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The Abbeville press and banner. [volume] (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, February 22, 1899, Image 1

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I The Abbeville Press and Batiffiifj
BY HUGH WILSON. ABBEVILLE, S. C., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1899. ESTABLISHED 1844 M
WM H. PARKER WM. P. GREKXE
F. PARKER & GREENE, )
Attorsfys and Con&se!!ors atLav.
Office ou LAW RANGK.
ABBEVILLE - SOUTH CAKOLINA. I
May 4. ISM. tf i
iTi WILDER,
-DEALER INSTAPLE
AND FANCY GROCER-1
IES, CIGARS, TOBACCO, &c. |
V * STOCK FRESH AND NEW AND
W CHEAP. DON T FORGET TO
GET HIS PRICES ON
I KEROSENE OIL
BY THE GALLON' OR BARREL.
PRICES TO SUIT THE HARD
TIMES.
D. H. WILDER. j
?? I Mt
Don't Grope
IN THE j
DARKNESS
WHEN THERE IS AN ?
ABUNDANCE
OP
.. KEROSENE
AND x
LAMPS
FOR SALE BY
L. T. & T. M. MILLER.
N I Am Nice
| IN MY NEW QUARTERS,
JHj where I am prepared to look aft
as well, if not better than ever hefo;
K3 nope fo.r belter things all around in
M
?? Good Goods, Living Prices, and
m I will try to hold the OLD and b
M me a chance to help von, a* whII a*
U THING, specially GROCERIES.
|H| PHONE NO. 13.
? J. Allen &
W &?ll WILL HAVE I
^ t^P A FULL STOCI
# Guano, Acid
VS MR. FRANCIS HENR
FERTILIZERS FOR
fy YEARS WILL L0(
w BRANCH OF THE Bl
T 1 1? ^
Lamberts |[
The best remedy for Mil
Horses, Cattle or Pla
Price 10 and 25c pe
TVTilfnrfl & DuPre'i
Drug3 Seed am
? ! > XM i-i-t vfc rfc >! ? vfo vl-t vt-i
S|?\ >|'x >}s /:|x /f* /:f* I *I**
i Horses ai
^ ^ ^ TOR SA
^ tp a ni/> c
^51 niviv ^
iff ~~
One car load new stoc
vt|/ at prices that will sell th
horses that 1 have taken ii
Don't fail to see them
X J. S.
v?V;.:-.v. J *' /
,>
r"?
OUKSARE ?
^ wuuJJd Always Reliable, j
(t Send for our lllnstraipd eata'ogup 'indi
V?r<jt-r direct. Augusta EARLY TRUf.'K \
^ER CAHL5AGE, a Sure Header. Seed J He V
f) pix ki't.
+ ALEXANDER SEED CO. }
A I
P AUUUSTA, <_>A. r
MUTUAL
Ml HUB
$ 425,000,
WRITE TO OR CALL on the'undevclgned ]
or to tbe Director of your Township
'or any information you may d6?ire about 1
>ur plan of Insurance. (
We insure your property againet destraeion
by
r:ss, mmm on uunian, '
iad do so cheaper than any Insurance Com J
Jttay iu ennicuko.
Remember we are prepared to prove to you
.baioursls the Nafeit and cheapest plan of (
Insurance known.
f. B. BLAKE, Jr., Agent,
Abbeville, S. C.
J. FULLER LYON, Pres.
Abbeville, S. C.
BOARD DIRECTORS.
J. Add. Calhoun Ninety-Six Township
S. M. Benjamin Greenwood "
G. B. Riley Cobesbury "
W. B. Acker Donnalds "
M. B. Cllnk6cales Due West "
T. L. Haddon iLong Cane "
J. W. Scott?........ Smllhv||!e "
Joseph Lake White Hall "
J.W.Lyon Indian Hill "
Capt. John Lyou Cedar Spring "
W. E. Leslie Abbeville "
Dr. J. A. Anderson.Dlamond Hill "
H.A. Tennent Lowndesvllle "
A.O.Grant Magnolia "
J. B. Tarrant Calhoun "
G. N. McKinney Bordeaux "
Abbeville, S. C., Jan. 18, 1896.
ly Fixed sh! ,
NO. 5 WHITE'S BLOCK, | :
,er the interest of my customers,
re. '9S was a tough one, but we feQg
"J9. By means of ^ **
Close Attention to Business
ring in NEW TRADE. Give W 1
myself, when in need of ANY- fejf 1
P
AMOS B. HORSE. gj
Kid: m'm mzu ?? WW ^
ifr1'A~ ^ m'w **'^ n5?
liiiiiiiiiiii' ;
>mith, Jr., I
<!?
N DUE TIME ^
C OF ? /|\
&
! and Kainit W
Y '
Y, WHO HAS SOLD \l/[
A NUMBER OF ijjS
)K AFTER THIS (jS
JSIXESS.
^ >? *C- ^ ^C- ^CDei
to fa.
:es on Poultry, Lice on
.nts, Fleas on Dogs,
r box. For sale at
3 Phone 107
d ]3oolc Store
?<t> :!> <t> <t> *'!> <t> <i>
/'f\ /f\ /f\ ' Ts 'T - ' T s ' T ' T
odMules!
XE AT-*"?-' ;k
Stable. $
k right from Tennessee,
em. Some mules and \fc/
ri at your price. <
before buying. "fys
STARK X
\ /f\ /"f\ /f\ /f\ /f\ /f\ /f\ /J\
< I
? ! -
THE PHILIPPINES.
Our Moral Obligations Arc Dwell
l/'pon at I.onKlli-' Froc Can Conquer
Itnt to Save.'*?He Reviews
Events of Year .lust Fuded and
Deals With Outlook at This Time.
Boston, Feb. 1G.?President Wm.. McKlnley
Arrived In Boston today to be the guest of the
Home Market club at a banquet In Ills honor
fit .Mechanics hall. Messrs Long, Aluer, Bliss,
(jage, and smith, of his cabinet, accompanied
Utin together with Congressman Grosvcnor,
of Ohio. The arrival of the train at South
ifiiuiLmi Mrtuun ill. 11/ u uu;v;? war* i.uo uuta*
slon of a general outburst of enthusiasm
from the thousands who lined the streets on
the line or the procession from the station to
the hotel. The remainder of the day after
the arrival at the hotel wafi spent In quietude
by the president until at4.15 when he was escorted
to Mechanics Imll to participate In the
reception and banquet of the Iiome Market
club. ,
The president tomorrow will visit the G. A.
It. encampment, dine at the Algonquin club,
hold a reception there, drive from the club to
the South Uniou station and leave Boston at
5.10 p. in.
The crowning event of the day and the
principal feature of the president's visit to
Boston was the banqnet tendered to him by
Ilii Home Market club at Mechanics hall tonight.'
The presidential party'left the Hotel
iouralue under a cavalry esoori at 4 20 and
proceeded through an Immense cheering
crowd direct lo Mechanics hall.
The reception was held In Paul Revere hall
find for over three-quarters of an hour Preslient
McKinley and otberdlstlngulshed guests
-tood in line and were Introduced to and
shook hands with fully 2,500 persons.
At6 o'clock the bugle sounded, announcing
that the banquet was ready to be served and
the immense company marched Into the ball,
while the band played. The president's table
was made'consplcuous"*1?" Immense bonquets
of American Beauty roses and pinks. Over
the stage were large pprtralts of Washington,
Lincoln and McKinley, anl underneath *as
the word "Liberator" in large letters. Upon
the balcony was a picture of Admiral Dewey
with the motto "To the captain of a German
Ship; 'You must not sail by the United States
flag wltnout seeing it,'" and his famous command
at Manila: "You may fire, Grldley,
when ready."
'President McKinley sal at the front of the
platform and among those at his table were
Mayor Quincy, of Boston ; Secretary Long,
Secretary Alger, Gov. Wolcott, Secretary
Uage, Postmaster General Smith and Secre
tary Bliss.
There was great enthusiasm when President
McKinley was Introduced. He spoke as follows:
Mr. Toastmaster and Gentlemen: The
years go quickly. It seems not so loqg, but it
Is In tact six. years since it was my honor to
be a guest of the Home Market club. Much
has happened In the intervening time. Issues
which were then engaging us have been
settled or put aside for larger and more absorbing
ones. Domestic conditions have improved
and are generally satisfactory. We
nave made progress In industry and have
realized the prosperity for which we have
been striving. We had four long years of
adversity, which taught us some lessons
which will never be unlearned and wblcb
will be valuable in guiding our future action.
We have not only been successful In our
financial and business afialrs, but we have
been succ'eesrul In a war with a foreign power
which added great glory to American arms
and a uew chapter io American history.
I do not know why In the year 189S this republic
has unexpectedly had placed before It
might/ problems which It must face and
meet. They have come and are here, and
they could not be kept away* Many who
were'impatient for the conflict a year ago.
apparently heedless of Its -larger results, were
the first to cry out against the far-reaching
consequences of their own act. Those of us
who dreaded war most, and whose every effort
was directed to prevent It, had feurs of
new and grave problems which might follow
lis Inauguration. The evolution of events
which no man could control has brought
ihese problems upon us. Certain It is that
they have not come through auy fault on our
own part, but as a high obligation, and we
meet them with a clear conscience and unselfish
purpose and with good heart to resolve to
undertake their solution.
W?r was declared in April, 1890, with practical
unanimity by the cougress, and, oare upon
us, was sustained by like unanimity
among uie pe"pie. i were are nmuy wuu nave
tried to avert if, as on the other hand there
are those who would have precipitated Hat
an earlier date. In Its prosecution and conclusion
the great majority of our countrymen
of every Bectlon believed they were fighting
In ajust cause, and at home or on sea or In
the field they had part lu Its glorious
triumph. It was the war of an undivided na
tlou.
livery great act In Its progress, from Manila
to Santiago, from Guam to I'ana, met universal
and hearty commendation. The protocol
commanded pract' -ally the approval of the
American people. It Is welcomed by every
lover of peace beneath the flag. The Philippines,
llae Cub', and Puerto Rico, were entrusted
to our husds by the war, and to that
great trust, unacr the providence of God and
in the name of uuman progress and civilization,
we are corn ml tied,
It is a trust wu ,iave not sought; it Is a
trust from which \vc will not flinch. The
.-vmei lean jJtuiJii: mil uuiu up luo uuuun ui
ihelr servants at home to whom they commit
Its action, while Dewey and Otis and the
brave men whom they command will have
the support of the country in upholding our
flag where.it now floats, the symbol and assurance
of liberty and Justice.
Wliat nation was ever able to write an
accurate progrumine of the war upon wblcb
it was entering, much less decree in advance
the scope ol its results? Congress can declare
war, but higher power decides Its bounds and
fixes Its realities and responsibilities. The
president can direct the movements of soldiers
on the field and fleetfl upon the sea, but
he cannot foresee the close of such movements
and prescribe their limits. He canuot
anticipate or avoid the consequences, but he
must meet them. No accurate map of nations
engaged in war can be traced until the
war lii over, nor can the measure of responsibility
be fixed until tbe Jast gun is fired and
the verdict embodied in the stipulations oi
pence.
We bear no complaint of the relations created
by tbe war between this government and
the islands of Cuba and Puerto Rico, There
are some who regaid tbe Philippines in a
dift'ereut relation, but whatever variety of
views there may be on this phase of tbe question,
there Is universal agreement that the
l*li i I i rkrvl n ou uhull rwil tnmoH
Spain. No true American consents to that.
Even if unwilling to accent them ourselves, It
would have been a weak evasion of manly
duty to require Spalu to transfer them to
some other power or powers and thus shirk
our own responsibility. Even if we had had,
as we did not have, the power to compel such
a transfer, It could not have been made without
the most serious international complications.
Such a course could not be thought of. And
yet had we refused to accept the cession of
them we should have bad no power over
them, even for their own good. We could not
dlschargo the responsibilities upon us until
these Islands became ours, either by conquest
or treaty. There was but one alternative and
that was either Bp <ln or the United States In
the I hillpplnes. The other soggestion?first,
that they should be tossed into the arena of
contention lor the strife of nations; or, second
to be lett to the anarchy end chaos 01 no protectorate
at all, were too shameful to be considered.
The treaty Save them to the Unit
ed States. Could we have required less and
dotieour duty? Could we,alter freeing the
Filipinos from the domination of Spain, have
left tLeru without power to protect lileand
properly or to perforin the International obligations
essential to an Independent state?
Could we have left them in a state of anarchy
and Justified ourselves in our own conscience
or belore the tribunal of mankind ? Could we
have done that iu the sight of God and man ?
Our concern was not for territory, or trade,
or empire, but for the people whose Interests |
and destiny, without our willing it, had been
put in our hands, it was this feeling from
the first day to tjie last, one; not one word or
line went lrorn the executive in Washington
to our military and naval coinmauderH at
Manila or to our peace commissioners at
l'aria that did not put as the Hole purpose to
be kept in mind firs!, after success of our arms
and the maintenance of our own honor, the
welfare and happiness and the rights of the
inhabitants of the Philippine Islands. Did
we need their consent to perform a greRt act
for humanity? We had it in every aspiration
of their minds, in every hope of their
hearts. Was it necce.^ary to aslc their consent
to capture .Manila, the capital of their islands?
Did we ask their ronsent to liberate
them from Spanish sovereignity or to enter
Manila bay and destroy the Spanish sea power
there? We do not ask these; we were
obeying a higher moral obligation which rest
eel on us and which did not require anybody's
consent. We were doing our duty by them
with the consent of our own conscience and
with the approval of civilisation. Every pres
ent obligation has been met and fulfilled in
the expulsion of tliu Spanish sovereignty
tVoui their islands, anu while the war that
destroyed it was in progress we could not ask
their views. Nor can we ask their consent.
Indeed, can anyone tell me in what form It
nmiiii ho murul.nlpri und ascertained until
| peace and order, ro nec.ccssrry to reign of reahod,
shall be secured' and established ? A
reign of terror Is not the kind of rule under
| which right action and deliberate Judgment
are possible. It is not a good time lor the
liberator to submit Important questions concerning
liberty and government to those
to bo liberated while they are engaged in
shooting down their rescuers.
We have ended the war with Spain. The
treaty has been ratified bv more than ',wothirds
of the senate of the United States and
by the Judgment of nine-tenths of its people.
No nation was ever more fortunate in war or
more honorable In peace. It remains to ask
what we shall now do. I do Dot Intrude upon
; the dnt leR of congress or seek to anticipate or
forestall its action. I only say tnai tne treaiy
of peace, honorably secured, Laving been ratified
by the United States, and as we confidently
expect, shortly to be ratified In Spain,
congress will have the power, and 1 am sure
the purpose, to do what in good morals is
right and just and humane for these people
In distant seas.
The future of t he Philippine Islands 18" now
in the hands of the American people. Until
the treaty was ratified or rejected the executive
department of this government cou'd 6nly
| p-eserve the peace and protect lives and property.
Thattreaty now commits the freeand
enfranchised Filipinos to the guiding hand
and liberating influences, the generous
sympathies, the uplifting education, not of
their American masters, but of their American
emancipators. No one can tell todp.yi
what is best for them or for us. r know
no one at this hoar who is wise enough o?sufficiently
informed to determine what form
of government will best subserve their Intereats
and ours, their and our well being. If we
knew everything by Intuition?and I sometimes
think there are those who believe that
If we do not they do?we should not need
Information, but unfortunately most of us
are not in that happy state. The whole subject
Is now with congress and congress Is the
voice, the consciences and the Judgment ol
the American people. Upon their Judgment
and conscience can we not rely? I believe
in them, I trust them. I know of no better or
safer or more humane .tribunal than the
people.
Until congress shall direct otherwise it will
oe me amy 01 me exeuuuvu lo possess ?nu
bold the Philippines, giving to the people
thereof peace and order and beneficent government,
affording them opportunity to
prosecute tbelr lawful pursuits, encouraging
them In thrift and Industry, making them
feel and know that we are their friends, not
their enemies; that their good Is our aim,
their welfare Is our welfare, but that neither
their aspirations nor ours can be realized until
our authority Is acknowledged and unquestioned.
That the Inhabitants of the Philippines will
be benefitted by this republic Is my unshaken
belief; that they will have a kindlier government
under our guidance, and that they will
be aided lu every possible way to be self-respecting
ana self-governing people is as true
as that the American people love liberty and
have an abiding faith in their own government
and In tbelr own inhaltants.
No imperial designs lurk In the American
minds. They are alien to American sentiment,
thought and purpose. Our prloeless
principles undergo no change under a tropical
sun. They go with the fiat:
"Why read ye no the changeless truth,
The free can conquer but to save?"
If we can benefit these remote peoples, who
will object? If In the years of the future they
are established in government under law and
liberty, who will regret our perils and sacrifices?
Who will not rejoice In our heroism
and humanity? Always perils and always
xfter them safety; always darkness and clouds,
but always shining ^hrcugb them the light!
huo su Dsn me; aiwuyn ciwi huu suunuce, out uiwnys
after tbem the fruition of liberty and
education and clvilzatlon. 1 have no light or
knowledge not common to my countrymen.
I do not prophesy. The present Is all absorbing
to me, but I caunot bound my vision
by the blood-stained trenches around Manila,
where every red drop, whether from the veins
of an American soldier or a misguided Filipino,
Is anguish to my heart, but by the
broad range of future years, wheD that group
oi islands, under the Impulse of the yearjust
past, shall have become tbe gems and glories
of those tropical seas, a land of plenty and of
Increasing possibilities, a people redeemed (
from savage Indolence and habits, devoted to <
the arts of peace, in touch with the commerce
and trade of all nations, enjoving the bles
slngsof freedom, of civil and religious liberty.
of education and of homes, and whose
children and children's children shall for ages
hence bless the American republic because
It emancipated and redeemed their father- '
land and set tbem in the pathway of tbe I
world's best civilzation. I
THE STOYE BLEW UP.
An Accident Cansed' by a Frozeu 1
Water Pipe. 1
Columbia Record.
People who have heating pipes running
to their stoves and furnaces should be careful I
to see that the pipes have not been frozen, as |
At Prof. Colock's house a pipe runs to the
stove and heat is conveyed through the house. I
Yesterday morning the cook started the Are,
turning on the water. This soon came to the
boiling point, but as the pipe leading from It
was frozen solid, there waH no escape for the
steam.
In a few minutes a terlfic explosion occured,
In which the stove was knocaed to smithereens.
Great pieces of it flew to the ceiling
and around the walls, two pieces strlcklng
(he cook on the bead and hip. Fortunately
the cook was not killed, but It was only by a
miracle. One or two accidents of a similar
character, but of smaller consequence, have
been reported in the city.
Npenklue Facia.
Columbia Record.
Here Is an cxtract from Governor Ellerbe's
message to the legislature In 1899.
"It Is useless for me to make an extended I
argument to show that our system of liquor ]
control Is a proper exercise of t he police pow
er, ana mat, juage mmomoD is wrong iu uis
decision denying his power to the state.
'But as facts speak louder than words,
1 will give the testimony of ministers of the .
gospel In the state as as to the effect of the dispensary
law on the morals of the. people and
on the reduction of drunkenness among <
them. Out of four nundred and alxty-three
answers received from the ministers of the ,
state to questions submitted theui In a circular
letter, dated October 1st. 1897, three
hundred and twenty-four reported a decrease j
in drinking of forty-six and one-third per '
cent,, and a corresponding decrease in drunkenness
since the dispensrry law went intoef- i
feet. Sixty-nine reported an Increase in <
drinking of fifty-four and three-fourth per i
cent." i
Since that messaee was written, the su- i
preme court of the United States upheld the <
constitutionality of the dispensary law, the
original package shops have have been closed '
and there has been a further decrease or |
temperate use ol liquor. These are tacts |
which speak iu thunder tones and tell the i
legislators to let well enough alone?to let ,
the dispensary stand.
!
L. T. & T. n. Mlllpr's LocalK.
10 lbH. good green coffee for $1.00.
4 lbs. dried apples for 25c.
Evaporated apples In 1 lb. packages, 12%o.
16 lbs. granulated sugar for S1.00.
18 lbs. "0" sugar for 81.00.
Remember our oil wagon will continue to
i around three days in the week?Tuesdays,
i Thursdays and Saturdays.
I 30 bars of good soap for 31.00.
Remember we sell kerosene and gasoline t
oil. Special prices on oil by the barrel. Call t
and see us before buying. j
Call up phone 75 when you are In need of ^
I anything In the grocery line. We deliver t
goods a:>y where In the city free.
L. T. & T. M. MILLER.
J. R. Glenn will always give tbe best bargains
in corn, oats, bacon, lard, molasses,
sugar and coffee. Don't forget to visit Glenn's
utnrc nti Trinllv Kti'apl in front, of McClUltS
hotel.
|e. f. gilliard,
/.TAILOR, .V
HAS moved, nnd ocuple* the rooms upsiairM
!n Knox's Hh'iI. and Is now prepared
to do all kinds <>! repalrlinj and pi*hmink
of ceut letneti'K oiotheH on nliort uottce.
saiupleHol 6ults always ou band. Cbarges
reaaonable
10WNDE8YILI/E LETTER.
,
The Nnow anil the Rabbit*?Valentine
Party?Cheap .11 til en?Personals.
Lowndesvllle, Feb 20,1899.
"It is an 111 wind tbat blows nobody some
good." The depth, about 8 inches, snow a
week ago, although It produced much suffer- .
lng with all who were not supplied with
wood, yet was a Joyous time with the rabbit
hunters. Mr. B. Bolln Allen with a lew
hounds caught and killed 85 Monday and
half the day Tuesday. Others, were'almost
equally successful In diminishing the rabbit 1
race. . _ x f
The expected valentine party Tuesday
night, either froze up, or stuck in tbe mud.
The mail was freely used however. In commemorating
the day. The modern way of
doing this, Is, to our way of thinking more
objecilonaole, than that "of the days of yore."
Then a valentine was complimentary both to
the sender and receiver?now, It Is neither.
Times change.
Dr. 8. J. Brock, of Modoc, was here Thursday
and Friday, "spying out the land," to see
If It flowed with milk and honey.
Dr. J. S. Wilson of Antrevlile, was here
Thursday, with the same purpose in view.
In plainer words these gentlemen, were looking
around to find out tbe Inducements offered
to an M.' D.. to locate here, as Dr. B. A.
Henry's early departure would leave an
miHiii mr. Several nhvslcl^ns from as manv
different places, have been here In tbe near
pant, but not one, so far as Is known has decided
to come. 1
Rev. G. T. Harmon, Presiding Elder, was
looked for Thursday night, but having failed
to make the neccessary railroad connection
at McCormlck, did not reach here till 6 p. in.,
the next day. The Quarterly Conference for this
charge was held in tbe Methodist Church
Friday night. Owing to tbe unfavorable
weather the attendance was quite small, only
a few of tbe official members being present.
Tbe different reports given, were as lavorable '
as could have been expected under the olr- '
cumstances.
Saturday evening as tbe down freight train
was leaving this point, before it bad passed
entirely beyond tbe sidetrack, two of tbe cars
and the cab, left the rails and damaged the
road-bed considerably. The three ladles who J
were in tbe cab were badly shaken up and
scared. During tbe past two or three weeks
the bad weather has put tbe road-bed in such
a fix, that some part of tbe freight train on
this road has run off every few days. The
rolling stock, and the road has suffered, but
foctunately no lives have been so far lost.
Mr. M. W. Speer returned a few days ago
from a very pleasant trip to Winder, Ga.
Mr. W. C. Tennent w?nt to Florida, this day j
was a week ago, where be expects te remain
for sometime.
Rev. J. R. Vaughan of Hendersonvflle, N. c
C., delivered a temperance lecture in tbe 1
Methodist Church, this place, yesterday at
3.80 p. m., to quite a large audience, which '
gave tbe speaker very close attention. His t
address was a good one, on this very lmpor- t
tant subject.
Prof. J. R.T. Major,as Ibe exercises in bis
school were necessarily surspended because
of th dreadful weather, went to bis home la
Greenwood for a few days visit. All of tbe i
schools, so far as known to the writer were ,
closed.
Mrs. John Cater, of Atlanta, came here a few 1
days ago, to visit tbe families of ber brothersin-law,
Messrs. Ed Smith and J. M. Carllte.
Owing to too much feed, and having bad f
nothing to do, a few days ago, Mr. M. W.
Speer's horse got above himself *nd while
bitched to tbe buggy and tied to a tree, broke
loose, ran off and somewhat smashed up
things.
A bale or two of cotton Bold here for 6 l-4c
Saturday.
mere m uuimuca uciuuuu lur uorsen uuu
mules In this section, or at least some mules _
are not rated high. One sold last week for ,
30 cents. It Is reported tbat Bome merchants
have bad to take In so many mules and
horses, tbat as soou as they can get the stock
fattened up and able to travel, will drive It off
to market. A little out ol their line to become
a horse drover, but then there !s no
knowing what a day may bring forth. /
Rev. J. A. Brown, pastor of the Baptist
Church here, occupied the pulpit In the
Methodist Church in this place, last night at
7.30. He gave us quite an interesting sermon,
which was closely listened to by the good'
congregation present. Troupe. J
r 1 - E
Learn to For^Jve.
Learn now to forgive. Do not carry j
an unforgiving spirit with you 8
through your life;'it will hurt you c
mnr<? than anvthlnc pise. Ft will de- i,
3troy the happiness of mauy around
you, yet its chief feeding ground will n
be found in your own heart. You
hate your neighbor. Yonder is his
dwelling, one hundred and fifty yards
away. Suppose you pass by a wood n
fire, and as you pass you pluck a half- j
consumed brand from it, flaming and
gleaming, and thrusting it under your
garment to hide it, you start for your p
neighbor's dwelling to burn it. Who
gets the worst of it? You will find
your garments on fire and yourself _
burned before you can harm yoor
neighbor. So is he who carries an un- '
forgiving spirit in his bosom. It
9tings the soul like an adder shut up
there, I know of some who call themselves
Christians who are miserable
because of their own revengefulness.
I^AK/wttra trnnr artomiaa nnH nrof HflWn
l?\* IglVC JWU? \J li V1A11VO uuu V.W ? ?
an your knees and pray for tnem, and
3alvation will come into your soul like
a flood. "Father, forgive them."
Sweet prayer and ble89ed example.
The blows of an enemy may be hard,
but they do not hurt like those of a
friend,
Cigars and cigarettes, all grades, at Harrl- sou
ii Game's.
See C. P. Hammond about putting In hot
water.
If you have no sewerage you had better see
C. P. Hammond at once.
Ik you want to exchange cotton mill stock
forooe or more mules, call at the Press and
Banner office.
CI pair ladles and misses shoes, numbers 2
to 3U. Former Drlce 81.50 to S2.00. Your
jboice on bargain'counter for 50 cents. Hadjon's.
T
01 pair ladies and misses eboes. numbers 2
to 8 1-2. Former price S1.50 to S'2. Your obolce
jn bargain counter for 50c. at Haddon's. j
Law Bkiefs at GOCeutsa Page?Good Work.
3ood Paper, Prompt Delivery. Minutes ft
cheaper than at any otber bouse. Catalogues t|
in the best style. If you have printing to do, .
It will be to your interest to write to tbePress u
ind Banner, Abbeville, S. C. it s<
I.
M
DENTAL NOTICE. "
S. F. Killingsworth, 1
No. 4 Seal Block, Abbeville.lS. C.
Want to Buy Land.
Landowners in this county having 2
land for sale will And it to their Interest
,o communicate with me as to location, num>er
of acres and very lowest price for same.
Vly object Is to Induce good citizens to settle
imongst us and I hope land will be quoted at
,ue very umrni jvuoaityib
Jan. 21, 1839, tf WYATT AIKEN. 3
ra
ai
Mortgagee's Sale! ;
m
By virtue of a chattel mort- a.
gagn HXPeuted by r. h. hemminger u
o farmers' bank, filed 22d February, "
IMS, conditions broken and virtue of asHlgnaoent
to me as Agent and foreclosure and colect
name by Banners' Bank, i will sell on a
. .^.rr.^.vr ,u? or.,,. of Wn.MNO. 8
roN. Link ko.. SC.. ONE BAY HORSE, w
HENRY. ONE COPPER ENGINE (8 horse)
SAW MILL in good order, for satisfaction of ?"
mid Mortgages for balaoce du^ SljXMH), with pi
interest, cost and expen ses. rERMS?OAati.
F. W R. NANCE,
Feb. 2,1890, tf Agent for Mortgagee.
r
Master's Bale.
mi ?i _ i _ . i* n ii. n l*
rne aiate 01 aouin uaroima,
COUNTY OF ABBEVILLE.
COCRT OF COMMON PLEAS.
lames W. Tolbert, Assignee, Plaintiff, against
Mary L. Hadley, Defendant.?Foreclosure.
By VIRTUE Cb' AN ORDER OF SALE
made In the above stated case, I will offer for
iale at public outcry at Abbeville C. H., S. C.f
m SALESD4Y IN MARCH, 1899, within
ihe legal bonrsof sale, the following described
property, situate In said State and Connty
iowlt: All that trp.i.t or parcel of land sltlate,
lying and being In tbe town of McCorulck,S.
C., and known as lots No. 7 and 8
n Block J., Abbeville County, In the State
iforesald, containing
30 by 100 feet, each Fronting Pine
Street, 3U ft,; eacn lemming
Back 100 ft., to Alley.
TERMS OF SALE?CASH. Purchaser to
pay for papers.
WALTER L. MILLER,
Feb. 18,1899. Master.
Master's Sale,
rhe State of South Carolina,
COUNTY OF ABBEVILLE. . j
COURT OF COHMON PLEAS.
S. Hawes and O. W. Cade, as Admins., {
of Guilford S Cade, deceased, and In tbelr
own right as partners doing business under
the firm name of Hawes & Cade, Plaintiffs,
against Fed Freeman, DefendantForeclosure.
By VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF SALE
Bade In the above stated case, I will offer for i
lale at public outcry at Abbeville C. H.. 8. C? ,
) Saleday In MARCH, 1890, within tbe
egal hours of sale, tbe following described <
)roperty, situate in said State and County
o-wit: All that tract or parcel of land, oonalning
Sixty-Five (65) Acres,
nore or less, bounded by lands of Qaddy .
Dixon, Nathaniel Brown, John Rice and .
dartha Jones.
TERMS OP SALE?CASH. Purchaser to
>ay for papers. .
WALTER L. MILLER,
Feb. 13,1899. Master.
Master's Sale. J
rhe State of South Carolina, .
COUNTY OF ABBEVILLE. 1
i
COURT OF COMMON PLEAS. (
L S. Hawes and G. W. Cade, as Administrators
of Guilford Cade, Deceased, Plaintiffs,
against Sallle J. Cowan, et. al., Defendants.?Relief.
'
Jy VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF SALE I
aade in the above stated oase, I will offer fo '
ale at publlo outcry at Abbvllle Court House,
I. 0., on Salesday In MARCH, 1899, wltb.
u tbe legal hours of sale, the following decribed
property, situate in said State and
Jounty to-wlt: All that tract or parcel ot
and, containing
Three Hundred and Seventy-Five
(375) Acres, * {
i
aore or less, bounded by lands of J. S. Brltt,
. H. Morrab, S. P. Morrah and others.
TERMS OF SALE?CASH. Purchaser to
ay for papers.
WALTER L." MILLER,
Feb. 13, 1899. Master. '
low Rates West 1
TEXAS, MEXICO, CALIFORNIA;
ST. LOUIS. CHICAGO, or any ?
po'.nt, wltb FREE MAPS, write to
FRED. D, BUSH, |
District Passenger Agent,
Lonisville & Nashville R. R.,' j
No. 1 BROWN BLDG., ATLANTA, GA.
j
Mortgagee's Silt!
?? ? r
he Level Land Enterprise Company to J. R. b
C. Dunn.?Foreclosure of Mortgage. *'
3 tl
->Y VIRTUE OF THE POWER COX- g
!i red in and by a certain Mortgage given by
le Level Land Enterprlne Co., to J. R. C. I
unu, on the 4tb day of MARCH, 181)9, I will '
ill to tbe highest bidder at the store of JOHN
BRYANT, in the County of Abbeville, beveen
tbe hours of 10 a. m., and 2 p. m., tbe
blowing described property:
st. One Twenty-Five Horse
' Power Engine, Thirty Horse
Power Boiler, Wheat Mill in
Good Running Order.
d. One Vanwinkle Gin Feeder, %
Condenser, and Vanwinkle
Press with Shafting Attached,
d. One (1) Acre of Land ?
cl
lore or less, bounded by lands of J. T. Bryit
and lot No. 2, it being the corner lot, hav- P
igon It the MILL HOUSE and GIN HOUSE. I
th. One (1) Acre of Land, ^
ore or less, bounded by lands of J. T. Bryitand
lot No. 1, having on It the Dwelling jjj
ouse, Barn and other buildings.
TERMS?One-half Cash, the balance on a D
credit for twelve months, with interest at
onnum from date of purchase,
per tcuu poi ?? _ m
itli bond of purohaser and mortgage on 8g
operty to secure payment. Purchaser to
iy for papers, with privilege to pay all cash, ^
F. W. K. NANCE,
Feb. M, 1899. Agent for J. It. 0. Dunn.
DENTAL NOTICE.
Dr. S. G. Thomson,
OFFICE DP-STAIRS ON MoILWAIN
Corner, Abbeville, 8. C.
Notice to Tresspassers.
A LL PERSONS are hereby warned not to , - '
hunt, nsh, or otherwise trespass upon tbe .
januti 01 me unaersignea.
F. E. HARRI80N. , *?
Dec. 20, 1889. HUGH WILSON. .;1|
C. G. GAMBRELL, Mv. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
ABBEVILLE, 8. C. .
JW Office In tbe National Bank.
May 25, 1898. tf Professional
Notice.
DR. J. B. C. WRIGHT,
Physician and Surgeon.
#~|FFICE at residence, for the preoent, hext
v door to Mr. T. P. Quarles'. Diseases of ' .-l
women and children a specialty.
Abbeville, S. C., Sept. 12,1898.
ATHENS STEAM LAUNDRY, f
Proprietor N. W. Collett, $|
Of Abbeville,
OLICITS TRADE FROM ABBEVILLE. ' $
WORK AND PRICES GUARANTEED.
GAINES HAMMOND* Agent, Phone 94 ^
Jan. 8,1899. 3m
Extra Fine Lot
OF SADDLE AND HARNESS
Arm ..v M
flWiWL* AiNi/ - mULU
WILL BE RECEIVED AT OUR STABLES ||
THIS WEEK.
A. M. Hill & Sons. ||
iws mm.
it liviiiirctnn ft Pprrin's (llii Stand .1
HI JJ1 I HJ?UIU11 U LU11 111 IJ U1U U1UUU
E1.AVING BOUGHT THE 'BUSINESS OP pS
Livingston & Perrln, I will continue tbe pj|
juBlness at the o?d stand, serving tbe people ^
vlth the best of fresh meats, bread and llsb.
Jail Phone No. 1.
T. H. MAXWELL. J
Sept. 7, 1898. tf
CHARLIE HOITG i
CHINESE MACHINE
LAUNDRY.
f-*T ? tin \ir/\nfr ' /ITT a D A WMJUn _ _ zEt
t'iiwi ULA33 VY UIVIV uuAnauiuiJu
Washing done by band. Ironing dODe ??
>y machinery, with or without gloss. Try 7j
ne once and you will try me again.
CHARLIE HONG.
Nov. 36,1898, tt I
^ Complete and Full
STOCK OF THE CELEBRATED
fletnplitaiBrand of MiieflPainte
JOHN LUCAS & CO. J
ALWAYS ON HAND AT THE I
3ity Brag Store. J
PRICES IN ONE_GALLON CAN8J>y the
L HIDgltJ CHU QL.4U. SL UUTJI a.i uiovvuM? ^
lalnters using large quantities.
WILE HOSPITAL J
E D. REESE, SURGEON. |
_____ 3
PHE place to carry your SICK WATCHES
- and BROKEN CLOCKS, where they will
e looked after and attended to at all hours of - ~
tie day with skill and experience. No turn3k
you away or sending Patients off to have
:)em treated elsewhere, but I will put them
olng at prices to salt the times.
Milu Presents, Clocks,m
and JEWELRY.^B
Prices Down. flU
H. D. REESE,
THE PEOPLE'S JEWELER.
r. L. HILL & CO., 1
No. 3 KOSENKERG BLOCK. fl
,T7'E HAVE MOVED OUR WAGON AND '|^H
' * Carriage Repository to the htore room HH
icently occupied by Mr. J. D. Kerr. Ourspe- HH
alty la
? r\ f\ TTT I m ASt/^ KH
imiRll WHS.
These wagons were given first prize over al
>mpetitorsat the Nashville Exposition. We H
so have a fail stock of
luggies, Carriages, Harness, &c.^B
Give us a call before buying. We guarantee
itislaction.
f. Lf. HLL.L, & <JU., 1
No. 3 Rosenberg Block. J

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