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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, July 07, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026853/1922-07-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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Abbeville Press and Banner!
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Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Friday, July 7, 1922. Single Copies, Five Cents. 78th Year.
SUPREME COURT
DECIDES MANY CASES'
BASIL MORRISON MUST SERVE
SENTENCE?CASE TRIED IN
ABBEVILLE LAST SEPTEMBER.
HAYS AND WILSON ALSO,
, ASHLEY GETS NEW TRIAL.
The Supreme Court has affirmed
the judgment of the lower court in
the case of The State vs. Morrison.
Morrison was tried at the September
term of the Court of General ses
sions for this County, last year, for
the homicide of his brother, Basil
Morrison, and was convicted of mur
der with recommendation to mercy.
He was sentenced to life imprison
ment. Later he made a motion for a
new trial on after discovered evi
dence, which was argued before
Judge Wilson at the March term, the
motion being refused. From the
judgment and the order refusing the
new trial, the appeal was taken with
the result stated.
Other Case* Decided.
Walter Hays and Ed Wilson who
were convicted of manslaughter in
connection with the killing of Tom
Ramey in Anderson county must
serve the sentence imposed by the
lower court. The two men got fifteen
years each. The evidence showed that
the two, along with George Wilson
and Allen Emerson went to the home
of Ramey to make trouble. Wilson
'and Emerson were convicted only of
carrying concealed weapons.
Ernest Ashley, convicted of man.
slaughter for the killing of Arthur
Hughes, a policeman at Honea Path
in Anderson county gets a new trial
the court reversing the decision
which gave him a sentence of nine
years. The court upheld exceptions
brought by the appellant, including
the allegation that the foreman of
the jury, A. M. McFall had a tele
phone conversation regarding the
with Judee Prince when thei
defendant was not present, it was
also alleged that Judge Prince said
in the court room, to the foreman
while the jury was out, that "It was
a disgrace to the county that a ver
dict could not be reached." The judge
was also quoted as saying that too
many mistrials were being ordered.
Morrah Case Affirmed.
Another case in which local people
are interested was decided yesterday.
That was the case of S. P. Morrah
vs. the Dr. John De la Howe Indus
trial c/?hnnr Mr. Morrah Durchased a
tract of land from the De la Howe
trustees several years ago. He made a
settlement for the balance of the pur
chase money some two years ago.
At that time he contended that he
had made an additional payment on
the purchase money of $500 for
which credit was refused. He settled
with the understanding that if he
established his claim it wouia oe re
funded. He later produced a receipt
for the payment claimed and asked
that the money be repaid him.
His demand being refused he
brought suit. The Attorney General
answered the complaint for the de
fendant and moved that the State be
made a party, which Judge Sease re
fused. The defendant then demurred
to the complaint on the ground that
the State should be made a party
which was also refused by Judge j
Sease. The appeal was from the or-i
der to this, effect. The case is sent J
back for trial on its merits.
HARRIS LITHIA SPRINGS
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Starnes went
Ninety Six to spend the fourth of
July with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Starnes.
The family had a picnic at Harris
Lithia Springs on that day. The old
hotel is standing just as it was 25
years ago.
VISITORS FROM TENNESSEE
Miss Mary Carter and Mr. (3. E. j
Freeman of Tennessee are in the
oity Tisit'ng Miss Eva Reames on'
21 zguz'v.e street.
MM ISTRFFT
V UUIII ILbk V
I
SIEGE OF STRONGHOLDS OF
INSURGENT IRISH FORCES
VIRTUALLY. ENDS WITH
(SURRENDER OF SMALL
GROUPS
'Dublin, July 6.?The siege of the
strongholds of the insurgent Irish
forces was virtually ended tonight
with the surrender of small groups
of the men who had been fighting
for the past week behind the barri
cades, and the capture of one of
(the princij>al leaders, Cathal
Brugha, former minister of de
fense. But the success of the na
tional cause has been purchased at
the cost of 'blazing building's and
terrible destruction in 0' onnell
street, to say nothing of the loss of
life and the many seriously wound
ed.
There is still no information as
<to the -whereabouts of Eamonn De
Valera, who has apparently escap
ed from the Free Staters' net.
In the afternoon, when ten
buildings, including three hotels,
were aflame the remainder of the
irregulars driven into the Granville
hotel -With fire on all sides, still
maintained a desperate resistance
with automatic guns and rifles, but
it was already seen (that they could
not long delay the inevitable end.
The final attack by the Free State
troops commenced at midday after
a lull, during which the firing
slackened . greattly. The regulars
then began a desperate plan of
bombarding the insurgents, a
bomb was hurled into Hamagues
and ?rtnn fpfnt wisns creot
(through the shattered windows and
suddenly a gust of flame in front
\vias followed by dense volumes of
smoke. The flames spread swiftly
and the first 'brigade hurried to the
; scene. But a fusillade from the ir
regulars in the Granville hotel
I compelled them to retreat The fire
attacked the shops adjoining the
Hamagues and in* less than_two
hours the offices Had collapsed.
{Three buildings Were completely
| destroyed, the ruin being hastened
(through the flames reaching stores
of bombs and ammunition, causing
numerous explosions and throwing
up great clouds of smoke.
Still the irregulars fired from the
windows of the hotels while the
nationals fired from their positions
opposite and from armored cars.
Machine guns fired into the hotel
windows. Within half an hour the
front of the building was a flaming
furnace. Even while the lower
floors of the hotel Were burning,
I tne irregulars continued to me
I from the upper windows but iby 3
o'clock the remnant of the garri
son, five men weary eyed and
blackened, emerged from the rear
of the building under the white
flag and surrendered.
COTTON MARKET
Cotton brought 23 1-2 cents on
the local market today. Futures
closed:
July
October
(December ?
January
March
Futures closed yesterday
July
22.65
22,69
22.46
22.16
22.05
October
December |.
29.34
22.33
22.10
oi ai
uauuaiy
March 21.70
SPANISH-AMERICAN
VETERANS TO MEET
The veterans of the Spanish Am
erican war will hold a meeting in
the Council Chamber at six o'clock
Tuesday afternoon to organize a
camp and to make arrangements
to apply for a state charter. All
veterans of the county are request
ed to be present.
CONTINUE PEACE
IK IN SHE
MARKED TREND TOWARD PEACE
DURING PAST 24 HOURS. JEW
ELL ISSUES LETTER IN REPLY]
TO ONE FROM HOOPER OF
LABOR BOARD.
Chicago, July 6.?Emerging from
the holiday week-end, the strike situ
ation took more definite shape today
as both strikers and the roads settled
down to attempt an accurate sur
vey.
There were apparently no additions
to the strikers' ranks today, while
several roads reported considerable
gains and many roads have made
formal announcement that the strik
ers must return to work by next
Monday, July 10, or forfeit all rights
? ? j
'l'neir places, ranroaa ouimais ?aiu,
were gradually being filled by new
men.
Railroad officials here predicted
that by Saturday when the strike
will have been a week old they will
have an accurate line on the situa
tion and begin a definite program of
retrenchment. Their attitude today
seemed to leave little hope of a set
tlement with the strikers.
A statement issued by Mr. Jewell
referred to a letter sent to him yes
terday by Ben W. Hooper, chairman
[of the railroad labor board, in which
Chairman Hooper said the board "has
been protecting the interests of the
striking shopmen."
Mr. Jewell's statement in part fol
lows:
"Though the letter itself has
not reached me, I can, on the basis of
press reports, say that the mere de.
claration that the organization of!
employees who have declined or may
decline, as is their legal right, to
accept the dictates of the labor board
are not to be 'outlawed,' does not re
move' or annul the official action of
the board. The language of the reso
lution clearly provides that the shop
crafts organizations are to be sup
planted by organizations of what may
be termed 'whitewashed strike break
ers.' "
county memorial
celebrate:
Abbeville County celebrated the
second birthday of the Memorial Hos
pital yesterday afternoon after the
ball eame besrinnin? with a errand
parade on the public square.
The parade was led by Hatch's
Concert Band and the formation was
as follows:
Birthday Cake float drawn by five
little girls dressed as cupids: Chris
tine Stephens, Floris Vandiver, Eliz
abeth DuPre, Carolyn Hughes, and
Elizabeth Woodhu'rst, and driven by
little Tina May Andrews dressed as
a fairy.
The second feature of the parade
was Dr. J. E. Pressly as a two year
old baby and representing the Hospi
tal. If Dr. Pressly Mrly represented
the condition of the Hospital it
seems to be well nourished, the Doc
tor having very much in evidence a
bottle filled with pure unadulterated
milk. Dr. C. C. Gambrell had the task
of pushing the Hospital Baby in an
invalid's chair. Dr. Pressly also had
along as mascot Lad Perrin's favorite
dog "Daisy."
Next came the little girls pushing
doll carriages. Then about twenty
bicycle riders and at least twenty tri
cycle riders, followed by Sol Rosen
berg as ambulance driver. The ambu.
lance was drawn by Billy the Goat.
And last but not least came Allen
Hall dressed as a clown and driving
a wagon advertising the Hospital.
The parade was unusually attrac
tive. each one taking part deserving
a gold medal for the way in which
the part was tarried out.
The little girls pushing doll carri
ages were all so sweet and pretty,
HARDING PRAISES
AMERICAN EEGION
DEDICATED TO PRESERVATION ]
OF CONSTITUTION.?PRESI
DENT DELIVERS BRIEF AD
DRESS TO SEVERAL THOUS
AND WORLD WAR VETERANS
Marion, Ohio, July 6.?So long as
the American Legion is consecrated j
to the preservation of the constitu- j
tioq and of law and order, the Amer-- I
ican republic is everlastingly secure, <
President Harding asserted in a brief <
address today to several thousand ]
World war veterans who held a re- <
union here.
Reminding them that they were
now charged with a greater respon- ]
sibility titan they were on the battle
fields of France, Mr. Harding declar
ed the destiny of the United States
was in the hands of former service
men. j
"I have no hesitancy in saying," ^
he added, "that it is in good hands." j
The president urged the men in j
Viia miHionrp all nf whom parlipr in
the afternoon had participated in a ,
historical parade which he reviewed
to serve their country as civilians
with war time consecration and devo- ]
tion. ,
The president started off his last <
day among the home folks with a
morning round of golf on the new
links here with 0. S. Rapp, a close .
Marion friend; General Pershing and i
Charles G. Dawes, former budget bu- .
reau director. After luncheon at the
home of C. B. Kling, Mrs. Harding's (
brother, the president went to a re
viewing stand to witness the parade (
which deDicted various stages of Ma.
rion's history.
The president entered into the
spirit of the pageant with the enthu
siasm of a school booy. He grinned ,
broadly when a float passed on which
a colonial mother was rocking a cra
dle placarded with a sign:
"No flapper rocked in this.* ,
Former service men from all parts ,
of Ohio had flocked in to Marion to
participate in the parade and to
hold a reunion later at the fair
grounds. (
IS ;
[? ornmin mmuniv
) OLOUNSJ Dinmufti
each one being the result of hours of
love's labor, that it would be hard to
decide between the different forms
of beauty and art. Little Julia Barn
well won this prize. She represented
a Red Cross nurse, and in her cart
she pushed a soldier of the 30th Di_
vision, with medals, and a complete
outfit in detail.
Frances McComb won the prize for
the best girl's bicycle. Her wheel was
decorated with pink chrysanthemums
and green asparagus fern, with pink
illusion wings fastened to the han
dle bars, -while Frances was dressed
in a fluffy pink dress making a most
attractive outfit.
Rivers Mabry won the prize for
the best boy's bicyclle. His colors
were purple and yellow, and he car
ried out his color scheme in his out
rider's costume.
Mary Alice Lomax won the prize
for the best girl's tricycle. She was
in pure white, and made an effective
picture.
Jack Gilleland won the prize for
the best boy's tricycle. Jack was also 1
in white, wearing a cap with a long
white feather as headdress.
The prizes were given by the fol
lowing merchants of Abbeville: R.
C. Philson, Rosenberg Merc. Co., W. j
E. Johnson, Austin-Perrin Co. and 1
F. E. Harrison, Jr.
During the entertainment at the
Opera House at night the winners !
were announced and appeared in
costume on the stage to receive their
honors.
After the parade the birthday cake
(Continued on Page Four.)
PROGRAM FIXED
BY REPUBLICANS
LEADERS WILL CONSULT WITH
(PRESIDENT HARDflNG WHEN
HE RETURNS FROM MARION.
MORE CLEARLY DEFINED
AT LODGE DINNER
Washington, July 6.?The legis
lative program of the present ses
sion of congjress was said today by
Republican senators to be some
what more clearly defined as a re
sult of the dinner conference last
night at the home of Senator Lodge
rv-f M.npoo/?kiiofl+>a +Vio nflrt.V
J L !TiaCi?avl?U^vvvw; v*?w
The passage of the tariff bill and
possibly of the soldiers' bonus
measure would constitute the raajoi
part of the program ' "before ad
journment in the opinion of the
Republican leaders with the Cappei
Tinoher grain future trading bill,
the librarian loan measure and
the rivers and harbors development
bill on their tentative calendar for
passage at the present session. Ris
ing opposition because of its sub
sidy features and the prohibition
element injected through an
amendment prohibiting sale of
liquor on American ships left con
siderable doubt as to the possibili
ty of the bill's disposal before ad
journment, Republicans said.
The soldiers' bonus 'bill, however,
was sai-d to be the read thorn on the
legislative vine. This, it was said,
was discussed at some length at the
Lodge dinner, but without definite
conclusions other than for consulta
tion by senate leaders with Presi
dent Harding when he returns from
Marion.
- The conference report on the bill
to create 23 additional federal
judges also is to be pressed, ibul
with uncertainty as to its fate dur
ing this session. The Dyer anti
lynching bill and the Muscle
Shoals matter seemed doomed to
+K/v nav+ ??s?!nn. IpjmJpts
5 v UTCl cvy vi*c 1&WAV wwi
said.
NO MAIL INTERFERENCE
Government Will Tolerate No Delay
of This Matter.
Washington, July 6.?Under nc
:ircumstances will the government
tolerate any hindrance to the
movement of the United States mail,
it was said here today after receipl
of reports that striking railway work
ers had interferred with mail trans.
portation in different parts of th?
:opntry.
There is a disposition on the pari
of the administration, it was under
stood, to deal with strikers or anj
others who may interfere with the
proper dispatch of the mails in the
most vigorous manner.
REDUCTION ON CLOTHS
Approved by Committee Rewriting
Tariff.
Washington, July 6.?Continuing
its work of rewriting the tariff bill,
the Senate finance committee major
ity has approved reductions in the
duties originally proposed on cotton
cloths and some cotton goods, includ
ing hose and half hose and under,
wear and other wearing apparel
Some attention also has been giver
to the woolen schedule, but it is un
derstood that the committee will
make few if any changes in the
rates in that schedule.
TT 5 +-V* r\ AAffATl
unaer uie i-imngea m wc vvvi,v?
schedule, duties on cotton cloth
would not exceed 45 per cent ad val
orem as compared with original du
ties in some cases of 60 per cent and
more. In the place of rates on hose
and half hose ranging from 15 pei
cent and prevalorem and 70 cents
per dozen pairs to 80 per cent ad
valorem the majority has fixed a
straight duty of 10 cents per p'ound
and 60 cents ad valorem.
Hon. Joel Bailey of the Index
Journal was in the city taking in
the ball game between Abbevile
and Greenwood yesterday.
CASE OF TOL6ERT
GETS ATTENTION 1
SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE TO
HAVE INQUIRY?ANNOUNCE.
MENT MADE THAT JUNIOR S.
r ccmatad urn r nooACP
v. i vi\ nibu vr k w??ti
CONFIRMATION.
Washington, July 6.?The consid
eration of the nomination of Joseph
W. Tolbert to be marshal of the Wes
tern district of South Carolina by a
sub.committee of the judiciary com
: mittee of the senate, of which Sena-'
> tor Samuel M. Shortridge of Califor- '
, nia is chairman, is scheduled for an
[ unnamed day next week.
1 Without specifying, Senator Short
ridge stated today that certain pro.
" tests against confirmation of Tol
1 bert had been received by the sub
committee. He also stated that when
> the matter is under consideration,
Senator N. B. Dial of South Carolina
; would be received for the purpose of
making a statement. Senator Dial, as '
' previously reported, will protest
' against the confirmation of Tolbert.
L The senator returned today from * "i
South Carolina. He did not make pub
lic the ground on which he would
' base his protest, but it is understood
" that he will review the history of
' Republicanism in his state since the
inception of the administration of
President Harding. It is .expected
! that he will declare that, in his opin.
> ion, Tolbert, in consideration of his
! record, is not an ideal man to be
1 made an important court official in
' South Carolina.
Senator Dial said today: "It b un
1 pleasant to proceed against any one
appointed to office. But certain du
^ ties confront a senator when his peo
' pie send him to Washington, and
' such duties must be regarded,
whether they are pleasant or not. I
fool tVint tiro oVirmlrl ho vpnr /*aroflll
f i in suffering the confirmation of men
appointed to-hold office in oar state.
11 It is my duty to oppose the confirma
tion of any appointee I do not re
gard as satisfactory and it will not
suffice, I hold it, that I simply regis
ter my protest by a negative vote."
The case is one of the really in- '
teresting which pend in Washington. .
Tolbert is the oldest1 member of the
[ national Republican committee and
' I * * f J.L. - ?A _ A ? ... iit..
is cnairman 01 uie smut cumuiaicc.
| He is spokesman for the Republican
party in South Carolina and as such
his appointment by the president was
natural. His rejection by a Republi
can senate, after he had recommend
ed appointees for practically all eth
er offices would be to a certain extent
at least, sentational.
$ The intention of Senator E. D.
, Smith regarding the Tolbert case is
unknown. The senator is absent at
present.
TAFT LEAVES LONDON
Leading Lawyer* Tender Hki Im.
posing Testimonial.
London, July 6.?England's Bench
and Bar said farewell to Chief Jus
tice Taft tonight. The leading mem
bers of the Middle Temple, Britain's
foremost training center of lawyers
tendered him an imposing testimo
nial in the ancient hall where Shakes
peare acted before Queen Elisabeth
and where three signers of the Dec
laration of Independence took legal
degrees. At the conclusion of the
dinner the entire assemblage arose
and gave Mr. Taft three cheers, sang
lj"For Kfe's a Jolly Good Fellow" and
n j ? ^ j
wisnea nun uuuspecu.
I
GO TO FAYETTEVILLE
> Messrs. J. C. Thomson, T. G.
1 White, J. M. Nickles and Joel S.
i Morse presented a call from the
I Presbyterian church of Abbeville to
Rev. John A. McMurray of Fayette
ville, N. C. Tuesday. The call was
personally presented to Eh-. McMur
ray by this committee for his con
sideration. He will visit the church
and preach on the 16th of July.

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