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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, October 23, 1922, Image 1

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Abbeville Press and Banned!
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Mo^TOctober 23, 1922 Single Copies, Five- Cents. 78th Ye&Sli
BIGSTATE FAIR
OPENED TODA1
ALL RECORDS TO BE SMASHEI
BY SHOW?THE DEMAND FOI
SPACE. EXCEEDS EXPECTA
TIONS?EXHIBITS FROM AL1
OVER THE STATE.
\ Columbia,
Oct. 22.?The greate
South Carolina state fair, the great
est agricultural, live stock, mechani
cal and amusement show ever hel<
in the state according to those con
nected with it, opens Monday a
noon.
The claims of the men who havi
worked hard to make the fair an un
qualified success are borne out b;
the very varied line of exhibits al
* ready collected, by the full amuse
ment program and by the plea fo:
space, which in a number of depart
ments has already been exhauste<
and for which waiting lists have beei
compiled.
. The fair pictures, in miniature, th<
resources of the Palmetto Stat<
and the numerous exhibits will a
rouse in the breasts of visitors feel
ings of pride by reason of their beau
ty and attractiveness.
An indication of the magnitude ol
the show that is to be held next weefc
is revealed in the statement by J. C
Harrell, secretary of the poultry
show, when he came to Manager
Fleming yesterday afternoon anc
asked if he could not get more
space. Something like 1,500 birds
will be shown in this department as
against about 1,000 at the fine poultry
show last fair week.-And yet exhibitors
are still asking to be admitted
and there is no place to put theii
birds.
The big steel building will be filled
to overflowing. Space in this main
exhibition hall was consumed earlj
in the week. ,
The new cattle barn will not hold
the exhibits in that department and
part at least of the former poultrj
show building will be used for the
excess of cattle.
It is expected that the swine show
will go beyond the bounds prepared
for it and that a portion of the old
cattle barns will be used by the exhibitors
of hogs.
The busy scenes at the fair ground
for the past few days are all the
more enlarged now. From now until
Monday noon hundreds of men, women
and children will be busy getting
everything in shape for the people
who will come into Columbis
I from every part of the state nexl
week.
_
LYCEUM COURSE.
The first number of the Lyceun
Course, held in the Community
Building, on last Friday night was
exceptionally fine iand was receivet
by< an enthusstic audience. Very fev
of the members got by without a!
least one encore. It was an hou:
of solid enjoyment.
The second number of the Course
will be held Friday Nov. 10th. whei
the Laura Wemo Ladies Quartette
will entertain. Miss Werno has beei
on the Entertainment platform foi
a number of years and has gathere<
about her a group of real artists
The evening entertainment will in
elude a number of the choises
melodies from American Song litei
ture and an interpretation of th<
dress, manners and songs of th<
Colonial period, of the Civil wa
times, the early seventies, and o:
r\nol'ore TVic* Tvrriorr?am Viae VIOPT
built with the idea of giving to' th?
patrons a program of the best Amei
ican songs.
The reserved seats for the re
maining five numbers may be secur
|e<d from the Community Buildinj
cflfice for $2.50.
Wallace Reid Seriously Iill
Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 21.?Wal
bee Reid, motion picture actor, waJ
eported by relatives to be seriouslj
11 today.
FRENCH PROPOSE
I RIGID CONTROL
y OF ALL GERMAN FINANCES IN
* FUTURE?PLAN SET FOR.
WARD IN PARIS FOR SOLUL
TION , OF DIFFICULTIES OF
BERLIN GOVERNMENT.
r Paris, Oct. . 21.?'Complete and
rigid control of ail German finances,
. power to veto expenditures and re j
gulatie taxation and authority
. to dictate the arrangement of the
t various German states are among
the chief proposals contained in the
e plan of the Srench government for
_ a solution of Germany's financial i
y difficulties and for the placing that i
rountrv in a position to meet her re
. paration^ payments.
r The plan was submitted to the re
parations commission tonight by
1 Louise Barthon, the French repres1
entative on the commission of the
project will begin tomorrow. Al- 1
i though not mentioned in the official '
i summary, M. Barthou's plan contem '
- plates a meeting of leading busi- :
- ness men of the world to determine '
- Germany's capacity to pay and to
consider the question of inter-allied '
? debts. . J
*" i
: The plan, in effect, ia a reply to (
the British reparations project re- '
i (
71 cently placed before the commission
r by Sir John Bradbury. It differs ra- !
' dically from the British point of ^
! view, M. Barthou urges the calling
5 of the Brussels conference to deal ^
5 with a board reparations commis'
sion to the application of new ?
' guarantees and reforms for Gor'
many, leaving the more comprehen- ^
sive issues to an international meet- ^
ing. ; ' ^ i
The proposition would gradually ,
[ 1
put Germany on a gold basis, begining
with an issue of gold treasury j
; | securities. M. Barthou would have j
| Gormany pay her outstanding obli- j
gations in paper currency and he ,
calculates that then Germany's pap- \
er circulation would be 510,000,r
000,000 marks, which at the present j
rate of exchange are worth less than
j the reichbank gold reserve. .
The monent has come according
to M. Barthou when the allies must
I take energetic steps or else be faced
, jby a Germany proclaimed before 1
[ the world a ruined nation, despite ^
. j tho fact that her actual capital is *
intact.
"We don't accept the contention c
t that Germany is totally incapable j
t of paying," says M. Barthou in his ^
plan "Despite Germany's enormous
budget difficulties, she retains tremendous
riches and has great
strength to continue production and
j maintain her national vitality."
n
TO PRISON FOR LIFE
Mri. Vinson Pleads Guilty At New
Trial
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 22.?Mrs. Cora
Lou Vinson, will begin serving a
term of life imprisonment at the
state prison farm within the next
few days, it was stated at the Fulton
county jail yesterday.
. The statement came after Mrs Vin- <
son had entered a plea of guilty soon
after Judge John D. Humphries had I
signed an order granting her a new '
trial on the charge of murdering her i
husband, Dr. W. D. Vinson, an At
lanta physician, several, months ago.
a I
" | Mrs. Vinson was convicted of
r i
J first degree murder at her first trial
and sentenced to death on the gal- 1
lows, execution of the sentence hav- <
a
ing been held up pending the appeal. <
-
DEATH OF LITTLE GIRL. 1
r Ruth May young daughter of Mr.
and Mra. Joe Smith died at their
*home on Mill street Friday Oct, 20,
1922 and was buried Saturday at j
. Melrose cemetery. Funeral services 1
; were conducted at the home by Rev. 11
r (Frith, assisted by Rev. J. W. Bus^-lt
hardt. ' '<
i
FIFTEEN PERSONS
BORNEO 10 DEATH I
FIRE IS BELIEVED TO BE WORK <
OF PYROMANIAC.?FLAMES
SPREAD SO QUICKLY MANY
VICTIMS ARE FOUND IN BEDS.
SEVERAL CHILDREN DIE.
New York, Oct. 22.?Fifteen persons,
most of them children, lost (
their lives early today in a fire, be- <
lieved by city officials to be the work 1
of a pyromaniac. The flames swept >
with murderous suddenness from cen "I
lar to attic of a five-story brick tene- i
naent at Lexington avenue and 110th
street, in the thickly populated East
side. (
The blaze apparently started in j
a baby carriage under the stairs in i
the lower hall, under almost identi- 1
cal circumstances, as the recent incendiary
fire in an upper West Side ,
Uaiioa TOiViinVi rnonH ifl
UUVllb IIVUIJ^I AV0HAWU *? | ^
seven deaths. So quickly did the ,
flames spread through the building
that a number of the dead were
found in bed. without chance of es'
<
:ape. '
A Mr. Silver and four of his ehil- *
iren were victims. Mr. and Mrs. *
Abraham Matilsky and Sidney and (
Catherine Sugarman also perished. (
Shortly after 1 o'clock this morning a
3ity Marshal Joseph I-a^rus saw 1
smoke from the hallway of the build- 0
TT I. il.. i - J f
ng. ne ran vo me next corner anu :urned
in an alarm. When he re- *
;urned the whole building the ground *
loor of which is occupied by stores, 5
vas a mass of flames and exit by the ^
stairways was cut off. Most of the c
)ersons on the second floor succeed- t
?d in making their way down the t
irst flight, but these had to battle ^
;hrough smoke and flames pouring
>ut of the windows.
While the firemen were at work on s
:he second and preparing to fight t
;heir way to the one above, the third T
floor collapsed, but not before a
earning roar had sent the firemen
1,
)ack.
}R. ABELL RECEIVES DEGREE
Degree to Be Conferred on Dr. R.
E. Abell' in Boston.
Chester, Oct. 21.?Dr. Robert E.
\bell of this city expects to leave
'or Boston within the next few days
;o receive his degree as a fellow of |
;he American College of Surgeons,
rhis is the highest honor given a
surgeon in the United States and
:he Chester people feel proud that ^
L>r. ADeii is to receive inis nign non)r.
Dr. Abell is surgeon in chief of
Q
:he Chester sanatorium.
make biscuit at state fair. c
Miss Lucia Vandiver and Eunice
Fisher leave today for Columbia
where they will demonstrate making
aiscuit at the State Fair. The Abbe- '
,'ille team has a high rating, and no '
ioubt will live up to their reputa- 1
;ion as biscuit makers tomorrow. 1
I
?? ^
abbeville boys enlist
u
Floyd Travis Davenport and Carl 1
Samuel Bond of Abbeville were among
those accepted for the United
States Marine last week at Columbia
and will go into training at Parris
Island near Charleston.
t
HAS SLIGHT OPERATION.
3
Lewis Perrin had a slight opera- |
;ion on his arm Sunday at his home
>n North Main street. Dr. R. E. Abell ^
lame over from Chester to perform
he operation and Mr. Perrin is dong
nicely today.
MISS MARTIN TO TALK. t
1:
Miss Lula Martin of Donalds will ]
;peak in the Methodist church here ?
tVednesday evening at 7:30. All i;
nembers of the Auxiliary are urged s
;o be present, and the public gener- p
lly is invited to hear Miss Martin, t'
CHINA'S INVITATION
SENT TO UNDERWOOD
)RIENT ASKS THE DEMOCRATIC
LEADER IN SENATE TO VISIT
EAST AND PREPARE AND PUT
INTO OPERATION TARIFF
SCHEDULE.
Washington, Oct. 22.?The Chinese
government has invited Senator
Dscar W. Underwood of Alabama,
Democratic leader in the senate, to
risit China, prepare an acceptable
tariff for that country, and put it
nto operation.
The invitation was delivered some
lays ago, it is just learned, by
Saoke Alfred Size, envoy extraordilary
and minister plenipotentiary,
China's chief representative in the
United States. Senator Underwood
leclined the invitation but it is unierstood
that he has agreed . to aid
he minister in securing the necessary
assistance from tariff experts
n this country.
At the Washington conference
Senator Underwood was chairman of
:he international committee which
>repared and reported a tariff judged
applicable to conditions in the
Jrient. .The tariff was not entirely
tgreeable to China because certain
estrictions against complete autonimy
were imposed. The Chinese gov rnment
since that time, however,
las apparently concluded that the
ariff was as satisfactory as possibly
:ould have been devised in view of
China's more or less dependence on
>ther nations. It is understood that
he Chinese government determined
hat the tariff prepared for it in
Vashington was so fair and equitable
md expertly drawn that the1 author
foould have the distinction of puting
it, with certain amendments
vhich lapsing time would make necissary,
into effect. Senator Undervood
is at present in Alabama.
DIVIDENDS DECLARED
)n Stock of Union Buffalo Mills At
Union.
Spartanburg, Oct. 21.?Dividends
ipproximating $750,000 were declar;d
yesterday on the first and second
referred stock of the Union Mills
Company, at Union.
- In addition to the regular semiinnual
dividend of 3 1-2 per cent
ieclared on the first preferred stock
if the company, the directors de:lared
also on the second preferred
itock a dividend of 35 per cent, the
atter on account of accumulated or
:umulative dividends.
GREENSBORO VISITORS
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Boren Mrs.
f. Van Lindley and Mr. apd Mrs. W.
C. Boren, Jr. all of Greensbore, N.
C. arrived in Abbeville Friday Tor
i visit to Mr. and Mrs W. L. Peebles
rhey made the trip through the
:ountry, Mr. Boren, Jr. returned
Monday while the others will remain
over for a visit of a week or
TWO.
DEATH OF YOUNG SON.
Jack Goings Woolbright died yeserday
at 10:30 o'clock after an ill:ess
of several weeks. Jack was one
rear and four months old and was
he son of Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Wool>right.
Funeral services were held
his afternoon and interment was at
neirose cemetery.
ON THE SPORT PAGE.
A picture of the Davidson foot-1
>all squad occupied the place of
lonor on the sport page of the Charotte
Observer yesterday. George
>mith and Billy Long had promnent
places in the picture and their
miling countenances on the front
'age gave the home people quite a
hrill.
IMPROVEMENT IN
BUSINESS OUTLOOK
COTTON PRICES CONTINUE TO
MOVE UPWARD?WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL ACTIVITY SHOWS
INCREASE OVER THE COUNTRY.?HELPS
IN SOUTH
New York, Oct. 22?Developments
of the past week in industry and
finance are encouraging in many respects.
Wholesale and retail activity
in particular increase perceptibly,
partly stimulated by the cooler weath
er. Continued strength in prices for
farm products, however, overshadowed
for the moment other important
industrial factors. Although cotton
growers have sold the staple
heavily, excellen buying by the foreign
and domestic trade has given
the market the needed support. A
tardy awakening of spinners to the
fact that a real shortage may have
to be faced later, it is pointed out,
is responsible for much of the pres
pnt active demand. Cotton futures
at 23c a pound, or better, are selling
at the highest levels since the beginning
of drastic deflation in 1920.
The effect in the South already is
Apparent. Prevailing, grain prices also
contrast sharply with the recent
low levels and With prices of a year
ago.
Reports of shortages abroad have
been an important factor in the
market of late. This has offset heavy
marketing, which has gone on apace
in iVn a# a rQilrAa^
iU IUC VI U QUVA V4
cars. With wheat close to $1.15 a
bushel at Chicago, the farmer is getting
around $1 a bushel. While he
^
may not realize any great profit at
this figure, the fact that he is receiving
nearly twice as much for corn as
a year ago and that other farm products
have risen, shows the improvement
of his position as compared
wi+Vi o lroor actn *
""" ? J
Now that fuel supplies are plentij
Jul, the transportation situation is
no longer menacing, sales of finished
steel are smaller and the demand
for prompt delivery is less insistent.
The industry has made up the ground
lost in the late summer and the
trend is toward quieter conditions
with prices working lower.
YOUNG MAN FOUND DEAD
IN A SPARTANBURG HOTEL
Spartanburg, Oct. 21.?A young
man age 28, giving his name as Char
ley Parker, 111., was found dead m
bed at a local hotel today. He was
treated by a physician during the
night who left a prescription for the
man to have filled. Parker told the
physician that he was on his way to
Columbia and that he ran some
sort of game in the state* fair.
A telegram has been sent to an
address found on a postcard in his
pocket. A message of inquiry will
also be sent to the carnival company
which he claimed to be connected.
$115 was found on his person.
DEATH OF MR. McCOLLUM. 1
Mr. Angus McCollum, a brother
of Miss Hettie McCollum, died in
Memphis, Tenn., Sunday night, Oct.
22, 1922, at 11 o'clock, and will be
buried in Memphis tomorrow. ,
MRS. PEELE AT HOME.
Mrs. C. E. Pecle was dismissed
from the Hospital this afternoon and
is at home. Her mother, Mrs. Hall,
of Rock Hill has been here and looked
after the home during her ab
sence at tne nospitai.
COTTON MARKET.
Cotton brought 24 V2 cents on the
local market today and futures dosed
: J
Oct. 23.50
Dec. 23.59
Jan. 23.37
March ___ 23.47
Hay 23.40 ;
'
LIQUOR RULING j
EFFECTIVE NOW ;
MIDNIGHT BRINGS END TO TIME
EXTENSION.?SEVERAL DAYS M
WILL ELAPSE BEFORE AUTHORITY
OF OFFICERS IS
DEFINED.
Washington, Oct. 22,?Pro vis- | Jj
ions of the lifuor statutes held by "J
Attorney General Daugherty to )l(ja
prohibit trans]>ortation and sale of
alcoholic beverages on American - J
vessels anywhere and on foreign
vessels -within three miles of the |
United States coast, became effec- :^i
tive tonight at midnight.
The extension of time ordered by
President Harding to permit ship- <
lines to arrange their affairs to con i
form to the ruling, expired at midnight
and enforcement officials declared
suggestions for a further extension
had not been approved.
It waa considered probable that
several days would elapse before; y.
customs and prohibition forces
would have at hand specific instruc- \?j
tions as to the scope of their author
ity under the Daughterly opinion, |
u..* n ?... u
| UUW UilO| IV woo UCVltUCU, VYUU1U
have no effect on the operation of '/
the law. A foreign vessel . sailing . -.|j
with inhibited cargo today, it waa
said would 'be liable) to the penalties _ :J
fixed by the Volstead act if an<l
when she entered American coastal
waters bearing that cargo.
American ships under the ruling :,'i
of the attorney general, which received
the formal approval of President
Harding, are prohibited from ^
"crossing" wfth liquo^ . rtegardless
of where they are in operation. The
ban was made operative as to ship
ping board tonnage as soon as the
ruling -was published, though time
was allowed for the disposal of any ' ' *
illicit stocks on board vessels of the
fleet than at sea. Enforcement offic
cials are hopeful of a decision coming
from the federal district court
in New York, where the new interpretation
for the law is under fire
by both foreign and American lines
before the arrival of a vessel in vio#
lation of the ban nocassitates punilive
action against the ship,. the agents
and; her masters as required by
law. /
It is pointed out that only vessels
which clear from foreign ports after
midnight tonight come within
the restrictions, thus giving a further
"automatic stay" of from five
to seven days in the cases of most
ships on the regular Atlantic routes
and of an even longer period with
respect toj ships crossing the Pacific.
7
DEATH OF J. S. NORWOOD
.
>1
News was received in Abbeville
yesterday of the death of Mr. John
S. Norwood which occurred Sunday,
October 22, 1922 at his home in
Medford, Oregon. Mr. Norwood has
been in failing health for the past
year. , %
Ua wbp o ncfiwA A KKnvill/i S*A11T1?
xic vy ?o a iiavirg Ui. iiwuvuiv w????
ty being the son of Mr. and Mrs.
James Norwood *who made their
home on the Norwood plantation in
the Flatwoods section of the county.
Many years ago he moved to Abbeville
and built the house now occupied
by Dr. McMurray. At that time
he was engaged in business with J.
H. McDill. About fifteen years ago
he moved to the west and has since a
engaged in farming in Medford.
Mr. Norwood married Miss Aimee
Walker of Baltimore who with one
daughter, Miss Sarah Norwood survives.
Mr. Norwood was in his sixtyeighth
year. He was familiarly
known around town as "Pipe" Norwood,
and his friends will hear with
regret of his death.
Attend Lecture in Greenwood.
E. F. Arnold and 0. H. Cobb went
to Greenwood Sunday to atend the
lecture by Dr. Bridgers. They report
Dr. Bridgers a splendid preacher and
a large crowd out to hear him.

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