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The Abbeville press and banner. [volume] (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, June 07, 1899, Image 3

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Lane's Family llerticine.
Moves the towels each day. In order to
be healthy this is necessary. Acts cently
on the liver and kidneys. Cures sick headAche.
Price 25 auu 50e.
A spidsr can live ten months without
food.
Arc You Vsinz Allen"* Foot-Ease?
It is the only cure for Swollen. Smart
Inp, Tire.], Actiiir^, j;urnmK, ?weauns;
Feet, Corns ami Uunious. Ask for Allen's
Foot-Ease, a powder to be shaken into tha
shoe?. Sold by all Druggists, Grocers and
Shoo Stores, 25c. Sample sent FREE. Address,
Allen S. Olmsted, Lelioy, N. Y.
"Hamlet" has m.-ide more money than
any other play in the English language.
Bernity Is Blood Deep.
Clean blood means a clean skin. No
beauty without it. Cascarets, Candy Cathartic
clean your blood and keep it clean, by
stirring up the lazy liver and driving all impurities
from the bodv. Begin to-day to
banish pimples, boils, blotches, blackheads,
and that sickly bilious complexion by taking
Cascarets,?beauty for ten cents. All druggists,
satisfaction guaranteed, 10c, 25c, 50c.
Maiden, Mass., celebrates this year the
2nO?h nnni vprsnrv of Its foundine.
Mrs. Wiuslow's Soothing .Syrup for children
teethinjr, softens tlie turns. reduces inllarami?tiop.
ailftys pain, cures winii colic.25c.abottle.
Only one per cent, of the population of
India know the alphabet.
"He Laughs Best
Who Laughs Last."
j A hearty laugh indicates a
degree of cood health obtainable
through pure blood. As
but one person in ten has
cure blood, the other nine
should purify the blood with
Hood's Sarsaparilla. Then
they can laugh first, last and
all the timef for perfect happiness
comes with good health
Hood'* Pllit corc lirer ills: the non-irritating and
only cathartic to take with Hood'* Sar>aparilla.
|TryGrain=0! jj
j: Try Grain=0! ji
j J Ask you Grocer to-day to show you J J
I > a package of GRAIN-O, the new food * >
I > drink that takes the place of coffee. ,
J J The children may drink it without J *
I injury as well as the adult. All who <
! try it, like it. GRAIN-0 has that < [
* rich seal brown of Mocha or Java, J J
but it is made from pure grains, and < *
i the most delicate stomach receives it o
* without distress. $ the price of coffee. J [
15 cents and 25 cents per package. * >
i, Sold by all grocers. < >
\ | Tastes like Coffee ?)
j | Looks like Coffee ? J |
l > Insist Ibat your grocer give? yon QRAIN-0 <
I Accept no imitation. \ *
I I'
WANTED?C?se of bad healih tbat K-I-P-A-N-S
will not benefit. Send & cte.to Ripans Chemical
Co., New York, for 1 u salaries and lOOu testimonials
nUdtU ATI CM C'CKED?Sample bottle, 4 day?'
KnCUrr) A I "Onl treatment, postpaid, 10 cents,
?Alexandl* Remedy Co..s<eGreeuwich 8t.,n.y.
Marriage Increasing in England.
Great Britain is flourishing. The
dure test is the marriage record shown
in the Registrar General's annual report
just issued, in which it appears
that the rate is higher than itha.s been
in twenty-one years. The Registrar
points out that a marriage rate usually
keeps in close touch with the value
of British exports and imports., and
the price of wheat. Up goes trade,
and up goes the marriage rate! Not
exactly romantic, but eminently practical.
It seems that widowers have
been in greater demand than widows,
for 98 ont 100 of the men married in
the course of the year were widowers,
whereas only 69 out of 1000 of the
women who married were widows.
Nearly half of the bachelors and
spinsters were married between the
ages of 21 and 25. The favored age
for the re-marriage of widows and
widowers was between 35 and 40. In
one out of every 100 of the marriages,
husband and wife could neither read
nor write, and signed the certificate
with their mark.?New York Press.
HOME dt4ies to many won
health.
No matter how ill th<
through the daily tasks and pile
This is heroic but a penalty h
paid.
i A woman in New Matamora
Mrs. Isabell Bradfield, tells
following letter how she foug
disease of the feminine orgai
finally forced to take to her be
Bays:
Dear Mrs. Pinkham?I fe?
tell von that I have taken Lvdis
pound and think there is no me
suffered for nine years, and soi
time I could not stand on my f
all kinds; bacKac
| ^ 6 ^ereB^ ^
advice is promptly given with
, The present Mrs. Pinkham's
ills is unparalleled; for years :
Mrs. Lydia E. Pinkham, and fc
charge of the correspondence i
ress. advising and helping by
thousand ailing women during
"He that Works Easily Work
Easy to Cleai
SAP(
f*
Roughs Lead to Consumption. |
| Kemp's Balsam will stop the cougb a
1 cnce. Go to your druggist to-day and get
a sample bottle free. Sold in 25 and 59 I
cent bottles. Go at once; delays are dan- (
gerous.
Australia is capable of supporting a; I
least 10,000,000 inhabitants.
?I?'()iral Book Free.
"Know Thyself," a book for men only, I
recular price 50 cents, will be sent free j
(sealed and postpaid) to any male reader j
of this paper mentioning this advertise- i
intuit. Address the Peubody Medical In- |
stitute, 4 Buifluoh St., Bo9toD. Muss., the !
oldest and best institution of its kind in
N'evr England. Write to-day for free book, j
Austria-Hungary has a forest area oi I
about 47,000,000 acres.
Don't Tobacco Spit and Smoke Tour I.ife Array.
To quit tobacco easily and forever, be ma?
netic. full of life, nerve and vigor, take No-T?
Bac, the wonder-worker, that makes weak men
strong. All druggists, 50c or 81. Cure guaranteed.
Booklet and samplo free. Address
Sterling Remedy Co., Chicago br New York.
A frog cannot breathe with its mouth
open.
We will cive S'-OO reward for any case of catarrh
that cannot be cured with Hall'sCatarrh
vure. i iiseu mi/tji u?ii>. _ ? , , _
F. J. Cheney & Co., Props., Toledo, O
The first steam calliope made its appearance
in Albany in 1858.
Campbell's ]Ylalarial Specific.
Guaranteed cure for all Malarial disease*
At all druggists, or sent on receiptof 25centf
J. B. Campbell, Suffern, x. Y.
For every widower who merries a widow
there are eleven who espouse maidens.
Educate Your Bowela With Cascareti.
Candy Cathartic, cure constipation forever.
10s, 25c. It C. c. C. fail* druggists refund money.
The United States consumes more coffee
than the whole of Europe.
America's greatest physicinns have con*
quered La Grippe and its after effects.
Their treatment has been thoroughly
tested in the hospitals of Europe and of
this country, and is embodied in Dr. Kay's
Lung Balm.
Rev. H. B. Dye, of Morrison, Iowa,writes:
"Mrs. Dye bad a bad attack of La Grippe
which settled on her lungs. She used Dr.
Kay's Lung Bulm, with most decided good
effects, which is a repetition of past ex- i
perience with her. Nothing is so prompt |
and positive in its effects on her lungs."
You should write for free advice and a :
| copy of Dr. Kay's Home Treatment, an I
| illustrated book of 116 pages of receipts, j
etc. Dr. B..I.Kay Medical Co., Saratoga
Springs, N.Y.
t<
Nearly 20,000 pounds of bread is daily
eaten in the Sultan of Turkey's household.
Dnily Service Between Baltimore
and Uichmond. "York River t.ine."
Steamers will leave the pier of York Rivei
Line. Baltimore, every afternoon after arrival
of train trom New York an<l the east,
reaching West Point the following morning. '
Connection made with special boat train ovei |
the Southern Railway, which makes the run i
to Richmond in an hour and twenty minutes. I
The steamers are of the most modern build,
and the cuisine has no equal?for which the
Chesapeake service is noted. Full particu.
lars, rates and state room accommodations,
address Alex. S. Thweatt, Eastern PaBS. Agt,
271 Broadway, New York.
In 1897 Hangkow, China, exported 3.250,
000 fans.
I have fend Piso's Cure for Consumption I
an unfailing medicine.?F. R. Lotz, 1305 Scott I
St., Covington. Ky., Oct. 1. 1894.
Germany has never had a battle on the
sea and the Spaniards never won one.
Danger ahead signalled by cough averted.
Hale's Honey of Horehound and 1 ar.
Pike's Toothache Drops Cure in one Minute.
Fifty years ago the population of the
United States was about 22,000,000.
No-To-Bac for Fifty Cents.
Guaranteed tobacco habit cure, makes weak
teen strong, blood pure. No, 11. All druggist*
The Moccnuln In the Forest.
Id autumn, when all the leaves end
twigs are dry as tinder, a man wearing
shoes makes a noise in the forest like i
a troop of cavalry; but in moccasins !
he can move swiftly through the
woods with the stealth of a panther.
The feet are not bruised, fcr, after enjoying
for a time the freedom of
natural covering, these hitherto blundering
members become like hands,
and feel their way through the dark
like those of a cat, avoiding obstacles
as though gifted with a special sense.
Best of all, the moccasin is light. Inexperienced
sportsmen and soldiers
affect high-topped lace boots with
heavy soles and hobnails, imagining j
that these are the most serviceable for j
rougn wear, jdui iuese ooois weigu i
between four and five pounds, while a |
pair of thick moose-hide, moccasins ,
weigh only eleven ounces. In march- j
ing ten miles a man wearing the j
clumsy boots lifts twenty tons more !
shoe leather than if he wore mocca- i
sins.?Harper's Magazine.
len seem more important than
?y feel, they drag themselves
: up trouble.
as to be |????_________
,s, Ohio, WOMAN'S
DEVOTION
I ast TO HOME
J L
;1 it my duty to write to you to
i E. Pinkhara's Vegetable Comdicine
in the world like it. I
netimes for twelve weeks at a
eet. I had female troubles of
he, and headache all the time,
octors treated me. Some said
aave to go to the hospital and
operation performed. But oh 1
lkful I am that I did not, that
I tried your Vegetable- Compound
instead. I cannot say
too much in its traise. nor
thank you enough for what it
has done for me. I want you
to publish this in all the papers
Sie good of other
s."
The wives and
mothers of America
are given to overwork.
Let them bo
wise in time and at
the first indication
of female trouble
write to Mrs. Pinkham
at Lynn. Mass., '
forheradvice. Thi3
lout charge.
experience in treating female
she worked side by side with
?r sometime past has had solo j
department of her great busi-1
letter as many as a hundred
a single year.
;s Successfully." 'Tis very
it House with
3l.lt>
BLONDE FOUNDLINGS IN DEMAND i
Nine Out of Ten Foster Parents Selec
Golden-Haired Infanta.
All those little children who hap
pen to possess other than light hnii
aucl blue eyes are uesuueu xo sxaj ? |
long time in the Home for the Friend' j
less ut No. 29 East Twenty-ninti!
street, says the New York Telegram.
This home is tilled with nice little
girls who have brown hair and black
eyes and black hair and brown eyes,
but they are all passed by when the
elegant women come to search for a
child to adopt.
Why it is that childless women
must have only the blonde variety of
youngster the managers at the homo
are unable to say, but they declare
this to be the case. Nine out of ten
of the requests for children stipulate
that the little one must be about "two
years old, with curly blonde hair and
blue eyes."
Perhaps it is because angels and
cupids and all the light and airy creatures
of fancy are usually pictured as
being fuzzy blondes -with sky bine
eyes. And, of course, a woman who
has never had any children is always
looking for the ideal in this line.
>> Blonde children, however, as is well
known by the experienced, are as
prone to evil as the darker varieties.
In fact, a blonde youngster can perform
as much mischief in a minute as
some brunettes can think of in a
week. The little saintly blonde, with
its wide eyes and open countenance,
readily disarms suspicion and while
you are engaged in prait ing and petting
it, it is secretly planning an assault
upon the raspberry jam or figuring
out how it is going to break into
the cupboard and carry off the custard
pie.
Blonde youngsters are more sly
than brunettes, and though light ol
countenance they are dark plotters
and schemers.
They will eat all the oranges in tho
cellar and make you think the rats
have carried them off. They will
break the bric-a-brac and lay it to the
cat. They will dig up the garden and
ruin the flower beds aud bo arrange
matters that you will swear the neighbor's
hens have been guilty of tho
depredations.
It is a strange thing how every
mother is partial to her golden-haired
darling. Such a mother may bo a
brunette and she may hate a blonde
woman with all the dark intensity of,
her nature, but she will swear by that
white-haired kid of hers and trust it
to the limit.
Only the neighbors can Bee the
faults of tho golden-haired darlings
and these see them magnified a thousand
times.
This is particularly sad inasmuch
as the majority of homeless children
are brunettes. In the home in Twenty-ninth
street are 140 children, all
nice little tots who would be glad of a
good home and a foster mother's love,
but they aro destined to grow up without
theso blessings, for every woman
wants a golden-haired darling and
these are not such.
A Ureal Autograpn collection.
The owner of probably the greatest
private collection of autographs in the
world, Alexander Polonyi, has died in
Vienna. His collection was so la^e
that it filled the entire upper story of
his house. Polonji possessed the
autographs of over 30,000 persons,
not only of moderns, but of mediaeval
and renaissance persons as well. He
was not particular as to age, religion,
profession. All he stood out for was
that the autograph was to be that of a
person of certain historical importance.
He possessed original writings
which have not yet been printed
of Michael Angelo and Marie Antoinette,
letters by Calvin and Luther,
Schiller and Goethe, pages of music
by Wagner and Beethoven, original
documents from the eleventh century, I
private letters of Canovas, old Hebrew
scrolls, and sermons by famous
Hussites. It was Polonyi's greatest
pleasure to show his treasures to
scholars and to bewilder them with
the wealth and variety of the materials
which he plsced before them in
tho calculated disorder we have attempted
to describe. He began life
a& an apprentice to a Leipzig bookqleller.
His greatest success was with
a magnificent collection of Durer's
drawings, which he happened on quite
accidentally and sold to the Royal
Gallery in Berlin for a prodigious sum
of money. Polonyi nad no scientific
or historical knowledge, but he had a
genius for collecting, and it was as a
3ollector he was known throughout
the world.?Leisure Hours.
Horses Tlint Sleep UpMnlrg.
It is not unusual to see bedding
placed on the window sill of upper
6iories of houses to air; there were
9een the other day projecting over a
window sill in the second story of a !
building some fragments of bedding of
another kind, these being wisps of
straw from a horse's stall close by.
These wisps had not been placed there
to air; they had just happened to get
there, but they served to bring to
mind the fact thathuman beings are
not the only creatures that sleep in
rooms upstairs. In a city like Chicago,
where ground is of high value,
great numbers of horses sleep upstairs,
too; only, of course, they don't go upstairs
as humane do, but up an inclined
plane called a runway, leading |
from one story to another and covered
with leather scraps or tanbark, or
sometimes with discarded rubber hose'
cut in suitable length.') and laid crosswise
and close together up the slope.
,
The Stature of Hitler*.
In point of stature the rulers of to
day compare very unfavorably with j
their predecessors. Christian I., King '
of Denmark, was seven feet high. The I
present Danish king, Christian IX., j
barely reaches five feet eleven inches,
and his son, King George of Greece,
is four inches shorter. The same
physical decline seems to mark the
Czar of Russia. Peter the Great was
a Riant of six feet ten inches. The
Czar of to-day barely reaches five feet
six inches. The late German EmDeror.
William I., was six feet high,
and his brother, Prince Charles, wa3 j
but an inch shorter. The present
Kaiser cannot stretch himself beyond
five feet eight inches. The King of
tho Belgians, with six feet four inches
of stature, is the tallest of the ruling
monarchs, and Queen Victoria, with
four feet ten inches, two inches le63
even than the present Chinese Emperor,
is the shortest.
I
To Care l'vni?)iation Forever. K
Take Cascarets Candy Cathartic. 10c or 250.
C. C. C. fail to cure, druggists refund money. |
During the last six months of 1898 the I b
total immigratioa to this country wtts 125,- E
ii
Only one rann in every 203 is over six i]
rn-t ;n heigtit. ti
?? 8
An Excellent Combination. I
The pleasant method and beneficial ' i
effects of the well known remedy, .
Syrup op Figs, manufactured by the
California Fig Syrup Co., illustrate
the value of obtaining the liquid laxative
principles of plants known to be f
medicinally laxative and presenting
fchem in the form most refreshing to the
taste aDd acceptable to the system. It I
is the one perfect strengthening laxa- i
tive, cleansing the system effectually, <
dispelling colds, headaches and fevers ,
gently yet promptly and enabling one
to overcome habitual constipation permanently.
Its perfect freedom from
every objectionable quality and sub- 1
Btance, and its acting on the kidneys, <
liver and bowels, without weakening i
or irritating them, make it the ideal (
laxative. j
In the process of manufacturing figs
are used, as thev are pleasant to the ]
taste, but the medicinal qualities of the '
remedy are obtained from senna and <
other aromatic plants, by a method 1
known to the California Fig Syrup ]
Co. only. In order t(} get its beneficial
effects and to avoid imitations, please j '
remember the lull name of the Company i j
printed on the front of every package. !
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
san fbanci8co, cai*
?? *rumr vnTJV W V I ?
LUUXbV1LIXJ?*, O.X. ...
For sale by all Druetrists.?Price ?0c. per bottle
Fire Drill In Boaton.
We met with a single adventure the
other night. Our friend Sonberger
lives in the well-known apartment
house, the Despondia. This house ie
one of a long'block, and Sonberger's
fiat is on the top floor. There was
some delay about answering the bell.
Finally a questioning voice was reassured
and the door was opened. To
our amazementwe found Sonberger in
pajamas, his charming wife in something
soft, fluffy, bewitching, and little
Harold in his night shirt and with a
tin horn in his hand. (We have known
the Sonbergers for years.) "For
heaven's sake, old man, are you crazy?"
we asked, with voice toward husband
and appreciative, respectful eyes to- 1
ward wife. Sonberger smiled a feeble 3
smile. "You see, we practice the fire 1
drill every night. We were just going '
out on the roof. Ever since those J
fires in New York we have been more
or less timid, and Monday I deter- *
mined that we should be in a state of 1
constant readiness. Each night we '
pretend to be in bed. I turn on the ]
licht suddenly, shriek, 'Get up,' thea
we rush to the back door, unlock it,
climb the flight of stairs to the roof,
and run to the end of the block."? f
Boston Journal.
, i
Old-Time Words. '
Old words survive to a remarkable 1
degree in north Derbyshire, and the |
country districts of Lancashire. Perhaps
the most interesting is "Yah,"
which the rustics of the Peak frequently
use for "Yes," and which they employed
exclusively thirty years ago,
when manv of them had never seen a
railway. Sounded exactly like the i
German "Jah," it is evidently a de- !
scendant of the Anglo-Saxon "Gen,"
and must, therefore, be more than a
thousand years old. In Lancashire
the commonest antiquity in speech is
"Gradeley," the meaning whereof is
"Beaily.genainely, thoroughly." Both :
counties are happy in the use of j
"Nesh" (Anglo-Saxon: Nesc), an admirable
word, which ought to be rein^
i 3 i:i. u
Biaieu 1J1 JJU111U Mpccuu, 1UX uiuuciu
English contains no exact equivalent.
It means unduly sensitive to cold,and
is correctly represented by the French,
"Frileux."?London News.
Wound* Which Heal Rapidly.
Wounds caused by Mauser bullets
bealeil with wonderful and unexpected
rapidity. The small frontage of these
bullets caused lesions in the soft
tissue almost subcutaneous in their
nature and the wounds healed quickly
and kindly. Frequently repair went
on under a scab. In many cases it
was found unnecessary even to change !
the first-aid dressings. Not .over
three per cent, of the wounds went on
to suppuration. In these results i
; J ! ? I _i_;ii I
aHUSepSlH UUU BUr^ICUl Olilll pmjcu uu
important part, reflecting great credit
on the medical department of the
army, which observed every requirement
of modern antiseptic surgery in
the face of serious obstacles. Mortality
among the wounded is considered
almost entirely dependent
upon antiseptic treatment, and this,
even more than the humane modern
missile, has mitigated the horrors of
warfare.
Dili Not Have to Lay
A young woman of Sheffield, Eng.
land, came into a fortune and promptly
hunted up a country house, where
she played the role of chatelaine to
the manner born according to her
own ideas of the part. One day ?ome
of her old-time friends came to see
ber, and she condescended to show
them all over the place.
"What beautiful chickens!" ex. j
claimed the visitors when they came !
to the poultry yard.
"Yes. All prize birds!" haughtily
explained the hostess.
"Do they lay every day?"
"Ohf they could, of course; but," |
grandiloquently, "iu our position it I
isn't necessary for them to do so."
Cycling Koneflclnl to Ilealth.
A physician who was asked why he |
recommended cycling to a patient
said: "The benefit of physical culture
whioh delays the decline of bodily and j
mental vigor. The debility and ill- I
health which beset young men and j
women of the day is generally due to
* stagnation of energy indulged by a
desire to take things easily,and cycling j
has been found to alter this state of
things in a comparrtively short time."
?-N?w lork Tribune.
?iiiAi'kal>le SluLucs Discovered In Egypt.
Two of the most remarkable statues
ver found were recently unearthed
y M. Georges Legrain, a French
Egyptologist. from the ruins of the
smple at Karnak on the Upper Nile,
a Egypt. One of these is in alabaser,
and represents the great Theban
;oci Ammoii.
This alabaster god is eighteen feet
igh, and was originally made from
ne solid block of stone, the largest
labaster statue in the -world. It was
ound in three pieces, wbicb were
asily put together. The artistic finah
is perfect.
The second statue is one that was
et up by King Usertesen I, in honor
f his father back in the days of
Lbraham. On the lap of this effigy is
, slab upon which are carved inscripJnno
Mnuinir tlio nmrlr'n n.ntiniiitv.
?UUO pvriujj ? V.?. ? ?? ? >2 y
Accompanying M. Legrain when he
aade the discovery was Charles N.
)rewdson, corresponding secretary of
he Chicago Society of Egyptian Reearch,
who is touring Egypt in the
nterest of the society he represents.
-Chicago Times-Herald.
Paper Collar* in the 60'a.
In the late 60's the enormous con ramption
of paper collars was not reitricted
to the United States. Exsorting
them to Canada and Central
ind South America added hundreds
if thousands to the annual revenues
of the paper collar manufacturers.
\n American firm erected a plant at
;he Paris Exposition of 1867 and
nanufactured collars before the eyes
)f astonished visitors. Immediately,
ind as a result of this exhibition,
>rders were received in this country
'or the necessary machinery, and
paper collar manufactories were estabished
in Germany, where a tremenlous
business flourished for a time,
that country supplying nearly all
Europe -with paper neckwear. The
Srst plant was established in Leipsic,
lud is still operating, although all the
jthers have ceased to exist.
Origin of the Elevator.
Thfi elevator originated in central
Europe. The earliest mention of the
levator is made in a latter of Napoeon
I., addressed to his wife, the
Archduchess Maria Louise. He writes
;o her that, when in Schoenbrunn,
;h9n the summer residence of the
Austrian emperor, near Vienn% he
ised the "chaise volante" (nying
;hair) in that castle, which had been
constructed for Empress Maria Theresa.
It consisted of a small, square
room, sumptuously furnished with
tiangings of red silk, and suspended
by strong ropes with counter-weights,
*o that it could be pulled up or let
3own with great ease in a shaft built
tor the purpose about 1760.
Bohemia'* Strang;* Mineral!.
Not fat from Trebitsch, in Bohemia,
ire found many glassy-looking objects,
of a bottle-green color, and
Ending, when unbroken, to an egg
shape, to which the name moldarites
aas "been given. Doctor Suess, of
Vienna, from a recent Btudy of these
? ????1? of +Vinr
SUriUUO HiiJUCI OID, UUUV1UUVO ?u?a ?uvj
ire really meteorites, and should be
idded to the list of foreign bodies that
bave found their way to the earth's
surface by falling from space.
Mistress (engaging cook)?"There's
>ae thing I am very particular about.
[ cannot on any account allow you to
entertain policemen in the kitchen."
Sook?"You may be quite shore I
wouldn't do sich a thing, mum. I
jan'ta-bearp'leecemen, mum. Father
c^as a sosherlist!"?Punch.
IAyer's Sarsap
n A
meuicme vj ^
Old frfinds, old trine, t
trusty kinds. For half a ce
A ~
Ayj
has been the Sarsaparilla wh
when they were sick and icante
is none too good for you, you
. of Ayer's Sarsaparilla contair
the ordinary kind.
%
*
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Jin,
IVORY SC
In fifteen minutes, with only
you can make a better cleansing ]
Ivory Soap Paste will take s
carpets, rugs, kid gloves, slippers,
canvas shoes, leather belts, paint
special value of Ivory Soap in th
can be used with a damp spongt
that cannot be washed because t\
tion of water.
DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING.?To one
(one-quarter of the small size cake) of Ivory Soap
thoroughly dissolved. Remove from the fire and <
in an air-tight glass jar. >n| ? TMf
The Vies of Zinc.
The largest consumers of zinc are
the manufacturers of galvanized iron
work. Tben come the brass founders,
for zinc is an important element in
brass alloys, and large quantities are
used in the sheet form and as an element
in galvanic batteries. Zinc is
put under stoves and is used to line
bathtubs.
Great quantities of the ore are used
also to make zinc white, or zinc oxide,
for paint, but this is made direct from
the ores and is not materially affected
by the present rise of values, the zinc
oxide having gone up only about half
a cent a pound in price. Of this the
United States imported at one time
about 30,000 barrels a year. Now we
can export it as we do the metal and
ore. Our exports of the ore were
only 48,000 pounds in 1895, but last
year rose to 21,040,000 pounds, while
our exports of pig rose in the same
period from about 3,000,000 pounds
to 21,000,000.?New York Sun.
One on Her Majeitj.
The following story?for the truth
of which, however, we are unable to
vouch?is told of the Empress Fred
erick. When Her Majesty was last in
England she purchased a quantity of
very artistic wall-paper, which she
had sent to her villa at Homburg. On
showing some samples of it to her
chamberlain she asked him where he
thought they came from. "This
piece," replied the chamberlain,
"comes from .Berlin, and the other
from Magdeburg?'made in Germany,'
your Majesty."?London Chronicle.
In 1898 the single colony of New
South Wales imported books and stationery
to the value of ?2,905,000.
arilla is the
uld Lang Sync
Ind the old doctor ore the
ntury
PR'S
ich the people have bought
d to be cured. If the best
will get Ayer's. One bottle
is the strength of three of
in i ii i in ii
... * '
1
'
\ ^
)AP PASTE.
' a cake of Ivory Soap and water
paste than you can buy.
pots from clothing; and will clean
, patent, enamel, russet leather and
ed wood-work and furniture. The
:is form arises from the fact that it
? or cloth to cleanse many articles ^
iey will not stand the free applica*
%
- . .. -41
pint of boiling water add one and one-Half ounces
i cut Into shavings, boll five minutes after the soap la
:ool in convenient dishes (not tin). It will keep well
STIR * QAM I LI CO. CINCINNATI
' - %
Biliousness
"Ihave used Tour valuable CASCARETS
and find them perfect. Couldn't do
without them. I have used fhem for some time
for indigestion and biliousness and am now completely
cured. Recommend them, to every one.
Once tried, you will never be without them In
the family.,T Edw A. Marx, Albany, N. Y.
pea
Pleasant. Palatable. Potent. Taste Good. Do
Good, Never Sicken. Weaken, or Gripe. 10c, 2Sc, 60s.
... CURE CONSTIPATION. ...
BUrll?? Kw4j C?H?r. Qtety. Kdalwl. KwTwi W - ' ?
mo-to-bac
BOYS I I
Spalding's AtLletlc Library should be read by
every boy who want* to become an athlere.
>*o.4. Boxing. [lete. No. 85. Official Foot BaQ
No.P. How to bean Atk- Guide. [Ball Guide.
No.20. How to plav Fcpt No. 86. Official Baaket
Ball, by Walter tamp. No. 87. Ath'etlc Primer.
No.27. CollegeAthletics No. 93. Official A. A.U.
No.32. How to play Baae Bnlee.
Ball. [letlcg. No.93. Athletic Becorda
No. 87. All Around Ath- No.96. Official Baae BaU
No.42. How to Punch Guide.
the Bag. No. 100. How to be a BlNo.
82. How to Train. cyc:e Champion.
PRICE, I0CENT8 PER COPY. #S
Send for catalogue of all iporU.
A. C. 8PAL0INC & BROS..
New York. Denver. Chicago. *
I
Hartford and Vedette |
Bicycles.
:hs
These machines are acknowledged
everywhere as leaders. An
excess of* competition has xiot i
weakened their hold upon the
public 4
NEW MODELS. ,;J
GhainSsss, - , ? $75
Columbia Chain . . 50
Hartfords, . . - 35
Vedettes, - . $25,26 ..
? 1.?* n-i v!a VaUIo ak a a
I A iimilCU uumuor Ul VUlUlUUiBi mr ,4?>B -XV
and 49 (improved) and Hartfords, Patterns ? 3
and 8, at greatly reduced prices. I
SEE OCIt CATALOGUE. I
POPE MFG. CO., Hartford, Oonu.S
DHRIIIA STOPPED FRET'
IT^I KV Permanently Cored \
H ' E| iMMity Prevented by
m H 3 U DR. KLINE'S CgSAf
Ik W 3ERVE RESTORER
PoritlT??w? : * ill JftnoMj IHmm, rui, BfOtptf,
M Apunu and Si. Vitus' Dmu. >oriUcrSOTrmiM
ga w.r em d*7'? bm. Tr?ati?? and $8 trial bottlf
n free to Pit ptUtsu, Uty p?7w* "I'm ciulM ofif
B9 wh?o rreriT?<1. Stnd to Pr. KMoe, Ltd, Bflltra#
BH iBKltuu of liedlclst, Ml Arch St., PhlltdtlphU, Pi.
i B n Q V NEW DISCOVERT; tfvw
^ |T w | O I aoiokroliof aad o*tm wont
' Book of io?timoaial? aad 10 d*?i' malaont
' Freo. Or. B- B. OXIKX't IOHS. *>ox O, itluti, 9k.
i Happy 1
Tho nrfo^tACt n IB
"remedyfor * ? Junriauria
M ALARIA,CHILLS&FEVER
Crippe and Liver Diseases, gg
KNOWN ALLDRIGCUT8. OvCl
tg c* O-WHY 8UFFEH. Get a box of
| I 8m & O JirdsaU> Guaranteed i'leOwt
ajent. It gives instant relief and has real merit.
5t? ;'en:? a ik>x a* dmgaist-, or ?eud to E.T.LAI1K
l.EV) 7G l'ike Street, Port Jervl*, Y.
Libera! Compensation snd Easy Work
DURING LEISURE HOURS FOR
Ladies, Boys and Girls.
white HOME SUPPLY CO.. ?urr?lo, w.v.
{ Thompson's Ey? W?t?r
S5 Easily Made in 5 Hours jjf
article in constant u>e and demand. Write for particulars.
Archibald & Co., 78 Sfrssan St.,NewVork.
IiEKTD YOUR
ten Un-IVoJ t.'ERHlX UtCTIII.URf fJr&v. \
published, h [ tne reiunrickbly low priutf IM-f JKL **
ui uu.* puHtpail i'liio Iloo-C coil- f JBjf'yrQfV A) ,
lamK <?. ? ,nm;ly prmte I pa^e.4 o: cloir [ jf;
lype o.? ex.-eiWut uapsr am is n.vu oinely
vet ie.-viefiDly oo.ml in clo:i.
Itgirei fcujUsh worij with cb? Uermta V*V4A \
equivalent* an I pronunciation. aa I \\t?_ )
Oermau wor.li with Kn^lUn 'le.1uttlont \ r
Jt u< invaluable to (ierma'is who arana: ? i,
thoroughly familiar with tluifllsh. or;? V . vft
American* woo waj to iearu Gvnnaa Xti'.1 Ji
Adarcu. ?ith
ROOK PUBLISHING HOUSE,
1 34 Leonard St., Xtw York CHy.
n/tp'nt'ttnm this paper when reply
ixlbjn 1-lu-ln ing to advta. nyxp-21.
UUKtU WKtRE ALL ?LS? FAtlS- ES
U Bqk Cough Syrup. Tastet Good. Cwt H
CJ in tlrna. Sold bjr druRjrlcta. M

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