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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, July 26, 1922, Image 1

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Abbeville Press and Banner
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly ~AbbeviIIe, S. C., Wednesday, July 26, 1922 Single Copies, Five Cents. . 78th Year;
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PUG BOARD
FACES HARD TASK
ARMY OFFICERS MUST BE RE
TIRED.?OFFICERS GREATLY
CONCERNED OVER PROBABLE
EFFECT WHOLESALE "SEPA
RATION" MAY HAVE.
Washington, July 25.?The board
of general officers appointed to under
take the most wholesale "plucking"
job ever initiated among the regular
army organization will enter at once
upon the duties to which it has been
assigned. The first meeting will be
held tomorrow with Maj. Gen. Joseph
T. Dickman, retired, presiding as
president. It was to have begun op
erations towards the elimination or
demotion of some 2,500 officers today
but was held up by the absence of
one member.
Members of the board, which is rep
resentative of all arms of the ser
vice, were greatly concerned in their
preliminary discussions today over
the probable effect upon the morale
of the army of the suspended sen
tence now hanging over the head of
11? /vflKrtA* in fha GOT
pra.cucai.iy eveiy vuiv? w vuv.
vice, with the exception of General
Pershing and a baker's dozen of sec
ond lieutenants now in the array.
Congress, in directing that the of
ficers' corps be reduced by January
1 to 12,000 did not include the gen
eral officers of the army in fixing the
number to be retained in each grade.
The war department, in preparing in
structions for the "plucking board,"
did include the general officers
in so far as retirement of any of the
major or brigadier generals for
physical disability would create va
cancies and permit the appointment
of colonels to general officer rank,
reducing the number of surplus colo
nels to that exten^
There appeared also to be much
concern among board members as to
the view army officers might take of
the board's action in recommending!
any officer for honorable discharge.
Preliminary investigation indicates
that probably more than 1,700 offic
ers now on the rolls must be "separa
ted" 'from the active service in this
way. The board, it is understood, will
seek by every means to impress upon
the army upon the general public the
view that discharge under these con-'
ditions in no way reflects upon the
character of the service a discharged
officer has rendered and that in a
majority of the cases at least, the
army would much prefer to retain
these officers' services.
Board members are understood to
feel that there is little prespect of
finding many officers now on the rolls
who merit discharge. The army re
cently cleaned house in this regard
on its own motion and the sugges
tion of General Pershing to congress
that the strength of the corps be fix
ed at 13,500 was based upon the
efforts then in progress to get rid of
unsuitable officers in the way con
gress previously had provided through
efficiency ratings and the "Class B"
ratings.
B. O. WILLIAMS HERE.
Mr. B. 0. Williams of Clemson
College who is in charge of the
^ Qntlfll P.Q^aIityO io 1T?
UUJTO TT VIA IVi MVWVU VM4 *u |t?
the city today assisting Mrs. Gibbons
the Home Demonstration Agent, with
arrangements for the short course at
Due West, Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday.
GEO. GAMBRELL TAKES CHARGE
George C. Gambrell of Green
?3 -C ??m i-w.1 tr Artnnn/i fori raifh f V* a
\YUUU, JUllUCliJ WUIKV,kk.U II1KU ?uv
Internal Revenue Department, took
charge of the Adair Department
Stores in Abbeville yesterday, and is
looking for his old friends to come
in and do business with him in his
new line. Mr .and Mrs. Gambrell ex
pect to move over from Greenwood
in a few days and will be at the home
of Mr. J. M. Gambrell until they
can get located.
INTO GALTEE AND KNOCK MEAL 1
DOWN MOUNTAINS?IT IS
THOUGHT WILL COMPEL IR
REGULARS TO MAKE STAND,
PERHAPS THE LAST.
London, July 25?Unconfirmed re
ports received in London today said i
the Irish irregular forces were re- 1
treating with all speed into the 1
Galtee and Knock Meal Down moun- i
tains, harassed by free state troops, 1
who are pressing them hard and pre- s
venting them from concentrating. 1
A Waterford dispatch to the Daily t
News says the irregulars have burned i
the barracks at Colmel and Tipper
ary, long held as garrison, and it be- ;
lieved that the national army forces ^
have occupied both these places. This
however, is not claimed in any offic- ,
ial report. ^
The Express correspondent says it ?
is believed the pressure being exert- (
ed by the national troops upon both j
flanks of the republicans will compel
them to make a stand, perhaps their
last, in these mountains, some of the
other correspondents, however, doubt C
j whether they will be able to make a
I stand anywhere, although they do not
draw the conclusion that an early end
of resistence can be expected. They|v
IbeHeve the republicans will continue
guerilla operations in the wildest 0
g
parts of the mountains. The possi
bility that the relating irregulars may ?
?
yet reach Cork and make a last .
desperate stand there is still enter- .
tained in some quarters. The various 1
views, however, obviously and large- ?
ly speculative, since none of them 1
can be verified except by the general
turn of events. s
Gain Fresh Victory. v
Dublin, July 25.?National army *
troops have gained a fresh victory in 1
west Ireland by Capturing Bally- c
heunis, counfyjMayo, from the repub- e
lican irrMrulars. it was announced c
! today. a
The Free State triumphs in the
capture of Limerick was swiftly fol
lowed by successes in the surround- ?
ing districts. A number of minor po- r
sitions in this area have been added t
to the list of Free State victories, r
according to today's official bulletin. r
The total number of casualties in
the Limerick fighting has not been
accurately estimated, although it is
known that at least fifteen of the na
tional troops were killed and 87 j
wounded. It is generally believed
that at least thirty of the irregulars .
lost their lives. The total number
of casualties suffered by Free State
forces during the capture of Water
ford was nine killed and nineteen
wounded.
SENATE REMOVES COTTON
BAGGINt FROM FREE LIST
Washington, July 25.?By a vote
of 31 to 17, the senate today ap
proved a committee amendment re
moving cotton bagging from the tar
iff free list and making it dutiable
at rates varying fr&m 6-10 3-10 cents
Two democrats Broussard of Louisi
ana and Kendrick of Wyoming, vot
ed for the amendment, and one re- i
publican, Borah of Idaho, voted a- i
gainst it. i
Previously the senate had rejected 1
35 to 18, an amendment by senator 1
Robinson, democrat, Arkansas, to re- 1
duce the rates to 1-10 to 1-20 res- 1
pectiyely. Senator Borah supported :
that amendment and senators Brous- ]
sard and Kendrick and Ransden,
democrats, Louisiana voted against
it.
DR. HAYDEN TO LECTURE.
Dr. A. H. Hayden, M. D. Epide
miologist of the State Board of
Health will lecture Thursday after- j
noon at Due West on Health and Ty- 1
phoid Fever. The lecture will begin
at 5 o'clock and last until 6. The i
public is invited to attend this lec- !
ture. . 1
CIVIL SERVICE
WITHOUT BIAS
|
REPORT MADE BY SPECIAL
COMMITTEE-MISTAKES MADE
ERRORS OF JUDGMENf. AND
NOT DUE TO WRONG INTENT.
MONTHS OF STUDY.
Washington, July 25?After spend
ng nearly three months in an inves
;igation of the subject a special com-!
nittee submitted a report to the sen-j
ite today declaring without founda
;ion charges that the federal civil
service commission had been biased
)y political influence in its examina
;ion and certification of postmaster
ipplicants.
The report said that while there
vere mistakes made in the certifica
;ion of candidates for the many
ilaces, the investigation it made
'would indicate that the mistakes
vere surprisingly few and that such
is may have been are due to errors
>f judgment and not to any wrong
ntent.
"Judged alone by the cases pre
lented," the report went on, "this
:ommittee believes that the work of
he commission was ably and con
cientiously performed and that po
itical influences have not been used,
>r if sought to be used, had had no
effect in examinations conducted un
ler the supervision of the commis
ion or in the making or altering of
.Tades. It believes also that the acts
if congress and executive orders giv
ng preference to former service men
n appointment to office under civil
ervice rules have been observed by
ts examiners." *
Further in absolving the commis-,
ion of blame, the report said, it J
vas believed that many of the con
roversies as to postmaster appoint
nents had arisen out of the rule re
[uiring the names of the three high
:st eligibles for appointment to be
ertified by the commission to the
ippointing power.
It added that there remained a
rrae question whether there would
lot have been less complaint had
hat rule been abrogated and the
lame of only the highest eligible sub
nitted.
DEATH OF A LITTLE GIRL.
Blanche, little daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. M. B. New of the city, died
ibout 4 o'clock Tuesday morning,
Tuly 25th, 1922 at the home of her
parents on Maple street. She was a
ittle over three years old and had
seen sick only a short time.
Funeral services were held this
norning at 11 o'clock by Rev. Wat
son Sorrow and interment was at
Melrose Cemetery. She is survived
>y the following brothers and sisters:
M. B. New, Floyd C. New, Albert H
Mew, Margie L. New, and Lula May
Mew, all of whom live in Abbeville.
Blanche was a sweet and attractive
:hild and will be greatly missed.
CAESAR'S HEAD PARTY.
A party of Abbeville folk leave
next Monday for a two week's jaunt
at Caesar's Head. This is a famous
resort and has a peculiar lure for one
who has ever watched the shadows
fall over the "dark corner", or the
Hiin wViifA rihhrm of smoke wind UD
from mountain recesses. The party
from Abbeville will be composed of
Mr. and Mrs. Townsend Smith, Mrs.
Bill Speed and little Elizabeth, Mr.
and Mrs. Claud Wilkinson, Mrs.
Otto Bristow, Ralph Syfan, Jim Cole
man and Robert H. Coleman.
WILLIAM GRAYDON SICK
William M. Graydon, son of Mr.
and Mrs. W. N. Graydon of Colum
bia, is reported very sick at the Bap
tist Hospital in Columbia. He had
an acute attack of appendicitis last
Sunday, but is considered improved
;oday.
COIN ACREAGE I
AND FERTILIZER I
REPORTS GATHERED BY GOV- I
ERNMENT?NORTH CAROLINA
WELL IN LEAD WITH OTHER
STATES FAR BEHIND?FIG
URES ARE GIVEN.
Washington, July 25.?Commercial
fertilizers was used on about 33 per
cent, of the cotton acreage this year
or on about 11,500,000 acres, ac
cording to reports gathered by the
United States department of agricul
ture. On these acres, 249 pounds of
fertilizer were applied per acre on
the average and the total fertilizer
used was about 1,429,000 tons with
an average value of $29.49 per ton,
a total value of S42.121.000 and an
average value of $$3.69 per ac:re.
North Carolina led all states in the
application of commercial fertilizer
to cotton production, having used
410 pounds per acre. North Carolina
was followed closely by Virginia, with
400 pounds per crop acre, but the
other states are far below, South
Carolina having used 280 pounds pe^
acre, Georgia 218 pounds, Alabama
210 pounds, Florida, Mississippi and
Tennessee each 200 pounds. Other
states used still less. Little com
mercial fertilizer is used west of the
Mississippi , river.
North Carolina also used com
moYtniol foffiliror nn tVio hicbest ner
? V
centage of cottbn crop acre?95 per p
cent. In Virginia, it was used on 95 ^
per cent, of the cotton crop area, in ^
South Carolina on 88 per cent., in &
Georgia on 83 per cent., in Florida p
on 80 per cent., in Alabama on 78 t
.per cent., in Mississippi on 30 per j
cent., in Tennessee 25 per cent., in g
Louisiana on 20 per cent. Arkansas ?
on 15 per cent, and in Texas *nly on r
20 per cent. , e
The cost of fertilizer per acre of
cotton using it, North Carolina again e
led with an average of $6.35. In
Virginia tne itveratte yei otic nas
$6.19, in South Carolina $4.12, in
Georgia $3.23, in Arkansas $3.02, in
Mississippi 2.95, in Alabama $2.92 in
Louisiana $2.85, in Texas $2.68, in
Florida $2.65 and in Tennessee $2.05
'Comparisons can not be made with
former years because this was the
first year this inquiry has been made
in its present form.
WASHINGTON BOYS.
Andrew White and his friend, Mr.
Brown, are here from Washing
ton, D. C. and will spend their va
cation at the home of Mrs. L. W.
White.
Andrew White has finished his law
course and is employed in the legal t
department of the government and j
is making his way along the road to c
success. c
Mr. Brown is from Missouri and (
has come South to be "shown" just }.
how hot it is and if it is an actual ^
fact that the prettiest girls in the t
world live in Abbeville. v
GETS THIRTY DAYS.
Abbeville County does not tolerate
roughs stuff. Magistrate McComb c
sent Curtis Perrin to the chain gang i
Tuesday for thirty days for carrying 3
a small revolver fastened to his belt. \
Curtis Perrin is a negro and worked t
with the Bowen and Hill road gang 3
on the Hodges road. He came to this c
part of the country several years ago z
with Hagenback & Wallace's circus, r
In thirty days he will realize this is c
not Texas, and William S. Hart
wouldn't stand a ghost of a chance in t
this town. c
LEAVING FOR CALIFORNIA.
Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Brown leave
tomorrow for Los Angeles, Califor
nia, to attend a meeting of the^
t
s
Knights of Pythias. Mr. Brown is tne f
Grand Keeper of Records and Seal of 5
j the order and the trip will be a fine I
one. They will be gone for over two 1
weeks, and will visit many places of I
interest while out West. t
JNDERWOOD DENIES I
;M OR COLLUSION
N DEFENSE OF CHEMICAL I
FOUNDATION?SAYS GERMAN
INTERESTS ARE SUPPORTING
ADMINISTRATION IN HOPES
OF Dr?TlTITTIOW
Washington, July 25.?The Chemi
al Foundation and its president, r
'rancis P. Garvan, former alien a
roperty custodian, who are being ti
roceeded against by the government r
or the return of German chemical c
atents, were defended in the senate t
oday by Senator Underwood, of x
ilabama, democratic leader, who i
riticLzed President Harding and the ,
dministration for the action taken s
gainst them. ^
Denying that there was fraud, col- 1
asion or conspiracy in the acquiai- \
ion of the German patents by the t
Jhemical Foundation, Senator Under- t
food also commended the record of f
L. Mitchell Palmer, former attor- i
iey general and former alien prop- j
rty custodian, in dealing with ene- s
ly alien property. German interests f
lenatoi Underwood said, were sup
porting the. administration's course
gainst the Chemical Foundation in ?
he hope, he said, of securing restitu- ;
ion of property and also damage l
laims for its use. ; ,, c
Senator Underwood's Statements i
^ere made during an address in sup- c
ort of his recent bill to create an i
imerican commission to press Amer- a
:an damage claims against Germany j
nd Austria, using enemy alien pro
erty, Senator Underwood said that *
he $250,000 paid by the Chemical I
'oundation in securing rights to the ?
,000 German chemical patents was s
adequate" when the government's s
ight to use the patents was consid- i
red. c
"This report said Mr. Underwood," ^
ffectually disposes of the charge that c
bere was a fraudulent conspiracy on 8
he part of those in the alien proper
y custodian's office who erected the 6
hemical foundation and sold these v
atents to it. The charge has been re- c
eatedly made that Mr. Garvan as i
lien property custodian sold these ^
stents to himself as president of the
hemical foundation. The entire plan t
levised and perfected before Mr. i
Jarvan became alien property custo- i
lian or had any thought of being ap- J
ointed to that office. The entire plan j
v&s devised and perfected while Mr. <
'aimer was alien property custodian.'i <
i t rue a tu a M <;r
' 1 VltJun. a ? a,
HAS OPERATION ON HAND i
Word was received in Abbeville i
his morning from Columbia that
ilr. J. T. Cheatham, Sr., had been <
perated on for some trouble on one .?
if his hands, and his son, Robert I
Cheatham, has gone down to be with ]
iim. His many friends over the coun
y will be sorry to hear that he con
inues to be bothered with this trou
>le.
Reap Rich Harvest in Coal.
Chicago, July 25.?The price of
:oal in large quantities in Chicago
;as jumped from $5.15 a ton to
>11.65 and $13 since the miners
vent on strike, while in small quan
ities the cost has increased from
>5.25 and $6 to $15.25 and $18, ac
:ording to figures given out today by
l large industrial concern which
anks among the largest users of
:oal in the middle west.
It was estimated by the concern
nnur orp nnlv 40.000 tons <
,iiav uiciv iiwi
if anthracite coal in Chicago.
WELL AGAIN.
John Klugh, who has been the vic
im of a prolonged spell of fever this <
ummer, is well again and was about *
lis accustomed work at Barksdale's 1
Saturday. Sunday he went over to <
Jnion and will spend some time with i
lis uncle, J. T. Bradley. Mr. Bradley, >
David Bradley and John made the >
rip through the country. J'
JNLESS SETTLEMENT IS REACH
ED?STEEL PLANTS TO CLOSE
ON WHOLESALE SCALE.?
WASHINGTON MAINTAINS SI
LENCE ON RAIL SITUATION.
Washington, July 25.?The Rail
oad Labor board remains the only
gency through which the govern
nent can and will deal with the rail
oad strike situation, though Presi
[ent Harding is continuing to hold
timself in contact with all actions
vhich the board takes in the matter,
t was said today at the white house.
The administration in the railroad
strike as in the coal controversy, it
*ras asserted, intends to proceed in
'airness to the interests involved and
vith the determination to maintain
he dignity and majesty of the Uni
;ed states government In accord
mce with this policy it believes that
ill labor controversies should be
ilaced before the labor board, the
lole authority under the acts of con
rress.
Chicago, July 25.?The railway
rtrike combined with the coal strike,
vas being brought home to the pub
ic today through the announcement
>f leaders in several industries that
inless a speedy settlement was reach
id closing of the plants with result
ng unemployment, rationing of fuel
ind food supplies, and a crippling of
>ublic utilities service would result.
Steel plants, especially in the east
vjll be closed on a wholesale scale if
>resent conditions continue tmtft'Au
rust, according to the head of a large
/ * iJ.
fm
; rS
. j i i i
xeei corporation, industrial coai was
aid to t>e unobtainable at any price
n New York. In Chicago increases
if from $5.25 to $15.25 in coal prices
rere announced. A shortage of coal
ars in bituminous fields has caused
in appreciable decline in production.
Official Washington still maintain
id silence on the rail situation but it
vas confidently expected that Presi
lent Harding would begin action to
=nd the shopmens strike during the
veek.
Hopes for immediate peace were
:entered in the meeting today of of
icials of the Baltimore and Ohio
with representatives of the strikers.
Success in settling differences on
;hat road probably would mean that
>ther roads would adopt a similar
;ourse, it is understood.
Further spread of the walkout was
considered unlikely since the an
innncpmpnt that the 10.000 members
)f the station agents union would re
main at work.
Existing embargoes on freight hav?
caused a shortage of commodities in
several cities and lack of transporta
tion has reduced the supply in a few
lines.
COTTON MARKET.
Cotton sold on the local market
today at 22 cents. Futures closed:
Oct. 21.20
Dec 21.08
Jan. _ - -? -- 20.94
March 20.89
Futures closed yesterday:
Oct 21.40
Dec. 21.39
Jan. ? 21.23
March 21.18
LANDS IN JAIL FOR STEALING
Clarence Prince is in jail f?r
stealing a bale of cotton from Asa
Sail, Jr. He was captured yesterday
;n Anderson County by Deputies
ei ? 1
r ergusun auu it mite.
i V VV V V V V S. V VVS
BASEBALL
Thursday and Friday
Abbeville Vs. Greenwood
Games start at 4:30
Stores Closed.
Prices - - 50 and 25 cents.
Akii

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