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The Wheeling daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, W. Va.) 1865-1903, October 18, 1900, Image 4

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? THE INTELLIGENCER.
Published Dolly, except Sunday, by
Intelligencer Publishing Co.,
2S nod 27 Fourteenth Street.
JOHN FREW, Pres. ood Bus. Manager,
Torma: Per Yoar, by Mall, In Advance,
PoHtntso Prepaid.
Dally (0 Paya Per Week) 1 Ycar...$5.20
Dully, Six Montha~~~ 2.00
Dally, Three Mouths ~. 1.30
Daily* Throe Days Per Week .... 0.00
Dally, Two Duys Por "Week 2.00
Dally* One Month ........ .40
Weokly, Ouo Your, In Advance...- 1.00
Woekly, Six MonthFU~~. ~ .00
THE DAILY INTELLIGENCER In delivered
by carriers In Wheeling und adjacent
towns at 10 cents per week.
rcrat>n3 wishing to subscrlbo to THE
DAILY INTELLIGENCER can do bo
by sending In their orders to tho Intelligencer
offlco on postal cards or
otherwise. They will bo punctually
served by carriers.
Tributes of Respect and Obituary Notices
DO cents per inch.
Correspond once containing Important
news solicited from every part of the
surrounding country.
Rojcctcd communications will not bo roturned
unless accompanied by sufficient
postage.
(Tho INTELLIGENCER, embracing Its
uevcral editions, Is entered In the Post
office at Wheeling, W. Va., as secondclass
matter.)
TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
Editorial Rooms 823 I Counting Room S22
THE INTELLIGENCER.
WHEELING, OCTOBER 18. 1000.
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL TICKET.
For President,
WILLIAM McKINLEY,
Of Ohio.
For Vlco President,
THEODORE ROOSEVELT,
Of New York.
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS.
At Large.
BENSON B. McMECHEN,
Of Marshall County.
J. B. LEWIS.
Of Kanawha County.
DISTRICT ELECTORS. .
First District.
O. W. O. HARDMAN, of Tyler Co.
Second District,
N. G. KEIM, of Randolph Co.
Third District,
CHAS. C. BEURY, of Fayette Co.
Fourth District,
T. B. McCLURE, of Wayno Co.
FOR CONGRESS.
First District,
B. B. DOVENER of Ohio Co.
Second District
ALSTON G. DAYTON, of Barbour Co.
Third District,
JOSEPH H. GAINES, of Kanawha Co.
Fourth District,
JAMES A. HUGHES, of Cabell Co.
REPUBLICAN STATE TICKET.
For Governor,
ALBERT B. WHITE, of Wood Co.
For Auditor,
ARNOLD C. SCHERR, of Mineral Co.
For Treasurer,
PETER SILMAN, of Kanawha Co.
For Supt. of Schools.
T. C. MILLER, of Marlon Co.
For Attorney General.
ROMEO II. FREER, of Ritchie Co.
Judges Supreme Court.
HENRY BRANNON, of Lewis Co.
GEO. POFFENBARGER, of Mason Co.
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT.
For Circuit Judge,
THAYER MELV1N,
Of Ohio County.
FOR THE LEGISLATURE.
State Senate,
SAMUEL GEORGE, Sr.,
Of Brooke County.
House of Delegates;
ABRAM McCOLLOCH,
HENRY STECK, 4
8. G. SMITH.
GEORGE A. LAUGH LIN.
REPUBLICAN COUNTY TICKET.
Criminal Judge?T. J. HUOUS.
Sheriff?D. H. TAYLOR.
Prosecuting Att'y?FRANK W. NESBITT.
Assessor (City)?ADDISON ISRAEL.
Assessor (Country)?LESTER SMITH.
County Surveyor-ROBERT IIAZLETT.
Governor Eoosevelt's Visit.
Governor Roosevelt, who will be with
to-dny, and who is swinging back to
the cast after a marvclously enthusiastic
reception In the far west, has been
on the go for over forty days, and has
made a wonderful record as a campaigner.
He comes to us as a type of
American manhood that Is worthy of
the emulation of every young manclean,
forceful and honest.
The Intelligencer believes that the reception
that will be accorded him in
Wheeling to-day will not suffer In comparison
with the warm greetings that
have been extended to him in other
und larcer centers of population. We
bespeak for liltn a respectful hearing
and an extension of that cordial and
warm-hearted hospitality for which
Wheeling Is so famous abroad. And, so
far as Is compatible, we believe the
Democrats of this city will Join the Republicans
In welcoming In a respectful
manner a hero of the Spanlsh-Amcrlcan
war nnd a governor of .one of the
Cniatvat state* In the Union.
Croker's Demonstration.
The mlnuti- IJryan stopped speaking
Croker led him to the rear of the stand
to ??h* the crowd assembled there. He
waved his hut to thein and Croker finked
hlin. "Die! you ever see anything like
It?" "Wonderful! Wonderful!" Utyan
Bald.?Am elated I'retw dispatch.
Wonderful, Indeed. Alice In Won*
<t?rland wisn'i a clrrumstanre to the
Kr?at outpouring of the Tammany
faithful. Croker commanded and hl?
minion? obeyed. Uut th'*?" I* another
?U?? tu the* tumultuous welcome extruded
to IJryan?* very serlou* *ld^ for
Hryan. and one that lu* Mill reallte on
the 7th day of November, when the
volca arm couufed. Thw MojUaon Square
I
demonstration was nothing but froth.
The New York Sun puts the situation
In' a forcible light On Tuesday morning
It said:
The more "triuinphunt" his (Bryan's)
Journey from Madison Square Garden to
Cooper Union, the louder the blare of
trumpets and the more brilliant the calcium
lights, the greater will be the determination
of the eobor Intelligence of
New York to beat him. They will all
serve only to Intensify the alarm his
candidacy lino caused and consequently
will be worth to the sound money
cause far more than they will be worth
to him.
The more the prominence given to
Bryan, the more portentous appears the
pern <ji 111.1 cuuuiuuuy, tor uie isaui' ui
this campaign, boiled down to Its esseutials,
is simply Brynn and Bryanlsm.
The bigger the Tummany demonstration
In his behalf, therefore the more
hopeful 13 the cause of sound money. A
tremendous Bryan demonstration In the
great capital of American comracrce
and finance, with a sight of the crowd
making It, will exercise a wholesome
influence on the dominant political canity
of New York.
Crooked Records.
Bryan has two records that are especially
crooked. One Is on the trust
question and the other Is on the Philippines,
and all through the campaign ha
has been trying to wriggle and squirm
away from them. About a year ago,
at Chicago, at the Conference on Trusts,
he declared: "Now this is a conference!
We have not met here to destroy the
trusts." Later he still wanted them to
be regulated.' Still later he advocated
a constitutional amendment, so the Republicans
In the last Congress proposed,
therefore, to amend the Constitution
that the precise thing favored by Mr.
Bryan might be done, not in an uncertain
or doubtful way, with everything
unsettled until a case could be carried
to the supreme court, but by building
on a solid basis from the beginning.
Then the Bryonltos in Congress cast an I
almost solid vote against the Republl-|
can proposition and defeated It. And
ever since then Bryan has twisted and
tried, by loud general clamor about
trusts, to get away from his own record.
That amendment was voted on in the
house of representatives June 1, 1900.
One hundred and forty-eight Republicans
voted for the amendment and one
hundred and thirty Democrats voted
against it. Bryan did not really desire
any favorable action. He wanted to keep
the matter alive for lila demagogic
campaign purposes.
So it was with the peace treaty, whose
ratification he favored and worked for.
Now he is trying to escape responsibility
for thuypart he played in the ratification
of that instrument. In analyzing
bis recent article in the North
American Review, in which he says,
"Honest men will admit that from the
very beglnnlnglhave been wholly of one
mind ns to what we should do with
the Philippines," a writer in an exchange
makes the following rather
caustic comments:
Now, if Mr. Bryan has never changed
his mind, there are some matters he will
have to explain. Mr. Bryan made a
special trip to Washington and labored
with the opposition to secure the ratification
of the treaty of Paris. Without
this effort on his part, say3 Senator
Hoar, the treaty could not have been
ratified. All this he did with the firm
determination that the Philippines
should not become the property of this
country. Thus Bryan stands convicted
out of his own mouth of favoring the
treaty without acquiring the property.
Just what the vpter wants to know Is,
was Col. Bryan, who held a commission
In the army of his country. In the employ
of Spain, to bunco this country
uut ul *su,uw,vuur jii not, wny aid ne
labor so earnestly to pay Spain $20,000.000
for, as he thinks, no value received?
If. on the other hand, it was, ns lie
said to Senator Hoar, for a ''political
Issue two years hence;' is the man who
takes $20,000,000 from the United States
treasury to secure an Issue to make
himself President the man we want to
trust In that exalted position?
Signs of Democratic Distress.
Elsewhere Is published two circulars
sent out-by the chairman of the Democratic
congressional committee for the
Fourth district, and thq chairman of
the Democratic state executive committee.
The statements contained in
Chairman Miller's circular contains
many glaring misstatements. The one
with reference to the special telegram
sent out from Charleston by a correspondent
alleged to be a clerk In the office
of Secretary of State Dawson Is
maliciously false. The warnings contained
In these circulars that the Republicans
In the legislature will re-district
the state to suit themselves are
highly amusing In the light of the vicious
gerrymander of the Democrats,
which now virtually disfranchises 8.000
Republicans. "Jim" Miller would better
stick to his original occupation of
running down "one-legged niggers" and
leave the peculiar literary work he Is
engaged in alone.
Is devoted to a wall and warning about
the corruption of the voters that is going
to be done by the Republican managers.
Thin Is a sad comment on the
commercial Instincts of the Democrats
of the state. So It Is only necessary
to buy them? They have no principles.
Well, It appears to us that there
are some Democrats who are likely to
resent this Imputation. Every move the
Democrats of Went Virginia are making
shows their desperation, and their
utter hopelessness of carrying the state.
Methods as Well as Principles Wrong
A policy which is dangerous to every
Interest of every class of people in this
country Is not the only bad thing about
the Democratic party. Its methods of
prosecuting Its campaign are equally
vicious, and contrary to the spirit of
our Institution*. The Drmocratlc politicians
arc unfair and unjust to the
people. They seek In every possible
way to deceive anil mislead them. They
are thoroughly schooled In the art of
deception. Standing for a bud proposition,
they dlitcusa everything but
that proposition. Professing to discus*
certain subjects, they evade and dodge
them In every conceivable Way.
A striking Instance of their substitution
of both for reason nml argument
Is their constant quoting of what prominent
Republican* have *ald In their
Interchange of views In determining
the position of the party upon new qu-.s.
Hons ns they arise. Among others,
General Lew Walloon la quoted ns having
crlticlsrd the Porto Rlcan tariff law.
The I.hsu1* Is not what General Wallace
said, but what l? right. It is not
whether the Porto Klcan act Is right
In all respects, either. It Is which
party ought to be entrusted with power
la this country for the next four
1
i
III
i l| oepoai',
v fiscal
JUN
i WA6E-SW
mi
: IIL6W&
r. Illll ' il l SAVINGS Bl
'/// !M deposits
' 1 m 1NCREA!
:
'' ?
BRYAN?'
WORKING
years, over all our Interests, domestic
and foreign, and upon that question
finnprnl'Wnllr? ? la ivlfh ihn n^nhlUn
party, and stumping the state of Indiana
for the Republican party. He
docs not feel bound, and is not bound,
to the Democratic party, nor divorced
from the Republican party by what he
said. Neither are Senator Iloar nor
General Benjamin Harrison. Quoting
what they said Is deception and controversial
fraud, not argument. Nearly
every Democratic speech is predicated
in part upon those quotations. Why?
Because the Democratic position is so
rotten legitimate argument cannot be
brought to its support.
Death of "William L. Wilson.
The news of the death of Hon. Willlam
L. Wilson, at Lexington, Va., while
not unexpected is none the less deplorable.
The deceased was the ablest
Dsmocrat who ever represented West
Virginia In Congress, and was one of
her most distinguished sons, gaining
distinction In letters as well as politics.
As an educator, perhaps, his talents
shone most brilliantly, his tenure at
president of the West Virginia University
being unequivocally successful.
Entering politics he was elected to
Congress from the Second district, and
his name is Inseparably connected with
the low tariff measure known as the
Wilson-Gorman bill. H<? was also postmaster
general under President Cleve
juau. ma puuucai careeer ciosua ne
re-entered the educational field, being
cho.-en president of the Washington
and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia,
which honorable position he held
at the time of his death. lie was a
man of line attainments, gentle spirit
and admirable quailtes of heart, whose
demise will be sincerely mourned.
Coal Strike Settled.
The strike of the miners in the anthracite
coal region of Pennsylvania
has been settled by the operators granting
all of the demands made by the
miners. This Is a happy solution of a
contcst that threatened to be prolonged
and involve other sections of the country.
The amicable settlement of the differences
between employe and employer
will no doubt be a sore disappointment
to the high priest of calamity, who has
been going around the country citing It
as one of the evidences of his claim
that the boasted prosperity of the country
was a mockery and a sham, although
the contentions of the miners
bore no relation to the general prosperous
conditions of the land. In
Democratic times worklngmon do not
strike, because there is nothing to strike
for.
"I have never yet voted for a Chief
Magistrate of this nation whose
name had not been presented for the
sutt'ragos of the people by a Democratic
convention. There is no taint
of 'trimmer' in my blood or lineage.
* * *
''Sixteen to one lives, with all the
lifo that Mr. Bryan can give to it.
The imperialist dodge and Croker's
denouncing trusts as the great and
standing menace to our government
aro both tubs thrown to the whale.
"I can conclude no better than to
U30 the languago of my old friend,
the former mayor of New York,
Abram S. Hewitt, a Democrat and
chosen friend of Tilden, whose political
integrity has never been questioned.
He says: 'There is no longer
any room for doubt as to the course
which should bo taken by men who
believe in true Democracy, and desire
to preserve its principles for the benefit
of those who are to come after us.
We are compelled by every consideration
of honor, of duty and of interest
to repudiate Bryaninm, and to vote
for llcKinley and Roonevelt.' And i
so say we all of us."?General Bragg's
speech at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, la3t
week.
In 1S94 Ocnernl Coxcy U*rl an army of
7,2.10 Idle men, who tramiud with him to
Washington. This sanrj "General"
Coxcy being recently asked what ho
thought about tht; political outlook, replied:
"I have been no busily engaged
In the construction of my steel casting
plant during thesu prosperous times >
that I have given hardly a thought to
rolltlca, and hardly know there l? a
presidential campaign." Ar.d yet Dry an
says thare is no prosperity; it Is all a
fiction.
Thtfi Bryanltes aro a little early this
year \Vlth their outcries about coercion
of wage earners. Four years ago they
deferred this trick until a week before
election. No one has ,voiced a better
'reply than President McKluL-y did In a
speech to a Cleveland- club of wmv u
& 8 If
a#!*??15'-' i \m
year ending fig }m
? no 100o. n2k>
- Malaya jpxri?
,Rj 7.500,000.
HTif3,l23.750-00a
J?o?,6.ooaooo.(^p^
o?j?2,5C0,M?.000. gg |jg
>e or deposits. 3f mmt
oo over !g96 qmm
ORE THAN ; W//
o.ooo,ooo,??. Willi
'You want something moro than a Pa!
MAN?"There it is?tho Savings Bank
workers during that campaign. "They
talk about coercion, the coercion of employe
by employer. They mistake the
spirit of the campaign. It Is not coercion
but cohesion?cohesion between
employer and employe, made stronger
bv a common Interest and a common
experience."
Bryan made a demagogic plea to the
"Mothers" at Youngatown, Ohio, a few
days ago. How miserable It sounds
when compared to the plea of "an
anxious, troubled woman," addressed to
the editor of the New York Sun, as follows:
"In behalf of every woman who
Is a "bread and butter" worker, and
those even less favored, who depend
upon a slender Income, who are and
must bo controlled by decisions of political
majorities, for the Almighty's
sake, please print dally, up to and including
election day these Indisputable
disastrous consequences of Bryan's selection
as the Chief Magistrate of our
country. She who addresses you Is
suffering terror lest the Ignorant, unthinking.
unreasoning masses should be
in the ascendancy November 6. May
God spare us from such an infliction
whereby integrity shall give place to
enforced dishonesty."
John P. Altgeld, Mr. Bryan's anarchist
friend, spoke in Brooklyn Saturday
night. He talked like the anarchist
he i3. He sneered at "the full
dinner pall," declared that the trusts
were putting up prices to suit themselves
and running the government;
that "foreign Inlluence" was dominant
at Washington; that "our soldiers are
laying waste fields, burning houses,
shooting down women and children;"
that the administration had created
hundreds of offices In Porto Rico that
are of no use to the people, etc. It's
the same old Altgeld talking for the
same old Bryan.
"Let this nation declare that it is not
going to conquer the Philippines, and
then say to other nations, 'Thou shalt
not.' Then if any European nation
should provoke war with us to get the
Philippines, this nation would be .'n a
position to stand before the world as
the exponent of the doctrlno of self-government,
and no king would dare oppose
her."?Bryan's speech at Tammany
Hall, New York.
What a beautiful mess he would
make of It. Then wa should have wars
that would be bloody indeed.
Bosh Crokur is reported as saying that
"the silent vote Is the thing. It Is the
silent vote that does the work. Everybody
will be surprised at the silent vote
this year." Indeed they will, and no
one will be more surprised than the
Tammany Ice trust magnate himself.
Besides, the outspoken vote will largely
assist In indicting punishment on the
Tammany tiger.
"If there is anyone who believes
uiat tno goia stanaara is a good tiling
or that it must be maintained, I
warn liim not to cast hia vote for me,
becauoo I promise him it will not bo
maintained in this country longer
than I am ablo to get rid of it."?
William J. Bryan at Knoxville,
Tenn., September 10, 1800.
The Democratic party is for the
Free Coinage of Silver at the ratio of
16 to 1, without waiting for the aid
or consent of any other nation.?
"William J. Bryan, at Ann Arbor,
Mich., on Thursday, October 11, Just
u week ago.
The large crowd that greeted Bryan
in New York will serve to make his
plurality less. This may appear paradoxical,
but It la true.
After partaking of a 512-a-plate dinner
Bryan went to Madison Square Garden
and wept over the oppressions of
the laboring man.
Ohlo'3 capital did Itself proud In the
reception It tendered Governor Roosevelt.
The metropolis of West Virginia
tvlU fin fhn ?nmn
The Register thinks the Y. M. D. C. Is
the "whole thing." That's a Blur on the
other Democratic clubs.
"Corruption, will win!" cry the Democrats.
Nice reflection on the 'members
of the party.
Lot every Republican banner be un- I
rurl?'<l to-day.
Show your colors!
Roosevelt Day.
Decorate.
? ? i
MY line of Overcoatings and Suitings 1
,re always of the choicest patterns.
C. \\\ SEA3IUGJIT'S SOX. |
11 Dinner Pail/*
>?.
AMUSEMENTS.
ttOPERH HOUSED
Friday Night, Octobcr 19.
Mr. Charles -Frohman Presents the Succcs3
of the Century.
THE
LITTLE
MINISTER
By. J. M. Barrie.
Founded on his novel of the same name.
Presented for 3P0 Nlshts'ln New York.
Prices?COc, 75c, 11.09 and 11.50. Reserved
scat sale opens Thursday morning. oc!3
#0PERH HOUSES
Tuesday, Octobcr 23.
Primrose &
Dockstader's
BIG MINSTRELS.
Same cast as played at the Alvin
Theatre, Pittsburgh, last week
PrlccBr-&Oc, 75c nnd 51.00. Reserved sejit
sule opens Monday morning. ocl7
?OPERH HOUSE?
Monday, Octobcr 22.
HOYT'S ?r
a hole
in the
ground.
Cast Includes Charles Cowles, Nettle De
Coursoy.. Frank Young. Barry Maxwell,
Bessie De Voe. Trans-Atlantic
Quartette and 25 others.
Prices?23c, 50c, 75c and $1.00. Reserved
seat sale opens Saturday morning. ocl7
Q.RAND OPEItA HOUSE.
Three nights, commencing Thursdav.
October IS: usual matinees. \V. O. Edmunds
presents the sensational novelty,
Midnight In Chinatown.
Night prices?15, 25, 35 and 50 cents.
Matinee prices?15. "5 anil 35 cents, off];'
FsSasai
CATARRH MSk
la all Its stages there
should bo dcanliueia.
Ely's Cream Balm ^
cleanup,soothes and heals
the dlscatcd membrane,
It cures catarrh and drives
away a cold la tho head
quickly.
Cream Balm is placed Into the nostrils, spreads
over tho meinbrano and Is absorbed. Rcll?f is Immediate
and a euro follows. It Is not drying?dees
not producc sneezing. Largo Size, CO cents at Drug- I
gists or by mail; Trial Sbo, 10 cents by mall.
ELY DltOTOBRS, 66 Warren Street, New York.
- (
EDUCATIONAL.
mount :
de chantal Wheeling, *
academy, w-va- ,
IN THE CHARGE OP THE ,
Sisters of the Visitation, B. V. M. ]
Fifty-Third Yr.r. 1900-1901, 1
^ Opens Wednesday, Sept 12.
Cllxnato desirable lor drllento girls. .
Ton no res beauilftiUv laid out. Golf, }
Tennis, Croquut uud other athletic
CnmoH. Kxuelluui curt*; reasonable
rates. Andreas
The DIrcctress of ?
Mount dc Chnntal Academy,
Nonr. Whecllnc. >V. Vn.
PLUMBING, ETC. 1
VYM. F. C. SCiiNLLL^ ;
Plumbincj, Gcs und Steam Titling.
Dealer In nil goods pertaining to the trade. r
2012 Main Street, *
Telephone 27. Wheeling, W. Va. s
SANITARY PLUMBSNG. '
Pleam and Hot Water Heating. High
Grade Plumldng Fixtures. Call and .*oo
tho "Llnko" Filters In operations. Dans,
specifications nnd estimates lor any work t
Vn our line furnished on application. Prices
moderate, consistent with tlrst-class work, t
and satisfaction guaranteed.
ROBERT W. KYLE,
No. 1 IS?S Mnrkot St.. Wheeling, W. Vn. |
\YM. IIARE & SON, '
Prnctical Plumhore-x-i-ii
"~rr 1.
uos nnd Slcnm Titters.
No. SJ Twelfth stro?t.
Work Jono promptly M rvu.onablo prJ?. li
UOTTLES^ ^lioTTTrs" '
JACOBSON BROS* c
Dwilcru In Sccoml-hmul
BO TTLES,
Ale. lortrr. Appollnarl,. Vln<\
... . l?rnnillo?, ctr
me snllclM. 1..V -IM,,?,,,. .
2125 to 2135 PKtli \\c? I'lllstiur?, I>a.
JOTTIBS.-W "-UOTTI.es. \
NEW ADVERTI^^
T WISH TUB rOUCE~T7TS^
I LUTKS by b*rA,\12o,ST0P>
me, walklnB by three*
? ?he street. H. 0. Ztv-.''!??I
teenth street a f J
TR^e^D ?
F-I-R-E,
Beat Quality. 0rd,r p.,
Ll?t*?'Prug Store, l0I0_Maia ^ I
STORE ROOMS TO REVtl
MONEY TO LOAN. I
8torc rooms on Tenth and iia\n ... fl
(or rent. Money to loan on ml
Acceptablo loans made without SB
JAMES L. HANVLUY,
Real Estate and Loani^AgentMilatfl
HIGHEST CASH PRifJ
Paid for Woolen and Cotton (W.M
Brass, Scraps of Leather and oil s&
Old llubber, Cones, Rope .and all ktc^H
metal. "Htt
...ALFRED DIMMACKJ
240G Chaplin? street. Telephone <& M
Yards 271- Main St. -Telephone H
wmT briceLand, 1
FRESH FISH
and OYSTERS....
Spccial attention given to all orimig
Prompt delivery guaranteed. ffi
Telephone 951. Ial2 Harbiw
Rational tube company!" 'H
No. 20 Cortlandt St., Xevr Yort 1|
COMMON STOCK DIVIDEND^* \ H
At a meeting of tho board of. dlrectm 62
held October in. litOO, a quarter-jeSM
dividend of ONE AND ONK-UALV pnB
CENTUM upon tho common capltaU'SHB
of tho National Tube Company waj?H
clarcd out of tho not prints of the cos-hB
panv, payable November 15, 1K>), at ty BB
olflco of tho company, No. 2tl.Coni-> W
street, New York City.
The Common Stock Transfer Hoot??iBH
bo closed on Tuesday, October 3);
3 o'clock p. m.. and will remain c'.mh BH
until Friday, November 16, at 10 o'cit,BB
a. m. . A. P. LUKli Wfl
oclS-21-20-nol-7-14 Treasury CT
REAL ESTATE BARGAINS,?
12-room brick residence, lot 3C feet fn* BE
very desirable property. On Chayta Hfi
street, between Twenty-first and
third. A special price for a few I '
12-room brick residence, all modem |K
vonlenceH; on Chapllne street,
Eleventh and Fourteenth. BH
o-room, uvo-siory lrunie, modern l*
proveincntHi on South Front street; res
for $25 per month; price $3,000.
Business property on Market anil Jfcs
streets.
MONEY TO LOAN.
THEO. W. FINK & co,
No. 11G3 Market Street.
LOOKINO
backwards
al l^e racriIur('
V/ ,aun(lt'rInS linen.*
vi?t 11 wnH dono nt r.:ti
MlMO by Inexperienced ?
Z7 vantH, It makes ti
smile when c?,'ja
\ * 1.7 . ,y parcil with the a
qulslte work da
at this laundry.
WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY,
Telephone SCO. 30-32 Tenth St.
F. R. SCROGGINS, Prop.
...W5NG01D FLOUR..
makes a large, light an:
white loaf of bread. House- g$j
wives will not be disappoint* p5
t ed if they use this popular p.1
brand of flour. The price is
right?GOc a sack.
&3kkmXt I
...NINE NOTABLE NOVELS J
"The Master^ChrlstjanJ' Correlll W ?!
inu isii! u; unrest, Aiernman ur;
"The Bath Comedy," Cuttle ISM
"Gebar. a Tale of Baghdad." Benton.. l? BE
"Z!10 Vo,ce of the People." Glasgow.. 18
"The Yellow Danger. Shlel 1*?|S
"The Waters of Edera." Onlda IS Bj
"Lylnp Prophets." Phlllpots 1>B
"Phillip Wmwood," Stephens 13 K
LIBERAL DISCOUNTS FROM Eft
ABOVE PRICES
STATION'S
Seasonable,
?!? Gas Ranges.
Gas Heating Stoves,
X Rubber Gas Tubing |
Coal Ranges.
^ Coal Cook Stoves.
'}?i Coal Heating Stoves, r
m. W. JOHNSON'S SONS,
1210 Main Slrcet.
CHANGE IN~V0fTNQ PLACES.
At a mooting of the hoard of coraro^
sinners of the county of Ohio, held at tt?
court house of said county on the Id W
->t October. 1900, the following: ordlnaac*
kva.s adopted:
An ordlnace changing and establishes
Lhe places of voting In certain dlstrl:'*
Be It ordained by the board of cornet*
'loners of the county of Ohio that
,daces of holding elections be changed a
[he following districts and precincts, u
follows:
MADISON DISTRICT.
Precinct No. 1?From corncr of Florid
'trcet and Alley J to No. ?0 South Vtii
'trceL
UNION DISTRICT.
Precinct No. 4?From 200 Slxte^
?trcet to Beabout club room, on
itreet.
Precinct No. G?From Bcarley Uall K
30 Eighteenth street.
CENTRE DISTRICT.
Precinct No. 3?From corncr of ChJ? J
Ino and Twenty-second streets to -* F
uarket street. \
Precinct No. 5?From corner <>f Marl??j i
md Twenty-third streets to 1315 Maf<? tj
WEBSTER DISTRICT.
Precinct No. l?Prom corner of Markjt
ind Twenty-sixth streets to 2605 CUupl'c*
itreet.
Precinct No. "?From corner of Twenty*
Isth and Eoff strict,* to 2519 Eoft street.
Precinct No. 3-Frum No. 2741 Eoft strw
0 27ICJ Chanllne r.trcct.
Precinct No. 4?From 2D04 EofT street W
S27 EoIT street.
RITCHIE DISTRICT.
Precinct No. 3-Froin 3710 Jacob ntrcet
o J71H Jacob street. ,
Precinct No. 4-From SS27 Jacob strcfi
o r.<25 Jacob street. ,,
1 reelnct No. S?From S)37 Jacob strei'
o 1011 Jacob street.
triadelphia district.
Precinct No. 3?From the town hall I'
?lm drove to the mayor's ofJlce In tnf
own of Kim Grove.
Prod net No. I?From the Feay hou#
o Charles Davis' hou?o.
Precinct No. ?-F: om Joseph Robln*^"
louce to the Glemlale school, house.
LIBERTY DISTRICT.
Precinct No. 2?From Mrs. John Fart*'
ousc to 11. L. McCnmmon's hou*'. lc
no town of Potomn<\
Precinct No. 3-Prom Clmrlcs Cruw*
acker'* la the Valley drove School hotf#Mirst:
' T. C. MOFFAT.
'Wit Uoanl of Omtnlscloncro of trCounty
of ni'lo. \V. V.-x. Oo'.,nj
D'^ELOWfanmiiNTig
row..
. Amateur
-A_ Photographers.
Mall Orucr.s Sollcltcil.
V. C. BrjOW.N, 1222 Market St

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