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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, July 28, 1922, Image 1

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Abbeville Press and Banner !
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Friday, July 28, 1922 Single Copies, Five Cents. 78th Year.
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5REAT BRITAIN
WILL PAY DEBTS
1EDDES AND BIRKENHEAD
SPEAK IN LONDON?LORD
HIGH CHANCELLOR DECLAR
t?c orrnon rvr yfars WILL
REMAIN CLEAN.
London, July 27.?Sir Auckland
reddes, British ambassador to the
Jiiited States, and Lord Birkenhead,
>rd high chancellor, took occasion
jday at the dinner of the English
peaking union in farewell to the
mbassador on his return to Wash
lgton, to reiterate and underscore
revious ministerial assurances of
le inviolability of the obligations of
*eat Britain of her debtors.
The lord high chancellor's refere
* - * AmB?i/>on finsn(>ial af
[ICC tU Aii^iu*nmci tvati
airs which he termed "a delicate
ibject," was the only materialistic
ote introduced in what otherwise
as a most felicitous exchange of ex
ressions of amity and good will be
veen "the two greatest English
leaking nations."
"When we look back upon our
mg history we find no occasion
here we ever failed to meet a bond
> which we had set our hand," Lord
irkenhead declared. "Honor and the
ability of the finance of this coun
y require that we should be ready
meet any proper and reasonable |
large which can properly and leg
lly be laid upon us.
"I only touch upon this delicate |
ibject because it is proper I should
ly plainiy for the understanding of i
le citizens of thi3 country and the:
nited States that we are today the j
lworthy legatees of those who for!
merations had charge of the se-j
irity and financial hegemony of the !
orld.
The lord chancellor's declarations
ew more applause than Sir Auck-1
nd's affirmations a few minutes lat-1
that far more Americans had a
:omprehensive view of Great Brit
In'o riTnWpms ATi/i conditions than!
ritons of Americans affairs." This
> attributed to the insufficiency of
sws of the American continent ca
ed to the British press. # j
The ambassador, tnroagh his resi
;nce in America or the reading of
swspapers, which he praised so high |
, displayed an extensive knowledge;
: American slang, which he used ap- j
opriately and handily throughout j
s address. He also illustrated what|
? termed "the unbelievable ignor
lce of Americans-existing in Great
ritain." by a number of amusing
lecdotes. mis ignorance, nowever,
i added, was not a one-sided affair,
id h? urged a campaign of educa
?n "to throw light into the dark
aces in the minds of citizens of the
iro countries to remove such colos
1 ignorance." In conclusion the am
issador said that at present so far
official relations were concerned
>thing could be more fortunate or
ippy than the relations between
ese two governments.
MR. JAMES ROCHE ILL
Friends of Mr. James Roche will
? sorry to hear that he is very sick
the home of his brother, P. A.
>die. Mr. Roche has been in frail
^alth for the past year, and has
^en seeking advice and change of
(innate for some time. He had in
Inded to go to Asheville Wednes
|iy but felt unable to make the trip.
has a general nervous break
|>wn, which is a hard thing to head
when it e-ets arood under way.
JULIA TELFORD IMPROVES
Julia, the young daughter of Rev.
d Mrs. G. M. Telford who has
en very sick with scarlet fever is
nsidered better today. She has a
tter pulse and her fever is lower
d those near her feel encouraged
er her condition.
Ernest Hanvey of Troy was in
ivn Thursday on business.
M'CUMBER MAKES
SERIOUS CHARGE
BLAMES NEWSPAPERS FOR RE- 1
PUBLICAN D EFEAT?DEMO
CRATS CALL FOR PROOF OF
REMARKABLE STATEMENT.?
DEMAND FOR DETAILS.
Washington. July 27.?Defeat of
the Republican party in 1912 was at- (
tributed today in the senate by t
Chairman McCumber of the finance 1
committee to the refusal of that com i
mittee three years previously to c
heed the demands of newspaper pub- (
lishers that news print paper be plac- I
led on the free list in the Payne^Al- i
jdrich tariff act. His declaration ?
brought demands from the Demo- i
cratic side for full details and was |
'followed by recitals by Senators '<
Watson of Indiana, Smoot of Utah ]
' 1 TtrVi i /"?Vl 1
isnu lucv^uiuucr ui iuvmcitvi9 wmavu
they said had taken place behind the ]
[scenes of congress a decade ago.
Senator Robinson (Democrat) of 1
Arkansas declared that if Senator t
jMcCumber's statement that the news c
(papers of the country, because they t
could not "intimidate" the finance *
committee into giving free news 1
print, had turned against the Repub- i
lican party and defeated it were true
it was "a terrible indictment against c
the press of the United States, the (
men who own it and the men who <
control its policies." Asserting that ^
he "could not accept it without first I
having "definite and complete" in
formation the Arkansas senator and i
later Senator Stanley of Kentucky t
demanded that Senator McCumber i
give the names of representatives of (
the publishers who had made threats i
I to the committee. 1
Stating that he wanted to give the ;
senate the "facts," Senator Smoot I
said the late John L. Norris, repre
senting the Newspaper Publishers' '
association, had appeared before a 1
finance committee of which Mr. *
Smoot was a member, had refused to c
compromise on the matter of a duty 1
on news print and had stated that if (
a duty were imposed 'the Republican *
party would be driven from power." J
The Utah senator said he supposed
this was the statement from which (
Senator McCumber had drawn his {
"conclusions" and added that he did '
not think Mr. Norris had been au- *
thorized by the publishers to make *
such a statement. 1
Senator Robinson said at the con
clusion of the recitals that the Re- *
publicans had been holding "an ex- ^
perience meeting?not a revival, (
but a confession," and, he added, 1
had failed to make out their case. 1
fJUNIOR ORDER MECHANICS
MEETS HERE AUGUST
First Meeting Will be Held Tuesday
Afternoon in Court House?150
to 200 Delegates Expected
The State Council of the Junior
Order of the United Mechanics will
meet in Abbeville Tuesday and
Wedaesday, August the 8th and 9th
at the Court House. The first meet
ing to be held at 1 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon. Between 150 and 200
delegates will be in attendance, and
it is desired to find homes for those
nonnnf V>o dccnmmnrfetcfl at the 1
hotels. Those in a position to take
any given number of delegates will <
notify T. M. Miller or J. S. Cochran ]
of the fact. Their entertainment will ]
be paid for.
The following program will be in !
order:
Address of Welcome from the
City by Mayor Mars. I
Address of Welcome from the
Chamber of Commerce by Hon. J. M. ,
Nickles.
AHHress of Welcome from the
public by Hon. J. Howard Moore. I1
A Response will be made by Dr.
S. F. Killingsworth, State Council- <
lor of Columbia.
Two addresses will be made on
"The Objects and Aims of the Or
der" by A. B. Langley of Columbia,
and Rev. L. W. Blackwelder, State 1
Vice Councillor, of Union. <!
[
DENIES THAT DISABLED VET
ERANS ARE NEGLECTED.?
PRESIDENT'S PERSONAL PHY
SICIAN SAYS HE CAN NOT BE
STAMPEDED OR CAJOLED.
Washington, July 27?Replying to
:harges that as chief coordinator of
;he federal board of hospitalization
le had delayed and obstructed the
mvernment's Droeram for care of
lisabled war veterans, Brigadier
General Sawyer, President Harding's
jersonal physician, in a formal state
nent today declared "facts certainly
ihow that the United States govern
nent is doing every consistent thing
jossible for the disabled veterans;
ind for the length of time at its dis
josal everything has been achieved
vhich human agency could accom
>lish."
General Sawyer's statement was in
eply to the charge made public yes
:erday in Chicago by A. A. Sprague
ihairman of the national rehabilita
;ion committee of the American Lea
jion that the president's physician
vas standing in the way of hospital
zation work.
In his statement General Sawyer
leclared that "it is the determination
>f the administration to give to th?
iisabled World war veterans the
rery best of hospital service that can
jossibly be provided."
"It should be my constant effort
tnd my policy," the statement con
;inued, "to proceed with reason, ef
iciency and economy in carrying
>ut such of its affairs as come to the
ittention of the federal board of
lospitalization. From this position I
vill not be forced, cajoled or stam
jeded."
Declaring that the American pub
ic should know the hospital situation
is it really exists at the present time
General Sawyer said it could then be
letermined whether the government
s making efforts to take care of its
iisabled war veterans and whether
;he charges by Mr. Sprague were
ust.
"At present under government
:ontrol and operation,' his statement
:ontinued, "there are in the United
States of America 99 government
lospitals with a capacity of 28,413
>eds, 10,191 of which are at the
jreeent time unoccupied.
"When the hospitalization plan of
;he government for the care of the
former service men shall have been
:ompleted as now contemplated
md which is being hurried to early
:ompletion?it will represent in all
>f the departments a total expendi
:ure of approximately $800,000,000'
McCALLA BROS. GET CONTRACT
To Build Road from Due West Via
Ashley Store to Kay Place.
At a meeting of the Highway Com
mission held in the Court House $fes
;erday the road from Due Wesfc^by
;vay of Ashley's Store and Keowee
:hurch to the Kay place, a distance
jf about nine miles, was let to Mc
Calla Brothers of Lowndesville for
?22,196.99.
The following were the contrac
tors bidding on the work:
Johnson Construction Co., Sen
eca, $26,553.56; M. T. Holder and
B. A. Havird, Newberry, $25,463.28;
H. W. Garrison, Easley, $27,619.97;
I. M. H. Ashley, Honea Path, $22,
289.84; McSalla Brothers, Lowndes
ville, $22,196.99; R. P. Kyle, Abbe
ville, $23,585.78; C. R. Willard &
Son, Spartanburg, $23,332.95.
J. M. H. Ashley of Honea Path
ivas second lowest bidder and C. R.
IVilliard & Son of Spartanburg:, was|
V?
third lowest bidder. jn
The following members of the M
commission were present: Messrs. J. Tl
R. Lomax, J. A. Gilliam, R. L. Bar- ^
p,
more, Joseph Hicks, S. J. Wakefield, ^
Dr. Kirkpatrick, J. Claud Ashley, Dr
G. A. Neuffer, L. W. Keller and J. S. ^
Stark. ' Jc
\THER IN NEW YORK TO CON- 1
SIDER PLAN FOR SETTLING
STRIKE, BUT "NO DEFINITE
BASIS" FOR AGREEMENT HAS
BEEN FOUND.
Washington, July 27.?A meeting
executives 01 ine i?o majur tan- ?
ads of the United States will be 1
lied in New York next Tuesday to
nsider a plan for settling the strike i
w in progress, T. DeWitt Cuyler, 1
airman of the Association of Rail- i
ty Executives, announced tonight i
ter a conference with President i
irding. <
Mr. Cuyler added, however, that 1
iO definite basis" for a strike set- (
sment was ready to be placed be- <
re the meeting. His conference
th the president tonight, he said, i
d been devoted to a general sur- ]
y of the "situation. ' J
While Mr. Cuyler was positive in <
3 statement that the basis for the i
oposed settlement of the strike 1
d not been definitely drawn up, i
rlier reports indicated that at least 1
tentative Dlan had resulted from | -
e conferences held daring the day i
tween President Harding and lead- '
s of the various railroad's labor <
oups. 1
President Harding has made no 1
ecific request to the railroad exe- i
tives, Mr. Cuyler said when asked ]
the question of seniority rights had <
en brought forward at the confer- 1
ce with a view to influencing some 1
ilroads to reconsider their stand i
;ainst returning these rights to
riking shopmen.
The executives' chairman said he
is unable to foretell whether action
the strike situation would be held
abeyance until the New York
eeting. The four day deh.y was ne
ssary, he explained, in order that
presentatives of railroad manage
ents might all get to the meeting J <
ace. <
Tentative proposals for the settle- 1
ant of the railroad shopmen's strike i
?re drawn up today after a series i
conferences between President '
jrding and labor leaders headed by i
M. Jewell of the shopmen's union. 1
It was understood that the suggest 1
plan for settlement?details of j
lich were withheld by those partic- '
ating in its formulation?would be '
bmitted later to executives of the
ilroads. 1
The settlement proposals appar
tly had reference to the seniority 1
>ue, which it was generally agreed :
is the sole remaining bar to con- i
asion of the railroad war?or at
ast of an armistice in the struggle.
CONDITION OF BANKS
iven in Statement by Bank Exam- -
iner Bradley.
Columbia, July 27.?Total re
urces of state banks amounted to
.49,048,997.21 at the close of busi
iss June 30, according to the called
atement of the condition of all
mks as of the close of business on i
is date. The statement giving the
sources and liabilities of the 372
ate banks, 16 branches and pri
ite banks was issued yesterday by
W. Bradley, state bank examiner.
The total capital stock of the
inks is $17,299,811.16 and the in
vidual deposits subject to check
tal $44,650,890.63. The savings
sposits amount to $36,399,951.60.
OUT IN FULL. FORCE.
Abbeville was present with a
rong delegation at the meeting of
e District Bible Society at Green
tie church Wednesday, the follow
g being in attendance: Mr. and
rs. J. C. Thomson, and Mrs. Lucy
tiomson, Mr. and Mrs Alf Lyon, Mrs
'. F. Nickles, Richard Sondley, Roy
>wer, R. B. Cheatham, Mrs. Joe T.
vans, Rev. C. E. Peele, W. M. Barn
ell, Mrs E. R Thomson, Fred Cason,
. B. Morse, J. L. Hill and Judge
ines Fi, Miller.
GOOD?TOO WARM AND DR
IN WEST AND EXCESSIV
RAINS IN SOUTH?SOME FE\
EXCEPTION.
Washington, July 27.?Summar
)f weather and crop conditions fc
;he week ending July 25:
The last week was another rathe
favorable one for cotton. Temperi
;ures were normal generally, exce]
ibove the seasonal average in tl
irocfnrn nnrfiATl ftf fVlP Hplt!. TVlPI
was too much rain in some Atlant
Soast sections, 'but it was too dry i
the western part of the belt. Shoii
;rs were mostly light to moderal
?lsewhere.
Cotton made very good progrei
n the Carolinas, except in eastei
portions where it was too wet Pro]
ress continued mostly very good i
Georgia and considerable improv
ment is reported from Alabama. Co
toi made very good progress gene
illy in Mississippi, Tennessee, A
kansas except fair in northeastei
Arkansas where there was rather t(
much rain. Dry weather is becomir
unfavorable in Texas and Oklahom
especially in western Oklahoma ar
to late planted cotton in Texas, a
though progress in those states wj
mostly fair to very good. High ter
peratures and dry weather were fa
orable in checking weevil in the we
tern part of the belt, but cloudy, w
weather favored increase in tl
more eastern portion.
ACCEPTS CALL TO
PRESBYTERIAN CHURC
Rer. John A. McMurray to Becon
Pastor of Presbyterian Chuch
Take up Work Sept. 1st.
Rev. John A. McMurray has a
cepted the call to the Presbyteris
church at this place and will raoi
to Abbeville with his family in tl
near future. Mr. McMurray was boi
in Corsicana, Texas, but spent h
boyhood days near York, S. C. E
is the son of Rev. John A. McMum
tvho was for many years pastor <
different churches of the Southei
Presbyterian Church, and for a lor
time was a trustee of Davidson Co
lege.
Rev. Mr. McMurray was u clas
mate of Joel S. Morse of the cit
having graduated from Davidsc
College in 1909, and afterwari
from the Columbia Theological Sem
nary. One of his first pastorates wi
Bethesda, of which the late Dr.
Lowrie Wilson was pastor bef-oi
coming to Abbeville From Bet
esda Mr. McMurray went to Princ
ton and took a post-graduate cours
He then accepted a call to the Hig
land Memorial church at Fayett
ville, N. C., where he has been fi
the past five years.
MV M/>lWnrrav married Mi
Beaufort Brand of Sumter and thi
have one little daughter, who is
bout eight years old.
The Presbyterians are delighted wi
the acceptance of Mr. McMurra
and feel sure they will have in hi
the pastor they hive wanted, esp
cially as he comes to Abbeville re
ommended by such men as Dr. Ree
of Columbia, Dr. Thornton Whalii
of Louisvile, Ky., and Dr. F. \
Gregg of Rock Hill.
The other churches of the city ar
the public at large extend to Re
Mr. McMurray and his family a co
dial welcome.
J. C. MILLER SUFFERS STROK
J. Chauncey Miller of Columb
suffered a stroke of paralysis ye
terday at his home in Columbia ar
is in a very serious condition. D
and Mrs. J. E. Pressly have goi
down to be with him.
T. J. Anderson of Greenwood w<
in Abbeville yesterday on busine
arid to see the ball game.
TO BE REPORTED UNFAVORA
BLY BY COMMITTEE?SOUTH
CAROLINA SENATOR WOULD
SECURE RECORD VOTE ON SEN
ATE FLOOR.
Washington, July 27.?The senate
committee on agriculture determin
ed formally today to report amend
ments to the cotton futures act, pro
posed by Senator Dial of South Car
olina, unfavorably.
The committee is composed of sen
ators thought to be partial to the cot
ton producers of the country. The
amendments, according to Senator
Dial, were designed further to re
strict cotton exchanges in their op
portunity to prey upon the produc
ers. It was his contention that the
amendments would give purchasers
of exchanges an even break, whereas
now exchanges can deliver to pur
chasers any one of ten tenderable
grades.
The determination of the commit
tee was reached by consent but not
by a record vote. The remarkable
feature connected with the commit
tee's action was the granting of the
request of Senator Ransdell of Louis
iana that he be permitted to prepare
the report. Senator Ransdell, in re
pect to the Dial amendments, moves
openly and admittedly in behalf of
the cotton exchanges of New Or
leans which, he declares, would be
ruinously affected were the Dial
amendments to prevail.
The Dial amendments greir from
similar amendments proposed two
years ago by B. B. Comer, then a
senator from Alabama. The Comer
amendments were put through the
senate practically unanimously, the
only opponent having been Senator
Ransflell. At that time, and since, up
to.the present moment, cotton fac
tors and cotton exchanges have
fought the effort further to control
thpir nnprnHnns
On the committee on agriculture
are some of those Southern senators
who repeatedly declare themselves
the particular friends of the cotton
producer. Among them are Senator
Smith of South Carolina, Senator
Heflin of Alabama, who has express
ed in speeches willingness to "cut off
the heads of the exchanges;" Senator
Caraway of Arkansas, who has a
bill providing for the abolition of the
exchanges and Senator Harrison of
Mississippi. With the exception of
Senator Ransdell no member of the
committee has openly declared him
self opposed to the Dial amendments
As the action of the committee was
ordered without record vote, no oth
er senator has yet declared opposi
tion.
Senator Dial said tonight, however
that all of them would be put on
record. ^
DEATH OF MISS IRENE McCAIN
News was received in Abbeville
this morning of the death of Miss
Irene McCain, daughter of Dr. J. I.
McCain and Mrs. McCain of Due.
Miss McCain has been, for several
years, a Missionary in China. She
returned home sometime ago on ac
count ?f sickness and since that
time has been in a hospital in a
northern city. Lately she is under
l(* stood to have had more serious trou
v' ble which accounts for her death,
r
THE COTTON MARKET
;?
E Cotton brought 22 1-4 cents on
the local market today while futures
ia
closed:
s
Oct. __ _ __
21.47
ld
Dec. ? _ ?
21.40
r.
Jan. __ _
21.28
le
March
21.27
Futures closed yesterday: <
Oct. ? 21.2G
as Dec. 21.22
as Jan. - 21.08
March 21.05

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