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Daily intelligencer. [volume] (Wheeling, Va. [W. Va.]) 1859-1865, March 13, 1862, Image 1

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VOLUME X.
WHEELING, V A., THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 13,1862.
NUMBER 189.
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY
CAMPBELL & M'DERMOT
IXTKI.LKJKXCER BUILDINGS,
iV K. corner of Quiney and Main-Stt.
T K it 1VI 8 s
Daily,(by mail, payable in advance,).- .$6,0(
By the W?ek ? ?. lfl
Trl-Weekly, (per year, payable In advance,)..-..... W?
Advertising dona on reaaouabl* terms.
All advertisements from a distance, or from transient
customers, most be paid in advance.
INSURANCE.
CASH ASSETTS, JULY 1, 1801,
$1,929,763 20.
LOSSES PAID, UPWARD OP
$14,000,000.
The great public service, promptness and reliabili
ty of this well-tried and sterling Company, recotn
nieud it to prefrreuce with thoie uceding Insurance.
N. C. AHTMUK. Ag't.
Girard Fire & Marine Ins. Co.
PHILADELPHIA.
Capital AXD Surplus..'. 4318,723 6S
N. C. ARTHUR, Ag't.
Pennsylvania Insurance Co.
OF PITTSBURGH, PA.
Capital - - 4300,000
f IMI B above Companies havingappoitited the under
L signed their Agent for Wheeling, and vicinity,
would respectfully nolle! t tho patronage of the public.
S lid Companies are well known to be first class offices.
All lo<Metf promptlyadjuated. N.C.ARTHUR, Agt.
Jan3 Office over the Bank of Wheeling.
TO THOSE WHO WISH TO BE
INSURED
AGAINST ALI< CONTINGENCIES.
rimEIHOME INSURANCE COMPANY
1. of New York.
C ash CAPlTAL(erery dollar paid in) ?$1,000,000
44 Contingent Fund (over(............ 600,000
The largest Canh Capital for the amount of risk o
uy office in the United States.
W. F. PETERSON, Agent.
' pIIE 1XSURA.NC E CO.?F TIIE V AL
1 LEY OF VIRGINIA.
Cash Capital (paid in) ........................ $300,000
Much the largest Cadi Capital of any office charter
ed by thin St ita.
?j*-Fire and Iulaud risks taken on the most rea
oaable termii.
Losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid by
W. F. PETERSON, Agt.
rilHK CONTINENTAL INSURANCE
L COMPANY, of New York.
Oisb Capital (paid in) $500,000
?J x?h Contingent Fund (over) 375,000
An this office the assured participate in the profits
without incurring any ri-ik.
W. F. PETERSON, Agent.
I 1IIE LYNCHBURG HOSE AFIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
Cash Capital .......... $100,000
W. F.PETERSON,Jr, Agent.
A^-Over $2,600,000 of Cit?h Capital represented by
his old and well established Agency, where every loss
u the abovo office has been promptly paid iu Wheel
n?, before it was due by the terms of the policy.
W. F. PETERSON,
Office noxt door to the M. & M. B enk,
Jy7,'59? ly Mains t. "Wheel
insurance .
The Fire&Marine Insurance Co.
OP WHEELING.
INCORPORATED IN 1837.
1 TAKES nrSKS AT T1IK LOWEST RATE8 ON
. Buildings of all kinds Steamboat*, Furnitureand
Merchandise, aud against all dangers attending the
Transportation of Goods on rivers, seas, lakes, canals
ad railroads.
R W. lUtDiso, Bec'y. IIkxey Cravolb, Pres't
DIRECTORS.
J O Acbtaou John Donlon, Rob*t Morrison
K.Cr&ngle, 8. Brady, 8am*lOtt.
lJtn'1 Lamb, Rob't Patterson,
^-Applications for I nsuronce will be promptly at
snded to bv tho President and Secretary.
jsn 28/53
Saddles, Harness,Trunks &c
WHOLESALE * RETAIL.
JB. SIIEPPARD No.131 Main Street, corner
? Union, will continue to keep on hand alargeand
complete assortment of all articlesin his line, consist
ing of Ladies' and Gentlemen's Sail dies. Fine A Coarse
liarncss,Trunk9, Valiees, Carpet Dags, Satchels,Col
lars, Hames, Whips, Ac.
I would rospectfully call attention to my stock,and
trust by strict attention and promptness, to merit
continuance of the pnblic patronage
All kinds of repairing promptly done, and In a pro
per rannner. J. B. SIIEPPARD.
sep'JO '59 131, Main Street
CARBON OIL!
I HAVE ESTABLISHED AN OIL REFINERY
in this city, on Lindaey street, below the Gas
Work*, where I ke?p constantly m hand and for
Rile a good quality of Illuminating and Lubricating
oils. Also * good article of Axle Grease, for wagons
or drays. Dealers and others iu want of any of tlio
above articles will And it to their interest to giro mo
a call bef ?re purchasing eW where.
augZl-ly JOHN COOK.
Savings Bank of "Wheeling,
Oficr, Main-St., Ixtween Monroe and Union.
Money received on transient deposit
Interest paid on Special Deposits. Collections
promptly attended to. Exchange on the East bought
and s-ld. TiiOS. H. LIST, President.
3AMI.P IIILDRRT1I, Treasurer. Janl4-'69.
OH* LIST. ROBT. M0RRI80!f? W.B.LOOAlcl
ZCQIXtLlST. B.DATKXPORT.
LIST, MORRISON ft CO.,
W hole sole Grocers & Prodnoc Dealers
?Voj.TO and 80 Whaling, Fa.
W* ?l?Mire to stat? to the friends of the late firm,
?nd to the trade generally, that we are in possession
^ the moat ampls facilities for the transaction ofa
Wholesale atocery and Produce Business.
We are determined to execute all erders entrusted
to our care with fidelity and promptness, and on the
no,t favorable term,. Yonr ob't aerranta,
^ ? . _. U8T, MORRISON A CO.
Wheeling, January 2d. 1M0.| Jan?
COL. SAM. COLT'S
REVOLVING FIRE ARMS
Pistols, Rifles, Carbines Sl Shot Gnni
Patixts 07 1860; 1855; 1857; 1858.
'IUIE3E ARMS HAVE NO EQUALS IN QUALITY
*-*nd finish; are adopted by ths Army and Navy
o? the United States, and the principal gowrnmeut"
o. Europe; are uniform In all their parts, are simple,
safe, sure, servicable and can be had in one huntlred
?ari?liM, aa w.ll at CartridjM of Powder, ball and
?hot, and all amall parte for repairs, from all respect
able jnn dealers, and the Hardware trade generally
Addreee, Swrretary
WLrs PATENT PIRK ARMS MAH'Fa CO., ?
Hartford, Conn.
the PEOPLE'S BANE
OF WHEELING.
Wheeling^ ?creet, first door South of Bank o
Viscount days, Wednesdays, 10 A.M.
TRf^S,r^7,^D3PJ5CIiI'DKP08ITa THANK
Intro* paid on Special Depoalta.
kxchang. on the kaat bought and Bold.
collections, at home or from abroad, will receiTe,
prompt attention. - J
, ? SIUCT0U.
J. 0. llarbonf, , John Vockler,
RiT;8*?* . ChrisUan U.m,
Richard Carter. Lorenzo D. Walt,
. 3. R. DICgEY.^, ".ARB0Ult' Pr""-PT0^
TC8'^?YS'r* P"*1 ""ortment of Atnerl
foJ0?,o^s*ho,~le
No. 30 Monroe St.
.BUSINESS CARDS.
ALP'D HUGHES, M. D.
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
OFVIOK AND R8S1DKN0K: Corner of Fonrth and
Qulncy streets, below the 1st Presbyterian Church.
OFFICE HOURS.
Morning.7 to 9i Noon, 1 to 3; Evening. 7 to9.
J. BOON M'L URK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Office, N. E. Com. Mo raw* A Fourth 8te.
(Oppositethe Court Roust,) WHEELING, TA
N. B.?Will practice In the several Conrta of thla
and the neighboring Counties.
^-Particularattention will be given to the cot
ectlonof claims. nov20?ly
A. M. ADAMS,
WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL
CLOTHING STORE,
\TT HERE always may be found SUPERIOR CLO
T V THING; also makes to order, at the shortest
notice,
AllGariveuts belonging to Gentlemen
No. 30, Water Street,
'Wheeling, Fa,
Agents for W. Bingham's Shirts and 8tocks
of every description. Also, for A. B. Ilowe's Excel*
sier Sewing Machine. atig26 '61-1 y
S. G. ROBINSON,
manufacturer OF
WINDOW GLASS,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer In
PAINTS, OILS, 8 ASH, DOORS, LIMB,
CEMENT, PLASTER PARIS, dfcC.
No. 75 Main Street*
Jy4 WHEELING, YA
M. REILLY,
Wholesale Dealer in
GROCERIES,
Forflgu and Domestic
Wines and Liquors,
Not. M * 67 Mast Street,
my7?ly WHEELING, VA
J. A. METCALF,
COMMISSION HKROHANT AND
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT
FOR TUB hale OP
Nails, Window Glaus, Cincinnati Soap
Iron, Flint Glassware, Lard Oil I,
Steel, Green Glnmware, Lime,
Springs, Printing Paper, Plaster Paris,
Axles, Wrapping Paper, Cement,
Rosin, Wooden Ware, Starch.
Together with many articles of Pittsburgh and
Wheeling manufacture.
No. ao Pazton's Row, Main St.,
novl7 Wheeling, Vu.
JKO. S. CABULE. UAS3IBAL TOrbes.
CA.KLILK & FORBES,
Attorneys At Law,
WHEELING, VIRGINIA.
Practice in all the Courts of Ohio County, and the
adjoining counties.
Orrics ox Fourth Steeet, No I6OJ4 septSft-l^
ALFRED CALDWELL. OEOEOE X. BOTD.
CALDWELL & BOYD,
Attorneys at Law.
No. GO Main Street,
The Citizen's Deposit Bank
of wiieklino.
Bank open from ? o'clock a. m., until
P. M. Discount days?Thursdays 10 o'clock A.
4^?Money received on transient deposit.
Interest paid on special deposits.
49-Collectlonsmadeaud proceeds promply remit ted
DIRECTORS:
Jacob Berger, J. N. Vance,
Jacob Hornbrook, G. W. Franshelm,
Warren Cooper, J. K. Botsford,
Geo. K. Wheat, Chester D. Knox.
J.R. Miller, Cashier. Alfred Caldwell, PresM
ffeb4-'691vl
CLABK L. U5K. S. F. kills A
C. L. ZANE & CO.
Importer I and Dtaltrt in ForHgn <t Donatio
Wines and Liquors,
Manufacture? of
Pare Catawba Wines,
Qdixct Struct, bstwskn Maw k Uaur Sts.
WHEELING, VA
KEEP constantly on hand Brandies, Scotch and
Irish Whiskies, Jamaica Rums and Cordials.
Choice Old Bye and Bourbon Whiskies. sepZT?ly
W. T. MEEDS,
IBooli Bin cler,
? A It D ?
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER
InUUigtnctr Building,cor.Quincy <? Main it*.
ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF BLANK BOOK8 KULKL
and made to order, printed heads if required
Magazines, Music and all kinds of printed matter
bound in the best and most substantial style at rea
oableprices. All work guaranteed. noT^0'68?
E.ECayes & Co.
XAXUTA0TUKJIK8 OF
LIGHT CARRIAGES AND HARNESS
LOCATION IN THB ATUENJKUBJ
Building, oorner Market A John streets
opposite t?e Custom House, Wheeling, Ta. Always
on hand Carriages of superior workmanship, warran
ted to giro satisfaction. Also, work built to order, o
I lie latest styles and most Improved patterns, at the
lowest market rates. myI8?ly -
I S. W.PAXTO*. ? JOHH DOJTLOlf. 0. OOLBtAT
PAXTON, D 0NL0K & OGLEBAY,
Wholesale Grocers,
PRODUCE & COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
!Tos. 52 and 54, Main St.,
noTl W heeling, Vs>
J. C. HABBOTJB.
WholuaU <* Retail Dealer in
CARPETS RUGS, OIL CLOTHS
Wall P?pei, Cmrt?iii material.,
. x^S^SSSSSSS^M
. WKIBBLING, V A.
49*GIlt and Mahogany Framed Looking Glasses
n hand and made to order. sep9.'69
T. H. IjOG-AN Sc CO.
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
WHIHIH8. Ti.
HAYS remored to their NEW WAREROOM8, No
47 Main Street, aai so.8 Qulncjr Btrwt.
W-M?ln Street Entrance, next door to Balur
HonUnj. Qolncj Street entrance near the Bait. .1
R. R. Depot, and wharf*
DRUGS, PAINTS, OILS, ?
MEDICINES, VARFI8HK8, BRUSHES,
WINDOW OL-.88,PEREimERIE8, WHITE LEAD
PATENT MEDICINES, *0. ?
Offered to the trade, la dtj and conn try, at toprtel
andoftheiutouoUiy. Caeh and prompt _
cnetomere are Invited to call. ? epl, 6? ?
TT/OOl. H ATS?190do*. Men and Bojil W?ol
TV BaVlJatt opened, which we offer nncommraly
low, wholeeele and retail.
ootSO HARPER * BBO.
?? i ^^
O ALT??00 bble. Pittsburghand Ohio Klw, '
O for aale low by
notlB PAXTON, DONLON * OGLBBAY.
TERMS OR ADVERTISING.
TwsivkSoup Lixzb or Nokpamu, (ob oil lnch,)oj
Lxss, XAXI A SqUARt.
One Dayr_.l sqk. $0 76
Two Days,.. ? 1 00
Three Day,*, .125
FOitr Day?r.. ;.. 1 60
Five Day*. 175
Ono Week*... 2 00
TwoWeeks, 3 50
Special Notices Don
Throe Weeks.; ?%4 51
One Month, ... 6 0(
Two MonthJV. 8 0<
Three Months,.. .10 0(
8ix Months, 15 0<
One Yew, 20 0(
rte the above rnt e*.
^^?Yearly Advertising on reasonable terms, accor
diuR to the space occupied and the numberof changei
made.
All advertisements from transient persons or Strang
ers. to be paid for in advance..
Budinees Card* not exceeding five lines, $10 peryear.
or $6 for six months, bnt for a shorter period uothing
will bo counted leas than a square.
The privilege of Annual Advertising is limited to
the Advertisers' own Immediate bunineas; and all
advertisements for the benefit of other prsons an
well as all legal advertisements, and advertisement!
of auction sale* and real estate,sent in by them mnf
be paid for at the nsnal rates.
Advertisements not accompanied with written
directions, will be inserted until forbid,and chargod
accordingly.
Koticcs for Political Meetings to bo charged in all
cases at full rates.
Marriages,Noticesof Funerals, and annoncements
of sermons, 50 cents cach. nouvll-'59
The Battles in Hampton
Roads.
Interesting Details or the Two
Days Fighting.
Graphic Description by Eye-Wit*
nesies.
(From Correspondence of Xew York exchanges.)
Fortress M on rob, March 9.
A t noon, or thereabouts, the signal officers
on tbo lookouts at Fortress Monroe BimoN
taneously descried several rebel steamers
moving out from Norfolk by the Elisabeth
river. The/ were first discovered by the
black smoke curling out of their pipes.?
The approach of the rebel fleet was at once
communicated to Gen.. Wool, the com
mandant of the military department, and
subsequently to Captain Murston, the flag
officer of the station, then on board the
steam frigate Roanoke. The troops in the
fortress and at Camp Hamilton, a few miles
distaut, were immediately called to arms;
the flagship of the CJnion fleet in port was
signalled to get the naval vessels under
weigh. In fifteen imputes afler the "long
roll" was beaten the troops were iu line
aud the artillerists on the fortress manned
the guns ready for actiou. The frigate
Minnesota, Captain Van Brunt, having
steam up when the sigual for njoving was
given, hoisted anchor promptly and steam
ed in the direction of Newport News,
where an attack ou the Union vessels there
by the rebels was anticipated, closely fol
lowed by the guuboat Whitehall. The
flagship Roanoke, having her shaft, broken,
was unable to move by her own power.?
Owing to tho fact she was taken in tow by
the little gunboats Dragon nu4 Young
America. By the time she was under way
she was preceded by the gunboats Rescue,
Ranger, Relief, Mystic and Rover. The
Mount Vernon was in port, but did not
move from her anchorage.
It now being pnstone o'clock, the rebel
fleet by this time had followed the course
of the ship channel out from Norfolk, pro
ceeding in a zigzag course for a few miles,
and then running in a straight line paral
lel with the rebel batteries at Sewall's
Point. Reaching the latter locality they
made a turn in the channel, and Bteered in
a direct line for Newport News. The in
tent was now apparent. As the Merritnuc
showed her huge dimensions, as she made
the turn described, she looked terrible
saucy. She was closely followed by two
or three smaller vessels, but of a sufficient
size and appearance to make them seem
prepared for mischief. The Merrimac and
her consort were closely followed by the
Union vessels.
Tbe Union fleet, consisting of the vessels
alreudy named, after reaching a point se
veral roileB from the fortress, struck 'the
same channel in which'the rebel fleet'bad
already preceded them. When the rebel
fleet were within a mile or twp from New
port News tbey opocd lire on the United
States sailing frigat Congresse and Cum
berland, which were blockading off tha^
point. Tho rebel vessels then ran up: their
rotors?a black flag at the fore anil the
rebel ensign at their peak. The Union
vessels, seeing .the rebels apppoachiug,
beat to quarters, and every guu wus shot
ted for action. The rebel battery- Merri
mac opened the engagement by directing
its attention to the frigate Cumberland.
At this juncture, it being abont half-past
two o'olock, two other rebel steamers
which subsequently proved to be tbe
Patrick Henry and Yorktown, came steam
ing down tbe James river, from the direc
tion of Richmond. Tbey soon joined the
fleet from Norfolk, and 'both fleet9 became
botly engaged, the air reverberating with
the booming of cannon and the hissing and
bursting of shells. The Merrimac, Irom her
formidable' armament, was more bold than
bcr compeers, wno kept At a long range
distance. She first directed her attention
to the frigate Cumberland, which was
anchored about half a mile from and under
the Union water battery at Newport News.
The Merrimac steamed boldly up to tbe
Cumberland until within an eighth of a
mile, when she turned her side to the Cum
berland, firing ii broadside of five heavy
euns, every shot taking effect. The Cum.
berland, meanwhile, was not idle, but
gave broadside for broadside with her an
tagonist several times. No percepti
ble impression was made,'on the Merri
mac, the balls from the Cumberland
glancing off as if they were India rubber.
Tbe Union water battery at Newport
News, consisting of heavy columhiads, as
sisted the Cumberland against her formid
able antagonist, but with no better result
than before mentioned. Tbe .Merimac af.
ter a while approached within fifteen or
twenty yards of the Cumberland, and par
allel with her, and fired another broadside,
completely riddling the Cumberland,- and
wonndirg over fifty or sixty men. ; She
then backed off several hundred yards, and
pointed her bow for the Cumberland, and,
nnder full bead of steam, ran directly into
the sido of the Cumberland, driving the
immense ram, twelve, or fifteen feet long,
into the side of the CAmjb'erland," below^he
water mark, perforating the latter vessel
and crashing in' planks and timbers -with
apparent ease. The Merrimac then disen
. gaged herself, backed off a sufficient dis
: tance, and then repeated a similar opera
' tion, but in the waist of the Cumberland.
. The shocks from the collisions were terri
ble, the momentum sneb as to make The
topsail yards' ot the Cumberland touch the
water. The crew of the Cumberland, or
aach as had not been pat Aor? <fu> cogiAaf:
after having fought newly two boors with
? the rorst rt?'?rmined bravery, seeing-that
the Shin was disabled and sinking, songht
such means of safety as were at bund.?
The boat8,8uch of them as were not des
troyed, were quickly filled; others sought
to cave themselves by swimmiug, those
from the lower deck jumping out of the
portholes. The Cumbeiland commenced
sinking soon after the Merrimac bad colli
ded with her, and those of the crew that
did not attempt to save themselves by the
boats or swimming took refuge in the rig
ging after the hull bad disappeared beneath
the water. The steam propeller Wbilden,
which was at the wharf at Newport News at
the time, was immediately dispatched to
rescue these men, by order of Brigadier
General Mansfield. Out of two hundred
and ninety-one men on board the Cumber
land it is reported tbat'oue half were either
killed, drowned or wounded.
The Merrimac, after completing the de- !
struction of the Cumberland, turned her |
attention to the water battery on shore, j
throwing shell with greut rapidity into the
Union camp. Some of these missiles went
a mile over the camp. One shell explodedin
the light artillery stables back of the camp,
shivering tlieiu to atoms. Fortunately,
the horses were absent with their battery.
The Merrimac, in engaging the water bat
tery, posted herself under the bluff, and
the guns of the battery could not be suf
ficiently depressed to have aoy effect on
the rebel battery. After shelling the camp
for ubout half an hour with little or no ef
fect, and with no considerable list of woun
ded, the Merrimac then proceeded towards
the frigate Congress?which was then en
gaging the rebel gunboats Patrick Henry
and Yorktown?which were anchored a
few hundred yards from where the Cum
berland was. The first shot fired by the
rebel steamer at the Congress struck her
in the stern, passing through the cabin,
killing Lieut. Jos. Smith, the executive of
ficer of the ship,. and three sailors. The
two vessels then became hotly engaged,
which continued for thirty miuutes, when
the Congress, being riddled with solid
shot and shell, struck her colors, and hoist
ed the white Hag. The Merrimac theu
turned her utteution to the other vessels of
our fleet engaging them all seriatim. Af
ter the Congress surrendered, arobel steam
er, the Jamestowu, came alongside and
took all the Union officers, prisoners, but
allowed the crew to go free, they having j
no room on board for them .
The frigate Minnesota had early got on
shore at a place called the Horse Shoe
bar, about two miles from Newport News.
The Merrimac hotly engaged the Minne
sota, after destroying the Cumberland and
Congress, bnt on accout of the support
given by other vessels of tho Union fleet,
the Merrimac gave her a wide berth. The
fight continued, with no particular results
except those before mentioned, until long
after dark.
As the night approached the flashing of
the guns and bursting bombs were terrific.
At seven o'clock P. M. the rebel fleet, with
the addition of the Patrick Henry and
Yorktown. which had corac down from
Richmond, proceeded to Norfolk. During
the day, from the time the uaval battle
commenced, Major General Wool made the
most perfect preparations, in cas? a land
attack was made by the rebel* f'em the
direction of Yorktowu. What tbnee pre
parations wer?iit would not be permissible
to state. The frigate St. Lawrence, in tow
of the gunboat Cambridge, both of whom
had just come in from sea after the battle
commencud, proceeded directly for tho
scene of action. She remained hotly en
gaged until the fight ceased, and returned
and anchored off tho fortress at niue
o'clock P. M. The Roanoke, which left
her anchorage ofT the fortress at the same
time the Minnesota did, got aground mid
way Newport News and Fortress Monroe,
and did not participate in the muin en
gagement. All tbe Union war vessels on
their passage from Fortress Mouroe to New
port News went within range of tbe rebol
batteries at Sewall'g Point. . Both sides
opened fire with rapidity, bat no material
damage was done on either side; but the
fact was disclosed that a new rebel mask
ed battery of sis guus is on tbe extreme
portion of the point. The troops at the
Rip Raps, under the command of Major
Ilolliday, engaged this battery, using u
large rifled cannon, throwing tbe Sawyer
projectile The rebel battery was com
pletely silenced after a spirited cannonade
on both sides. Tbe frigate Roanoke was
got afloat about ten o'clock I*. M., and re
turned to ber anchorage off tbe Rip Raps.
She received three shots from the rebel
battery, but doing no injury to tbe crew.
The Minnesota remained still aground
after tbe engagement notwithstanding sev
eral tugs were sent to he assistance. Cupt.
Grier Talimadge, tho efficient Quartermas
ter at this post, subsequently proceeded by
special steamboat conveyance to the
Minnesota, and to learn what, if anything,
was needed in the way of. assistance, lie
succeeded in tuking off life money chest of
tbe Minnesota, in which whs one hundred
rnd fifty thousand dollars, and brought it
in safety to tbe fort.
In tbe evening, tbe horizon was all of a
sudden brightly illuminated. We sooa as
certained that the noble frigate Congress
was in a blaze. Tbe rebels having so dis
abled tbe vessel compelling her to surren
der, determined Uen. Mansfield to destroy
tbe vessel rather than to let the accursed
rebels have one plink of her. Uy bis or
der she was let on fire, and she sank near
the spot where she had been driven ashoie
?a monument to rebel atrocity. The
sight of the burning vessel was a moat
fearful and sublime spectacle. The night
was clear and beautiful, the bay without a
ripple on its surface. At first the flames
appeared in a small body, but gradually
they spread aft, and iu about two hours
time from tbe commencement of the con -
flagration tbe Congress was one mass of
flames. _ Slowly ,qnd gradually did the de
vouring' element encircle the tarred; rig
ging, until every stick of wood uud every
ply ot hemp was environed by the fiery
element. The waltr.being very calm, the
reflection of tbe burning mass was terribly
g^and. Tbe fire raged with great fury un
til about half past twelve o'clock, Sunday
morning, when all at once a shock and ex
plosion resembling tbe ernptlon of a- vol
cano, was beard, shaking the staunch old
fort almost to its foundation, and the burn
ing vessel, with everything on board,, dis
appeared forever from view. Tbe Ore bad
reached tbe extensive powder magazine;
which blew tbe hulk to atoms. The ex
plosion had the effect to cull all the troqps
to arms?imagining that a signal gun had
been fired. Namerons ' fragments of < the
vessel were picked.up on the beach three
or fonr miles from the fort,' which is a dis
tance of abont fourteen miles from where
the Congress went to-th?-bottom.
The day. closed, indeed, with sadness in
the hearts of our officers, besides having
the fact resting on their minds (hat the
hostile machine that had just made such
mnrderons work had only retired appa
rently to recruit itself, and then return to
complete the destruction she had so au
spiciously commenced, having the floating
vessels here at her mercy. While despon?
dency settled on many brows, and conjec
tures were rife as to where the Mcrrimac
would direct her attention the next day, a
gleam ot hope arose. At eight o'clock iu
the evening a bright, movable light was
discovered seaward coming from the di
rection of Cape Charles light. It being
known that the Ericsson Battery bad left
New ^"ork a lew days previous, surmises
were rife tlmt the light might proceed from
the deck. The best night telescopes were
brought into requisition, and in less than
half an hour after it first hove in sight the.
fact was circulated that the Ericsson ttat
tery was comiug up the Iloads. The news;
spreak like wildfire; the ramparts in the
fort was soon liued with troops. At nine
o'clock the Monitor anchored off Fortress
Monroe. Lieutenant Commanding Worden
immediately reported to flag officer Mars
ton, and subsequently to General Wool.?
It was at once determined by those officers
j to send the battery to Newport's News, to
I protect that port, also to defend the Min
nesota, which was still on shore. Before
! she started on hor missiou an additional
supply ot ammunitiou was placcd ou board,
and at half past eleven o'clock the Moui
tor went on her missiou, to await the ap
pearance of things the following day.?
The arrival of the Monitor was, indeed,
providential.
At early dawn this morning, the Merri
mnc, Jamestown, Vorktowu and a number
of other Rebel crafts were seen drawn up
off Sewall's Point, apparently waiting for
the smoke and haze to lift before resum
ing the contest. The Monitor had taken
her station to the loft and in advance of the
Minnesota, and our other gunboats were in
the neighborhood of the frigate. Shortly
after 8 o'clock the Merrimacbegau to move
up toward the Minnesota, about three miles
distautJ lier path lay across the bows?of
the Monitor, whose presence or r*?a! char-1
acter it is probable she was uot then aware
of. When within about a mile, the hall
was opened by the Monitor firing a shot,
which struck the side of the iron-hided
monster, the Merrimac at the sumo time
diackeuing hor speed, lier intention evi
dently was to make directly for the Min
nesota and serve her as she had served the
Cumberland uud Congress. But Middenly
she found a "lion in her path. The firing
was kept up for souie time at the distance
of about one mile, when the Monitor began
to move toward her antagonist, delivering
her fire deliberately and with precision.?
Tbo Merrimac, six times her size, and with
an armament equally out of proportion,
awaited her at rest. At a distance of a
quarter of a mile or loss, both opened their
terrible batteries?the Merrimac firing
much tho oftenest of course.
it was idc nrst irtai ot an experiment in
a tearful ordeal. Tliu scene was witnessed
by tliose who crowded the ramparts nnd
lined the docks with almost breathless in
terest. It would not bare disappointed
many at tbat moment had it become appa
rout that Iho unpretending Monitor was
unequal to the contest, liy this timo the
two iron-clad combatants seemed to toncb,
lighting at close quarters, delivering their
sbots seemingly into the muzzles of each
other's guus. But so far from being une
qual to ber adversary, tbe Monitor moved
around her, planting ber sbots where she
would. The contest was so hot that for a
time the smoke obscured both the Monitor
and tbe Merrtmac. As if realizing tbat she
had fonnd at least her match, if not her
superior, the Merrimac drew off towards
Craney Island, tbe Monitor pursuing,plan
ting her shot with tbe same deliberation
which bad characterized her movements
from the outset. After keeping up tbe
pursuit for half an hour, the Monitor re
turned toward the Minnesota. 1 should
have mentioned thnt shortly after this en
gagement commenced, one of tbe Rebel
gunboats, apparently tho Yorktowu, steam
ed out, aud boldly engaged the Monitor.?
A shot through ber, which must have done
serious injury, sent ber back again, and
she did not venture within range of tbe
guns of the new comer witbiD the day.
As if having rested from the first round,
and recovered from tbe bewilderment re
sulting from finding such a terrible antag
onist in so small a one, the Merrimnc re
turned to the contest, nud, as before, was
?uet fearlessly by the Monitor. Tbe Mer
rimac being now within range, the Min
nesota'delivered several of her thundering
broadsides, and showers of solid shot went
crashing against the side of the iron mon
ster. The gunboats also went into tbe
light gallantly. Though the Monitor again
sought close qnarter, tbe Merrimac, hav
ing already a taste of that sort of thing,
kept at a prudent distance. For more than
an hour the battle was kept up without
either side showing damage, when, at
about 11 A. M-, tbe Monitor retired beyond
tbe Minnesota to alluw her guns to cool.?
Tbe contest now raged between tbe Mer
rimac and Minnesoto and the gunboats.?
The terrible broadsides of tbe frigate,
chained to tbe bottom us it were, shook
tbe earth, and tt? solid shot glanced in
every direction from the sides of the Mer
rimac.
Having given her guns an hour to co.olj
the Monitor returned to the contest, and
the Merrimac was apparently ready for her,
for she did not retreat, but stood ber
ground. Nothing could exceed the accur
acy of the firing on both sides. After
kecpiug up the contest for half an hour at
a range of half or three quarters of a mile,
the Monitor began to advance on her an
tagonist, who awaited her with apparent
confidence. Delivering her fire with de
liberation and unerring precision, the Mon
itor went straight ahead and At fall speed
for the Merrimac, till the men on both
boats, if tbey bad not been hidden by tbe
iron covering, might have engaged in a
hand-to-hand fight. Now followed ono of
tbe most remarkable and exciting scenes
ever witnessed in naval warfare. Tbe
vessels touched, and delivering tbeir
broadsides simultaneously, tbe sbot crash
ed upon tbe sides ol both, either glancing
off and falling Into the water; or crumbling
into atoms. As if determined that tbe
contest should have un end, the Monitor
moved round tbe Merrimao at a distance 0/
only a few yards, plunging her sbots into
her sides: With well-directed aim she
planted one into her hull' below her iron
coating, and below her water line. Three
gaping holes now appeared in ber iron
coating. Passing deliberately roond the
stern of the Merrimac, the Monitor aimed
a sb'ot at ber screw, and several others at
vital points. '
The Merrimao now began to' inove on
toward tbe cove flanking Oraney Island,
and, as it became apparent that she was
tUiabled, cheers went op from tbe ram
pirts and shore. Tbe Monitor did not pur
?se, probably on acconnt of tbe beating ot
her guns, or some other equally good rea
son.. After lying for a short time near the
shore, the Merrimac slowly rounded out,
and turning her prow toward the place she
was seen In the morning, where the other
rebel boat9 were assembled spectators of
the fight.1 They gathered around her like
the backers of a whipped bully. At this
time it was the general opinion of those
who had the best means for observing, that
the Merrimac bad sunk at least two feet,
and that she was fast going down. Eler
deck was thronged with her crew. She
gave no signs of steam or smoke. Small
boats put off from her, and tug boats came
to her sides, as if to render assistance.?
As soon as arrangements eould be made
for doing so, the boats took her in tow,
and about three-quarters past 12, the Mer
rimac, the Yorktown, the Jamestown and
the other rebel craft, either towing or pull
ing the former, might be seen; constituting j
a mournful procession, as they passed into
the dim distance under Graney island.
Thus ended probably the most remarka
ble naval engagement on record; certainly
the first between two iron-clad antago
nists.
Deaurftptton of the "Moultor."
Under the act of Congress passed last
Bummer, appropriating $1,500,000 for
I irou clad vessels for the navy, Captain J.
tiricsson, the world-renowned iuventor
of the caloric engine, presented proposal*
for a. battery, to be launched within one
huudred days from the date of the con
tract, the iinpreguability of which should
be tested before the heaviest guns of the
enemy, and at the shortest rango. The
contract was signed in October, and on
the one-huudredth-and-first working day
thereafter the Monitor was launched from
the Continental Iron Works, at Grcenpoint,
where she was constructed by C. 8. Bush
nell & Co., under the superintendence of
Thos. F. Ilowlaud, of Brooklyn.
Externally she presents to the fire of the
enemy's guns a hull rising about eighteen
inches above the water, and a sort of mar
tello tower, twenty feet in diameter and ten
feet high. The smoke stack during action
is lowered into the hold, it bciug mado
with telescopic slides. The bull is sharp
at both ends, the bow projecting and coin
ing to a point at an angle of eighty degrees
to the vertical line, li is flat bottomed,
six and a half feet in depth, one huudred
and twenty-four feet long, thirty fonr feet
wide at the top, and is builtof light tiiree
cightb inch iron. Another, or upper hull,
rests on this with perpendicular giaes and
sharp ends, five feet high, forty feet four
inches wide, ouc hundred and seven
ty-four feet long, extending over the sides
of the other hull three feet seven inches,
aud over each end twenty-five feet, thus
serving as a protection to the propcllor,
rudder and anchor. The sides of the up
per hull are composed of a inner guard of
iron, a wall of white oak thirty inches
thick, covered with iron armor six inches
thick.
When in readiness for action, the lower
hnll is totally immersed, and the upper ono
is sunk three feet six inches, leaving only
18 inches above water. The interior is
open to the bottom like a sloop, the deck,
which is bomb-proof, coming flush with
the top of the upper hull. No railing or
bulwark of any kind appears above the
deck, aud the only things exposed are the
turret or citadel, the wheel-house, and the
box crowning the smokc*st:ick. The in
clination of the lower hull is such that a
ball to 6trike it in any part must pass
through at least twenty-five feet of water,
and then strike an inclined iron surface at
au angle of about ten degrees. In the
event of the enemy boarding the battery
they can do no harm, as the only entrance
is at the top of the turret or citadel, which
cannot easily be scaled, and even then on
ly one man at a time can descend into the
? ii
This turret is a resolving, bomb-proof
fori, and mounts two U-incb guns. It is
protected by eight thicknesses of inch
iron, overlapping so that at no one spot is
there more than one inch thickness of
joint. A shell-proof flat roof, of perfora
tedplate iron, placed on forged beams, in
serted six inches down the cylinder, cov
ers the top. The sliding hatch in this
cover is perforated to give light, and for
musketry fire in case the battery is board
ed. A spur-wheel,GA inches in diuraeler,
moved by donble cylinder engiuo, turns the
turret guns, and all, a rod connecting with
therunuing gear of the |engine enabling
thegunner to control the aim. The gum
move in forged-iron slides across the
turret, the carriages being made to fit
them accurateley.
These guns were furnished with 400
wrought-iron shot by the Novelty Works,
each ball weighing 184 pounds, costing
?47. The balls were made by forging I
square blocks of Iron, which were after
wards turned in the lathe. Cast-iron shot
would break against such a vessel as thej
Merrimac] and these shot were forged for I
the especial purpose of smashing through |
her sides. Lieut. Wordea intended in case
the Merrimac did hot come out, to go into !
Norfolk harbor and la} alongside of her
there. She has savod him that trouble.
Hats & Caps.
S. N. PRATHER,
Cor. Monroe Market Sts. I
A LWAY8 on liand a cholco and varied Stock of j
/jL HATS and GAPS for lien and Boys' wear.
lielng desirous of establishing a permanent trade, j
both in the city and surrounding country, all those
who favor me with their patronage can rely on being I
supplied with the best good* at the lowest flgaren.
Country Merchants are particularly requested to
call and examine my stock;
novM-tf 8. N. ritATHKR. . |
lVhceltng Wholeisle &. Retail
SHOE MANUFACTORY.
>... TlIK undersigned maybe found at 140
Main Street', where we are extensively
engaged In
in' manufacturing the latest and best styles
and quality of Ladle**, Mi?se?', Children's, Boys* and
Gentlemen's SHOES, expressly adapted to the tastes
and necessities of the citisensot Wheeling and the.
surrounding country, which we offer at wholesale'
and retail at prices which cannot fail to please the
most fastidious. .
Wo Invito the traded and the public, to call and
examing our goods. While we gratefully remember
past favors, which have already far exceeded onr
most sanguine expectations, we hope in the future '
to merit a continuance and to share a large increase
of public patronage.
Having largely reinforced our manufacturing 4e- j
partmrnt, with experienced and accomplished me
chanics, we are prepared to manufacture stylos and
sizes to order for the trade and public.
nov22 ' JAB.' W, PILL8WJRY A CO.
IBt EVERT PAHIliY, almost, can now be
found the KXCKLSIOR BAKING POWDER. It
excels everything of the kind in the market. For
; sale iu bulk and in'tin cawV>aHous sizes, by
\ ... T T* H. LOG AN k CO.
febW and LOO AN. LIST A OO.
TTEW HOOP SKIRTS,
Fir ladies, misses * children, .a 0r
bast muntketore, (net opened by
J*nl 8XO. R. TAYLOR.
PLOW WINGS?UO Minted Steel Wlop.
500 assorted Iron do, for sale by
feb!7 JOB. A. MKTCALF.
TEEMS OF WEEKLY.
One Copy per Tear, $1,00
" Six
1MTAKIAUT IN ASTAJTOl.
The Weekly Intelligencer "
Will contain thirty-two columns, mostly filled wit J
0 bole* and carefully prepared reading matter?em y
clog all subject*?tho* mucins it the largest and l>
Dollar Newspaper in thissectio country. *
??????
Blackwood's Magazine
AMD THX
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The present critical state of European affaire wili
render these publications unusually Interesting dur
ing the forthcoming year. They will occupy a mid*
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The Postage to any part of the United States will
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Premium to New Subscribers,
the No*, of the came Periodicals for 1SG0 will be
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Unlike tho more ephemeral Magazines of the day,
these Periodicals loee little by age Hence, a tull
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Subscribers wishing also the Nos. for 1861, will be
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' NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE!
yjff1 Remittances must, in all cases, be made direct
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can be allowed to agents.
LEONARD SCOTT A CO
janG No. 54Gold street. New York.
1AM'L OTT. MORGAN L. OTT. WK. H. UJ
SAM'L OTT SON 3, CO."
AOEKTS r0R
FAIRBANKS'i
STANDARD SCALES,
Adaptkd to rvgry branch or bubinhss
whore a correct and durable Scale la required.
Counter Scales or Every Variety.
PORTABLE & DORMANT SCALES
FOR STORES.
HAY AND CATTLE SCALES.
Ware home ?fc Transportation Scale*
Scales for Grain and Flour?Scales for Railroad*- ?
I Scale* for Coal Dealers aud Miners?Cotton and
i SngarScales?-Farm and Plantation Scales?
Post Office Scales?Bankers and Jewel
j lers Beams?Weigh Masters' Beams,
Ac., Ac., Ao.
I AH of which are warranted in every particular.
I Call and examine, or send for an illustrated and
descriptive circular.
N.B.?These Scales have all steel bearing*, which
purchasers will find upon examination is not the cas?
with other Scales offered for sale in this city, which
are represented to be "as good as Fairbanks." A
Scale with cast iron bearings cannot be durably ac
curate.
SAM'L OTT, SON & CO., Agents.
WBOLXSALX DXALXKS IX
Hardware,Saddlery Hardware,&e
Cor. Market A Monroe sts., opp. McLure Hons*,
mj4 Wheeling, Vs.
JAMES R. BAKER,
(rOXXXKLY or BACKS a xopxma)
WILL continue the Prodnce and Provision busi
ness iu the liouso occupied by the late firm.'
No. 49 A 61 Main street. dec!4 tf
JOHN G. CHANDLER,
Attorney at Law.
S3F"0FFICE over Bank of Wheeling.
decSO-ly
WM. SHAFFER,
PRACTICAL WATCH MAKER
JEWELER & ENGRAVER.
nxALxmix
Watches, Jewelry,Silver & Plaed
Ware,
FANCY GOODS, *.
Ho. 33 Monroe St.
OPPOSCTB M. A M BA2TX.
JAS. M. DILLON,
ISo. 107 Market Street.
WHEELING, YA.
PlatTMBEB AND GAS FITTEB,
Airs
BRASS FOUNDRY.
-pvBALEH IN WROUGHT IRON. OALVAHIZXD, .
1/ and .11 aixee or Lead Pipe., Shut I?d, Bru,
Cocke and Valm, Steam VbhttM. flt earn and Water
O um, Lift aod force Pnmpe, Li uka, Hoea, Antlfirla*
tlon Metal, Brancer Tin, Zinc, Antimony, Crndbale,
ilalranlacd Lightning Rod a, I nin latere and Pointa.
.VlENT FORTH E MENERLY BELLS. AqueJmet
Pipe, constantly on hand.
0?li paid for Oopper,-Braa? and Lead.
octlO ... . ? . .
SHAWLI.IBAWLS, IHAWLk
Square BrochaBhawU, worth $12, for Honfr. ,
Long do do "? 10 ?" f ? "
Rerenable, Sulla and Blanket Shawle, In great
r.rietj at ?ae|*30i ALEK. EHUU??.

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