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The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, December 22, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026853/1922-12-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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Abbeville Press and Bamle|l
Established 1844. $2.00 Year. Tri-Weekly Abbeville, S. C., Friday, December 22, 1922.. Single Copies, Five Cents. ; 78th ^ea|?p
STRENGTH OF SHIPS
DEVELOPS ISSUE
CALLED TO ATTENTION OF
COMMITTEE?FIGHTING EFFICIENCY
OF BRITISH AND AMERICAN
VESSELS DISCUSSED
AT WASHINGTON.
Washington, Dec. 21.?Relative
fiffhting efficiency or British and]
American battleships, particularly at
long range wefe understood today to
have been called sharply to the at,
tention of the Senate naval committee
in consideration of the pending
naval appropriation bill. Naval officers
are known to be greatly concerned
on the point as the British
have virtually completed post-war
modernisation of their 15-inch gun
ships and no start on similar work
has yet been made in the American
navy.
The effect of the British postwar
improvement, it was said today in
naval circles, was to give the entire
main British fleet a range of 30,000
yards against a maximum of about
20,000 yards for all American battleknf
4lia Tannacssa Cnlifnmift.
diuyo UUd bUV jl v?t*vwovv| J
Maryland, Colorado and West Virginia
in addition as permitted under
the Washington treaty the British
ships have been equipped with "blister"
anti-torpedo construction and
their deck armored against airplane
bombs and high angle fire.
Arrough estimate of the cost of
modernizing American ships in the
ssae way, so far as increasing gun
elevations and strengthening decks
la concerned, is approximately $60,000,000.
In the British estimate as
high as $4,000,000 is said to have
been expended on a single1 ship.
When naval estimates were under
consideration in the budget bureau
and later before the House appropriations
sub-committee, it was said,
funds were asked by navy officials
? limitod Koonnninir +Viio voor An
i.VA a ?UU?V^U WMkW J VMi. w?.
making over battleships to be retained
under the tVeaty.
Change from coal to oil fuel, is
of vital importance in widening the
effective radius of action of the ships
it was explained by naval officials,
while substitution of five-inch antianti-aircraft
batteries means using
with a fifty-yard "burst" instead
of the 25-yard area covered by
3-inch projectiles. In other words, it
wae said, a "curtain of fire" against
aircraft with five-inch guns would
need one half the number of guns in
aetion to make it effective. '
ACCIDENT AT MARTIN'S MILL
William Coleman, one of the
baBda of the Carter Construction
gang, now building a bridge near
Martins Mill has (been missing since
Toesday and it is feared that he has
lost his life in the-' mill pond.
Tile negro is imtf-witted and has
been accustomed to going into the
pond after work. Thursday night
hie clothep were found on the banks
of the river by one of the highway
nanas ana today ueputy mnce
and Judge McCombs went to Martin's
Mill to investigate the matter.
The mill pond will be drained Saturday
in an effort to find the negro.
It is possible he went into the
water not realizing how cold it was
Tuesday. He bad $1.20 in his
pockets.
MRS. LEE SICK
l .
Mrs. W. A. Lee, who is in Elberton
with her daughter, Mrs. Rogers,
has been confined to her bed for
two weeks ( with flu. Abbeville
friends hope soon to hear that she
is quiw wen Hg?ia.
COTTON MARKET
{Jetton on the local market today
was 26 1-4 cento. Futures closed
January ? 25.96
Jfarch 26.28
Bey - 26.38
Joly 1 26.28
I
GOVERNMENT WILL SELL r
ANCIENT LAND IN SOUTH f
<Bo*gfct Long Ago?Some of it
Miffht Hare Figured in Hiatory
If Developed.
Washington, Dec. 21.?Bits of ^
land which have, or if developed
might have figured largely in the history
of the south are included in the
war department's "land junk" sale.
The bill authoriring the sale,
which was today before the senate
military committee shows that the f,
federal government plans to dispose
of real estate which was acquired as ^
early as 1799, for fortification pur- ^
poses, but which modern warfare jc
has relegated to the class of "surplus a
and unnecessary government property."
? ' v.
Communications received by a
number of senators from southern ?
states indicate that some of the property
will be purchased by historical "
societies. * .
if
The parcels to be sold include ^
Beacon Island off the North Carolina
coast, which was acquired oy tne Q
government in 1799 as a site for fortifications
off Newbern which was an
important city at the close of the ^
revolutionary war; Fort Macon, near
Beaufort, and Morehead- City, N. C.,
bought in 1910 and 1826 as a site ^
for the defense of Old Top Sail inlet ?
and Fort Stephens on the Mississippi
river, South of New Orleans, which
C|
was acquired as "defense against the
British prior to the battle of New ^
Orleans."
Examination of the history of the
tracts to be offered for sale revealed ?
/ T
today that the deeds to two tracts,
old Fort Jackson at Savannah, Ga.,
and Perry Point, in Norfolk county, 8*
Virginia, were made out and stand aJ
today to "Thomas Jefferson, presi- w
dent of the United States, and his r<
successor in office." a'
Another tract, Fort Nelson, also
in Norfolk county, Virginia, and
bought as a site for fortficatons for | gi
Norfolk, is covered by a deed made w
oat to John Quincy Adams, and his
successors in the office of President. ,
bi
ASK RESIGNATIONS
OF FOUR INSTRUCTORS
ai
Charged With Making Home Brew ^
At North Carolina State ,
College.
Raleigh, Dec. 21.?Resignations of
four instructors at North Carolina ^
State College of agriculture and engineering
here have been requested
as a result of charges that they made
'home brew" in their rooms, Dr. W. ^
C. Riddick, president of the institu
(,1
tion announced today. 1 .
The president did not give any furjther
details, except to confirm re- .
t ports that the action followed an in- ^
vestigation by students who conducted
a private investigation. The names
of the instructors who were saidv to
have offered their resignations as requested,
were given as C. V. Busbe, ^
T. B. Parks, C. B. Buckner and J.
C. Miller. ^
No further action is contemplated, ^
it was said.
DECEMBER 24 TO BE
WOULD PEACE SUNDAY ^
K
Washington, Dec. '20.?The Federal
Council of Churches of Christ a1
in America today issued a request ^
to 100,000 congregations in the P1
United States to observe December
24 as "World Peace Sunday" to
demand that the government oT the
world finds ways to settle their disputes
other than by war. The n
message also asked that the &
churches act in concert throughout ^
the year toward attainment of a m
wariess world through "WorW
Peace Sunday" it was,added, under ^
an agreement reached last summer "
at Copenhagen by the conference of ^
the World Alliance for Internation- ^
al Friendship through the churches.
Weddiag Guest.
Miss Lucia Featherstone of Greenwood
was among the out of town e:
guests at the Haskell-Smith wed- ai
ding Thursday afternoon. M
MI RAILWAYS
LEFT HOMELESS
/
HICAGO STATION DESTROYED
BY FLAMES?A BLACKENED
BRICK SHELL STANDS WHERE
POLK STREET DEPOT WAS
BUILT IN 1884.
Chicago, Dec. 21.?Fire starting a
;w minutes before 4 o'clock this afI
irnoon destroyed the Dearborn
Teet railroad station, formerly
nown as the Polk street depot, and
ift eight railroads homeless in Chi*go.
The building erected in 1884 was
alued at $300,000, but will cost
lore than $1,000,000 to replace, it
ras said. /
Within a little more than an hour
fter a traffic policeman saw smoke
isuing from the roof, the flames
arept through the 38 year old brick
nd wood structure, once the pride
f railroad men, and left only a
moke blackened brick shell behind.
Hundreds of passengers and 200
ten and. women clerks fled to safety
Postal clerks with motor trucks
jscued 150 tons of holiday mail and
lilroad employees saved all passen_
9 1 At. _ J A.L
er cars in tne tram sueua.
The station was owned by the Chiigo
& Western Indiana railroad and
as used by trains of that line and
le Sant^ Fe, Monon, Erie, Chesaeake
& Ohio, Chicago & Eastern
linois, Wabash'and Canadian Grand
runk.
Crossed wires are believed to have
arted the fire. Within 16 minutes
Fter the fire was discovered and
hile apparatus was still arriving in
jsponse to a series of general
arms, the roof of the north wing
dl in.
The eight railroads began reoranizing
their service while the fire
as still at its height, establishing of:es
in the station annex, a one story
ailding across the alie?.
Seventy in Her Family.
Gornal, Eng.?Mrs. Emma Flavell
jed, 77, has 15 children, 44 grandaildren
and eleven great-grandchilren.
' '
AN INTERESTING PROGRAM
i Given at the Parent-Teaher Meeting
Tuesday Afternoon.
The regular meeting of the Parnt-Teacher
association was held
uesday at the graded school and
ie program furnished an excellent
fternoon's entertainment for the
[embers present^ The program was
i charge of Miss Annie Hill and
[iss Thomas of the seventh grades
id was as follows:
hristmas Carol Class
eading?Through the Phone
Mabel Bradley.
nrlr TTornlrl Angela Sino??Clnss.
tory of Christ-- Margaret Penney.
ecitation Martha Calvert.
ady Clare Act?Nona Tutt, Mary
Norwood Perrin, Edward Comely,
John McMurray and Leon Ellis.
ong Mabel Richardson
ecitation Dorothy Humbert.
Miss Thomas' fifth grade was
warded one prize and Miss MeMflin's
seventh grade won the other
rise.
v
A CHRISTMAS TURKEY
Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Paele were
. J. 1 - A. J 1_ 1.L - /II 5 A ?
iaae nappy touay dj toe v/onstmae
ift of a fine turkey from Circle
o. 1, of which Mrs. Peele waa a
lember during the past year.
The Peele's usually spend the
olidays away from AJbbeville but
lis year they are staying here and
ley are pleased with the gift from
ircle No. 1.
ON GREENVILLE STREET
I
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Thomson are
cpected from Pell City Saturday
;id will spend the holidays with
tr. aad Mrs. J. P. Barnwell.
?
I
I
SENATE DEADLOCK "
IS TIGHTENED UPN
SHIPPING BILL ADVOCATES
HOLD ON TO FLOOR?FARM g
RELIEF^ SUPPORTERS MAKE a
EFFORT TO HAVE THEIR *>
MEASURE TAKEN UP b
- 6
Washington,. Dec. 21.?Five a
hours of debate and preliminary c'
maneuvering in the Senate today
served only to tighten the deadlock n
which has existed for three days ^
between two opposing and almost ~
equal groups one fighting to keep ^
the administration shipping bill be- 3
fore the Senate and the other to
displace the measure. *
Three separate and distinct efforts
were made during the day to
break the deadlock through a unanimous
consent agreement to vote at
a designated time upon .the pending
motion to lay aside the shipping
bill and take up the Norris agricultural
fintmcing measure but each
time an objection nullified the attempt.
After the unsuccessful result
of these efforts to* debate
ran far afield ranging from a discussion
of the disposition of
Muscle Shoals to charges that Ambassador
Harvey at London through
his recent statement on the European
situation has endeavored to
affect the cotton and grain markets
in the United S&tes.
Shipping and agricultural relief
legislation were discussed at lesser
length, and when the Senate f
adjourned administration leaders C
were frankly pessmistic over the v
>V
possibility of a vote within several a
weeks upon the ship bill. General
belief was expressed that Christ- ^
mas recess would come and go with- t]
out a break in the struggle for ti
dominance between those trying to ^
xeep the ship bill before the Senate a
until rurml credits legislation can P
be reported from the banking and *
currency committee and these ^
members of the alliance formed be- s
tween foes of the ship bill and ad- ^
vocates of the Norris agricultural ?
bin- s:
CHRISTMAS SEALS - 0
' \
Mrs. fiambrell, Ck^jjrman of Com- ^
mittee Makes Good Report. 0
Mrs. C. C. Gambrell who has the
sale of Christmas Seals in charge a
this year has l)een very successful.
Many bonds have been sold. The c
Peoples and the Farmers Banks have
bought $5.00 bonds and the National b
bank has bought a $10 bond. The g
high school bought a $10 bond and
Miss McMillan and the pupils of the v
seventh gfade are responsible for a ?
$5, bond and Miss Crowley and the q
pupils of the sixth grade took one ^
$5 bond also. The pupils of the
grammar school bought a $10 bond
lard one $6 bond.
About $150.00 has been realized
so fer and the committee feels that a
when reports are made from all <]
places where stamps have been of- c
fored a good sum of money will be ^
rin band. The money will be used for },
stamping out tuberculosis. u
C
A "MIDDIE" AT HOME v
Mr. W. J. Canrile, a son of Mr.
P. A. Carwile, is at home for the ^
holidays and was on our streets to- .
day seeing his friends. The young ^
man has been in the navy for several
years and has traveled the
world over. He has had many thrill- ^
ing experiences and tells of them ^
in an entertaining manner. '
/
GROOMSMEN.
Mr. and Mrs. John Harris and Mr. tl
and Mrs. Willie Speed and Miss Mary tl
Hill Harris went to Due West Thurs- in
day to attend the marriage of Miss ol
Virginia Galloway and Mr. Ansel in
Putnam. Mr. Harris and Mr. Speed n<
were attendants at the marriage. ' tl
ALF MILLION BALES i|
GINNED IN THE STATE |\
early Two Million Ahead of Last
Year?Total Glnninjjs Art
9,493,296 Sale*. #
Washington, Dec. 21.?Cotton ?
inned prior to December 13
mounted to 9,493,296 running
ales, including 161,698 round
ales/counted as half Ibales; 24,13
bales of American- Egyptian
nd 5,255 'bales of sea island, the
ensus oureau announcea toaay. g
To December 13, last year, gin- ^
ings were . 7,790,656 running q
ales, including 122,649 round ^
ales, counted as half hales; 25,827 g
ales of American ^Egyptian and n
,062 (bales of sea island. . n
Ginnings this year to December ^
3, by states, follows: r,
Alabama 811,759 ^
Arizona ... 31,461
Arkansas 990,168 s
California 20,461 p
Florida - 27,052 j
'Georgia ? . 724,879 c
Louisiana 341,970 ^
. Mississippi. ?976,624 p
Missouri 130,706
North Carolina 830,305 ^
Oklahoma ___ ? 626,172 ^
(South Carolina 502,594 0
Tennessee __ - 373,0 9 ^
Texas 3,065,972 a
Virginia __ 24.972
" " - ~~ e
All other states ,15,132 c
FREIGHT RATES HIGHER "
.. n
>n Fertilizer in South Carolina
Than Any Other State.
b
Columbia, Dec. 21.?^Steps to put &
reight rates on fertilizer in JJouth c
iarolina on a parity with rates preailing
in North Carolina, Georgia
nd Alabama were taken by the
tate Railroad Commission today, j.
Commissioner J. B. Wade, of Aien
submitted a tabulation showing
fiat the rate per ton for hauling fer- 0
ilizer was higher in South Carolina' 0
lian in the neighboring States for 6
11 distances up to 300 miles at which t!
\ c
oint the rates became approximate7
the same. Mr. Wade pointed out, *
owever, that South Carolina is P
uch a small State geographically ?
hat there is little possibility of great
uantity of fertilizer material being E
hipped as far as 300 miles. ?
The rates now in effect for a haul *
1 m
f several miles, according to Mr. s
7ade, given in cents pr ton, are:
Georgia and Alabaipa 68, North Car- s
lina 90, South Carolina 102^ P
For 120 miles, estimated to be the
yerage haul: c
Georgia 37, Alabama 2.38, North ^
iaroljna 2.73, South. Carolina 2.93.
.For 300 miles: Georgia 3.83, Alaama
3.82. North Carolina 4.05,
louth Carolina 3.82.
These rates are now existing, it ^
7&s stated, the 10 per cent reduc- ^
ion ordered July 1 by the Interstate T
!ommerce Commission having been *
educted.
. t<
THE COURT HOUSE h
w
There was mighty little news
round the Court House today.
Measurer Cheatham says taxes are a
oming in so slow that he has time
o read the newspapers instead of
aving two or three assistants as is
3unl at this time of year. Mr.
if 1.1 ^ "
'ireaui&in many w payers *uc
waiting to see "what the legislate
is going to do." The news ^
omes in from the {State treasurer
hat oaly sixteen thousand dollars
i tax money has been paid in at
lat office. ^
County Supervisor Keller says ^
le roads are so tad since the ?
e<
reeze he is keeping off them. e{
P
LITTLE TKOUBLE C(
During the freeze Wednesday
le Water and Light Plant came
lroucrh their difficulties with fly
irg oolors.. A wire down in front gt
f Harrison's Garage cot the cur- w<
>jit off for an honr hi the after- yc
jon, after which there was no far- wi
ter trouble. is
USINESS MEN MAY CONSIDER M
QUESTION? TRADE COM- "'&<
MISSION HEADED BY CHAN- j
CELXOR CUNO OF GERMANY Jg
MAKES REQUEST
London, Dec. 21.?The United ,'j|H
bates, at the request of a trade ||
mmission headed by Wilhelm ..s
une, the German chancellor, has m
egun negotiations with Prance and' ?
Ingland looking to the appointlent
of a body of American, bturiess
men for the fixing, of new A*
asia for the. payment of war rejtfU- ^ Ja
ations, it was understood here to- ' :'j|
In semi-official quarters it was r||
aid England's consent to such a : V
Ian had been cabled to Secretary
[ughes today and that the Amenan
state department at Washing- <
on expected an early reply from v
r?n?. The
proposal is understood to
ave reached Secretary Hughes
hrough the United States chamfi^r
f commerce, which body was asked
y Chancellor Cuno and his asaoei- > ^
tes to appoint a commission head- :/jy
d by Herbert Hoover, secretary of
ommerce, which would visit Serially
and make an impartial survey
f the country's financial and eco-. _;f
omic position.
The American commission was to
e empowered to detehnine what
mount of reparations Germany .jj$
ould pay and upon the basis of its
sport a new reparations treaty,
rould agree1 to fulfill if thp plans yjfi
'ere approved by England and
^ance.
The United States chamber of '-^r^H
ommeree complied with request ^
f the German chancellor to the i j
xtent of asking Mr. Hoover to ' 7:-J
ike the question up with President *
tarding's cabinet, which he did*. ;'i|
rith the result that the matter was r ^
laced in the hands of Secretory M
[ughes:
The negotiations between Mr.
[oover and the English and French
Overirments followed with the ob- ? A
&ct in view of obtaining their con- {tt
ent to abide by the reparations |
am fixed by the American commts- *$?
ion as within Germany's abilitjTto
Officials in London refused to ^ ^
omment on the subject tonight! ;:j
OFFERED JACK DEMPSEY
$3 SO,000 Ffc>R BOXING MATCH |
Portland, Or^on, Dec. L9.?W.> ' '%
[. Klepper, principal owner of the
'ortland Pacific Coast league baseall
club, last night telegraphed p ^
ack Kearns, manager for Jack
tempsey an offer of $350,000 for a |
sn round boxing match for the
eavyweight championship of the
rorld, between Dempsey and Jess
Pillard here July 4, next.
Willard, who is here, said he was :
greeable to the proposal.
NO MORE CONGESTION / ;|
Washington, Dec. 21.?Despite
eavy increases in holiday mall in
>me sections of. the country, no j yj
ingestion was reported in any of
le 15 mail service divisons of the
>untry in telegraphic reports revived
today by the post office de- "
artment. Marked improvement in \
ie operation of trains also was ?arted.
The Atlanta division report1
an increase over last Christinas
jtimated at 50 per cent and San
rancisco showed a gain of 30 pel*
w* I
AT THE OPERA HOUSE
%
Manager Verchot wilJl have a
>od line of pictures all of next
at the Opera Hons<> and the
roqg folks home for the holidays
ill have plenty to entertain tkeaa
the way of pictures. '

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