the Democratic disfranchisement
of the negro In the south
and wanted to know if they were being
governed with their consent. After Ihe
captain had concluded with a strong
argument In justification of the government's
policy In the Phlliplpnes, he was
cheered to the echo.
Mr. Arbenz Talks.
The chairman then introduced John
Arbenz as the next speaker.
Mr. Arbenz said he considered
himself presumptlous in
endeavoring to talk after so eloquent a
speaker as Captain Dovene'r ailil lie
would be brief. His.address was replete
with Illustrations that put the crowd
In good humor. He said the Democrats
referred to every act of the Republican
party as unconstitutional. In 1776, whvn
otir forefathers established a. coiitederate
government their cry was "Unconstitutional."
It was the same when the
Republicans established roads, when
they enacted a tariff fostering industry,
when they carried out the late war and
when they established a sound currency
basis.
Mr. Arbenz concluded his address
amidst applause and was followed by
Abraham McCoIloch, candidate for the
legislature. - He said the Republican
platform had no paramount Issue, every
plank in it standing on an equality anil
when they fought for one they fought
for all. He referred to Bryan as a
farmer and said that lie, too, was a
farmer. He said If Bryan; ns he claimed,
raised forty bushels of oats to the
acre and netted u per cent, he proved ho
was a prosperous farmer. Any farmer
netting over and above that was doing
well.
George La ugh l In, another legislative
candidate, was the next speaker. Protection,
he said, had built nil the Industrie
In this country. The Republican
tariff was responsible for all these industries
and wo owed something to the
party for that. They put a tariff on tin
plate and tin plate factories spring u?)
NAY BROTHERS?SHOES.
Visitors
to the Fair
will do more or less chopping while
. ?ln the 'dty, nhd many will provide
themselves with a pair of
Dress Shoes.
To theso- we extend a -cordial Invitation
to call at the popular Market
street shoe store and Inspect
one of the finest. lines of up-todate
footwear In the state. Our
full lino ;
Fall Styles
are now ready Jor. Inspection. We
shall be ploaued to s?o you and
show you the new styles, whether
you buy or not
NAY'S.....
\6U warm aireet.
all over the country. Bryan did not un- i
der8tand these great propositions and
we must look to the Republican party
to handle them.
Party of Sixteen Tails.
Frank W. Nesbltt, candidate for prosecuting
attorney, was then Introduced.
He said It was the first time In four
years he had been given an opportunity
of addressing a North "Wheeling audience.
Political parties represent great
policies. There were two great partite,
one standing alone and the other with
sixteen tails to Its kite. Each party
represented the principles set forth in
Its platform. One Btood for American
IaTmii*. .sound mnnpv colli stsnrinrr? and
expansion of our great and glorious
country. The other stood for free trade,
free silver and little one-horse America.
We were to choose between these two
as there Is no possibility of any uf the
other parties winning. Mr. Necbltt's
remarks, though brief, were eloquent
and his closing remarks were greeted
with great applause.
Henry Steck and S. S. Smith, candidates
for the legislature, were the last
speakers and after they concluded,
Chairman Caldwell proposed three
cheers for McKinley and Roosevelt.
They were given lustily arid with :t determination
that presages Republican
victory at the polls this fall.
Triadelphia Bough Eider3.
The Trladelphla district Republican
Club met at Hand's hall last night, for
the purpose of organizing a Rough
Riders company, and was called to order
by President George Humphrey. J.
A. Birkett acted as secretary- A committee
of six, one from each precinct,
was appointed to solicit names for
membership, as follows: Precinct No. 1,
Harry Humphrey; No. 2, Charles Seibert;
No. 3. J. A. Birkett; No. 4. J. T.
Carter, Jr.; No. 5, TJ. M. Hervey; No. 6,
Charles Sample. Clark McKee was appointed
organizer and manager of a
drum corps.
Island Republicans Meet.
The Island Republicans held an informal
meeting at the hose house last
evening. Dr. Etzler presiding and Mr.
Alf Davis acting as secretary. The
organization of a marching club was
discussed, and there is no doubt but
that a club from the Seventh ward
will be found in the line of parade this
campaign. Owing to the crampod
quarters final action was postponed
until next Monday evening, when it is
hoped Myers' hall, corner of Penn and
Virginia streets will be secured. Be- }
lore sojournment committees were appointed
to secure speakers and permanent
headquarters.
Centre District Republicans.
The Centre district Itepublican club
held a god meeting last evening, at
their headquarters In Hartmann's hall,
corner Market and Twenty-third street,
with President C. D. Thompson In the
chair. There was an enrollment of
fifty members last night, when the
club adjourned to meet on Saturday
evening, when It Is expected the membership
will be increased to over one
hundred.
Eighth Ward Club To-night.
A meeting of Company A, of the
Rough Riders Is called for 7:30 to-night
at their hall, corner Thirty-third and
Jacob streets. The meeting Is called by
the order of Captain Ben Honecker, and
Is for the purpose of being measured for
uniforms.
SEE our exhibit at the State Fair this
week. F. W. BAIJMER CO.
Who Holds the Lucky Number P
Ticket No. 170 drew the grand stand
prize at the picnic given by O. V. T. &
L. A. on the fair grounds last Monday.
The prize Is a handsome rocking chair,
which can be secured by the person
holding the lucky number presenting
the same at House & Herrmann's.
BLUE and the Gray for Reglna muslo
box at F. W. Baumer Co.
!
uutueunu suits
made to order. Knee pants suits $7; .
long pants suits, $8.
U. GUNDLING & CO.,
1215 Market Street.
BLUE and the Gray for Retina music
box at F. W. Baumer Co.
Hay Fever.
Wo can clt6 you a number of CURES
we have made In cases of HA.Y FEVER,
hut NOT ONE FAJLURE.
TR1-STATE
OSTEOPATHIC INSTITUTE.
Tenth and Main Streets.
BLUE and the Gray for Rc&lna music
box at F. W. Ikiumi-r Co.
When you fcrl that you have tried every,
thlnjc and overyonp, connult uh. a dally
occurrcnco In the surprint chown by th?
benefited patient* At our ofllce.
Do you havi- headache? Do your cyea
water? Do they s?inart or burn? Does tht
print run toother when reading?
For any trouble o? your eye* consult u*. .
We nmkn plamcs nt popular price*. Mako
a careful examination free of charge.
PROF. 11. SHEEF,
ThoSclontltlo Cor. Main and i
Optloluu ?lovouth?Suu '
THE HUJB CLOTHIBBS.
TIME is often '
- ?LOST
in making too great haste. Don't hurry. Visit other
r+nmc pvomir)i? thrir etvlpc and nrirr>c A,.
U1VSI'1U1I? 31UIV-J, ? . U1CH
come here. By that time you'll have found whatlyoii
don't want for a fall suit or overcoat and be redely to
see what you do want.
Nowhere else will you find a quarter as large a
stock of men's or boys' clothes.
Nowhere else will you find them made and
trimmed as well.
Nowhere else will you be able to match the
prices we name.
Nowhere else will you be able to get back every
dollar you pay?it's here for you upon demand for
any and every case of dissatisfaction.
Ms at $5, $7.50, $10, $12, $15, $18, $20, $25,
See our window display of new Fall Suits.
Make their closer acquaintance by stepping inside.
Don't buy unless you want to.
State Fair visitors especially requested to step
in and roam around at their will in Greater Wheeling's
Greatest store.
o * ?
THE HUB,
Fourteenth and Market Streets.
BAEH*S CLOTHING HOUSE.
Perfect Fitting . -B
Perfect Shape' , JUUlCliCSS
Trimmed Well
^ Prices Trousers
STYLE, MATERIAL
8jj| - ' AND FINISH
|l| ^ 1 JUST RIQHT
Fair Warranted I????-I
THEV MEET THE WANTS OF ALL.
WARRANTY
You may buy a pair of DUTCHESS WOOL TROUSERS at
$2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, $4 or $5
AND WEAR THEM TWO MONTHS. FOR EVERY SUSPENDER
BUTTON THAT COMES OFF WE WILL PAY YOU TEN CENTS.
IF THEY RIP AT THE WAISTBAND WE WILL PAY YOU FIFTY
CENTS. IF THEY RIP IN THE SEAT OR ELSEWHERE WE WL
VAY YOU ONE DOLLAR, OR GIVE YOU A NEW PAIR.
Best in the World Try a Pair
LEE BAER,
Sole Agent. Twelfth St.
LOCKE SHOE CO. _
A GOOD SHOE INVESTMENT.
LADIES', MISSES' AND CHILD'S,
MEN'S, BOYS' AND YOUTH'S,
TAN COLORED SHOES.
We can save you 25 cent?, 50 cents and $1.00 a pair on
these ?oods, and will give you this season's styles and
rnlnrc to colprt
1 ?.W o^ivv.1. iiVJlll,
T nrYu cunu ,rv-\7t7rr> artv
01 i\jLu v^wivir nn i >j
ga
f% EVERY WOMAN ..
ScnJoUscu o?rla?wllablf, monthlr, TfffoUtln* tnodleln#. OuTy h?naIc3lM
H Iho pure*!drug* should bo 8???1. If jroawuudM bM*,P*i
tfk Dr. PeaE's Femaiyroyai PW8
^>^*Th?ynr? prompt, ?nfo and crrtAln In rwult.
The Ronnlno (br. PcaI'b) nertr disappoint. Bold for #1.00 per bor.
Sold by Chn3. R. QocUe, Druggist, co r. Market and Twelfth streets. "P11
? THE IS THE BEST iff
9s INTELLIGENCER sr $

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