OCR Interpretation


The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, July 05, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026853/1922-07-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

v.
1
Abbeville Press and Banner
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Wednesday, June 5, 1922 Single Copies, Five Cents. 78th Year.
RAILWAY EMPLOYEES
POSTPONE STRIKE
PRESIDENT OF UNION AND
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL CON
FER WITH CHAIRMAN HOOP
ER OF LABOR. BOARD ANE
JV1CJV1 J3E.lt
Chicago, July 4.?The threaten
ed extension of the strike of rail
way employees to 400,000 tract
men was averted today through
the efforts of members of the Uni
ted States railroad labor board anc
.officials of the United Maintenancf
of Way employees and railroac
shop laborers.
Postponement of the strike was
announced tonight by E. F. Grabl(
president of the maintenance orga
.Via "hie
Ill^aVlVUy h/V*X iiw (?**U UM VAW??v?>?
council had conferred throughoul
the day with Chairman Ben W
Hooper of the labor board and W
L. McMenimen, laibor member ci
the board.
Maintenance of Way chairmen
wer? instructed to proceed to take
up Maintenance of Way dispute:
with the individual roads, and in
case an agreement is not reached
to refer the matter to the laboi
board. These disputes include the
wage cut recently authorized bj
the board for Maintenance of Way
employes, changes in maintenance
of way rules and of contracting oul
of traok work.
- Members were directed to con
tinue. work under the cut wages or
dered by the labor board, effective
July 1, and to withhold strike or
ders, pending the carrying out ol
these matters.
It was also announced that ai
immediate ruling from the labor
board would be sought absolving
members from doing any work for
merly done by members of othei
organizations on strike.
ujie 01 tne conditions 10 post
ponement of the strike was that th<
Indiana Harbor Belt railroad can
cel its contracts with an outsidf
agency to do track work and offi
cials of the road were summonec
before the meeting, and agreed to
do this, maintaining, however, that
such contracting was lawful.
With this crisis safely past both
railroad executives and officers ol
the shop crafts now on strike ad
mitted tonight that the first real
test of strength of the striking
shopmery will occur tomorrow
morning when the whistles blow.
B. M. Jewell head of the railwaj
employees department of th2 Ame
rican Federation of Labor, has
contended that practicaVy 100 pti
cent of his 400,000 members hac
obeyed the strike call.
The carriers have assented thai
many men who walked out last Sat
urday were merely going for s
holiday over the fourth oi juij
and will be back on the job tomor.
row.
Mr. Jewell today replied the pro.
nouncemerit of the labor board oi
yesterdafy "outlawing" his organi
zation by asserting that it was nol
the shopmen but the board itseli
that had been "outlawed." Mr
Jewell, in his letter to the board
asserted that the body had failed t<
negotiate a settlement betweer
the shopmen and the carriers anc
raitAratjul Viia intnnHnn /vf fiftnllTlf
only with the roads in making i
settlement.
GREENWOOD TO PLAY HERE
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
AT Rosenberg- FVeld?-Both Game:
Will Be at 5 O'clock?Come
Help Your Team.
Greenwood will come to Abbevilh
omorrow (Thursday) and Friday t<
?lay ball at Rosenberg Field. Botl
ames will be at 5 o'clock.
Greenwood will be sure to bring
long their rooters, so everybody
ome out tomorrow and boost youi
?sm.
; BOTH SIDES CLAIMS
: THE UPPER HANI
? RAILROAD OFFICIALS SA1
PLACES OF STRIKERS ARJ
BEING FILLED BY EXPERI
> ENCED MEN?25 WORKERS
STONED
New York, July 4.?Union offi
. cials insisted today that hundred
. of other union workers employei
t by railroads would join in th
. strike against wage; reduction:
I made 'by the railroad labor board.
J At the Sunnyside yards of th
I Long Island railroad, strike leader
said, that oilers, clerks, freigh
3 handlers and general workmen ha<
i inined the strike ranks. The strik
- ers also claimed that the . walkou
i of electricians at the Long Islam
t power house had compelled th
railroad to get its power from pub
. lie utility corporations.
L Railroad officials, denying tha
the walkout had hampered the op
i eration of trains, declared th
5 ranks of strikers were 'being rapid
! ly filled by experienced men wh<
i had been laid off duriing the de
I pression. Many j pensioners wer
' said to be reporting for work.
' There was little trouble re
' ported, union officials lnstructei
r their followers to avoid violence
? -WT * J OK -rv,Qi
in IX ew uersey a. aquau. ui mv.
' who had replaced striking railroai
workers were stoned iby a crowi
and five of the men refused t<
continue working.
! Members of the railroad clerk
" union in 'New York were instruct
: ed by their national officers to con
tinue on their "routine jobs" am
t not be stampeded into a sympa
' thetic strike until the result of th
: strike balloting now taking plac
- was ascertained.
7
HOME ON A VISIT.
5 Miss Caroline Graves who ha
been visiting at her home in th
i county for the past ten days arrivei
* in the city today for a visit of sever
I al days with Mrs. Frank B. Gary. Mis
Graves is in the Navy Departmen
in Washington and is home for i
vacation. She has joined the ne\
1 Woman's party and is South Caro
Una's representative in this organi
zation.
A GLORIOUS FOURTH
Usual Barbecue and Ball Game Hel<
At Cotton Mill.
The Fourth of July is always <
pleasant holiday for the people o
the Abbeville Cotton Mill and Tues
day was no exception to the gener
al rule. The usual barbecue was hel<
in the grove near the Mill and base
ball game in the morning and om
in the afternoon made up the pleas
ures of the day.
The tables for the dinner wen
spread under the trees and at
o'clock was surrounded by a happ;
group who enjoyed the hash, th<
barbecued meats and the delightfu
cakes and pies provided by the ener
getic house-keepers of the village.
Rev. Mr. Kilgore was present am
> asked "the blessing" at the dinne
1 and Hatch's Concert Band made th
1 music for the day.
JOHN T. EVANS SICK
John T. Evans, of the firm o
Miller and Evans, Is confined t
r
his home on Church street with
case of bronchitis. This is the sec
* * .1- i
1 ona attacK ne nas naa ^in xne ias
month and his friends hope for hi
early recovery.
COTTON MARKET.
Cotton brought 23 Vz cents on th
local market today. Futures closed:
July 22.90
Oct. 22.90
Dec. ? 22.66
Jan. 22.31
FINAL DEFEAT OF
( fllGHTING AIRCRAFT SENT TO {
I DUBININ? THE ENVELOPING
MOVEMENT IN SACKVILLE
STREET COMPLETE?FIGHT
ING IN SILGO
i- Dublin, July 4.?Hammam's ho
s tel on Sackville street, one of the ^
d main positions of the insurgents, (
was captured by the national army
forces this afternoon. The hostelry
with its garrison of 30 men was
surrendered to the Free State
troops after the building had taken
fire.
Dublin, July 4.?The enveloping
movement by the Free State forces
in the Sackville steet area is com
plete, and the final defeat of the
rebels is in sight, says a com
munique issued from general head
quarters in the Beggars Bush bar
racks today.
The insurgents have been driv
en out of the positions in Earl
| street, so that their comrades in
"I the Gresham 'hotel and adjoining
buildings in Sackville street are
entirely surrounded.
Thirty-two rebels were captured
when the national troops rushed
the Earl street positions and the
Catholic club, opposite the <Jres
hatn hotel.
The Young Men's Christian asso
ciation building in Sackville street,
which has been occupied by insur
gents, was burned during the
night, after an attack by the Free
Staters.
Yesterday's casualties were three
killed and 27 wounded.
The lull since the termination of
the fierce attack on the insurgent's
position early this morning had ;
been broken up to 9 o'clock only toy .]
the activities of snipers.
The government forces now ]
s hold all the positions dominating <
e the buildings in Sackville street oc- ]
i cupied by the rebels. Barricades at :
- the LifFey bridges and across the ;
s principal thoroughfares leading to* :
t the center of the city prevent the
a republicans from escaping or rein
r forcements from reaching them.
FIRST WHITE HOUSE REV
For the first time since the Ch
view before the President of the
were g,000 marines of the Marine
Quantico, Va. The Marinees wei
eround for their annual maneuve
ABBEVILLE VS. WARE SHOALS
Ware Shoals defeated the Abbe
ville mill team here on .the fourth,
the score being 7 to 3. Ware Shoals
had the pitchers and the pitchers
had the game. Milan knocked a
homer. Wolf and Watson pitched
for Ware Shoals and Milan tossed
for Abbeville.
MINE CONFERENCE
IS IN DEADLOCK
OPERATORS AND UNION MEN
ADJOURN ; TO MONDAY
CONTENTION CONTINUES
TO BE OVER 5COPE OF NE
GOTIATIONS
Washington, July 4.? The con
ference of bituminous coal mine
)perators and officials of the miners
anion summoned by President
Sarding to consider methods of
anding th| coal strike in unionized
ields adjourned today until Mon
day in the same deadlock which
^ad characterized its sessions on
Jwo previous days.
Participants apparently consider
ed that only government interven
tion going much further than it has
co date would oner possibilities ?i
in early strike settlement. Presi
dent Harding is expected on Mon
iay to have again direct dealings
[vith the negotiators but the gov_
erment's plans are kept entirely se
cret.
(From first to last, employers con
tended in the discussions here
that they could no longer negotiate
urage scales with the union in the
lentral competitive field as a unit
? _ ? ? xi?i ?u.oil |
jr in it rmuuimi gauicnug vi mi
anion coal operators and miners.
Miners' officials continued to de
mand such negotiations as the es
tablished practice In the industry,
and to refuse offers of negotiations
by districts, repeated in several
forms as <they were. Secretaries
Hoover and Davis, who have at
tended the meetings as representa
tives of the administration, have j
offred no propositions outside of
a tentative suggestion that a con
ference of miners and operators
might be appointed ito consider
possibilities of outlining districts.
Meetings of operators and of J
miners separately from the joint j
conferences were held today, but|
led to no action. Secretary Hoover
remarked after the meetings had
been concluded that participants
might renew their gatherings Mon-j
day with more hope of success af
ter discussing <the situation with
associates at home.
IEW SINCE CIVIL WAR
ril War, troops passed in re.
United States recently. There
Corps Expeditionary Force at
nt to the Gettysburg battle
rs.
SEEING THE GAME.
Mr. W. C. Cobb came over fi;om
Ware Shoals for the 4th and took
in the baseball games at the Mill in
:he morning and enjoyed the barbe.
:ue at the mid-day. Mr. Cobb was
accompanied by two of his charm
ng daughters who in turn were ac
:ompanied by two good looking young
nen.
GOVERNMENT GIVES FIGURES
FOR YEAR.?SURPLUS SHOWN
BY PINAL STATEMENT OF RE
CEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
SAYS TREASURY.
Washington, July 4.?A reduction
of $1,014,000,000 in the public debt
during the fiscal year ended June 30
and a reduction of $175,000,000 in
the debt during the month of June
was announced today by the treasury.
At \he same time the treasury an
nounced that the final figures of gov
ernment receipts and expenditures
for the past fiscal year revealed a sur
plus of $314,000,000.
The total ordinary receipts of the
government for the fiscal year 1922
amounted to $4,109,000,000 compar.
ed with $5,625,000,000 the previous
year, while the total expenditures
chargeable against ordinary receipts
amounted to $3,795,000,000 as a
gainst $5,538,000,000 during 1921.
"When the budget was submitted
last December," the treasury stated,
"the estimate indicated a deficit for
1922 amounting to $24,468,703 and
the better showing which has been
made results from a combination of
several factors. Aggregate receipts
for the year were about $140,000,000
greater than originally estimated.
Customs receipts proved to be larger
than for any previous fiscal year in
the history of the government and
amounted to $356,443,387.18, as
compared with the estimate 01 $z7i>
000,000. Internal revenue receipts
amounted to $3,213.,253,256.79, or
'almost exactly the estimated $3,214,
>500,000. Miscellaneous revenues, in
cluding Panama canal tolls, amount
ed to $539,407,506.97, as compared
with an estimated $478,953,663, the
difference being due chiefly to in
creased realization on property and
securities and the sale of about $44,
000,000 of federal land bank bqnds
owned by the government. Total' ex
penditures, on the other hand, were
almost $200,000,000 less than the es
timates given last December in the
budget, due largely to decreased ex.
penditures on account of the railroads
and to unexpectedly large realization
upoon railroad obligations held by
the government.
Total gross debt of the United
States June 30 amounted to $22,963
I AAA AAA 1 !iL ono 1 QO AAA
uuu,uuu, compared wun ^o,itio,uuu,
000 on May 31, with $23,997,000,000
on June 30, 1921, and with $26*596
000,0000 on August 31 when the
war debt was at its peak.
DEATH OF L. B. RAMEY
iLucius B. Ramey died this
morning July 5, 1922, at 2 o'clock
at his home in the Sharon section
He was 77 years old, yesterday be
ing his birthday, and had been ir
frail health for many months.
Mr. Ramey has lived in Abbe
ville Co*nty all of his life. He was
a confederate veteran, enlisting al
fifteen years of age, and was
wounded in battle.
Funeral services will be held a1
Sharon tomorrow at 11 o'clock
conducted by Rev. J. B. Kilgore:
and interment will be in the Sharor
burying ground.
Mr. Ramey is survived by his
wife, who was a Miss Gray before
her marriage, and ten children,
Messrs.. Hill, Lewis, Samuel, Allen
Van Runey, and Paul and Mrs. J,
E. Gray, Mrs. W. T. Sanders, Mrs.
Sam Hammond and Mrs. Norman
Cason and by one brother, L. A.
Ramey and two sisters, Mrs. S. E.
Moragne, and Mrs. S. M. Wardlaw,
CtUU <X lai^C VUV1C VA 4VJ?W.?VU.
BISHOP FINLAY TO PREACH
Bishop K. G. Finlay will proach
1 4-Via TTrkien Ar*o1 nVilirpVl
at 11 o'clock. He will go to Willir?.
ton and conduct services in the Wil
lington church that afternoon. This
is the regular yearly visitation of
the Bishop.
GROWN BY THEM TO THE
ASSOCIATION SAYS STATE
MENT ISSl/ED BY THE ASSO
CIATION
Columbia, July 4?Members of the
South Carolina Cotton Growers' Co
operative Association are not re
quired to turn over to the associa
tion says a statement issued by the
association today. This statement
was made, it was said, in reply to
numerous inquiries received from
all sections of the state.
The contract signed by the grow
ers, it was said, left it optional with
the growers as to whether they shall
turn over any cotton now on hand
to the association. If the grower does
not care to turn over this cotton to
the association he may continue to
hold it and sell it at any time and
under any conditions he ejects. He
must, however, turn over all cotton
grown by him in the years 1922,
1923, 1924, 1925, and 1926 to the
association, the statement says.
Further progress in the selection
of the department heads and the
perfection of the working force of
the organization will be made by the
board of . directors this week. The
board is proceeding most carefully,
it was said, in the selection of all de
partment heads and employees and
is making careful investigation in
each and every instance.
The contract for making the nec.
essary alterations in the old Masonic
Temple, which is to be occupied by -
the association, nas been let ana toe
association will probably move into
its new quarters within the next two
weeks.
The association will have no
trouble in securing warehouse accom
odations, it was said today, owners
of warehouses in every section of ''
the state having offered their places
to the association. Important anounce
ments concerning warehousing ar
rangements may be expected shortly,
it was said today.
Preparations for conducting a vig
orous campaign for new members
during the next two months are go.
ing forward rapidly. The announce
1. -4-1 L ILa VaaI/o
incut uuu tuc meiuucx auip uuu^o
I will be reopened has been received
with enthusiasm. J. P. Qiunerly,
county agent of Lee County in a let.
1 ter received yesterday said that he
believed that 6,000 additional bales
s cculd be signed in Lee county. From
almost every county comes word that
many farmers who did not care to
sign until the board of directors had
been elected, are now ready to put
i their names on the dotted line.
MR, McGOWAN LEAVES
t Wayne G. McGowan has been
appointed county agent for Bald
wyn County, Alabama, with head
5 quarters at Baymanette, with a
; considerable increase in salary and
5 expects to leave immediately to
take up his new work.
/ His place as County Demonstra
: tor here will be filled by July 15 by
, Clemson College.
i {Mr. McGowan has made many
friends during his short stay here
i who regret that he will leave Abbe
* ville and make his home in Ala
, bama.
TO DISCUSS WAR DEBT
i French Representative Sails For
America.
Havre, July 4.?Jean V. Parmen
tier was a passenger on the steam
ship La Savoie sailing today for New
York on his way to Washington to
confer with the American war debt
funding commission, to which he will
present fully the condition of France
It is understood he will declare there
is no possibility of France paying any
thing at present on her debt to the
United States and will ask the Am
erican commission to indicat? a so
lution of the debt problem. '

xml | txt