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The Abbeville press and banner. [volume] (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, July 17, 1922, Image 1

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Abbeville Press and Banner
\ " '*%
' -s4
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Monday, July 17, 1922 Single Copies, Five Cents. 78th Year.
i ~? ??
HURLING OF CHALLENGES, J
ULTIMATUM AND DEFI
JA1NCES APPARENTLY ENDS
THROUGH EXHAUSTION OR
HOPE OF SETTLEMENT.
Chicago, July 16.?A veil of
silence descended like a blanket 1
over the railway strike situation 1
today as both railroad heads and i
strike leaders turned hopeful eyes 1
toward the momentous develop- s
ments the new week was expected i
to bring forth. *
The bitterness which has mark
ed the progress of the walkout at j
times auring tne past two weeits, ?
seemed to have been succeeded by <
a pea-ce almost tapproching an un- \
derstanding. The hurling of verbal 1
challenges, claims and counter
claims, ulimatums and defiances, ]
apparently had ended through ex- t
haustion or the hope of an early ,
.agreement. ?
Railroad executives who declared l
their willingness last night to at- ?
tend any meeting called by the c
United States railroad labor board J
tuiifh a viow to a settle-1 <
ment 'that would not nullify, but i
would uphold and carry out the i
board's decisions," spent the holi- c
day away from their offices and in
seclusion. j
B. M. Jewell, leader of the strik- c
ing shopmen, visited his almost de- g
serted headquarters for a short v
'time only to run through his mail f
and telegrams. iHe read the railroad t
"executive's statement with a quiet r
grin, (but refused td comment m K. j
"There will 'be nothing over the 1
week-end," he said. t
<4T eotr o TlfAr/^ CAT1 Tint". A t
x van <j oaj u ??vi v*j wv??- ? ?
word," Ben Hooper, chairman of t
the labor board, sighed wearily, \
throwing his arm across the shoul- t
der of the reporter who had found g
him alone in the offices of the c
board. . I
Despite the silence of the lead
ers, with accompanying rumors of c
a tacit armistice or truce to allow c
fuller consideration of points t
Ant Hiirinc t.hp week at 4
conferences, hopes of an early set- f
tlement were expressed freely in c
. both railway and labor quarters,
although no tangible basis for j.
these expectations was given in any c
case. i
One of the factors most often t
quoted to justify a belief that the
drift was toward peace, despite the
failure last week of Mr. Hooper's
efforts to 'bring the labor leaders j
and the executives together, was
the statement of R. A. Henning,
general chairman of the federated \
shop crafts of the Northwest, that j
only the refusal of Eastern roads to r
agree to reinstate striking shop \
crafts workers with their full ?
seniority rights is preventing a j
settlement of the strike so far as f
MnrfcliiuMrf: rnQifs kro rftrw>?rjipH
The railroads throughout, it was c
declared have insisted that their j
men return to work as one of the f
first ?step3 toward peace, and the r
belief was expressed that the t
restoration of the rights sought e
would not alone be a great stumb- (
ling 'block. In this connection it was {
esserted that the roads had to a
Jars? extei^ stopped recruiting
men to replace strikers.
On the other questions at issue?
outside contracting for shop work, ;
modification of certain rules and {
working agreements, the establish- ,
ment of conciliation boards and
wages?it was declared that most
of the roads had already agreed to :
abolishing outside contracting as or
dered by the labor board and to es
tablishing early the conciliation
Hoards under the federal transpor
tation act. Thus, but two questions,
it was asserted, -were now at issue
?rules and wages both of which
might again be brought before the
labor board for decision on the de- ;
mand of the men for a rehearing. 1
BREAK COMES OVER CONFIS
CATED PROPERTY -DELE
(GATES APPARENTLY UN
ABLE TO GET TOGETHER
AGAIN AT THE HAGUE
The Haeue. July 15.?Both the
Russian and non-Russian delega
tions were sitting sadly on Scheve
ningen beach tonight, each delega
tion waiting for the other to make
>ome move which may resuscitate
'he expiring conference on Russian
ifFairs.
The Russians say they will not
ittend another sessions unless they
ire invited and the non-Russians
ay they are willing to meet with
the Russians if M. liitvinoff will
iring new proposals.
The British, Belgian, French and
[talian delegations all took a fling
?+ 'Rnlchovilc at the TJrolonSfed
session of the credit sub-commis
rion today in the course of which
tf. Litvinoff endeavored to place
entire responsibility for the failure
>f the conference upon the non
Jussians and charged that "the
:apitalistic press of the world join
with the capitalistic (governments
n defeating Russia's efforts to get
xedits for reconstruction."
From the beginning of the meet
ngs between the Bolshevik and tne
>n-Russians on June 26, the Rus
;ians have refused to say what they
voujd do about the restoration of
oreigners' property in Russia until
he non- Russians told them how
nuch credit they were willing to'J
fwtrtstes for Russian restoration.)
Phe non-Russians have insisted that
hey could not recommend the ex
ension of credits to Russia until
hey knew what the Russians
vould do about foreigners' proper
y and what guarantees would be
;iven for the safety of foreigners
lesiring to reenter the Russian
usiness field.
From beginning to the end the
lifferences have all centered about
:onfiscated property in Russia; all
he formulas of the experts have
ailed 'because the iBolsheviki stood
'ast on nationalization of property
>f foreigners and Russians alike.
M. Litvinoff said tonight that he
lad no late instructions from Mos
:ow and there is no disposition on
he part of the Russians apparently
o make any further proposals.
ARREST BANK CASHIER
'ohn W. Guy Charged With Embez
zlement at Statesville.
Statesville, N. July 15.?John
V. Guy, former cashier of the First
National bank of Statesville, was ar
ested here tonight charged with em
>ezzlement. He waived examination
ind gave bond of $25,000 for ap
>earance at the October term of the
ederal court.
Guy's arrest was said to have been
>rdered on the demand of the com
)any which had bonded him as an of
icial of the bank. Announcement was
nade Wednesday, followine examina
;i?n of the books by a national bank
sxaminer, that an apparent shortage
>f about $85,000 had been discover
ed.
DISTINGUISHED VISITORS
Mrs. R. F. Fleming of Ninety
Six and Miss Sarah Griffin cf
Houston, Texas, are in the city
spending several days with Mrs. H.
R. McAllister. Miss Griffin is the
daughter of the late Richard Grif
fin who lived in Greenwood and
manv vears aco surveved thp line
of the Greenville and Columbia
road. Miss Griffrn lived for many
years in Houston and is back now
for a visit to relatives and to re
new the friendships of years ago.
Mr. and Mr3. A. B. Cochran were
here Sunday to see Miss Griffin and
Monday was spent In Due West
with Mrs. Walker Edwards.
ABBEVILLE COUNTY GETS $1,
515.16 IN GAS TAX DISTRIBU
TION PAST THREE MONTHS.
OVER $108,000 GOES FOR ROAD
WORK ALL OVER STATE.
Columbia, July 16.?Charleston
county leads the entire state in the
amount to be received from the gaso
line tax for the first payment of the
year, this being for March, April and
May, sent out by Samuel T. Carter,
state treasurer. Charleston's share
was $9,306.91. McCormick tailed the
ticket with $756.36.
Treasurer Carter has sent checks
to all the counties for their share of
the first three months, this being 50
per cent, of the total collected, $216
901.57. The counties received $108,
448.56.
Under the law the tax of two
cents a gallon on gasoline is divided
50-50 between the counties and the
state, the amount to the counties to
be used exclusively for road purposes.
Each county gets a proportionate
share in the fund according to the
ratio of the collection in the county
to total in the state and the ratio
of the assessed value of the proper
ty in the county to the total assessed
value of the property of the state.
The tax so far has averaged about
$72,300 a month and at that rate
should bring in a total of a little
over $700,000 for this year. The law
went into effect March 1.
The amounts sent to the counties
of the upper part of the State are as
follows:
Abbeville ? $ 1,515.16
Anderson 5,382.31
Chester 2,230.34
Edgefield 1,125.24
Greenville . 6,924.15
Greenwood 2,639.40
Laurens 2,539.75
McCormick 756.36
Newberry 2,424.49
Spartanburg 7,906.28
REV. MR. McMURRAY PREACHES
In the Presbyterian Church Here To
Large Congregations.
Rev. John A. 'McMurray, pastor
of the Fayetteville (N. C.) Presby
terian church, who was recently
caneu iu mv pasuH'ttte uj uic iutai
Presbyterian church, was her? yes
terday and preached in the morn
ing and evening for the Presbyteri
ans. A large congregation listened
to him at each service.
Rev. Mr. McMurray is one of the
more prominent of the young min
isters of his church. He'was educa
ted at Davidson College, graduated
from the Columbia Theological
Seminary, and has done work at
the Princeton Seminary. Altogeth
er he is well fitted for his life work.
His sermon yesterday morning
was delivered in an easy and at
tractive manner. Its preparation
suggested thought and care. He
spoke earnestly and had the atten
ton of his congregation throughout.
Those who were fortunate enough
to hear him were more than pleased
with his discourse.
His hearers and the members of
the church here and the people of
the city generally are hoping that
he may find it consistent with his
duties to tdke up the work in Ab
beville.
MISS BLANCHE TARRANT
Miss Blanche Tarrant of Green
wood, District Agent of the Home
flnrnnnofritmr Wfirlf rPTlrPSAtltillff the
upper part of South Carolina, was In
the city for a few hours today as
sisting Mrs. Gibbons with plans for
the Shoi:t Coursp to be held at Due
West, July 26th through the 28th.
GONE TO HENDERSONVILLE .
Judge and Mrs. Frank B. Gary
left Saturday for HendersonvilLe
where they will spend sometime.
TWO HUNDRED MEN
TO GUARD MAIL!
riLnrtJiu i kj Alun inv/wjmu
OTHERS? FJRST REPORT J
OF SABOTAGE IN STAT1
' CAUSE ACTION BY FEDERAl
AUTHORITIES.
New York, July 16.?First re
ports of sabotage of railroads in th
New York district tdday caused fe<
eral authorities to deputize 201
guards for the mails and prepare t
arm 1,000 others.
United States marshals dn Ne^
York and northern New Jerse;
were authorized by Attorney Gen
pro] TinnorVi<vr++n 4'<rn ftQ fAT A
necessary" in keeping interstat
traffic moving. Reports of attempt
to damage locomotives on th
Lackawfanna and instances wher
whole freight trains were held u;
by slashed airbrake connection
spurred government officials to re
cruit deputies for strategic point
on all of the 11 mail carrying line
entering the city.
Fifty deputies were sent to Jet
sey City, where Erie road execu
tives demanded protection on th
plea that Mayor Hague was "intei
fering" with attempts to guar
railroad ,propfei|ty with privlati
police.
Tonight the situation was re
l . j 11 i j i..i
I porxeu weu in n?nu, hjui, ?auuvc
of the roads most senously threat
ened by the strike urged Unite
States marshals to have deputies 01
hand for any emergency.
A steady stream of deputie
passed through the examination
room at the federal building here
Each man accepted was put in uni
form and armed. Instruction, be
fore they entrained to go On duty
| were: "Remember yott are not sup
i posed to protect railroad propert;
all along the lines. Your jab is t<
see that United States mail and in
terstate trains are not interfere*
with."
ARRANGE ITINERARY
Third District Candidate* to Be Her
August the 5th.
Newberry, July 15.?A meeting o
the county chairman of the differen
counties of the Third congressiona
district was held at Greenwood Mon
day to arrange the itinerary for cam
paign meetings in this district. Onl;
two were present, County Chairma'
J. D. Wheeler representing Newbei
ry county and G. G. Dawling o
Greenwood. However, they hel
proxies from all the other countie
in the district and the following itin
erary was arranged:
Newberry court house, July 22
10:30 a. m.
Whitmire, July 22, 8:30 p. m.
McCormick, July 29, 3 p. m^
Ware Shoals, July 29, 8:30 p. m.
Greenwood court house, August J
10:30 a. m.
Abbeville, August 5, 3:30 p. m.
A_j A 19 9 .Qf? r> m
-tt-liuiirsuu, n. ug uoi xu, u .w f
Pickens, August 19, 3:30 p. m.
Walhalla, August 26, 3:30 p. m.
MECHANICS MEET HERE
The J?nior Order of the U. Am<
rioan Mechanics will meet in Abbe
ville August 8th at the invitation <3
the Chamber of Commerce. Ther
will be about 150 guests at th
meeting. It will be Impossible Sp
tfte addevine xiotei tu ?muiuu.v
date th^ number and it will ft
necessary to find homes for tfiei
over the city. If you are in positio
to take care of any number notif
T. M. Miller at the store of Mille
and Evarvs.
SEEING COLUMBIA
Mrs. W. A. Harris and daughte:
Salome, Misses Ruih Beeks an
Comer Phillips and Mr. Beckhai
motored to Columbia Saturdaj
Miss Beeks went on to Camden t
visit friends.
) SOVIET TO ACCEPT EUROPE'S
J INVITATION TO RESTATE THE
i CASE.?DELEGATES HOPE THE
CT A TPMPNT U/II I DC cno DC
NEWED NEGOTIATIONS
The Hague, July 16.?Soviet Rus.
sia will accept Europe's invitation to
restate its case. This information \^as
conveyed tonight to the Associated
Press by the Soviet spokesman.
Whether that restatement will result
in a revival of The Hague conference
nobody, least of all the Russian del
egates, dare predict.
Maxim Litvinoff, head of the
Soviets, has communicated with Mos
cow and Russia's answer to the com
munication sent to the Russian dele
ffofinn voq+iprHflv. which was virtuallv
a bid for new declarations from the
Russians, may be delayed until Mos.
cow has its say.
In the meantime further down the
storm-swept dunes of Scheveningen
the non-Russian delegates continued
their work of preparing reports of
the three subcommissions which will
show why they failed to reach an ac
cord with the Russian delegates on
the vital question of property, debts
and credits.
Whether these reports will be pre
sented and adopted at a final plenary
session Wednesday depends on the
nature of the Soviet answer, un this
Litvinoff, Krassin and Sokolnikoff
labored throughout Sunday.
"We hope," said the Soviet repre
sentatives, "that our new statement
will be deemed a basis for renewed
negotiations but that is for the non
Russian delegates to decide. We will
try to make our position clear."
Europe's attempt to resuscitate The
Hague conference is regarded here as
additional proof of the seriousness
of the general economic situation.
The Hague has become a sort of ba
rometer for Europe as a whole. The
experts assembled here have been in
structed by their home governments
to exhaust every possible means to
reach an accord, or the beginning
of an accord, with the Russians be
cause it is believed that any advance
made in the solution of the Russian
* * ?Mi a?St.?A- ? ~
t prODiem Will contnuute grtaujf tv a
,1 betterment of the economic situation
_ as a whole.
GONE TO FLORENCE
Dr. C. II. McMurray leaves today
for Florence where he will act on
the examining (board of the Phar
maceutical Association for a day
and then attend the meeting of
the Association which will be held
there Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday.
SEABOARD TRAINS
TO BE TAKEN OFF
Raleigh, N. C., July 15?Twelve
passenger trains on the Seaboard Air
Line will be discontinued Sunday on
account of shortage of coal and in
order to conserve motive p?wer t-o
protect United States mail and hand
ling off food stuffs and perishables
during the pnesent emergency," the
division passenger agent announced
,f today.
,ei The trains to be discontinued teni
e porari'.y are: Trains 19 and 20
,r between Raleigh and Weldon; trains
j_ 285 and 282 between Durham . and
,e Henderson; trains 486 and 487 be
n tween Dickerson and Oxford; trains
n 330 and 331 between Franklinton
y and Louisburg; trains 41 and 44 be
!r tween Raleigh and Hamlet; trains 31
and 34 between Wilmington and
Hamlet.
IS
IN THE MAYOR'S COURT
d Eight cases of gambling came up
n before the Mayor this morning and
j received fines of $10.00 each. Ose
o lease of disorderly conduct was fined(
$5.00.
COMMITTEE REJECTS
PROPOSAL BY FORD I
I # * 3
? *8
FAILURE TO ELIMINATE GORi ^
| GAS STEAM PLANT AND TO
REDUCE TENURE OF PRO
POSED LEASE FROM 100 TO
50 YEARS OBSTACLES.
Washington, July 16.?The een- .
ate committee on agriculture today
rejected the Henry Ford offer for .
Muscle Shoals by a voce of 9 to 7.
It refused to report the offer
with an amendment reducing the
proposed lease period from 100 to
50 years by a vote of 8 to 8. '
It refused to take up the govern
ment ownership till of Senator
Norris by a vote of 9 to 5.
As result each separate school of
thought will render its report ta
the senate and the battle will be
fought out in the open in the next
session of congress.
The Ford offer received eight of
21 votes in the house committee on
military affairs. It would hare re
ceived 13 or a majority of the
votes had the Gorgas steam plant
been eliminated from the list of
properties to be given Ford. The
offer would have been reported on ?
favorably by the senate committee
today had the proposed lease period
been reduced from 100 to 50 years.
The Gorgas steam plant is far re
move from Muscle Shoals, and in
the opinion of congress is not es- ,
sential to Ford as it is to industrial
rJ
Alabama. It Would foe contrary to
existing law were the government
to enter into a lease for a period
greater than 50 years. If , Ford
would amend his offer so as to
eliminate Gorgas and reduce the
lease period, it could be put
through congress.
That in the end he will do so is
confidently believed. This belief,"
which is becoming general, is based
on the knowledge that Ford is sin
cere in his desire to acquire the
property, build a new metropolis in -
Alalbama, give the South an aibun
dance of cheap, life giving fertili
zer and confer an actual boon on
humanity. It is not regarded as
possible that 'Ford, already enrich
ed beyond the dreams of avarice,
would permit such minor consider
ations to checkmate him in schemes
to uplift his more unfortunate
neighbors.
The fight in the committee today
was red hot and spectacular. Points
of order were made on every sug
I eestion and there were numerous
appeals from the decisions of the
chair. The conclusion reached,
however, represents the sense of
the committee when all its members
are present, and had, through a
technicality, Southern senators won
a victory it would have been an
nulled on the return of absentees.
As previously pointed out, the
Muscle Shoals fight could not have
been settled in committee. It Was
J predestined to constitute the issue
in a spectacular struggle to oe
staged in the open.
Senator Harrison of Mississippi
led the pro-Ford fight in committee
today ably seconded Ibjj Senator
Smith of South Carolina. Other
Democrats, Senators Heflin of Ala
bama, Rc^nsdell of Louisiana and
Caraway of Arkansas, supported
the leaders. One Democrat, Senator
Kendrick of Wyoning opposed
Ford.
COTTON MARKET.
Cotton brought 23 cents on the
local market today. Futures closed:
July ? 21.94
Oct. 21.99
Dec. 21.86
Jan. 21.60
March ? 21.25
Futures closed Saturday:
July
t)ct. 22.47
Dec. 22.33
^an. 22.00
March 21.90

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