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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, October 11, 1922, Image 2

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Established 1S44.
THE PRESS AND BANNER
ABBEVILLE, S. C.
The Press and Banner Company
Published Tri-Weekly
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, j
?
Entered as second-class matter at
post office in Abbeville, S. C. - I
Term* of Subscription:
One Year $2.00 j
^ Six Months $1.00 J
Three Months .50!
- - - ? ? ? ? nrimTAV1 I
AMUiKlUAXV .TKJLiijS ASSUOi-* HWI> |
Foreign Advertising Representative jj
|~. ______ : I
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 10221
CHEAP COTTON.
fe>" I '
Not only to show that the minds of j.
great men run together, as may be 1
evidenced by a reading of the edi-J'
torial in this paper of Monday last j(
and the following editorial from the j
; Manufacturers Record, but to let
the readers of this paper know just
what one of the most thoughtful.
writers in this country thinks, and
what one of the closest observers
sees, we reproduce what the editor
of the Record says on the above
subject:
"Randall N. Durfee, a New England
spinner and a prominent mem!
V *>er of the National Cotton Manu-j
f acturera' Association, has written an j
article for the New York Journal of;
1 f
Commerce almost every pararaph of
which begins with the dictum 'cotton r
should be cheap.' It should be cheap, v
says Mr. Durfee, because it is a prime c
necessity, because it furnishes cloth- s
ytig for the poor man, because mil- a
: Jions of workers are dependent on j
.it for a livelihood, because 'only in,*
times of cheap cotton does the manu- ^
facturer secure a reasonable profit1
+
on the capital invested/ etc., etc. We(
ought to strive to produce as cheap-jr
ly as possible, says Mr. Durfee, -in- jt
etead of curtailing production. He:8
thinks that the cotton-producing sec- *
' *.tions are capable of producing large!
enough crops to make cotton cheap. I *
As these arguments, however, appear;0
by themselves to be a little too 'raw'! j]
it should be stated that Mr. Durfee J
also contends that 'by cheap cotton is: ?
not meant a price which does noti**
snow a pront to tne producer, ah |
r.-v* interests handling cotton are entitled
to a reasonable profit, but the producer
is not entitled to charge 20
cents for cotton costing 10 cents,e
any more than the manufacturer is!G
entitled to charge ?1 for the finished
'cloth costing 50 cents." K
Fcrhaps Mr. Durfee thinks cotton ;e
labor--is inefficient and unprogres-jt
\ sive. It is. Five-cent cotton had a o
y*1 t ' I
way of closing schools, dressing la-j?
bor in rags, housing it in hovels and, s
prohibiting the construction of i
churches. It made the slavery of pre- I
J-iUicuin aays itjjpem 111 tviupaiiaun .t
i as somg 50rv of heaven. It degraded jv
even the negro. It ffw'tUfd the deftihj
lists, apotheosized ignorance, pauperized
whole sections. Before the
pivil War there had been negro
slavery in the South. After the Civil ^
2
War, the cheap cotton advocates uni
dertook a new enslavement of the
v ,
whole South, white and black.
"There is and can be no such i *
thing as cotton production at ten!!
cents the pound, under boll weevil j1
conditions, and nobody knows it better
than doof; Mr. Durfee. And no- j
body knows better than he does that
if production of cotton at ten cents j
the pound were possible it would be j
possible only by sweating blood out j
of American citizens and giving them!
in return not even a proper food.
supply. Mr. Durfee knows that, or>
ought to know it. Nay, more; he j
knows that that a price of twenty j
cents for cotton, now, is an infam- j
ous price?havoc-making. To defend i
it is equivalent to defending the j
march of an invading army through j
the South, spreading destruction at;
every turn.
"The maintenance of American
dominance in cotton production is j
desirable, highly desirable, provided j
profit also is maintained, but not 1
otherwise. Philanthropy is carried to
an extreme if the Southern farmer
is to go on indefinitely producing
cotton at a loss. None more than the
farmer laments the necessity for'
acreage reduction, but Mr. Durfee J
knows, or ought to know, that the]
only way in which the boll weevil j
can be fought at $11 successfully is
by intensive cultivation, and intensive
cultivation requires concentration
of available labor on smaller,
not larger, acreage. Doubling the
acreage might actually reduce th(
size of the total crop.
"No cotton is cheap that degrade;
millions. No cotton is cheap that i:
paid for by the misery and ignoranc<
of blacks and whites. No cotton i:
cheap that reduces whole popula
tions to the condition of Indian serfs
But if Mr. Durfee and his associate;
so intent on profits for themselves
would work for cotton prices thai
carried with them something: like i
living wage for the producers, out 01
the prosperity resulting the Soutl
unquestionably, we think, migh
through educational processes, etc.
gradually achieve a greater efficiency
which would correspondingly reduc<
production costs. 'Distress cotton,
however, is not a national asset; i1
is a national liability.
"It is true that foreigners ar<
making stupendous efforts to estab
lish cotton production in their owr
:olonies. Maybe Mr. Durfee has noted
that they are doing it by guaranteeing
nrices. which is the eauivalent
af guaranteeing profits. They are not
worried so muc|i about price as they
ire about supply. If more production
s what Mr. Durfee wants, he may
je able to get it by guaranteeing
prices also. We do not doubt that
lundreds of planters would be quite
villing to contract to produce cottoh
'or him at cost plus a reasonable
jrofit. The trouble with many men
>f Mr. Durfee's type, however, is
lot that they want cotton at a fair
irice, but that they want cotton at
in unfair price. They want it at less
han cost. Indeed, a little less selfishness
and a little more conscience
vould be good for more than one
lepresser of cotton prices. Moral reponsibility!
The boll weevil may be,
is some negroes think, a visitation
rom the Almighty in protest against
he conditions under which cotton
las been produced.
"The development of the co-operaive
selling plan in the South is so
apid that many look forward to the
ime when the price will be fixed as
tbsolutely, year by year, as is the
>rice of steel. Cotton then will be
cheap.' It will be 'cheap' in the sense
hat it will be sold for actual cost
if production, plus a reasonable proit.
But the kind of cheap cotton Mr.
)urfee seems to vision will, we trust,
lever again be seen in the United
Itates."
FORESTRY CONFERENCE
Columbia* Oct. 10.?The confernce
on forestry, recently called by
Jcvemor Harvey, to consider possile
legislative plans by which South
)erolina can match the federal govrnment
with funds for reforestaion,
will meet here tomorrow at 1
'clock. Delegates from every part
f the State?those interested in the
ubject?have been appointed and
nvited by the Governor to attend,
tepresentatives of the federal delartment
of the interior, forestry diision
will be present.
MINSTREL SHOW.
The Comrade club assisted by
;he girl scouts, will give a Minist el
Show at the Community House
"riday night, for the entertainment
md pleasure, of their friends.' A
?ood time is promised for specialty
*/vf-C7 on/l rryrm-n A TnmKlintr 8VP fin
the program.
LOSES FINE COW
Robers Ellis of Cold Springs,
says he is having lots of bad luck,
He lost a fine milk cow about s
week ago, and this week a mule ant
another milk co'.v. This is bad or
the stock, but light 0:1s the "feec
bill."
GETTING RICH
H. D. Reese of Biloxi, Miss i:
here for a few days visit to his soi
He says that he is enjoying goo<
health in his present homo and i:
getting rich off of fish, oysters an<
Yankee tourists.
CALL CONVOCATION
There will be a Call Convocatio:
of Hesperian Chapter No. 17 R. A
M. Friday night, Oct. 13, 1922, a
7:30 p. m. sharp. The Mark Master
Degree will be conferred upon car
didates.
F. E. Harrison, Jr. H. P.
H. S. Howie, Secreary.
Flowers for all occasions at W. J
Harris', Agent for Fant's Greet
house, Anderson, S. C. High Clai
funeral flowers a specialty. ad'
I
i DROWNED CHILDREN
IN BATH TUB AT HOME j
- I
s ' Father Then Blows Out His Own
?] Brains.?Despondency Over
s| Being Out of Work.
i
. Rochester, N. Y. Oct. 10*?The
; bodies of a father and his three
, j children today lay side by side in
tjan undertaking establishment, vici
i tims of a tragedy last night. The
f: children, Evelyn, 5, Grace, 2, and
i | Russell 6 months, were drowned in
t j a bath tub at their home? by the
, j father, William E. Wheeler, who
,1 then fired a bullet into his brain.
; j Despondency because of inability to J
' J obtain employment was responsible
tjfor the crime, police said, Mrs.
I * j.* 1 j..
W neeier uiscuvereu me txascuy |
: ter the returned home from church. j
- A note protruding from 'beneath j
i the bathroom door told of the act jj
of her husband and gave instruc- j
tions as to the disposition of his j
; body and the furniture in the house j
; It read in part. "Dear
Milly: It had to come at j
last, I can see no other way out.
Pay up every bill, That's what I |
did it for. I'm taking the kiddies g
with me so you and no one else can g
say that I left them a burden on g
you. If I were to hang on longer it g
would be the same old story. g
Mrs. Wheeler told police that her g
husband appeared to be in excellent j
?nirnta bVio lo-ffc -fnr phiiivh.
"r",*"v" vmv
Tho children were found clasped
in each other's arms on the bottom
of the tub which Was half filled
with water. The father hung over
the edge of the tub, still clutching
the pistol with -which he killed himself.
\
L \ \ V V V V V V V ^
V V
v. LOOK HERE! V
V Why is there one Divorce in V
V every eight Marriages? V
V Why cannot every marriage V
V be perfect? V.
V For the answer see V
V 1 "S I S T E R S" V
V Opera House?FRIDAY V
V 15c Admission 30c. .V
VVWV WWW WW I
\
| Now is th
|j> DRY
36 inch Heavy Sheeting .
40 inch Sheeting
Checked and Plaid Homei
Calico, light and dark
Heavy Outing, prices
Heavy Cheviots
Dress Ginghams
Apron Ginghams
20c Dress Ginghams at ..
w Amoskeags 32 inch Dress
sjjjj Heavy Cotton Flannel pr
WOOLEN DRESS
36 inch Serge ...
fei 36 inch Wool Serge
I $1.00 Wool Serges in all
$1.50, 54 inch all Wool S<
36 inch Silk Messalin-e, e>
, ' $3.00 Blankets at
I $3.50 and $4.00 Blankets j
$5.00 Blankets at ....
$(i.50 Blankets at
$8.00 Blankets at
$10.00 Blankets at
$3.00 White Bod Spreads
$2.00 White Bed Spread
SWE
COMPLETE ASSORTM1
Men's Sweaters prices f
Boys' Sweaters, prices f
Miasms Sweaters. wrices
5 || Ladies' all Wool Swoatei
! M MEN'S AND YOU
3 gH $15.00 Moil's Suits at ....
H $25.00 Men's Suits at ....
^ $35.00 Moil's Suits at ...
$25 Men's Suits in coat
jjga made up well and goim
n J $18.00 Men's Overcoats ,
|| $15.00 Men's Overcoats
t lion's Kain uoats rrom
s h| boy:
iKg
Boys' Suits in all sizes J
n Boys' Knee Pants in all
g D. P(
uaiacuacj nnocicuacicu
^snQnaoDnoDnia
[ Styl
I anC
! Stylef
j
I i You haven't a bit o
; without style. It d<
' 1 1
: nave a crupper axs
I way your mind tun
} STYLEPLUS CLC
things you must ha
I and real tailoring.
| them to you and le
I tion.
j
I We carry a fine i
I suggest that you
i Styleplu:
I .1
i Glomes
J .. OTHER GOOI
I PARK
i
izniaiiUiUEmanjziii^
m tima tn nrof hi
IV U11IC IU KU U
"> . **
t busy; we are re
GOODS
... ; ...... 10c yd.
15c yd.
spun 12 l-2c yd.
10c yd.
12 l-2c, 15c an d20c yd.
20c at 15c, 25c at 20c yd.
10c yard
10c and 15c yd.
15c yd.
Ginghams at 25c yd.
ice from 20c to 25c yd.
3LIAK0
GOODS AND SILK
. 25c yd.
50c yd.
colors 75c yd.
^rge $1.25 yd.
[tra tfood quality at $1.35 yd. j
LANKETS
$1.08 por prii- 1
at $2.98 per pair j
$3.50 per pair '
. $4.50 por pair
$5.50 per pair
$6.50 per pair
I at ; $1.98
s at $1.25
:aters
ENT AT LOWEST PRICES
rom 98c to $2.00
rom 9Sc to $3.50
from $1.25 to $3.50
s in all colors prices from
$1.48 to $4.50
NG MEN'S CLpTHING
$12.50
$19.00
.. $25.00
and pants in all-wool goods,
> as long as they last at $17.50
at $15.00
at $10.00
$3.50 to $G.00
S* SUITS.
From $1.98 to $10.00
sizes from 75c to $2.50
BBBBIllfiti ,
^ ??Sm*' \ ^ ^ [l %
f use for a Suit of Clothes or an Overcoat S
on't need to be noisy or jazzy but just : f
tinction or quiet character which ever |
)THES have the style you want, plus the j J.ve
to keep the .style?all-wool fabrics * It <
We want to have the pleasure of showing j 1
t you try them on for your own satisfac-.. J J
issortment tor men ana young men. w e n
come soon while the line is complete. ST
$25 and $30 I
) SUITS .. . .. $18.00; $20.00; $22.50 Wf
FR & RF.RSF. I
ig values for your money 8
< ii
B'
:ady with the goods K;
j^Kr i,.
MEN'S ODD PANTS B> f
$3.50 Men's Pants at " $2.50 a pair
$5.00 Men's Pants at $3.50 a pair ' B 1
$7.50 Men's Pants at $5.00 a pair ? H
$9.00 Men's Pants at $6.50 a pair 9 9
$2.50 Men's Paiits at $1.98 a pair B I
Men's and Boys' Dress Shirts from 75c to $1.50 51 a
Men's and Boys' Work Shirts froin 48c to $1.00 ' B|- ; 8
UNDERWEAR ... B I
Men's heavy Fleece lined Undershirts and Drawers B< I
Men's Ribbed Undershirts and Drawers, best grade \ KB
at 75c each ra I
Men's "Haynes" Unionsuits at. $1.50 suit ||9 fi
Ladies' Underwear price from .... 48c to $1.00 garment i| fl
LADIES* COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 8 I
Ladies and Misses Long Coats, from .... $4.50 to $15 B B
Ladies Serge & Plaid Skirts from $2.50 to $6.00 B
-r t ? rt-n? r? v., >./%+nn/1 rim-nr* rln ("111Ino Waists B-" I
.Lacnes L/oiiun ui*ui gCLLC UUU Vi vjyv V.v . price
from 75c to $.1.50 ug "J
Lades' Petticoats, price from 98c to $1.50 ^ I
SHOES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
Men's solid leather work shoes from.... $2.50 to $3.50 j&j I
Boys' solid leather work & dress Shoes price from W u
"Beacon Shoes" for Men $5.00 is I
j Men's Dress Shoes price from : $2.50 to $5.00 fl
! Ladies' and Misses Shoes price from .... $1.50 to $4.50 |I m
! Women's solid leather work shoes from $2.50 to $3.00 I
| Infants' Slioes price from 98c to $1.50 |j| B
' rp i- f?v, $5.00 to $10.00 g|
| 1 i ilUlll
j Suit Cases from 98c to $5.50 jgg B
LADIES' AND MISSES NEW FALL HATS || I
I Ladies' Hats from 98c to $3.50 11 I
j $3.00 Ladies' House Dresses at $1.98
HOSIERY H H
j Ladies' and Men's Hose from 10c to $1.00 a pair H 5
j Children's Hose from 10c to 50c a pair B I
j 5-4 Fancy and White table oil cloth at 28c a yard B m
I Table Damask, price from 40c to 75c per yd. H I
25c Towels at 15c each H I
50c Towels at 38c each fl S
Men's and Boys' Caps from 25c to $1.00 each I
Men's Hats from $1.50 to $5.00 each H I
Men's best make Overalls 2.20 weight denims $1.50 pr. I B
Men's 2.40 weight denim Overalls at 98c pair H
FF, Abbeville, S. C. II

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