OCR Interpretation


Daily intelligencer. (Wheeling, Va. [W. Va.]) 1859-1865, June 21, 1862, Image 1

Image and text provided by West Virginia University

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026845/1862-06-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WHEELING, VA., SATURDAY
JUNE 21,1862.
i-KlNTKb AHU Pl.tfLlSllKIl MY
CAMPBELL & M'DERMOT,
tXTKLLlCBSCKtt BVILDIXOS,
A*. K. corutr of Quitter and Mttin-SU.
T th: 11 M S s
Bally,(by mall.payaMe in ?drmnc?,).? -.$5,00
Ity the Week ?? 10
Trl-Weekly, (per year, payable In advance,) 8,00
JrJ- Advertising done on reasonable terms.
All adrerttsementa from a distance, or from transient
customers, most be paid In advance.'
INSURANdE
CASH ASSJSTTS, JULY 1, 1861, |
$1,920,763 20.
LOSSES PAID, UPWARD OP
? 14,000,000.
The (rrcat public service, promptness and reliabili
ty of tills well-tried and sterling Company, recom
mend it to preference with thoie needing Ins a ranee.
N. (!. AliTIIUR, Ag't.
Girard Fire & Marine Ins. Co.
PHILADELPHIA.
Al A5D Bcbplos. 4318,723 08 I
N.O. ARTHUR, Ag't.
Pennsylvania Insurance Co.
OF PITTS UDRQII, PA.
OANTAl..MM..<??nM....MM.. .....-.........^...^300,000
' llUR above Companieshavlngappolnted the nndor
L signed their Agent for Wheeling, and vicinity,
vronld respectfully solicit the patronage of the public.
S u J Companies are well known to bo first class offices.
All ioMcs promptly adjusted. N. 0. ARTHUR, Agt.
j nn3 Office over the Bank of Wheeling.
TO TtLvjSE WHO WISH TO BE I
I 1ST ST7 R IE D
AGAINST ALL CONTINGENCIES.
jlIIKjllOME INSURANCE COMPANY
Cash CAPi?AL(every dollar paid in) ............$1,000,00u
" Contingent Fund (over<..... 600,000
The largest Cash Capital for the amount of risk c?
oy office in the United States.
W. P. PETERSON, Agent
rnllEINgUBANCECO.iOFTHE VAL- i
1 LE7 OP VIRGINIA. 1
Casb Capital (paid in) ...... ... ... $300,000
Much the largest Cash Capital of any office charter-1
ed by this State.
fi^Pireand Inland risks taken on .the most rea
onablo terms. ?'- * 1
Losses equitably adjustod and promptly paid by
W. P. PETERSON, Agt.
'11IIB CONTINENTAL INSURANCE
L COMPANY, of New York.
Oisa Capital (paid in) $600,000
Jash Contingent Pund(over) ........................376,000
1nthisoffice the assured participate In the profits
without Incurring any risk.
W. P. PETERSON, Agent
11211C LYNCHBURG HOSE St, FIRE I
L INSURANCE COMPANY. 1
Cash Capital .................$100,000
W. P.PETER80N, Jr., Agent.
4jJ-0ver $2,500,000 of Cash Capital represented by -
his old and well established Agency, where every loss,
n tho above office has btfen promptly paid In Wheel-*
ng,belore It was due by the terms of the policy.
W. P. PETERSON,
Office next door to the M. A M. B ank,
J y7 ,*59?ly Mains t. TV heel I
INSURANOeT
The Fire&Manne Insurance Co. |
OP WHEELING.
INCORPORATED IN 1837.
11AKKS RISKS AT TIIE LOWEST RATE8 ON
. Unildings of all kinda, Steamboats, Purnltureand
Merchandise, and against all dangors attending tho
Transportation of Goods on rivers, seas, lakes, canals
ad railroads.
R W. IIa*doto, 8ec*y. II sir* t Cbavqlx, Pree?t
DIRECTORS. . ,
J C Acheson John Donlon, Rob't Morrison
!i. Crangle, 8. Brady, 8am'10tt.
Dan'l Lamb, Rob't Patterson, TO I .7
Applications for Insurance will be promptly at
ended to by tho President and Socretary,
Jan28,*53 ' 1 ' - . r ?
Saddles, Harness,1Trunks &c
wnoLiaula* BXML. rjt -
JB. StlKPPARD Jfo^rstaln BRUtf odrrfer
s Union, willeontinue to keep<ou hand qrtargeand
complete assortment of all articlo?)n ?ls line, consist
atg of Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saddles, Pins A Coarse
Harness, Trunks, Vailces, Carpet Bags, Satchels, Col
lars, Hauie?, Whips, Ac.
I would rospectfully call attention to my itock,and
trust by strict attention and promptness, w nwlt
continuance of the public patronage
All kinds of repairing promptly done, and In a pro
pernranner. J. B. 8HBPPARD.
sepS) '5? 131, Main Street
CARBON OJT
I HAVE ESTABLISHED AN Q>. OYINRRY
in this city, oa Lindsey street. N-ow the Gas
Works, where I keep constantly la hand and for
sale a good quality of Illuminating and Lubricating
oils. Also a good article of Axlo Groa<e, for wagons
or drays. Dealers and others In want of any of the
above articles will find it to their Interest to give mo
? jokk OQOK.
Savings Bank of Wheeling, \
OJHec, Uain-SL, btlwten Monroe and Union.
MONBT RECE1VKD ON TRANSDHiT BlttbSIT
Interat paid on Special Depoott.. OolloctloM
prompt I j attended to. Kxehange on the Bait Djnght
and uld. TR03. n. LIST, Prwddont.
S.VM'LP HltPRBTH, Trwrotw. janlV6g.
??un. ROBT. *0**130*. *.?.10?A*
? Iimillt. *.?AT*HK>*T.
LIST, MORBISOIT & CO.,
Whole.ole OrouM ProdM.D.?Ur.
-Vo?.70 and SO Ituin-St^ Wk?H*g,Ta.
- - - - - ?? - nf Hi* Ifttl
of tb. moat amplefacUM- torthe ttwacuoo ...
Wholenl.Groc.ry and Prodno. BiwIiwm.- nt ud
W. .re determined to execnt. ?U .rder. .ntro?.o
to onr cue with fidelity end promptM-, ?"d on tb*
mo.tf.Tor.bl. term.. Vonrob4 C0.
WbeoHn*. Jannaryld. 1W- janT
*.W.?AXT0S. JOHSOOinO*. 0.O01MM
JPAXTON, D0HL0ST & OGL^BAY.
1 aasa ?,r?
PRODUCE & COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
Hoi, 52 and 54, Main St.,
notl ' ' W heclliiK, V>.
T-HC. LOGAN &CO. .
^?jpPs.
AT8 T.mor?d to tte^NBW^WARgBQQM8, No
ZWTlSS sS2tlb?tr*i?,n?xt door to*Baker
Hopkins. Qnlncy Street ttttrluio. nMur th. Bait.
K-R. Depot, and wharf.
URUOS. SAINTS. OILS,
MKD1C1NB8.. VARFISIIB8, BRCBHB8,
WIND0WQL-R3.PBRFDMKRIK8, WltlTKUAD
PATENT MKD10INB8, Ac.
Offend to the trad ..In
andoftb.6-^
; -?'< - ?
SSSto^yMjconn^'at Umprteu
4UUS0ALBWZLU OEO*G? I. BOTH.
CALDWELL ft BOYS,
?*?1 F
BUSINESS CARDS.
T. C. KIGER, MD.
Homoeopathic Physician.
0P.C,C? "J? ??'??"">. Centre Wheeling, (Relow
!i# CI^JwLM"In ?lrMt' "lilc, between
second and Third.
Office hours from 0 to ? A. M, and 1 to 3 ft 7 to 0
11*1 _ ?rI2^3r_
A. M. ADAMS,
WUOLRfAUt AlTD RCTAIL
CLOTHING STORE,
W,L?.ll!l.5lwm/" m*T foand SUPERIOR OLO
notice ' makes to order, at the shortest
All Gar went* belonging toGeutlemen
No. 3d, Watkk Stuxt,
? : . Wh tiling, Pa,
J2KT Agent* for W.Bingham's Shirts and Stocks
of every description. Also, for A. B. Howe's Excel
sior Sewing Machine. aug2G 'Cl-ly
8, U*CXBLUC? C. V. XXOX.
M'CLELLAN & KNOX,
DXALBR8 AT W1I0LX8AJJI XXCLUMTKLT, IX
BOOTS * SHOES
No. 113 Main Stx*eet,
A few doors above M. k, M. Bank, West Side,
apiMJm* WHEELING, VA.
M.REILLY,
Wholesale Dealer in
GROCERIES,!
Forflgn and Domestic
Wines and Liquors,
Nos.56 AST Mxur 8nnr,
mj7?ly WHEELING, VA J
J A. METCALF,
CO'JIMISSIOS MBllCIIABiT AMD
MANUFACTURER'S AGENTi
rat m hal* or
Nails, Window Glass, Cincinnati Soap
Iron. Flint Glassware, Lard 0111,
Steel, Qreon Glassware, Lime,
Springs, Printing Paper, Plaster Paris,
Axles, Wrapping Paper, Cement,
Koeln, Woodon Ware, 8tarch.
Together with many articles of Pittsburgh and
Wheeling manufacture.
No. 50 Paxton's Row, Main St.,
norl7 Wheeling, Va.
JlfO. 8. CARLtLB. BAKXIBAL FORBES.
CAltLILE & FORBES,
Attorneys At Law,|
WHEELING, VIRGINIA.
Practice in all the Courts of Ohio Connty, and the
avoiding counties. ? 1
Omci oh Fourth Strut, No I60J4 septtM*
TheCitizen's Deposit Bank |
OF WHEELING.
Bank open from 9 o'clock a. m, until
P. 51. Discount days?Thursdays 10 o'clock A.
49*Mone) received on transient deposit.
w Interest paid on special deposits.
4arC"lloct tons madeand proceeds promply remi tted
DIRECT0R8:
Jacob Berger, J.N.Vance,
Jacob Hornbrook, G. W. Pranxhelm,
Warren Cooper, J. K. Botsford,
Geo. K. Wheat, Chester D. Knox.
J.K.MOLXR, Cashier. AlfredCaldwell,Prcs't
[feb*-'6Q ly] 1
OLARX U RAHI 8. T. MIUII |
C. L. ZANE & CO.
importer .nd Dtalert in Pmign <t Dowuittc
Wines and Liqnors,
Manufacturers of
Pure Oatawba Wines,
Q cur or Street, bbtweew Maw ft Market Sts.
WHEELING, VA
TTBEP constantly on hand Brandies, Scotch and
IV Irish Whiskies, Jamaica Rams and Cordials,
Choice Old Rye and Bourbon Whiskies. sep27?ly
c7h. dingeb,
DBALKlt IN
Hats and. Caps,!
Ho. 141 Main Street,
n>hl8-1r WnEKLING, VA.
W-nie?lglie?t Prlco in Oih, paid formU kinds I
of Tur-Hldee, inch u Mink, rox-jUccoon, Ac. |
J. C. HAEBOUE.
WhalutU <* Rdatt. DcnUrin
CARPETS RUGS, OIL CLOTHS
Wall Papei, Curtain Material.,
lAnaDphotat?ryW*ro ofoTerydeicrlptton
l^MatnStreet^^
49-Oilt and Mahogany Framed Looking Glasses
n hand and made to order. sepg. <w
THE BEST PIANOS
IN THE WORLD!
WM. KNABE & CO'S
These Instruments are warranted for five \
yeare, and the privilege of exchange '
granted at any time tcithin six
months, if not entirely
satisjactory. > ..
FINK ASSORTMENT on hand and fcrsUe at j
L Baltimore factory prices. !
JESSE B. MBLLOR,
laa Main Street.
aplO Sote Agent for }Vht*ling and vicinity. '
WM. SHAFFER,
'RiCTICAL WATCH MAKER
JEWELER & ENGRAVER.
? . ' MAUklR
I Watches, Jewelry, Silver & Played
Ware,
FANOT 600D8, *e
. No.Sg Monroeflt*
I0PP08JTB M. * If BANK.
P. C. HILDRETH & BRO.
S3 Main Street,
Wheeling, Va.
WlloLKSAL* DBALKRB IN .
Nail Rod, Window Glass, Maryland Lime,
Bar Iron, . . Printfn* Paper,Common Lime, -
si,
wS. I^PlMter, ten,. _ .
QutltMl Oonnt, YToatmi Ware, Ac.
Agent! for BaWff* ImproTOd Connter ?Bd PUtfona
? Mnmll Ar tei.Tlowtd
. JOHN G. CHANDLER,
IAttorney at Law.
er-OFFICEom o? ? aecBQ-ly
??? ? ? "
tjll il
XW'* " ~ ;
gailgftttdlipnccv
TERMS OF ADVERTISING*
Twelve Solid Likes or Nokfakeil, (or oiri nrcH,)oa
Less, kjlua'Sqvau.
Three Weeks*.. $460
Ou? Month,.iU.....~.' 5 00
TwoMocth*^...:.,.... 8 00
Three Months,? 10 00
Bbc Months, 15 00
One Yortr, ..2000
OneBay^ bqk.......$0 76
TwoD*ji,?...?....... 100
Three I>?re> 126
Four DajV? - 1 60
Five Day*, 176
One Weekr- 2 00
Two Weeks,?..... 3 60
-*3*-8pecial Notices Double the above rates.
-WYewly Advertising on reasonable terms, aceor*
ding to the space occupied and the munberof changes
made.
All adrertisementifram transient persons or Strang
ers. to be paid far in advance.
Business Cards not exceeding five lines, $10per rear,
or $0 for six months, but for a shorter period nothing
will be conn tod lets than a snuare.
L The privilege of 'Annual .Advertising 'is limited to
the Advertisers' own Immediate badness: and all
advertisements for the benefit of other prsons as
well as all legal advertisements, and advertisements
of auction sales and real estate,sent in by them mas*
be paid for at the usual rates.
4E7"Advertisements not accompanied with wrltteu
directions, will be inserted uutll forbid,and charged
Notices for Political Meetings to be clinrged in all
cases at full rates. A
Marriages, NoticeflbFunerals, and annoncements
of sermons, 50 cenflHach. nonvll-*59
Conditional and CiioonaitlonaUJnloii
,.ClarH"b"r* Telegraph,
imen.gS??? -nd W""I,n*
Editors Intelligencer :
It lias been suggested by some people
that the Democratic party ongbt to be re
organized, as ooet if not the only, meanB
of restoring the Union. I tbink there are
not very many who take this position, and
I am free to say, and do lay, that those
who do, have mo'ra impudence, presumption,
and audacity, than those who are in armed
rebellion ngiinst tho authority of the
United States, and aro wanting, if not in
common honosty, iu common sense. Every
reading tnno knows that the present conflict
was made and inaugurated by the Demo
cratic party?that is, the Southern wiogof
it, led by Ureckinridge and Yancey. It is
clear to the minds of all loyal men, that
nouo but sympathizers with the rebellion
want any party re organized at promt.
It is wanted by Vallundighum, Voorbi??,
Wood, Carlile, tho New York Herald, the
Clarksburg Telegraph, nnd the Wheeling
Prer*. These persuns nnd print3 can find
nothing so worthy, of villi6cation as the
Northern pooplo, all of whom, by implica
tion, it" not by words, they denounce
as "Abolitionists." The Telegraph and
Prut owe their livtt nnd living to the
patriotic sobs of the North, who volun
tarily "crossod the Ohio and entered
the soil of Virginia," as McClcllun said
last summer, to protect the lives and prop
erty of oar people, when we were not able
to protect ourselves. Tho Editor of the
Telegraph is a refugee from Tennessee
whence he wns driven, as he says, (but
which I doubt,) to save his life. 1 think
hit unionism might flourish well in Tennes
see. Now he is engaged in traducing the
very men who risked their lives in defence
of a country in which he was too coward
ly to live. Oh ! base ingratitude ! Well
might the Government exclaim?
'?How sharper than a serpent's tooth tt is
To have a thank'.eea child I"
The Editors of tile Prut aro refugees
from Hampshire county, in this State, who
came to Wheeling to get the publio print
ing, who instead of loving the Union, lovo
only the spoils which they can secure
from its treasury. The Government has
spent millions in defence of the County of
Uainp9bireand those surrounding it; thous
ands of Northern men have risked all that
they held dear in driving the rebels out of
that section, and hundreds and perhaps
thonsands of them have found graves upon
its suil, bravely delending a people who
despised them, while the Editors of she
Prf" ore daily denouncing them as ??abo
litionists," and pleading for the uegroes of
those who murder, at.d destroy, not only the
soldiers who have gone to their defence,
but assassinate, bunt and pillage the few
Union men who remained utleSUie inglori
ous flight of Trowbridge and Downey.
Where would at have been but for the
Northern army? Those who were uble,
and who did uot, like the Editors of the
Prat. seek safety in flight, would have
been impressed into the rebel army, and
their property would have been destroyed,
nnd their families insulted if not outraged.
Yet these men hurrah for slavery nnd burse
tbeir defenders us ?' Abolitionists." That
word has no terrors for me. That has been
the cry of Democrats ever since 1 can re
member. It lias been applied, to me and
to all who bad the boldness to denounce
their' infernal doctrine, which has culmi
nated, as it enemies always predicted it
would, in civil war and an attempt,at a
dissolution of the Union?to accomplish by
force of arms what it could hot accomplish
t,t the ballot-box. We told the Democrats
hat it was a Rule or Ruin Party; and that
prediction was as true as the glance;of a
prophet. They could not rule; they are
trying to ruin. Thank God!-.they can do
neither 1
But the most melancholy part of this
matter is that some who are Union men,
and muny who profess to !be Union men,
are joining In'the cry against the Northern
men, calling tbem "abolitionists," and va
rious other names 'manufactured by trui
tors. I want no better criterion by \vbUi
to jndge of a man's loyalty in these times
than to hear blm cry ??abpiitiQnJst
onrse Fremont, Hooter and Banks': swear
that all the "Black Republicans" ougfit to
be bong, saying that the Northern fanat
ics are worse than *th? secessionists; that
the abolitionists ougbt to be bung' by the
side of Davis and Yancey; 'never abuse
secessionists, except in company with "ab-.
olitionists" and fanatics?all of -which I
have beard nearly, every day for the last
three months;' 'These-Union *merf want the,
Union restored at it was, and the Constir
tution^^r?e^?f all ^itt They
remain?tbuy wero. before tb$ Srar. With
them, emancipation .is . a violation of the
Constitution. They .don't want the South
to be buit, not tt all; that would be un
constitutional. They have very inno
cently and "very... kindly ' attempted
to destroy the Union by arms, and it is nti
and especially their right to make tbeVnig
ger" soprttaej and. the "nigger" influence
predominate over erejything else; J don't
" ' ^on?-n?verth8lMLS that^'lavS U*f
one sense, the cause of the war: and I ani
equally of opinion, on the bther ban<l,that
tlactry will not be itortk jigktuigfar. Ilea
may deplore it, 'some honestly'believe "la
very is right; men may Buy they are sorry,
that it is Lincoln'* fault, that be promised
to.pratect the property of all Stales, &c.,
but after all, wise men can so.' that the
rebels made the war, and tbey can also see
that it is the war nod not Lincoln that is
playing the devil with the '.'peculiar insti
tution. ordained of (Sod."
Now, Messrs. Editors, if you will excuse
this personal allusion I will say that these
Union men, spoken of above, are subscrib
ing f?r the and buying it at till the
railroad stations instend of the Intelligencer.
It suits them; it is a sympathiser with their
rebel views, it talks glibly about Democra
cy and what a great aud good party it has
been in days agone. Some old line whig*,
who have been among, the best Uniop men
in their section, are catching the negro ma
nia, praising and buying the jPr?? and curs
ing the "abolition Intelligencer." These
fellows will soon bo democrats aod seces
sionists, and ns between the two I could
make no choice. Tbey are nearly synony
mous.
The Intelligencer stood .up boldly nnd
patriotically for the Dnion when nil was
dark and stormy, and no eye was found to
pity and no arm to save us in Western Vir
ginia ; it never faltered ; it stands to-day
true to the Constitution, the Union and
the enforcement ol the Laws. These so
called Uulon men applauded the Intelli
gencer a year ago when it defended the
cause of tbe Dnion almost ulone in West
ern Virginia; it was good enough when
there was no ouo else bold enough to pub
lish an unconditional Union paper in tbe
State; but the rebellion having been driv
en from our midst, hydra-beaded monsters,
Janus-faceed, rise up and call themselves
" Conservatives.'.' They are like cowards
in tho army, who are very bold, after skir
mishers have gone ahead and driven the
enemy to the wall, and tbe figure need not
nop here, for these fellows claim all the
honor, ? their rfgiment u-ai cut to [piece*.
The Intelligencer has done the: work ; tho
Prett steps in and claims that it was in the
hottest of the fight; the Intelligencer ra
minds it that it was not in the hottest of
the fight at uij, when tbe I'r^u cries, "Saul, .
Saul, why persecutest thou m? ?"
I guess, however, the Intelligencer will
live ; the calumuy of the tbiug on Market
Street cannot affect it, for to my mind its ?
Blander is praise.
Messrs. Editors, are not Uepublics un- ,
grateful?
1 conclude by saying that 1 sat down
merely to renew ray subscription, which I
now do. Very respectfully, R. E.
Juno 18tb, 1882.
The Attempt to Divide the Union
Strength In Oar. Midst.
Eeilore Intelligencer:
In this hour of national Buffering and
trial, when our Government is making one
mighty struggle for its integration and in
tegrity; when tbe resources of the cpan
try, pjlitically, financially and physically,
are engrossed in this sanguinary conflict;
when the energy and patriotism of a noble
people are impelling it to a speedy con
summation, it is ignominious and intoler
able to behold a reckless pack of hounds, :
clothed in tho ertnino of Democracy, at- i
tempting to restore and resurrect a polit- i
ical organization long since defunct. Tbe i
course they have hitherto pursued, tbey
have discovered to be rather unpropitious
and incommodious, in that their treasona
ble and nefarious programme of outspoken,
fiagraut disloyalty, has unceremoniously
been contravened and expunged by the vigl
Hnce of tbe Stste and Federal authorities.
Tbe idea of being incarcerated in Fort War- '
ren or dispatched to the Atbeneum, was not '
congenial to th6 sensitive nature of our '
"'constitutional gentry." They labored n J
long time to convince the Government, of 1
the nnvalidity of its course, and its en- '
oroachment upon the constitutional rights I
of citizenship. But the louder tbeir pro- <
tests tbe more inezorable became the ad- 1
ministration. The proscription Of the press I
and the arrest and confinement of a few <
champions of treason, und the refusal of ?
tile loyal masses of their own party to co- <
operate with them have rendered their ef
forts of successful .opposition to tbe Gov- .
ernment an .abortion. Hence change in ,
tho "mbJuj operandi" of the leaders. Tbey (
discovered the unpopularity of their move- y
raent and its utter impracability, and hav- ?
iog failed to cope with the Government
wbeo the direct issue was made, they now
meretriciously advocate the indispensible
necessity of tbe resurrection of the Demo- I
critic party in order that they may '
emasculate and enervate the Union plal- J
anx in its laudable ettorU to crush seces
sion aud treason whether it be North or 1
South. For I opine that these traitors at |
tbe Xortb, who are clandestinely availing i
themselves of every instrumentality to i
thwart the purposes of the natioo, and who
are inveigling against tbe regime > of tbe
"Lincoln party," And disclaiming tb'eir af
filiation with, sutih unbounded extrava
gance and licentiousness in administration
are equally culpable and dangerous as
tbose who have reared the standard of re
bellion and deteimined, to maiotain it by
force of arms, ffay, we would *ay, cal
culating tbe success pt the rebellion, more
so. With an open enemy in the.,field,
whose resources and prowess we know, we
can count the chances of success, and .nev
er apprehend defeat. But with an enemy
in tbe dark, wb^se ? dimensions we have
nover measured, and whose strength, we
can never, ascertain, who is' watching to"
waylay us, waiting every pretext to dis
tract, and every weakness to .expose, and
who is continually publishing libel
and canard in' order to, detract
confidence in the adpiinlstralido, and suc
ceed ultimately lit the disintegration.i>f, the
government is still formidable. In Ibis
contest we have but two parties. , One is
for tbe maintenance of the Union and su
premacy of the Constitution. The; other
for their subversion. The issue is radical ,
and vital having, appealed to the arbitra
ment of arms "and consequently . haying
merged nil parties. in .one.grand integral,
party 'upon whose altar are sacrificed all
political associations, anil party platforms,
and whose only politica l* the "Union nnd
Constitution." Vfhwv; the proper time
pomes .for, the. ..reorganization of parties
then let it be done, but not qntil our Got
sand.we bare
IP?
Let no, loyal
??Vending-,
10 similarity
The one is
The. other, at
Li9?"ere<! a"
WjWPMfMT'
erao
ed the dis*eodious,.ol partj
ham Democraeg." It has. i
to the old Democratic parky.,
all treason and :dlsloyaI?y
the inception of tfuacqp^st c
(From the Cincinnati Commercial.)
The Olijeot of Jackson's Raid Into the
Valley of Virginia.. :
It iB notorious that immediately after the
news of the Appearance of Gen. Jackson
with a formidable iorce in the. Valley of
Virginia; orders were issned from tbe War
Department, changing tbe destination of
the maio body of tbe army collected ut
Fredericksburg uoder Gen. McDowell, from
Richmond to the pursnit of Jackson. We
remarked at tbe time that tbe diversion;of:
Geo. .McDowell's army wrb ill-advised.?
The forces under Generals Fremont, Banks,
and Sigel, were sufficient to bold Jackson
in cbeck at least, and to render Maryland
aud Washington safe. In an emergency
tbe Militia could be called from tbe Eas
tern States, to reinforce our troops In front
of-Washington, and those on duty in Mary
land and in tbe Valley of Virginia. The
true policy would undoubtedly have been
to push McDowell forward as if nothing
bad happened in tbe Valley. The panic at
Washington caused different and unfortu
nate counsels to prevail. Wo have seen
that Fremont alone was able to drive Jack
son back over all the ground be won in bis
advance, and the first fruit of the diversion
Of McDowell's army is the defeat of two of
our brigades, worn down with excessive
marching, at Port Republic. There has
also been a want of proper co-operation
between Fremont aud Shields, or we must
credit the rebel General with extraordinary
skill in the management of his forces.
Light is shed upon the strategy of tbe
rebels, by the capture of some of the pri
vate corfespondencee of their officers at
Winchester. This correspondence was first
printed in tbe Baltimore American, and it
bears intrinsic evidence of genuineness.
The most important letter is one from Gen.
Joseph E. Johnston to Oenl Jackson, which
is dated "May 27th, nine o'clock and fifteen
minutes.7' The followiog is extracted
from it:
"You cannot,In your present position, employ hucIi
an army as youra upon any enterprise not tearing
directly upou the state of things here, either i?y pre
venting tho reinforcement* to McClellan's *rmy, or
by drawing troops from it by diversions. IbMe ob
jects might be accomplished by the demonstrations
proposed above, or by a movement upon rtIclx>wol),
although I fi-nr that by the tiiuo thin roaches you it
will be too into Or oitlier. The ?*?*?t impn'ridnl 4er
fie*, you can render Ute country is the preventing the
furtlttr rtrengt'+tning trf.MoGleUan'sarmy.'1
It thus appears that the draw'ng of
troops from McOlellan's army by diver- i
sioos was the paramount object of the i
movement made by Jackson, and in this
he.was successful in a degree greater than i
he could have hoped, actually preventing j
tbe reinforoement of McOlellan by an army i
of forty thousand men. Gon. Johnston
undoubtedly stated tbe exact truth when i
he wrote to Gen. Jackson, "The most im
portant service you can render the country
(that is, the rebellion) is the preventing i
the further strengthening of McOlellan's \
army." It follows that on our side the
most important service could be rendered
the Governmeent is the strengthening of
McOlellan's army. The diversion of Mo- ,
Do well's army from its proposed march on
Richmood was a grievous blunder. Of ,
this tact it is evident the authorities at
Washington are now sensible, and there is
reason to believe they are doing their best
to repair j damages. The essential thing
to do is to increase onr force at Rich
mond.
Gen Fremont to His Soldiers*
IIeadquartfrs Mountain Dbp't. I
Mt. Jacksox, Va, Juno 13. J
The Commanding General desires' to
hank the troops for their steadiness and
;oo(l conduct in the numerous recent on
:ounters with the enemy, and more cspe
:ially to express his admiration of the
ihstinnte and veteran courage and tho
nstancos of chivalric bravery (displayed
>y them at the battle of Cross Keys. He
hanks them warmly for the soldierly en
trances which enable them in their
rigorous pursuit of tho onemy to meet
he extraordinary hardships and fatigues
if forced marched, in the most inclement
vonthcr, and in the absensce of tlid most
irdinary supplies. ?
lie congratulates them upon their ra
nd iind glorious march, in which tbcy
Irove before them, in precipitate retreat,
i greatly superior onemy?inflicted loss
lpon him in daily engagements, compel
cd him after a hard-lbught battle to
-etreat from bis ehosen grouud, leaving
lis dead upon it. and abandoning two
?uns?and finally threw him across tho
Shenandoah, with tne parting admoui
,ions of their well-served artillery.
The General commanding congratula
tes his troops, but at the same time re
grets that he finds it necessary to call
.heir attention to the many disorders and
excesses, and wanton outrages upon pro
perty, which have marked the line of
inarch of this army from Franklin to
Port Republic. There seems to be an
irganizea band of stragglers and plun
lerers, who precede and follow tho nrmy,
having outrage and plunder for their
spccial occupation. The Commanding
general feels perfectly assured that no dis
position will be .attributed to him to re
quire unreasonably severe discipline or
to infliet unreasonable severe punish
ment, but the magnitude, of this evil
requires that it bo summarily and severely
shcckcd, and it is therefore ordered as
follows.
. Ifo, soldier shall., leave his ca
corps when upon the march, -
written authority of bis immi
mauding officer. Parties sent out for forr
age shall be under charge of a commis
?ioned officer, who will beheld strictly ac
countable for theirconduct. Men pllotred,
to bathe or quit their crvmpato waih cloth
ing will. In every instance, be accompan
ied by a. non-commissioned officer; and no
meo will be permitted to enter a h'ousi of
ft cltiien,unle?j order?d.'o.do so b/i bis
**MWJ J 1 WW . M
tccotding to the degree of their offensra ;
ind any map, whether he be a regularly en
tiled toldierteanuter_ or other employee or
nmp/olloUKr, .who ,kaU ie. fbarged with
ilundertng the property ojf eiUzou tcithoul the
'hue, or of etealing within the 'line*, ehatl he
,ummarily triedbycvmwrti^andifjitfnd
ruuty thall be ehot. The General Com
naniling trusts that in bis determination
it once td bring about and maintain
food order and. sound discipline in ihe
irray he will.;receive the. prompt,and
office to take care that it do not become
necessary to sacrifice lives in' the raiiiii
tninauce of good order. Tbey are clothed
for this purpose, with the necewary
authority, and will be hereafter held rigid
ly accountable. The troops will be driiwn
up in line this afternoon nt font o'clock,
and this order read in: English to all the
regiments, and in German also, to all those
of Gen. Blenker's Division.
It will also be read by officers comnUod
Ing companies, at three successive' parades,
and subaltern officers nod i Sergeants will
attend to its being read by every individu
al of their respective squads, who may
ha\ e been abseut lit the time of reading as'
above directed.
John G. Frimont,
Unj. Gen. Cgmmanding.
Albert Tkact,
'Col. and Adiutant General.
Constitution of. the Union Glab of
Charleston Vs.
[From the Kanawha Republican.]
ARTICLE lv
This Club shall be called the Union
Club, of .Charleston Kanawha county Vir
ginia.
ARTICLE 2.
This Club shall consist of a President,
Vice-President, Secretary, Assistant Secreta
ry, and an Executive Committee, to be com
prised of five members. All of which
shall be elected by the Club.
ARTICLE n.
The objects of this club are?to defend
3Urselves against'secret sworn enemies in
3ur midst who seek to crush nnd destroy
aur Union loving, and law abiding citizens
ind to build up the<doomed cause of re
d el lion, by insinuating themselves into
afiices and employing rebels ns .officers or
laborers under them to the exclusion of loy
il men, Or otherwise aiding or abetting re
bellion, particularly obstructing the course
3f justice. To defend ourselves nnd the
Prion agiunst the dangerous influences of
lelf exiled traitors,' who liaviug sacrificed
their honor and means upon the-altar of
the demon of- treason, return to our midst
tinder the garb of loyalty to eucourage and
build up the cause ot rebellion at home.?
By their fruits ye shall know them. We
ivill welcome all loyal men'?men who
prove themselves as such?back to our
nidsl, but petjured traitors we will treat
is such.
To defend out selves dnd the Utiion
igainst all sworn enemieB abroad, by aid
ng both the Federal Government nnd the
restored Government of Virginia, by all
neahs within our power to crush this un
latural and unrighteous rebellion.
To aid every means in our power to .the
-estoratiou of peace and order in our coun
,y by securing the election of officers of
jjood character and unquestionable loyal
ly.
ARTICLE 4.
It shall be the duty of the President to
Mill the club together forspuciul meetings,
tvheu in the judgement of the committee it
iball be deemed necessary.
ARTICLE 5.
This club shall meet weekly at the Court
Sonse in this place Monday evening at 7
)*clock. !
ARTICLE 6.
For the carrying out of the provisions of
article 3d, Vwe pledge our lives, our proper
ly, and our sacred honor."
The annex resolutions are adopted as
part of the letter and spirit of the consti
tution. ?
. Resolved, That we, the Union men of
Charleston, will hold every secessionist and
rebel living in our town and vicinity, re
sponsible, both in their lives.and property,
Tor all or any damages which they may
sommit directly or indirectly upon the per
sons or property of loyal citixens.
Resolved, That we, the loyal, citizens ot
Charleston, and of the Uuited States of
America, are willing to sacrifice both otir
properly and lives to support the Constitu
tion of these thirty-four States.
Rcsclvcd, That the Unio i men of Charles
ton will allow no. man, or set of men, to
sheer for any rebel or enemy of these Uni
ted States, In this town.
Resolved, That we, the Union men of the
town of Charleston, nre ready at any hour,
flay, or nightt to respond to any .call for
the protection and peace of this town, and
for the enforcement, of the laws.'
The terms of admission to membership
i>f the club are simply signing this consti
tution'.
OFFICIAL.
LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES)
Passed at the Second Session qf the Thirty-Seventh
Oongrtxs.
61
AN ACT- to nnkto'th?tlm? of holding the courts
of, the Uuiieu States for the district, of Kentucky,
snd (br otbor purposes. "
Be it enacted' by the Senate and House of Repres
tentative? of the United States of America in Con
gress AMsembled, That the circuit and district Court
of the .United States for .the district of Kentucky shall
hereafter commence and be held as follows: At Cov
ington on the third Monday of April and on the first
Monday or December; at Louisville on t&e third Mon
day of February and first Monday of October; at*
Frankfort-en the third Monday of Meyand first Moo-,
day of January: and at Paducah on the third Moh
day of Maroh and first-Monday of November.
? Sec. 'Z. And be it jfnrther enacted, That if neither
of the judges or said courts be present at Uptime for
opening court, the clerk may open and aiijourn the
oouct trom day to day lor four days, and ir the Judge
iota net appear by two o'clock p. at. bf the fourth day
the.clerk shall adjourn the c^urt the next stated
term, But either the' circuit' or district J udge, by
written order to the clerk within the first three.days
of his term may adjourn court to a future day, with
in thirty days oftheHftfaay, of which adjournment
the clerk shall ?i ?? notice by posting a copy or said
HU ?Wc?4t^cir?iU lwijO, Wr ?oIcT ? j.pectaI
term of the circuit court, designated in a similar or
ler, to be published In a similar 4afanafcr, and in one
Inttes of j the officers of court,is summoning juries,
md in the performance of other acts necessary forths
toldlng of such special termorthe court may by its
totalisthereof. _ -,i
See. 3. And be it farther enacted, That snch nam
>er of Jurors shall- be summoned by-ths marslial at
%7,
loos term'; ftml In case thes is not aanfftdent ounv
er of jurors in attendancest any time, the courtmsy
rder such number to' he summoned ss, In its Jndg
sent, may be deemed necessary to transact the host
ess of the court. . And ?g****d Jury may be rtah
xoned to attend everyterm of the circuit or district
tmri by order of court. The marnhal may sQtnmon
dries and talesmen in case of a deficiency, pursuant
? arforder or court made during-th* farm, aad they
Sec. iAnd be it farther enacted, That the i
srmof any district court may be held at any time
Itat the 1 dttrict Judge may order by giving notice ,
AjMr.Uther. b. uj the pUcn. -
lie necessities of the business ; and tbe lntes^rsntion
r a term of a district' or circuit btart -at another,
lace shall notprodudethepowarttf adjourn over to
latere days. .n'.-A
? any particular number of days, nor shall it be net*
^f^s,??i"nrrrAi
One Copy per Tear,? ?tl.C
" Six Months, 60
W iMTiiunxn Adtutob. "S?
The Weekly Intelligencer
Pfll contain thirty-two ooltumo, meetly filled wit
ahofce and careftilly prepared reading matter?em
clng till antjects?thus mating It the largest and b
Dollar New?peper in tW? wctlo country. *
e*mry to adjourn br rsasuu of tho intervention or a
term of tb* court elsewhere; but the business of the
conrU at two place* may proceed, there being a judge
present at each place, or the court Intervening may
be aOJonrned orer, as herein provided. till (ha bud
uess of the court in session is concluded.
8ec.7. Acd be It further enacted, That a clerk shall
be appointed at every place of holding circuit and
district courts for the /istrict of Kentucky, in like
manner and subject to the same duties and responsi
bilities that other clerks are subject to lb other inde
Ctadent districts; the deputy derlc*. at Covington,
misrille, and Paducah shall perform the duties of
the offices, respectively, till clerks are duly appointed
andqijallfled.
S-c. 8. Aud be it ftarther enacted, :That commission
ers appointed.by the-cburta of the United 8iates to
take bail, affidavits, and so forth, shall have like pow
ers to take surety of the peace and for good behavior,
by said act now have. ,,
Sec. ft. And be it further enacted, That all process
which shall not have been returned when this act
takes effect shall be returned t?the terms, respect
ively herein fixed; and the clerk, upon issuing orig
inal process in a civil action, shall make, it returna
ble to the court nearest to the county of the reji
dencsol the defendant, or ot that defendant whose
county Is nearest a court, if he have Inforaiatlon suf
ficient, and ahall immediately upon the payment by
the plaintiff of his fees accrued, send the papers filed
to the clerk of the court to which theprocesals: made
returnable; and whenever the proceea Ja not thu*
made returnable, the defendant or defendants may,
upon motion, on or. before the. calling of the cause,
have it transformed to the court to which it should
have been senTbad the clerk known' the residence of
the defendant or defendants when, the action.was
brought. ' '. *?
Sec. 10. And be it. further enacted, That in case of
the existenco of bail bonds for the appearance of .per
sons to answer. It shall' be the duty of the clerk to
call tho parties at the time they are bound to appear
and If they fail to enter the same oh his minutes, on
which entry a judgment may afterwards be made of
record by tho court; and Jf the party appears, the
clerk shall take another bond, with sureties similar
to the first, for lurther appearance at the next .suc
ceeding term ol' the court, and If the party foil to
give bond aud surety, then he shall stand committed
by order of tho citric till he do* s comply,
Seo.ll. And be It farther enacted. That all laws
and parts of laws inconsistent herewith are hereby
repealed, hnd this act shall be in force from and af
ter Ita- passage. /
Approved, May 15,1S62.
Wheeling Wholesale A. Retail
SHOE MANUFACTORY.
THE undersigned maybe found at 149
Street, where we are extensively
engaged in manufactnring the latest and best' styles
and ouality of Ladies'. Misse*', Children'*, Boys*, and
Gentlemen'* SlIOKS, expressly adapted to the tastes
and necessities of the citliensot Wheeling and the
surrounding country, which wo offer, at wholesale
and retail or price* which cannot tail to please the
most fastidious. : , . ?
We Invite the trade, and the public, to call and
examing our goods. While we gratefully remember
past favors, which hayo already far excecdal our
mostnauguiue expectation*, we hope in the rature
to morit a continuance and to share, a large increase
of public patronage.
llaviug largely reinforced- our manufkctaring de
partment, with experienced apd accomplished, me
chanics, we are prepared to manufacture styles and
sixes to order for the trade and public. . ;
nov22 JAS. W. PILLSBURY A CO.
CALL AND SEE
W Y JK El S *
Photographic Gallery!
WHICH 18 NOW TUB
Largeat and Moat Complete EstablUh
ment In Western Virginia*
Hating kecentlt knlajioeb* hhpitted
our Gallery, we have spared no expense ii ma
king it complete for every branch of the Art, and
the comfoit of visitors.
Our uow addition contains a LARGE SKY L1GI1T
on tho bank of the river, giving every advantage
desired.
Prices as low as at any. Gallery In the city. ?
Entrance 139 Main St., opposite Union.
mhl8 Top of thirHlll.
" JOEL J. BAILT & CO.
IMF0HTKR8 AMD JQB0EK8 Or
Hosiery, Gloves,
FANCY GOODS,
White Goods and Embroideries,
210 MARKET ST A 208 CHURCH ALLEY,
joklj. BAU/r, ,;*? , Phlls}dslphla,
ucxar j. davis, V
kltok a. airvoan.) ? inh&WJm*
POtt THE ADIE8.?Jnet received by Ex
I? press a few NUBIAS, at
ap29 D. N1COLL AII R0?8 Variety Btore.
New Spring and Bummer
DRY GOODS!
'|1HK tatocrfW bus now recelfai and opened 160
L cises of new Spring and Summer UryGbods,
which will be sold nt wholesale and reUli at lower
prices than ever before. Having purchased consid
erable more than 1 intended, as 1 bought all kinds of
goods for Cash and at leas price than at'any other
season, am determined.to dispose ot them according
ly, and will sell
BEST MERRIMACK, OOCHECO, and othttCall
P&2S&S&& 8~",d
B I. EACH ED MUSLIN, yard wide, beat quality, at
12Uc; 7-" wide at 10c iter?ard.
IfNBLEACilKD
UMBiiBAUiiEU hukijIN* suen as sold s weeks
ago a^g^wflj now eell.at 1234c, .and others,
ALL OTI1BR COTTON GOODS AT OLD PRICES.
BLACK 8ILK8,which sold always at$1.12U, per
yard, I will sell at 87J4C.
r In FANCY 8ILK8 I have all thfa latest novelties.
An excelled quality of Barred Sunpter Silk, at only
60c a yard. **'
KNUL<8H BEREGR8, worth 25c. for 12Uc.
LOPEN'S BERSOES, worth 37}#. for 20c.
TRAVELLING DRESS GOODS, all qualities and
""otTALLTBS A Dl LAIKB8 u low ul^ . ;ard.
Also a lane stock and .variety of SprlngandUnm
mer SHAWLS, CLOAKS * MANTILLAS^ at t&eVery
NEEDLEWORKS In every variety; Collars' worth
60c, for only 26e. . lilit/so
CARPETS?10 pieces, all styles, cheaper, than aver.
' COUNTRT 3IERCHAKT8 wHl And that
my Wholesale Department la ihorri complete thdn at
any previous season, apd I ill sell goods cheaper in
such quantities as they require, than they'eould be
mbiS-dJjw3m , m.suin.u.vrt^ui.g,^
_tl mm _mm. mm ^ si
11 ft]iC i-.it
TO THE POTIilCr
T KOW'keep the largest assort'meot of' WARE
JL that can be tound in the dry,, and amftallji pre
pared to fill all orders at short .notice.
My stock consists . In''part of tlie-foflowtn
All kinds of Plain Tin and Japanned Ware,
of fbeet Iron Ware, Copper and Brass Kett
J*^eVa^orwood or^3aI*lealiri*6tOTp"hmt
MerahaaMand otJ^wnrilafUng thedty will rind It
to their advantage to give me a call before purchas
ing elsewhere. -' ?.
"Untk">- No. 8
mbB-iy -r.-v j-yhVjtofrya.
.TATVrT!? J
rtriLL donUaa. th. Prods co uld PrmUImS Wrf
:Oc?pW,W.
- JT i" Bio O'WJ
^TTORNEfY'AT MW,
Omc.N.B.00.,
OppotjUt** Omrt?0 WHBKMICS;VA
49-r*ittcoUru{ibiIftnwfll b. tlTn to th, oo
etkmotUtbti^v ?- ."?? -, '^bUtTij
rjaTa* vuaw ???
?ST s.^vsassr *

xml | txt