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The Abbeville press and banner. [volume] (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, June 13, 1894, Image 8

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He in Thy Brother.
I
i
BY "LINWOOD. C
I
Has he fallen, deeply falleD, ^
From the path ol truth and light? C
Is he groping, blindly groping:.
Id the blackness of sin's nigtu ? j j.
Is he straying, sadly straying, I a
From the tender faheptaerd'B fold ? | \
Is he staying, Idly staying, t
On the mountain, bleak and cold ? 1
c
If he's fallen, still remember, a
Thine own steps may one day stlde, i
For while Virtue's path Is narrow,
Error's way Is broad and wide.
j v
Or, if from the fold he's wandered, ; n
Lured by pleasure's voice away, i T
Remember from His lovlngcare. j I
Thine own feet are prone to stray. ja
Torn not from a fellow creature
Haughtily, with scornful eyes, V
But from sin and shameful failures, t
r.or>H o hanri and helo him rise. I r
If on bin brow there rests a marking, E
Like tbe bluer cnrse of Cain, i(
By gentle words and kindly actions J
Help erase tbe deadly stain.
b
Tell blm of God's pardoning goodness ?
And you'll do the Master's will,
For It matters not bow fallen, c
Know be is thy brother Btill. ]<
r - t
s
A Noble Boy. j.
Well! I saw a little boy do some- v
thing tbe otber day that made me feel c
good for a week. Indeed it makes my i
heart fill with tenderness and good b
feelinsr even now as I write about it, I
but let me tell you what it was. p
As I was going down street I saw a
an old man who seemed to be v
blind walking along without anyone 1
to lead him. He went very slowly, i)
feeling with his cane. h
"He's walking straight to the highest
part of the curbstone," said I to ti
myself. "And it's very high, too; I t<
wonder if someone won't tell him, and a
start him in the right direction ?" t
Just then a boy, about fourteen years f
nihn nmo niaviriir near the comer, v
V??J, TTUW " ?" I J O
left his playmates, ran up to the old p
man, put his arms through the man's r
arm, and said, "Let me lead you across t<
the street." By this time there were e
three or four others watching the boy. f<
He not only helped him over one cross- o
ing, but led Jiim over another to the r
lower side of the street. Then he ran si
back to his play. g
Now this boy thought he had only o
done the man a kindness, while I a
knew he bad made three other persons v
feel happy, and better, and more care- s
ful to ao little kindnesses to those e
about them. The three or four per- s
sons who had stopped to watch tbe v
boy turned away with a tender smile h
on their faces, ready to follow the s
noble example he had set them. I
know that I felt more gentle and for- I
giving toward everyone many days af- a
terward. p
Another one that was made happy e
was t.hfi hnv himself: for it is impos- ii
sible for us to do a kind act, or to make v
any oueelse happy, without being bet- c
ter or happier ourselves. To be good q
and to do good, is to be happy.? u
Youth's Temperance Banner. li
tl
The Earth Wabbling.
Observations are to be made simul- a
taneously at Washington and at Ma- e
nilla, in the Philippine islands, which
is almost directly opposite Washington
on tbe other side of the globe, to
see what is the matter with the axis of
our planet. Observation shows that ^
for some time the earth has not been d
revolving on that important if imag- ?.
fr?p nan.
inary support, its sue una uuuc w- ,
turies, ana scientists have decided that v
it is time to find, if possible,* what it
all means. Those who have studied t!
the subject declare that if tbe varia- ?'
tions continue in course of some very "
long and very indefinite period we
shall have an arctic climate at Wash- ?
ington, and the latitude of every place
on the globe will be changed, and our 11
geographies will be useless. An equatorial
telescope has been finished and 11
sent out to Manilla, and before long e
diligent inquiry will be made into the *
whys and wherefores of the peculiar 1
performances of old mother eartb. ?
11
n
The symptoms of colic, one of the n
most fatal diseases to a horse, are read- S|
ily detected. The horse invariably ^
scrapes with his fore feet, kicks at the v
stomachand shifts about, turns around,
smells the floor, lies down, rolls, re- n
maing for a time on his back and e,
breathing heavily throughout. At a e
recent meeting of ?the London Farm- ti
er's club, a relief and cure was pre- c
sented by a gentleman who had been 0
all bis life among horses, vvneu a "
horse shows symptoms of an attack of a
colic, apply at once a horse cloth or v
wollen rug. wrung out of boiling wa- v
ter, to the stomach and to the sides, u
and cover with another couple of cloths
to retain the heat. As they cool, re- a
new the cloths as often as needed. A gj
large bran poultice, as hot as can be
borne, is equally effective and retains a
the heat longer.
One of the best temperance lectures }j
ever delivered fell from the lips of a D
little child in Covington, Ky., the -u
child of a reformed man.
"Father," said she, "are you always ^
going to wear the blue ribbon?" n
"I hope so, my dear," was the re- r[
ply. g
"So do I," said the little one. t
" w ay uu you uupc bu i <?acu uu g
father. e
"Because I've never had bo many ^
strawberries in all my life as I've had ^
since you signed the pledge aud put od 0
the blue ribbon.
Men who are not feeding saloon-keep- e
era' children can afford luxuries for c
their own. c
"Love not the world," does not
mean that we should quarrel with ourselves
disagreeable witn all of the people "
of the world. Jesus did not do this. ?
He was moved with compassion for ?
the multitudes, and they were moved ?
with admiration for him. The fol- ?
lower of Jesus should commend his |
Master and his religion to the world I ?
by his own loveliness of character and
disposition.
v
Of our fifty-one States and Territo- c
4ries, twenty-seven are each larger than
all of England, while the entire terri- E
tory of the Union would contain England
sixty-nine times. Five of our e
States and Territories are each larger
than the united kingdon of Great
Britian ana Ireland. li
An old lady up in the Adirondacks, 1
when asked if she heard the earth- c
quake, answered : "Yes, I heard it,
rather enjoyed it; for it is the first c
thing that has happened sioce I mar- &
ried Jeremiah that ne did not think I J<
was to blame for!" c
o
1(
I think that, as a result of almost 22
years of ministerial labor in this city, y
I have scarcely known a case of pov- y
erty, scarcely a case of falling away in
the Christian life, that could not be i
traced directly or indirectly to the
habit of intoxicatiug drink.?Dr. Arthur.
ti
8
Fair dealing is the sand and cement
of society;
.Something About Nnnncrs.
"The easiest people to meet in soiety,"
said the late Rev. Robert
Jaird, "are the crowned heads, and
he hardest are the mushroom aristoracy."
As the representative iu
Europe of American Protestantism,
le met the sovereigns of Europe soci,lly,
and was qualified to speak of
heir manners in social gatherings,
lejdescribed them as invariably affaole
ourieous, and friendly, seeking out ,
,ny guests that seemed constrained,
,nd putting them at ease. i
De Quincy says somewhere that the
uiviio and Hmi ah tprs nf "Flncrlish birih
pa may be known by their manners,
jnaccustomed to the honors of a peerge,
they must put on airs to show
heir fellows that they have been eleated
to a higher social round, or
heir quality will not be recognised.
)f course this does not apply to all
nembers of this class, but to the maDrity
of them.
If you go to a hotel or boarding
louse, you will find generally that
hose who are most comfortably cirumstanced
when at home find the
east fault with the table, the service,
he environment. If they are not
uited, they go elsewhere; if there
3 nowhere else to go, they are too
tell bred to make publio their dis- i
omfort; and if they cannot quietly )
mprove their surroundings, they
ear patiently what cannot be helped,
nvariably a loud mouthed comilaiuer
is not as well served at home
3 in the hotel or boarding house
irith which he or she finds fault,
'bis applies as well to boys and girls
a boarding schools as to adults in
lotels.
There are not a few people who
bink it an indication of superiority
o discover defects in whatever they
re pleased to remark on. They affect
he nil admirari in manner, and are
ond of saying, "Nothing delights me
erv. verv much." In looking at a
icture they comment on its faults
atber than on its merits. In listening
a a concert the discords catch their
ar rather than the concords. At a
?ast. the dishes that are overseasoned
r imperfect excite their comment,
ather than those above criticism, and *
o in everything. Such people will
enerally be found to be either stupid
r nouveaux riche. Your really tine
nd noble gentleman and gentle-1
r'oman wear calico as though it were
ilk, and silk as though it were calico;
at from pewter as though it were
ilver, and from silver as though it
rere pewter. Like Hamlet, they c
aye "that within which passes
how."
So terribly severe a critic as James f
lussell Lowell says: "I would not
dvocate a critical habit at the ex- <
ense of an unquestioning and hearty
ujoymeut of literature in and for
:self. Nay ; as I think the great adantage
to be gained by it is that it I
ompels us to see two sides to every t
uestion, it should, when rightly E
nderstood and fairly applied, tend to
berality of mind and hospitality of c
bought."
This remark is as true and just
pplied to general culture as to literry
culture, and to manners as the
vldence of general culture.
An Ante-Bellniu Negro Preacher.
The ante-bellum negro preachers
^ere the product of the times, and
iffered from the mass of their race
uly in the fact that they were
tirewder and more eloquent. Among J
liem were many men of piety, good
jnse and burning zeal. In others f
nere was a combination of cunning, t
uperstition, excitability and volubil,y
almost indescribable.
To the former class belonged a noted
egro preacher of Culpepper county,
rirginia?au old man of blameless
fe and veoerable appearance, who so
ntirely commanded the confidence of
tie white people, and whose influnce
with the people of his own race
/aa so wholesome, that no one
bought of enforcing against him a b
tatute.then existing which required a
bat at any gathering where six or f(
lore negroes were assembled a white
lan should be present. Despite th;s
Latute, Uncle Jack came and went as
3 pleased, trusted by the whites and
enerated by the blacks.
"At one of his meetings a party of
lischievous young white meu plannd
to have a little fun at the old man's
xpense. Waiting near the door of
tie rustic chapel until the service was i
oncluded, the party approached the s
Id preacher and their spokesman said:
Ola man, we are officers of the law
nd patrolling this beat. You have
iolated the law and we are going to
rhip you for it. Come along with
s."
They led the way to a thicket near
t band, Uncle Jack following in
ilence.
"Have you nothing to say old man?"
sked tbe spokesman. 3
"Nothing marster," said Uncle t
ack. g
"Perhaps you don't think we really
ntend to whip you," said the young
aan, "but we will. Have you noth
ag to say to tnatY"
"No, air," said Uncle Jack; "I
iave nothing to say. The fact is,
aarsters, 1 have often wondered that i
have never been whipped before,
it. Paul was a much better man than
am, and they whipped him almost
verywhere he went. I have preachd
much longer than he did, and never j
iad a whipping in my life. It seems
o me, my young marsters, that 1
ught to have at least a few licks." j
The young scapegraces looked at t
ach other In confusion, and it is f
leedless to say that Uncle Jack was
iot whipped.
The Rev. Billy Hibbard, as he was
iniformly called, was a somewhat ecentric
but zealous preacher, who laored
in Columbia and Livingston ^
ounties some forty years ago. At a
aeeting of conference the Bishop
ailed the roll of ministers' names, but
n calling the name William Hibbard
here was no response, whereupon the t
ollowing dialogue ensued:
Bishop?Brother Hibbard, why do
ou not answer to your name as
ailed ?
Mr. Hibbard?You have not called
uy name.
Bishop?What is your name, brothr'?
Mr. Hibbard?Billy Hibbard.
Bishop?Why that is the name of a
ittle boy. I
Mr. Hibbard?I was a very litle
boy when my father gave inn that
lame.
The reply upset the gravity of the
onference, and an explosion of laugher
followed in which the bishop
>ined. Mr. Hibbard at one time, in *
onversation with the minister of anther
denomination, was asked the foljwing
question :
"Brother Hibbard, why is it that
ou have so few doctors of divinity in
our church ?"
He answered: "Because ourdiviuity >
s never sick."
One-fourth of the land surface of l
he globe is occupied by English
peaking people. J
The good never lose by being per?cuted.
i
P Rosenberg a (Jo
ARE
TT 1 I
tieaaquariers
FOR
Ming,
* Shoes, *
Hats,
=?AND ^
Men's
Furnishings.
THEY CAN FIT YOU IN A SUIT OF
ILOTHES EQUAL TO A REGULAR
I'lltiOF Hill!?
JARMENT. BUYING FROM THE LEADNG
CLOTHIERS OF THIS COUNTRY
'HEY ALWAYS HAVE THE VERY LATST
STYLES, MADE IN THE BEST
1RADE OF
Workmanship.
They are showing an elegant line of
Boys Clothing,
BOYS SUITS,panto"6"
'ram 4 to 15 years, In all grades made in
he Latest Fashions.
Having one of the largest assortments of
SHOES,
oth Men's and Ladles, In the up Country,
nd Id all grades, they cats always fit the
set and pockets of their customers.
EVERY YOUNG MAN LIKES A NICE
STRAW HAT.
this line they are showing a stock which
urpasses all previous seasons.
THEIR STOCK OF
CRAVATS
'akes the eyes of the YOUNG MEN. Havng
everything In this line that Is New gad
Itaple they can salt the tastes of all.
THEIR SELECTION OF
Negligee Shirts
s superb, containing all the fabrics solta
ile for SUMMER WEAR In desirable patterns
or old and young men.
THEIR STOCK OF
Dry Goods
IS FULL AND CONTAINS SOME
RARE BARGAINS.
t must also be remembered that they always
have a complete stock of
GROCERIES,
vhlch they sell at the LOWEST POSSIBLE
PRICES.
rVHEN IN NEED OF ANY IN THE MERCANTILE
LINE CALL ON
P. ROSENBERG ft CO.
THEY GUARANTEE SATISFACTION
'O EVERY CUSTOMER.
> %
House and Lot for Sale.
T OFFER FOR SALE MY HOUSE and LOT \
?? 1 n?? In tho tnron nf Ah* <
J. Oil IVIOHeiejf roujr lunu iu iiiw **. .. ~
beville. Terms easy. Apply toW.S. Coth- ]
ran, J. Allen Smith, or to me at Greenville, 8.
C. T. P. COTHRAN.
Inarch 15, 1808, tf
CHANEY M. JONES, I
FIRST CLASS REPAIRER OFfSHOESand '
BOOTS, has bis shop in the office once oc- (
cupied by Colonel Orville T. Calhoun, where
he will be pleased to receive orders for all 1
kinds of work in bis line, which be will do in {
satisfactory manner, on short notice, and at ,
low price. [Feb. 13,1893, tf '
Notice !
| ^^^g'Raise your i
At Home.
We have Just bought a fine young JACK, i
Parties wanting will please rail on us.
SCOTT <fe DEVLIN.
March 28,1894. , Verdery, S. C.
I
iiaiiaaiaiSBiiiiiaiiiiaiiaiiiiBiiciiiB'ftft*
(Are
[You? I
:out of employment, or in:
| a position that yon do not:
? like ? Possibly the sol ic-S
I iting of Life Insurance is jj
: yonr special forte. A:' any :
5people have, after trial,;
sbeen surprised at their:
: fitness for it. To all such
5-v i ,1 ? :
:it mis pruvcu. it must vun-? |
genial and profitable occu- |
Epation. The Management: \
:of the :
| Equitable Life j
sin the Department of the:
Carolinas, desires to adds
5 co its force, some ageiUss
of character and ability.S
Write for information. :
s W. J. Roddey, Msr.xscr, :
E Rock Mill. 5. C. f
* - ?<
J. C. MILLER, Special Agt.,
Abbeville, S. C. J
WM. H. PARKER, President.
JULIUS H. Da
The Farmers' Bar
DEPOSITS ?
SurpluH
Does general banking business.
Mods. A Savings Department has been
wards. Interest at 4 per cent, payable quarterl;
Inge Increase rapidly.
SPEED'S m
With a LARE and w<
DRUGS, CHEMICALS,
PATENT MEDICINES,
OILS, WINDOW (
PUTTY, COMB
GOODS, PER
The demand of this market can be supplied.
Headquarters for fine CIGARS and TOBACCO
ed to. prescriptions carefully compounded at i
You are respectfully Invited to call.
P. 33.
iTrrv QUTTU I TVTHTT7 1
J OiUiiiii i i w |M m,mj I
Proprietor. | ?* J
Abbeville
Successors to J.
GHOC1
A full line of all Heavy Groceries Com, Br
Molasses, Syrups A bargain In 25cts Molasse
A line of 8ugars, Coffees, Rice and Grits of a
pound of our 50cts blended Tea.
IN CANNED GOODS-We are full In all th
0?lQ 10ct8.
We sell the Richmond Stove Co.'s Stoves an
TINWARE.?Everything in a line of Staph
of everyklnd. Cheaper than ever before.
TOBACCO/?Two new brands In 9 inch o's at
and price our goods.
W. D. BAR;
rwww W1
B. K. Be
f DEAL!
4 Lumber, Sash, Do
J . Moulding, Lj
J gles, Bi
I also carry a side line of
W POULTRY WIRE, WIRE
^ WIRE HANGING
W SAND SCI
KEROSEI
The Oil we sell is posi
Simply Try it ail
15 GENTS 1
12 CENTS
5 Gallon Tic
These Prices for CAS
H. W. La^
J
RICHARD GANTT. is now prepared to do I *"W
all work In his department Id the best 111
nanner and at reasonable charges. Monthly |f i
iustomers shaving, hair cutting and shampooing
81 per month. Rasors honed and put C
n the best condition for '25 cents each. c
i J. T. PARKS, 5 L
# Fire, Life & Real Estate Agent# *'p?
P Cothran's Brick Office, Main Street, w tee<
F FOR SALE. f
0 Settings of Indian Game Fowls $2.00 #
1 Settings of S. C. Brown Leghorn, 1.50 4 J. 8
\ Abbeville, S. C., Feb. 7,1894. X
E. F. GILLIARD,"
/.TAILOR,.', i
?-ar AO or\A r\nnnnloo thP rfinm rf?PPllt- i
hT ly occupied by Clark, the gun-1
smith, and is now prepared to do all kinds of
repairing and cleaning of gentlemen's clothes
on nhort notice. m.
Samples of suits always on hand. Charges M'J
reasonable *J
Vocal Lessons. pi
MR5*. STANLEY desires to teach a singing T ^
class, and will give instruction on the l~
most favorable terms. Of her ability and her J?c
sweet sinking Miss Sosnowski, Principal ol ln?
the Home School in Athens, Ga., cays: Wlft
"I am happy to speak most favorably of w.,j
Mrs. Ellen Stanley. She always gave pleas- j
ure In Athens by her beautiful singing, and to ^
besides the instruction she received at the to
Home School, she had the great advantage ol ,e^t
instruction in vocal culture in the Boston
Conservatory of Music."
1TBH Hi:
TO BE GIVEN AWAY AT THE
CITY DIG STORE
4
In order to advertise and bring before the
public the stock 0/ goods at the I 3j|
CITY DRUG STORE. I J
! I
I -is
EACH PURCHASER WILL BE entitled
to choose a present worth
20 CENTS
ou each dollar's worth of gooods purchased
C
Ii tie Mi Store Department8
from this day until this notice 1? withdrawn. ?
PRICES guaranteed to be as LOW as the
LOWEST, and all goods as represented.
March 8,1898, tf
A. W. SMITH, Yice President. J?1
PRE, Cashier. HE
ik of Abbeville, d
?
^OLICITEU. m
$65,790
5,000 "
Buys and sells Exchange and makes Collec
established. Amounts received of SI and up
y,-January, April, July, October. Small say W<
[March 1,1893,12m
;0G STORE. "
all Selected Stock of D
G
PAINTS, i
JLASS, PREPARED ?"!
S, BRUSHES, FANCY ,?
FUMES. STATIONERY. &C
>. Orders by Mall or band promptly attend
til hours. ^
SPEED. _
FIRM. | Manager. I f
Supply Co. I
H. LATIMER.
EWDCIEfS S
an, Hay, Meal, Bacon, Suit. Cotton Seed Meal,!
s, also In a 50c ts Syrup.
;I1 grades. Cheese of the finest. Try one)
e staple goods. Canned Peaches, two pound j
d Ranges. Every one warranted.
3 Tinware. Nails and Builders' Hardware :
25i;ts per pound. Give usachauce to show
KSDALE, Manager.
>acliam,
SR IN m
ors, Blinds, d
iths, Lime, Sliin- W ,
4 b<
ailders' Hardware. J
CHAIRS, W
BASKETS, PLASTERS ^
EtEENS. AND SAND RID- W
L.ES, AND ALL KINDS OF f
WIRE GOODS. S 4
WWi
(
, i
lively the best made. ?
d be Convinced. *!
I. GALLON. 1
IALLON FOR ?=?
==? 5 Gallons or over.;
kets 60 Cts. | j
>11 Only. If"
i Dea
rson & CoP
" ' _ ' ' '" V;*^
# s V*r * V - ; ?
I. R. WELSH,, Coal! Coal!
tone Cutter and Quarryman, ;vvr 1 - 1 a
nnarrn p n s n Wnnn ! Wood !
J * ' W" * "* WW W Wt WW W ? r
'
prepared to fill all kinds of orders on ;
nhort notice for first class granite of every
ripllon, either rough or dressed. All I
lite delivered on board earn. I ft AJ 1111 t Q OOHO
ices given on application. Work guaran ! A IUI Ull I MJ \|I|II\
1 to be aatlsCactory. rOct. 26,1898,12m : f\| Ivll lllLLi OU OUIlO
! tJ AVE opened a COAL and WOOD YARD
i 11 and are ready to receive your orders 'or
r-nTHT?AV i w pprrtv i Wlnlel*. Call and get cheapest rates. Terms
. COTHRAN L. W . PERRIN | _Ca8b on delivery. July 27,1892. tf
-T. P. COTHRAN.
rHRAN,perrin &cothran Registration
Attorneys at Law. OTIO ?3.
Abbeville S C. THK BOOKS OF REGISTRATION will he
mmmw 1 1 opened In my office on Law Range, as the '
; law directs on the
ERRA COTTA WELLS First M?DdaJ ? Ea^h Month, .
until first Monday In July, 1894, when the law
AT ! requires them closed until after the next gen_____
I eral election. This Is for the purpose of reglsIICES
to SUIT the TIMES. ,erln* a" persons who have become of age. or
| entitled to register since last election; to
THE FUTURE I propose to sink the eel- (transfer persons from this to another county;
ebrated Terra Cotta Weils nt a >rreat re- and from one township to another, or from
ilon in my former price. So parlies deslr-1 one residence to another. All this must be
an everlasting supply of good sparkling done before or on the first Monday in July,
erata low price would do well to confer 1?9I. Lost certificates may be renewed to
fi me before making other arrangements.; within 30 days of the election, and those who
t propose to make It to the interest of all become of age between 1st July aud the elec0
so. WATER OR NO PAY?is my mot- tlon, may register at any time before election.
1 have In ten years experience standing , Those who Refused or Neglected to Register
imonials In six counties. Address hefore the last election, cannot register until
r, -- j the law is changed.
C. M. CALHOUN, _ _
c n J D. CAE WILE,
v. oo looo **locuwwuu* v* j Supervisor of Registration for Abbeville
arch 22,1S93, It | county. [Dec. C, 1898. tf
.. . ?
j|j|M fceawtt | fiage,
7 jff-Jlr 1Marille * ^D'te Wsl0Iies & Mounts
o S0r JJbci
^=8 "Ie^I IRON" FENCING,
GREENWOOD, - S. C.
rational Bank of Abbeville,
dCXI^IMC? V?XJ.C7y V/i
a-nital, - ' - - $75,000.
urplus, 15,000
Officers s
ALLEN SMITH, President. W. C. McGOWAN, Vice-President. /
BENJ. S. BARNWELL, Cashier.
:?1 rectojp? z
f. H. PARKER, Abbeville, S. C.t J. C. KLUGH, Abbeville, S. C.,
W. WHITE, Abbeville, S. C., W. JOEL SMITH, Abbeville, 8. C?
!NJ. 8. BARNWELL, Abbeville, S.C., W. C. McGOWAN, Abbeville, 8.V.
J. ALLEN 8MITH, Abbeville, S. C.
OES a General Banking business, provides the greatest security and convenience for Its
Depositors. Is ready at any and all times to make loans based upon such safe collatera
?ur county affords. Pept. 11. 1892. lv
i
i are still at the eld stand, and will try to serve our friends and customers as
fully and faithfully during '94 as we have through the long years
of the past. With us you can always find what you most need.
ry Goods, Clothing, Hats, Shoes, Groceries of all
Kinds, Wooden ware, Hardwaie, &c.
ress and small check Ginghams, 5c yard. ulxle "?y pi?w. ?
oodyard wide Sea Island Homespun at lures, garden and farming tools of all kinds. , ;
cts. We carry a big stock of shoes, bats, clotbeautlful
line of colored Pru(?ees, Dotted lng, and can give you what you want.
?llne8, Eperlines, Cambrics, Lawns. Call- Bull Dog breeches, Elghmle shirts and
etc., Just opened. Means shoes are specialties with us.
aeon, corn, oats, meal, bran, hay, lard, Trunks, valises, harness, saddles, bridle*
ese, molasses, 4c. collars, <kc.
? '
Jome in and trade with us. We will be glad to see you.
V. JOEL SMITH & SONS.
li^iriAnn TTnn /I /nil nirf AHA I
wizens ncttuquancia
-^POR??
Fine Jewelry.
Scarf Pins,
Lace Tins,
-mi f
war mugs,
Bracelets,
VA ocks,
Watches,
And Wedding Presents.
We sell only for CASH and give you the
Miefit of the Low Prices.
Give the old reliable Jewelers a call.
REESE <fc DuPRE.
^ ^ DOUGLAS
T#x\f $3 SHOE ?!?.
S| $5, $4 and $3.50 Dress Shoe. I
cjp ?; ' ''Ml | \?L $3.50 Police Shoe, 3 Soles. I
- jft? H $2.60, $2for Worklngmen. I
^ACTION^I/^any^deale* B
^ "hoes at m reduced price, I
RTHIS IS THE I
H.: ~S >:K '.-. -/WftMaf : TV* jWak -%ob the bottom, pat him
H. L. DOUGLAS Shoes are stylish, easy fitting, and give bettei H
sfaction at the prices advertised than any other make. Try one pair and be con- H
red. The stamping of W. L. Douglas' name and price on the bottom, which H
rantees their value, saves thousands of dollars annually to those who wear them. H
lers who push the sale of W. L. Douglas Shoes gain customers, which helps to H
ease the sales on their full line of goods. They can afford to tell at a leu profit, Bj
we believe you can save money by baying all yoor footwear of the dealer adver*
i below. Catalogue tree upon application. W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, mail, R
A. W. SMITH; I

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