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Daily intelligencer. (Wheeling, Va. [W. Va.]) 1859-1865, July 09, 1862, Image 1

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VOLUME X.
___ G, VA., WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 9V1862.
NUMBER 290.
uiend it to preference with those needing Insurance.
N. C. ARTHUR. Ag't.
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY
CAMPBELL & M'DERMOT,
IXTEltlCESCER BULL.DINQ8,
iV. K. corner Quincy and ilain-SU*
TEHMSs
Daily, (by malLpaysMe in advance,).? 46,00
By the Week........?^.....i.....;?10
Tri-Weekly, (per year,payable in advance,)......... 8,00
49* Advertising done on reasonable terms.
All advertisement* from a distance, or from transient
customers, must be paid in advance.
INSURANCE.
CASH ASb-fciTTS, JUIiY 1,1801,
$1,929,703 20.
LOSSES PAID, UPWARD OK
$14,000,000.
The great public service, promptness and reliabili
tiirard Fire & Murine Ins. Co.
PHILADELPHIA.
AL AXD SCRPLDS .$318,723 ?
N.O.ARTHUR, Ag't.
Pennsylvania Insurance Co.
OF PITTSBURGH, PA.
Capital 4300,000
'pilK above Companies havingappointed the under
L signed tficir Agent for Wheeling, and vicinity,
would respectfully solicit the patronage of the public.
Said Coinpauies are well known to bo first class offices.
All losses promptly adjusted. N.C.ARTHUR, Agt.
Jan3 Office over the Bank of Wheeling.
TO THuSE WHO WISH TO BE
INSURED
AGAINST ALI. CONTINGENCIES.
'|1IIE|IIOI?IE INSURANCE COMPANY
JL of New York.
Oabh CAPrrAt^overy dollar paid Id) ............$1,000,000
44 Contingent Fund (over(...... 500,000
The largest Cash Capital for the amount of risk o?
ay office iu tho Uuited States.
W. P. PETERSON, Agent.
'I111E INSURANCE CO.JOK THE VAL
L LEY OP VIRGINIA.
OAsn Capital (paid in) $300,000
Much the largest Cash Capital of any office charter
ed by this State.
4^*Fireand Inland risks taken ou the most roa
ouable terms.
Losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid by
W. F. PETERSON, Agt.
'IIIIE CONTINENTAL INSURANCE
L COMPANY, of New York.
Oisn Capital (paid in) $500,000
Jash Contingent Fund (over) .........876,000
Au this office the assured participate in the profits
without iucurring any risk.
W. F. rETERSON, Agent.
rHE LYNCHBURG IIOSE & FIRE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
Oasu Capital $100,000
W. F.PETERSON,Jr., Agent.
49*0 ver $2,500,000 of Cash Capital represented by
bis old and well established Agency, whore every loss
n the above office haa been promptly paid in Whoel
ng. before it was due by the terms of the policy.
W. F. PETERSON,
Office next door to the M. k M. B ank,
Jy7,'59?ly Main 8 t. "Wheel
INSURANCE .
The Fire&Marine Insurance Co.
OP WHEELING.
INCORPORATED IN 1837.
rAKRS risks AT THE LOWEST RATES ON
Buildings of all kinds, Steamboats, Furnituroand
Merchandise, and against all dnngors attondingtbe
Transportation of Goods on rivers, seas, lakes, canals
nd railroads.
R W. Hardiho, Sotfy. Hxkky Crawqlx, Pres't
DIRECTOnS.
J 0 Acheson John Donlon, Rob't Morrison
>1. Cranglo, 8. Brady, 8am'1 Ott.
Dan'l Lamb, Rob't Patterson,
Applications for Insurance will be promptly at
endod to by the President and Secretary.
Jan 28,'63
Saddles, Harness,Trunks &c
WHOLESALE * RETAIL.
JB. SHEPPARD No. 131 Main Street, corner
, Union, will coutinne to keep on hand alargeand
complete assortment of all articleein his line, consist
dig of Ladies* and Gentlemen's Saddles, Fine A Coarse
Harness,Trunks, Valices, Oarpet llags, Satchels, Col,
lars, names, Whips, Ac.
I would respectfully call attention to my stock,and
trust by strict attontion and promptneas, to merit
continuance of the public patronage
All kinds of repairing promptly done, and in a pro
permsnner. J. B. 8HEPPARD.
sep20 '69 131, Main Street
CARBON OJ7
InAVE ESTABLISHED AN Q>. -OYINERY
in this city, on Llndsey street, Stow the Gas
Works, where I keap constantly hand and for
sale a good quality of Illuminating and Lubricating
oils. Also a good article of Axle Grease, for waeuns
or dray*. Dealors and others in want of any of tlio
above articles will find it to their interest to give me
a call^efore purchasing elsewhere.
aug?3-ly JOHN COOK.
Savings Bank of Wheeling,
Office, Jfain-SL, between Monroe and Union.
Money received on transient deposit
Interest paid on 8pedal Deposit*. Collections
promptly attended to. Exchange on the Bast bought
and Mid. TilOS. U. LIST, PreddenU ,
8 AM'I. P HILDRETH, Treasurer. Janl4-'59.
OHX LIST. aOAT. MOXRISOS. W. B. LOO AS
KUakNSUST. D .DAVSWrORT.
LIST, MORRISON & CO.,
Wholesole Grocer* dc> Prod.nee Dealers
Not.10 and 80 Muin-St^ Whctling, Va.
W? desire to state to the friends of the lateflrmi
nd to the trade generally, that we are in poueuion
clthe most ample facilities for the transaction of a
Wholesale Grocery and Produce Business.
Wo aro determined to execnte all enters entrusted
to our care with fidelity and. promptness, and on the
most favorable terms. Your ob't servants,
LIST, MORRISON * CO.
Wheelln g, January 1860. JanT
X.W.rXXTOV. JOB* DOXLOM. C. OOLXBAT
PAXT0K, DOBTLON & OGLEB AY,
Wholesale Grocers,
PRODUCE & COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
Nos. 53 and 64, Main St.,
noTl W heeling, Va.
T. IT. LOGAN As CO.
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.
WHEELING, V A. 9
XT AVE removed to their NEW WAREROOMS, No
XI 47 Main 8treet, and No. 8 Quincy 8treeL
Main Street Entrance, next door to Baker .
Hoptdaa. Quincy Street entrance near the Bait.
It. R. Depot, and wharf. -
DRUGS, PAINTS, OILS,
M KDIOrVES, VARFISHE8, BRUSHES,
WINDOW GL-.8S,l'BRFUMBRIES, WHITE LEAD
PATENT MBDIOINES, A?.
Offered to the trade, in ctty-iuid country, tow prion
andorthe6est<pf<iKty. * Cashand prompt
customers aro invited to call. mpl,'59
alvxxd cALitsnax. . axoxas x. botd.
CALDWELL & B0Y?,
Attorneys at Law,
60 Mj?1 t,
BUSINESS CARDS.
T. C. KIGER, M. D.
Homoeopathic Physician.
OFFICE and Residence, Centre Wheeling. (lielow
the Creelc.) Main street, west aide, between
Serond and Third.
Office hour* from 6 to 9 A. M., and 1 to 3 k 7 to 9
?! __ ' - my 12-1y
A. M. ADAMS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL ?
CLOTHING- STORE,
WHERE always may be found SUPERIOR CLO
.TUINO; also mokes to order, at the shortest
notice,
All Garments belonging to Gentlemen
No. 36, Water Street,
Wheeling, Fa,
Agent* for W. Bingham's Shirts nud Stocks
of erery description. Also, for A. B. Howe's Excel
sior Sowing Machine. aug26'61-ly
8. M'CLELLAN C. D. KNOX.
M'CLELLAN & KNOX,
DEALERS AT wholesale exclusively, IX
BOOTS * SHOES
3STo. 113 Main Street,
A few doom aboro M. A M. Bank, West Side,
ap9-6m* WHEELING, VA.
"kreilly,
Wholesale Dealer In
GROCERIES,
Forflgn and Domestic
Wines and Liquors,
Noa. 55 A 57 Mais Street,
my7?ly WHEELING, VA
J A.METGALF,
COMMISSION MERCHANT AND
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT
FOR Til* SAL* OF
Nails, Window Glaus, Cincinnati Bo*p
Iron, Flint Glassware, Lard OUI,
Steel, Green Glansware, Lime.
Springs, Printing Paper, Plaster Paris,
1 Axles, Wrapping Paper, Ccairnt,
Rosin, Wooden Ware, Starch.
Together with many article* of PitUbnrgb j
Wheeling manufacturo.
No* 00 Paxton'i Row, Main St.,
norl7 Wheeling, Vfi.
J NO. S. 0ARL1LE. JIAXXMAL FORBES.
CAIILLLE & FORBES,
Attorneys At Law,
WHUELINO, VIRGINIA.
Practice In all the Courts of Ohio County, and the
adjoining counties.
Office ox Fourth Street, No 360)4 eepfiN-"??
The Citizen's Deposit Bank
OF WHEELING:
Bank open from 9 o'clock a. m., until
P. M. Discount days?Thursday 10 o'clock A.
J?-Monej received on transient deposit.
Inter tit paid on special deposits.
ay-Collect Ionu mode and proceeds promply remitted
DIRECTORS:
Jacob Berger, J. N. Vance,
Jacob Hornbrook, G. W. Franzbeim,
Warren Cooper, J. K.Botsford,
Geo. K. Wheat, Chester D. Knox.
J. R. Miller, Cashier. Alfred Caldwell, Pros't
[feb4-'691y]
CLARK L. XAXJ 8. F. MILLER
C. L. ZANE & CO.
Importer .nd Dealers in fbreign tC Domestic
Wines and Liquors,
Manufacturers of
Pure Catawba Wines,
quixct Street, betweex Main A Market Sts.
WHEELING, VA
KEEP constantly on hand Brandies, Scotch and
Irish Whiskies, Jamaica Rums and Cordials,
Choice Old Rye and Bourbon Whiskies. sep27?ly
C. H. DINGEB,
DEALER IN
Hats and. Caps,
No. 14G Main Street, .
mill8-1 y WHEELING, VA.
^-The Highest Price in Cash, paid for all kinds
of Fur-Hides, such as Mink, Fox Raccoou, Ac.
J. C. HARBOUR.
Wholesale rf Retail DevZerin
CARPETS RUGS, OIL CLOTHS
Wall Papei, Curtain Materials,
i And Upholstery Ware of every description
143 MftinStreet.
WHEELING, YA.
^GOt and Mahogany Framed Looking Glasses
D band and made to order. lepd.'&O
THE BEST PIANOS
IN THE WORLD!
WM. KUABE & CO'S
GOLD MEDAL PIAHO FORTES
These Instruments are warranted for five
years, and the privilege of exchange
granted at any time within six
month*, if not entirely
satisjactory.
A-FINK ASSORTMENT on hand aod for sale at'
Baltimore factosy price*.
JK3SK B. MBLLOR,
139 Main Street,
aplO Sole. Agent for Wheeling and vicinity.
WM. SHAFFER,
PRACTICAL WATCH MAKER
JEWELER & ENGRAVER.
DSJLLKR I!?
Watches, Jewelry,SIlvcr&PI*,ed
Ware,
FANCY COOD8, &?.
No. 33 Monroe St.
OPPOSITE U. k. U BANK.
R a HILDRETH & BROT
S3 Main Street,
Wheeling, "V*.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Nail Bod, Window Glasa, Maryland Lima,
Bar Iron, Printing Paper, Common Lime,
Nails, Wrap. Paper, Floor,
Sheet Iron. Plaster Paris, Shanghai Matches
Wire, Land Plaster, 8alt,
Cast Steel Cement, Wooden Ware, Ac.
Agents for Ilowx's Improved Counter and Platform
The Highest Market Fric* paid for Sags, flaxseed
Qinsmg, Scrap Jro*, *te. JylS
JOHN G. CHANDLER,
Attorney at Law.
E9T"0FFIGB over Bank of Wheeling.
docSO-ly
Ayer's Sarsaparilla.
). J
TERMS OK ADVERTISING.
TwzlvkSolid Links or Nonpareil, (or on* inch,)oa
Lzsa, 11AU A 8Q0ARK .
One Dayr~l sqr. $0 76
Two Days,.. 1 00
Three Day*,.. 1 26
Punr Days, 1 50
Five Day?,..... I 75
One Week^ .... 2 00
Two Weeks,. .7..... 3 50
J?~8pecial Notices Dou
Three Weeks, ....$4 50
One Montli, 6 00
Two Months, 8 00
Three Months^. 10 00
Six Months, 15 00
One Year, . 20 00
>le the above rates.
*SrYearIy Advertising on reasonable terms, accor
ding to the space occupied and the numberof chauges
All advertisements from transient persona or Strang
ers. to be paid for in advance.
Business Cards not exceeding fivo lines, $10 per year,
or $0 for six months, but for a shorter period nothiug
will be counted less than a square.
The privilege of Annual Advertising is limited to
the Advertisers' own Immediate business: and all
advertisements for the benefit of othorprsona as
well as all legal advertisements, and advertisements
of auction sales and real estate,sent In by them mut*
be paid for at the usual rates.
Advertisements not accompanied with writteu
directions, will be inserted until forbid,and charged
accordingly.
Notices for Political Meetings to be charged in all
cases at fall rates.
Marriages, Notices of Funerals, and annoncements
of sermons, 50 cents each. nouvll-'59
An Eastern Virginia View of the Re
bellion.
We have been favored witb a copy of the
Fredericksburg, (Va.) Christian Manner
July 2d, one of the very best loyal papers
published in Eastern Virginia'. The copy
before us is printed on very respectable
coarse brown paper, about such as the gro.
cer ties up his coffee in. The color, how
ever, does not affect its loyalty which is ol
the straightest sort. "God and our conn"
try, now and forever," is its motto, and a
noble one it is, too. Wc make a few clips
to show how genuine loyalty talks about
the rebellion even in Eastern Virginia:
WHAT IS TO UKCOUK OP THE REIIEL LEADERS.
The ringleaders in thir secession rebel
lion trill, when the tragical scene shall have
closed, become a proverb a by-word and a
tiieMiig among all the nations of the civil
iced world. They shall be scattered to the
four corners of the earth, and like the old
bard hearted Jews, shall be sold to their eu
emies for bond men, and no man shall buy
thein. Then it will be seen nud acknowl
edged, that the whole plot was conceived
in iniquity, conducted by a systematic
course of villainy, and ended in irretrieva
able infamy. This is what we predicted
when (ho rebellion began, and it is what
wc have believed ever since. And as cer
tainly aa every cause produces its legiti
mate effect, so it will come to pass. Union
men have nothing to fear in the distant fu
ture. History and posterity will do them
and their cause justice. Then it will be
seen, also, that the Uuion men of the
South, were the only true friends of the
South. ?
??submission."
In proof that the people of Virginia were
forced out of the Union by the actions of
llie civil and military leaders of secession,
needs no stronger evidence, than the sup
pression of the publication of the popular
rote of Virginia. Who can tell the num
ber of voles actually polled by citizens of
Virginia for the*ordinance of secession T.-r
Tliis is a question of grave importance,
which we submit to the lending secession,
istsof Virginia. And still the people must
submit. This is submission.
Nor is this all. SVhen the people of Vir
ginia were called upon this spring to go in
to a mock-election for a President of the
Southern Confederacy they were told, that
i*. would be bad policy to have two candi
dates in this early stage of ourgovernment,
and that war times was no time to be dis
cussing politics; and, therefore, all the cit
izens, voters of Virginia, ought to go to the
polls and vote for Jeff Davis. What was
the number of votes polled,? Who can
tell ? The people of Virginia ought to
know this. We were urged to go to the
polls and vote, but we did not. Why
should we? Had there been but ten votes
cost in the whole State, Jeff Davis would
still have remained President of the South'
ern Confederacy. Virginians have to sub
mit to all this, and that in silence, or be
threatened with a drawn halter around
their necks. This is submission. Seces
sionists won't submit to the constituted au
thorities of their country, but pompously
and arrogantly dictate to others, and unless
all others bow in bumble submission to
them, they are to be bung, shot, banished
from their country. Good Lord deliver
us!
Ooce more; when the militia were called
out this spring, it is well known that they
were unwilling to go into service, and gov
ernment fearing the consequences. Con
gress: passed the act of conscription, by .which
they were wWforccd into service, except a
few, who so managed their cards, as to
elude the clutches of the military bands,
that were sent through the country to catch
them up "and hurry them into the army.?
There was no submission in all this, was
there? Yes, submission of the most op
pressive and aggravating character! Sub
mission, to a military despotism. Submis
sion, not to the Constitution of the Feder.
al Government, buisabmission to secession.?
Is it not strange, that men will croak, and
croak about submission, and. the depreda
tion of submission, while they themselves
are trying to brow-beat, and force all oth
ers, to submit to their lordly dictations??
We say that Virginians have submitted long
enough to the oppression and tyranny of
petty despots,* and if is'now time for men
who wish to be free, to rise up and assert
and maintain their rights.
If the citizens of Virginia were unani
mously in favor of secession, why do they
go into the army with so much reluctance?
If every Southern man is to be left dead on
the battlefield, unless the South obtain'
her independence, why is it, that so many
Southern men had to be forced into service
by an act of conscription ? These are
questions and facts which should be duly
considered by the people of Virginia. And
finally, suppose the South should gain her
independence?what will become of the
poor, old, desolated Dominion?Virginia?
Uer sons gone, her territory desolated, and
all left in one common wreck and ruin I?-"
We would beseech and eutreat our fellow
citizens, to think on this terrible black
picture before JtH Is . lost, and lost for
ever.
WHAT THK REBELLION WILL DO FORVIBGIS
IJl.
The present war-is going to produce a
general upheaving, turnirigover, apd com
plete revolution Qf.aU things in 'Fredericks
burg, and throughout the State of Virgin
ia, in institutions, society, politics, morals,
literature, science, agriculture, mechanics,
manufactures and religion, bo that, at least,
within ten years after the conclosion of the I
war the whole appearance of things in
nlettfr rh! ?. V"* VirginiA wi? ,J0 ?n.
pletely changed from what it was when the
war began. A new era will dawn npon the
ol^r' We not live tcfaeo it.
Every reverse which befalls the Federal
Army and every success gained bv the Con
ederute army reduces Virginia'to a still
more ruinous condition. The longer the
war IS continued in tbo State, the greater
will be the facilities for the escape of the
slave population. The more of her territo
ry will be laid waste?the more of her cit
ies, towns nod villages will be laid in ru
ins?the more of her soos will be sacrificed
?the more and more the whole State will
become impoverished.
Suppose Jeff. Davis should, as he says
'Ln?' P ,Up tUe war 00,1 c-lrry it on
should fCT'?Uet'r V'lr?ini?. even if be
should be driven out of Richmond, what
would ^ irfii^ia be within the space of
twenty years? in tenyeurs, or in five years?
STAUPBDE Or CONTBABANOS.
Early on Friday morning the 27th ulti
mo, thirty-three contrabands came into
town, and brought with them two yokes of
oxen and two carts, and ooe splendid dorse,
all of which, was the property of their
masters. Later in the morning of the same
day a woman with five small children, the
youngest nn Infant only four weeks old, as
he mother herself told us, came into town,
having walked during the previous night
and that morning, upwards of twenty-five
OHIm' a?"8'"5 in bcr nrm". ber infant
5? h ? ll,Ht 8,10 tt"d ,ler chil
dren had walked the whole distance en
tlrely unaccompanied by any one. She
seemed more determined to make her es
eape to the land of freedom than anyone
we have yet seen. Truly, secession has
produced a negro exodus.
On Sunday, Alonday, and Tuesday last
we supposo that hundreds came into town
seeking the land of freedom. Curiosity
induced us to ask noma or tl.em, from
what section they came, to whom they be
longed, for what cause they had left their
^n?trfi ?re thC)' purposed going, and
" 'hey intended to do. Some had
come fioni Caroline, some from Spottsyl
vama, others from Louisa counties, ka ,
&c. Some had bad masters, others wanted
to be free, and one woman said she had
left her master "to get shct or trouble*'
Some were going to the "Norf," and others
wanted to get work any where they could
And here ihey are strolling through the
town and country unprotected, uncared Tor
homeless, penniless and friendless, not
knowing where to go, what to do, nor
what s to become of tbem.
Before Virginia seceded and fur some
time afterwards the impression seemed to
be general umong secessionists, that the
negroes would nil prove loyal?that they
would tako up arms, and if necessary die
for their masters?that the slave popula
tion of the South was one great element
by which the Southern Confederacy was to
prove successful.
We never hnd any confidence in the loy
nlty of negroes to their masters as a gen
eral thing; there may ben few isolated ex
ceptions, but in tho winding up of this
matter, it will be found that these excep
tions are few and far between. We faith
folly and constantly-^arned our fellow
citizens of the danger anil certaiuty of
bringing Canada to our doors, and in our
very midst, but they laughed at our adrno
nitions and reproached us as one of the
crazy ones of the Lincolnite submissiooists,
who left their "slime .behind them ns they
walk the streets of Fredericksburg." Thev
fhU 'm/VU""1, ?f tbe 1,,w of r<=<"liation,
that if the Yankees take our negroes, we'll
take their horses, cows, hogs," kc. &e.
Such were the absurd ideas of oratorical,
logical, philosophical secessionists.
We went further still, and warned our
fellow-citizens, that if matters were carried
tj extremes tbe black man would lift his
nrm ngainst the white man, und that the
time would romo when the further white
men could get from tbe negroes tbe safer
and better they would feel. Wo warned
secessionists of all these and many other
evils which wonld necessarily result from
their course or action, for all which we re
ceived notbiug in return from them but
their continual reproaches. And now we
warn our fellow-citizens of greater evils
i*"" h,aTe yct befallen us, and
would mipiore them for their own sakes,
and for the sake of helpless women and
children, who In many cases, and especially
ar? unprotected, to
? !! J1?18 prudence, and dis
of "'ll?ch they nre possibly capable.
Will they do so, or will they not? Stub
bornness. rashness, and madness can effect
nothing now, but one common slaughter
tacts which occur every hour in our midst
convince all of the utter disloyalty of the
slave population of our country. Let us
therefore, beware as to the future. A
word to the wise is sufficient, but fools can
never be profited but by the bitterest ex
perience. The loss of negroes is nothing
in comparison t3 tbe horrible evils that
may yet visit our distressed countrymen
ileware. Beware!
The Celebrated Letter of Geu. liauter
About Uii Ileglineut of Contra
band*.
Washington, July 2.
Tbe following correspondence whs laid
before the House to>duy, tbe reading of
some parts of which caused much merri
ment :
War Department, Washington, July 2.
To Hon. G. IF. Grow, Speaker House of
Representative* :
Sir: On reference to the answer of this
department, of the 14tb ult., to tbe resolu
tiou of the House of Representatives, ot
the 9th of last month, calling for informa
tion respecting the organisation of a reg
iment of volunteers by Gen. Hunter, of tbe
Department.of South Carolina, for the de
fense of the Union, composed of black men
(fugitive slaved,) it will be seen that tbe
resolution had been referred to that officer,
with instructions to make immediate report
tbereou. 1 have now the honor to transmit
herewith the copy of a communication
just received from Geo. Hunter, furnishing
the information as to his actioo touchiog
the various matcera iudicated in tho resolu
tion.
I have tbe bonor to be
Very respectfully,
Edwin 11. Stanton.
Headquarters Dhp't op thi Socth, 1
Port Royal, S. 0., June 23. J
To Hon. E. J/. Stanton, Scc'y of War :
Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge
tbe receipt of a commnnUdtion from tbe
Adjutant General of the army, dated June
13th, 1862, requesting me to furnish yoa
with information necessary to answer cer
tain resolutions introduced io to the House
of Representatives,' June 9tb, 1^62, oa mo-j
J* .wj
tion of the Hon. Mr. Wickliffe, of Ken
tacky, their substance being: to inqnire:
1st, whether I bad organized or eras organ
izing a regiment of fugitive slaves in this
department; 2d, whether any authority had
been given to me from the War Department
for such organization, and, 3d, whether 1
had been furnished by order of the War
Depnrtment with clothing, uniforms, arms,
equipments, &c., for such a force. Only
having received the letter covering these
inquiries, at a late hour Saturday night, 1
urge forward my answer in time for the
steamer sailing to-day (Monday), this haste
preventing me from entering as minutely
as I could wish upon many points of de
tail, such as the paramount importance of
the subject calls for. But, in view of the
near termination of the present session of
Congress, and the wide spread iuterest
which must have been awakened by Mr.
Wickliffc's resolution, I prefer sending
even this imperfect answer to waiting the
period necessary for the collection ot fuller
and more comprehensive data.
To tho first question, therefore, I reply
that no regiment of fugitive slaves has
been or is being organized in this depart
ment. There is, however, a fine regiment
of persous whose late masters are fugitive
rebels, men who everywhere fly before the
appearance of the national flag, leaving
their servants behind to shift as best they
can for themselves. So far, indeed, are the
loyal persons composing this regiment from
seeking to avoid the presence of their late
owners, that they are now one and all
working with remarkable industry to place
themselves in a position to join in full and
effective pursuit of their ungracious aud
traitorous proprietors.
To the second question, I have the honor
to auswer that the instruction given to
Brig. Geo. T.jW. Sherman b}* Hon. Simeon j
Cameron, late Secrethry of War, and turu
ed over to me. by succession for iny guid
ance, do distinctly authorize me to employ
all loy-tl persons offering their services iu
defense of the Union and for the suppres
sion of this rebellion in any manner I
might see fit, or that the circumstances
might call for. There is uo instruction as
to the character or color of the persons to
be employed or the nature of the employ
ment, whether civil or military, in which
their services shall be used. 1 conclnde,
therefore, that 1 have been authorized to
enlist fugitive slaves as soldiers, could any
such be found in the department. No such
characters, however, have yet appeared
within view of our most advanced pickets.
The loyal slaves everywhere remained on
their plantations to welcome 'us, aid us.
and supply us with food, labor and infor
mation. It is the masters who have in
every instauce been the fugitives, running
away from loyal slaves as well as loyal sol
diers, and whom we have been only parti
ally able to see, chiefly with their heads
over ramparts or rifle in hand dodging be
hind trees in the extreme distance.
To the third interrogatory, it is my pain
ful duty to reply that 1 never have received
any specific authority for issues of cloth
ing, uniforms, arms, equipments, &c., to
the troop3 in questiou; my general instruc
tions from Mr. Cameron to employ them in
any manner I might fiud necessary, and
the military exigencies of the department,
and country, being my only, but, in my
judgment, sufficient justification. Neither
have I had auy specific authority for sup
plying those persous with shovels, spades,
aud pick-axes, when employed as laborers;
nor with boats and oars when using them
as lighter men ; but these are not points
indicated in Mr. WicklifTe's resolution.
To me it seemed that liberty to employ
men implied also liberty to supply them
with the necessary tools, and acting upou
this faith, 1 have clothed, equipped and
armed the only loyal regiment government
una raised in South Carolina. J mgstsay
in vindication of my own conduct, that if
it had not been for the many other diver
sified and imperative claims on my time
and attention, a much more satisfactory re
sult might have been hoped for, and that
in place of only one. as at preseut, at least
five or six well-drilled, brave, and thor
oughly acclimated should, by this time,
have been added to the loyal forces of the
Uniou.
The experiment of arming the blacks, so
for as I have made it, has been a complete
and marvellous success. They are sober,
docile, attentive and enthusiastic, display
ing great natural capacity for acquiring the
duties of the soldier. They are eager, be
yond all things, to take the field and be led
into action, aud it is the unanimous opin
ion of the officers who have bad charge of
them tbat in the peculiarities of the cli
mate and.country they will prove invalua
ble auxiliaries, fully equal to the similar
rights so long and successfully used in the
West India Islands.
In conclusion, I must say that it i3 my
hope, there appearing no possibility ot oth
er reinforcements, owing to the# exigency
of the campaign in the Peninsula, to have
organized by the end of next fall, and to be
able to present the Government with from
48,000 to 50,000 pf these hardy and devot
ed soldiers.
Trusting this letter rany form part of
your answer to-Mr. WickltfTs resolution, I
have the honor to be most respeetfnlly,.
your obedient servant,
David Huntkr,
Maj-Gen. Commanding.
Another Speech, by Mr. Train
England's Neutrality and Gen. But
ler'* Proclamation.
We find room only for the following
extract of one of Mr. Train's recent
speeches:
Mr. Train?Neutrality signifies weak
ness. All small minds hesitate. Lack
of decision shows lack of power. Gene
rals who win battles are not nentral men.
Neutrality on the American rebellion is
taking sides in disguise. The man who
is soft ofi the American question is soft
on all questions. 1 despise soft Ameri
cans as well as soft .Englishmen. It is
impossible for an honest man tq be neu
tral. He wbo is not for me is against me.
The Indian Thug is remarkable for his
neutrality until his garotte is around
your neck. The Camanche chief is a
neutral to your face, whde his scalping
knife sleeps in his belt. Dumollord, the
French murderer, wbs a neutral before
he destroyed his victims. ? There is no
half-way between a patriot and a traitor.
The woman who permits the least fami
liarity has already lost the foundation ot
her virtue.
Let her remain neutral in the presence
of the libertine and she is lost. The
young . man counting bis employer's
money must not be a neutral?if he does
not wish to end his life upon tbe gallows.
nautSrx . e made fits ?*?ctly the
abroad?who6" ?nd Americans
before hr,r!" wa,tluS for victories
The ?rm ,?S Seces8i<?' <"? Union flags.
j^awisSXiR ss
??^swjuate.afag
men choose sides-weak men are alwav?
neutral; once an idiot, always an id?ot
The world is paeked with fools
I Hn??1trality u i^beciUty. No man can
sane two masters, lie must either love
nn on?.aud l?llto the Other, or hate the
one and love the other. Our Saviour was
"eutr?1- England for three gene
rations has been unjust to America. He
that is unjust in little is unjust in much.
ir,. C0?Bs.'wm an ancient and
respectable authority. Unjust in small
iust'rho r1" KalfaCentUry' KnK,and was
just ripe fur being unjust in great mat
ters during our revolution. Neutrality
is aisguise ; assassins are neutral before
they use the poignurd. The tiger inthe
jungle is a neutral before he plunges on
h.s victim. When you wiriiVC
an enemy you hrst conceal your plan
fcrror and injustice iwe neutral before be
coming arrogant Sid impudent
loTe fault-finding is no proof of
Eft??Yo.ur oriticisuis on Ueneral
Butler a proclamation aro as just as your
pre ended love for Americi is honest!
Critics, says Wyoherley, are like thieves,
condemned to execution, choose tho busi
ness of oxecntioners rather than bo hung.
W distortion of the New Orleans pre
Uamation is worthy of tho people "hat
were abolitionists when jhoy thought by
S^r'Un hV ',6 thejr coaW l,reak
up our Republic?and pro-slavery advo
cates when they believed we should pre
h?ivn? r , T"? proclamation you
have dishonestly translated. Do you
mean to say that you believe ( Jen. Butler
issued tho order for immoral purposes?
Do you really understand Its wordin
to signify that unbridled license wuS
given U> the Federal aruiy7 The very
idea is contrary to the instincts of our
nature, insult",g to the American people
and outraging the senses of our race
rou give the order a meaning never ir^
?*?? U ,wa? unfoHunatefy worded,
but tho spiriti of the order was a proper
one. _ Laities hold the remedy. Let thorn
remain indoors, lot them behave like wo
men, not like human tigresses. The ter
rible slaughter of our soldiers will some
y toy heavy upon their consciences wo
i nP ?ut of their way t^in.sult
^ officers who have treated them
with every courtesy, by pouring hot
water out of their windows when tliov
pass, or throwing vitrei in their faces on
SOJar unse'nS themselves
"tnke an officer, ought not to object,
when martial law is ordered, to proda!
?nations that onforcc civility where rudo
ness was so marked. 1
in T,h * ?uniuil";' Iaw permits no disorder
" ,, p?"' *?omen breaking it are sent
to the Calaboose. That ii the terrible or
aer, nothing more?nothing Ibis thai
? o?liSep iJnB'and BDd ProToke3 this debute
Lord Palmers ton takes advantage ot it to
have another Hing at the Americans, .ad
"re m*'1 wi,h delight.
self and a1?Jh?Q "U? bt'?gS ?Ut K*rl Kuj
sell and all the newspapers clap their ban Js
with joy?and jrou, gentlemen, echo the
8e?t'ment of the land. Do you remember
a picture in the Illiutratcd Nov during/lie
Sepoy revoluiioo? I do?and^hree C!
tures were prominent?cannon?English
officers, and ?sepoy messengers bearing a
?i?|K ?.fctrDme' The P'ctur3 has another
officers consult?the Sepoys are
bound on the muzzle of the guns?and
w??Meir K?' tmce tied around, they'
they came"1 t0W"rd3 tbe can,P fr?f whence
Senalrh Se*4rd Ket "?P 'n his place in the
oenate Chamber and protest against it in
the name of humanity ? The atrocities of
your soldiers in India were onlv equalled
When a Ne'"1 Sahi'' himself.
When a British.officer enters a Sepoy vil
lage and gives tbe order to bis regiment to
ravish tho Sepoy women, and then level
their houses to the earth, humanity ghud.
rIIh i"" ?!,''"1' Compared with such
fiends General Butler is a scholar, a gen
tleman, and a Christian. How forgetful of
the rights of civilization for our statesmen
to rem-iin silent without recording their in
dignation .It such brutal acts ! England
must feel proud of those Christian officers
and no wonder she is indignant at Butler'
? u, e,y?? forK<>tten tbe siege of Limer
ick ? Is it true that Englishmen ravished
in* Wh?me? bef?re butchering tbe garrison
h^,wUr ,nAJhe'OWn? Do /<"> remem
ber the cold-blooded slaughter or the Mac
donalds of Glencoe, under the same dy
B*ron? V^r'ljr' what * m*n WRa Lord
If joa have acted once a generous part.
Tli? world, not tha world's ivtiw, wfll dteM** ?
And I shall be delighted tolearaSkl **
Sate you and your,, ka** <yiined ai Waterloo/
Davoustin Hamburg?J a not in Lisbon?
Malakoff in the Algerian caves?wens guil
ty of acta?and Wellington at St. Sebastian
?worthy of Iiaasia in Poland or Hayoau in
Austria. Butler's offence is words ? Eng.
land's offende was acts.' Was Bailer's mo
tive good or bad? It is the motive, not the
act, that blackens the crime. England is
not the land to give America examples as to
the treatment of woman. Amcrica is a
country where its yooth are taught not to
insult an old man orold'woman, and a we
man can go through the entire country,
without being/insulted. America is the
land where education and religion gives
tone to the morals of our people. How
careful England is to find fault with our
Federal army.
Hive you seen any questions on the Par
liamentary paper asking if the reports are
true regarding atrocities of the Confede
rate army? Has the Federal power uo
friend at Court to ask theae questions of
Lord Palmerston ? I* it true that savages;
led on by Confederates, scalped our wouod
ed officers at Pea Ridge ? Ie it true thatj
Governor Spragne found some of his aids,
who were killed at Bull Rao, buried with j
their faces downward ? It it true that Fe
eral wounded on the-ground at the battle
of Winchester werAMjoqfUvl by Confed
erate soldiers? it true that the ladies of
a certain town in Virginia invited one hun
dred Federals to their houses to tea, and
their brothers, who were In ambush,
rushed in aad put all to the,sword !*a i -
Sorely Ameisea ought to have oa# tr^eq^,
bold enough in Parliament, when Qregogf
TEBM8 0FWEISKLY.
One Copy per Year,? $1,00
" Six IConths,?? 60
49^ IariJUAXLT or ASTABCB.
The Weekly Intelligencer
Will oontala thirty-two columns, mostly fillsd wit
docaUiahJectt^iu imaamg It the largpst end b//
Dollar Newspaper in this ssetio country. ? ,
and the Premier are b urling their invectives
against America, to inquire if it ia true
that the skull of a Federal officer is a bon
bon for a Rebel ladj!?that Madame Beau
regard, who was treated with so much po
liteness by General Butler, wears a cameo
cut from the bone of a Federal Oolouel 1?
that Rebel ladies wear rings and brooches
made out of the skulls of our brave offi
cers!?that the proper thing for the rebel
gentlemen at Richmond is to have a spit
toon made oat of a human head I In con
clusion, let me ask if England controls
America's action ? If England pays onr
Federal officers? If England most first be
consulted before we declare martial law?
I was not aware that Abraham Lincoln was
elected President of the powerful American
Republic by the bankrupt monarchies of
Europe. [Cheers and applaose.j
SENT BY EXPRESS
KVERYWHEEE.
WARD'S
PERFECT FITTING
S1IIRTS.
Retailed at Wholesale Prices* 1
Made to Measure at 820 per doz
OE SIX FOK TEH DOLLARS.
MADE OF NEW YORK MILLS MUSLIN,
With fine Linen Bottoms, and warranted as good a
Shirt as aold in the rctsil stores at $2 SO each.
! ALSO, THE VERY BEST SKIRTS THAT CAN BE
MADE AT $36 PER DOZ.
I P. S.?Those who think 1 cannot make a good Shirt
(or $20 pqr dosen are mistaken. Mere is the cost of
oue dozen $20'fine Shirts.
30 yd*. New York Mills Mnslin at IS eta. per yd.46 40
7 yards of fire Linen, at 56 eta. per jwd..?? 3 92
Making an.I cutting...?..?? ? 6 00.
Lanudry, f I: buttons and cotton 75 cvs 1 75
Profit. 2 93
Total |M
Self-Measurement far Shirts.
Printed directions for M>II-mcs?nremrat, list ot
prices, and drawing* of differrer ?r?)esof Shirts and
Collars seutfreeererywWrs. T1j???. rales are so easy
to understand that any om can take their own meas
ure. 1 warrant a perfect tz.
The cash can be paid u? the Express Company on
receipt of the goodii.
The Express CompaoT Uve orders to allow all par
ties to examine thf r?l? fc.-ibr- paying for them.
If the goods are not asrrprc*at^i, yoa are at lib
erty to return them.
S. W. H. WARD, from London,
387 Broadtrsjr, op-stalrs,
Between "White and Walker Bta,
mh28 New York.
!iJ
TO THE PUBLIC!
I NOW keep the largest assortment of WARE
that can bo found in the city, and am fnlly pre
pared to fill all order* at ?ftort notice.
My stock consist* in pert of the fallowing modi;
All kinds of Plain Tin and Japtnned War*, all kinds
of f beet Iron Ware, Copper and Brass Kettles of all
sizes; also Cooking and Heating Stores of the beat
natterns. for wood or ooal.
Merchants and other* rUittry the city will find it
to their advantage to gtre me a call before purchas
ing elsewhere.
Spouting and Ontters cou*tant>y on hand.
All kinds of JOB WORK will receive ay personal
attention. XL F. CALDWELL.
No. 8 Main st, op. B. k O. R. R. Depot.
inhS-ly Wheeling, Va.
New Spring and Summer
DRY GOODS!
r|lHR subscriber has now received and opened 150
1. cases of new sprxnr and Summer Dry Goods,
which will be sold at vkuiMa and retail at lower
4>rices than ever betura. Daring purchased caneid*
erable more than 1 intended. Mt bought all kinds of
goods for Cash and at teas price than at any other
season, am determined to dispose of them according*
ly, and will sell
BK8T MERRIMACK. COCHSeO, and other Cali
coes of equal jrrude. at 12\4 cent* a yard. Second
?nality, taut color, at 9c.
BLKACUKD MUSLIN, yard wide, best quality, at
\2lca 7-4 wide at lOr y~r ?ar<L
UNBLKACiiKD MUSLIN, such as sold 3 weeks
ago at 183?c, l will now sell at HJ^c, and others,
very good at 10c.
ALL OTHER COTTON GOODS AT OLD PRICES.
BLACK SILK8. which sold always at tLUlC per
yard, I will sell at ??Wc.
In FANCY SILKS 1 have all the latest noreltiee.
An excelled quality of Barred Summer Silk at only
50c a yard.
ENGLISH RERE0BS, worth He, for l?4e.
LUPKN*S BKRKGKS, worth STUc. for fcc.
TRAVELLING DRESS GOODS, a|l qualities and
CHALLIE8 jk Da LA1NR8 s# low as 13%e a yard.
Also a large stock and raristy of Spring and 8umr
mer SHAWLS,CLOAKS A MANTILLAS,at the very
NEEDLEWORKS In erery variety; Collars worth
50c, lor only 21c.
CARPETS?40 pieces, an sty lee, cheaper than ever.
COUNTRY MERCHANTS will find that
my Wholesale Department is more complete than at
any previous season, and I ill sell goods cheaper in
such quantities as the/ require, 'than they could M
bought in the Eastern cities.
ALEX. HEYMAN,
mh2S-dAw3xn 137 Main st^ Wheeling,Va.
CALL AND SEE
W Y IS. E S*
Photographic Gallery!
WHICH" IS NOW THE
Largest and Moat Complete EitaUlik
neat la Western Virginia.
Having recently enlarged a refitted
our Gallery, we have spared no expense in ma
king it complete for every branch' Of the Art and
the comfort of visitors. -
Our new addition contains a LARGE SKY LIGHT
on the bank of the river, giving every advantage
desired.
Prices as low as at any Gallery In the city.
Entrance 190 Main sU, opposite Union,
mhlS Top of the Hill.
"^OELjTBAniY^COr"
IXPOKTH8 AID IOBMS5 Of *
Hosiery, Gloves,
FANCY GOODS, .
White Goods and Embroideries;
Sit MARKET ST. A 208 CHURCH ALLEY,
jon j. baxxt, ") Phlladslphis.
Hxjotx j. nans, V
w?-)
17OR THE LADIBS.-Just metre* by Ex
C press a few NUBIAS, at .
apS D.NICQLL ABEO^S Varlety^hwe.
SMITH, WILLIAMS & CO.
DEY GOODS,
[tTOKElGN ' sc DOMKSmC,
Noa. 513 Market St. 4:610 Commerce St. 1
.
PHILADELPHIA. ,
MALTBY HOUSE
PRATT STREET.
Between Light & Charles, >
BALTIMORE, HD.

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