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The Nevada Democrat. [volume] (Nevada, Calif.) 1854-1863, October 22, 1856, Image 1

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VOL. IV, NO. 3,
NEVADA DEMOCRAT,
PCTOMlIEn EVERY WEDNESDAY MOtiSlYtij
BY I, J. ROLFS & GO.
OFFICE—BROAD STREET, NEVADA,
T E ltM S »
For one rear, in advance) M
Six months. ® JJJ
Three months, *9®
Single Copies. rts -
BUSINESS CARDS.
ROSENHEIM & BRO.
watchmakers and jewelers,
AND DKAI.KK.H IN
Wattliea, Jewelry, Diamond*, to.
At their Old Stand, Main Street, Nevada.
Moans Rosenheim, Aaron Rosenheim.
r s.—om.n ni'sT bought at thk hiohest mar
■KKT I'RtCK. 4t '' lf
CHAS. W. YOUNG,
MAsrTACruRKR OF
CA LIE OR El A JE WELR Y,
VV ATCIUUKEU,
AND
DEALER IX FIXE WA1VHES, JEWELRY, DIA
MOXD WORE. Jr.
Junction of Main and Commercial Streets, Nevada.
CHARLES W. MULFORD,
B.\ \ K E It,— At his Old Stand, on Main Street,
Nevada. 1 will |*v the highest prices for HOLD HOST,
001,1) BARS, and COl’NTY ORDERS; will procure Drafts
payable in nnv of the Atlantic States. Canada, or Euro|ie,
in sums to suit; forward Dust for Coinage at the V. S.
Branch Mint, and if desired, w ill make advances on the
* 'sifJKT CHECKS on DREXEE, SAT1IER & CIR'RCH, San
Francisco, AT PAR. "
WILLIAMSON & DAWLEY,
BAN1K.E14S, and <kalors in GOLD I'LST—No. 30 Main
Street. Nwada.
SIGHT CHECKS on Garrison. Morgan, Frlti k Ralston.
£*n Francisco or Sacramento. AT PAIL
BII.CS OF EXCHANGE on New York or 8L Louis, at the
rowEST RATFX _ fi#
BY THE FLASK <>K P<H ND. (tf
F. MANSELL,
Sign and Ornamental Painter,
AM work promptly attended to, and in the best style or
the art. Ooinnweeia! street, above Pine. Nevada. 4(l-tf
THOMAS MARSH,
RIGA AXD Oil \ AMESTAl. PARTING,
No. 10 Commercial Street. Nevada. 4-If
* FU R \ I T l li E AV AHEHOOHIS.
john McFarland,
DEALER IN
FCRMTLIIE. REDS. MATRASSES. PILLOWS, PIL
LOW CASES, SHEETS, dr.
No. 11 Commercial Street. Nevada. — I tf
IftANTON lirOKNKR, <'. WII.SON HI1.I.,
BUCKNER & II1L.T.,
HAVING associated themselves together in the practice
of tho law, will attend promptly to all business con
lided to tlieir care in Nevada and adjoining counties.
Office —Over C. AV. Mulford’s Hanking House. Main st.,
Nevada.
July 2. 18.V1.—13-tf
11. I. THORNTON, Jr.,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Office —'To Kelsey'S Brick Building, Commercial street,
below Pine street, Nevada. el~lf
AVM. F. A NO®RSON,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Offh'k—Front Room, upstairs, Democrat Building, Ilroad
streets Nevada.
•I . I . C A I- I) AV Id L I*
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Office, No. 10 Bickxell’b Block, Broad st. Nevada.
Nevada. Aug. ‘27, 1856.—47-tf ,
F. II. CHAsK, <;E °- H * Hl'IT.
C II \ S E «& HUPP,
A T TO R X E VS A T L A W.
Ofkck—Front Rootn, up stairs, of I democrat Office, Br«>nd
street. Nevada. _ _
FRAX<T* J. DI NN, HENRY MKKKDtTII.
DUNN MEREDITH,
A TTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS A T LA W
Officr —Second Story of Alban's Brick Building, corner
Broad and Pine Streets, Nevada.
J. n. M'OINVKM,. WM. M. STFWAHT,
McConnell & stewaht,
A TTORXEYS A SI) COUNSELORS AT LAW.
'Will practice in all the Courts of the Fourteenth Judicial
District, and in the Supreme Court.
Omen—Crittenden’s Brick Building, Main Street. [4-tf
0 VERTON.
r II YSICIA X A XI) S UR GEO N.
Office —Alban’s Brick Building—rear of the Drug Store —
Nerada. 46-tf
McROBEUTS, FUNSTON Si CO.,
NE V A I) A ,
DEALERS IN
Family (iromks, Provisions, 'Wines, U
quors, and Miners Supplies.
KILBOURN’S CORNER, Opposite A. Block k Co’s., corner
Pine and Commercial streets.
W. 8. M'ROBKRTS, M. H. FINHTON, JXO. FATT1HON.
BLACKMAN, - HOWARD & CO.,
IMPORTERS AXD DEALERS IX
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
WINES AND LIQUORS,
85 Clay Street,
Bdttrcn Ball try and Front , one lh*or East of (hr Railroad
House.
SAX FRA SCI SCO,
45jU Orders from the interior command our particular
attention. O. P. BLACKMAN,
CHAS. WEBB HOWARD,
8 ly C. H. BLACKMAN.
PALMER & McKEN NE Y
NEVADA CARRIAGE SHOP!
No. 10 Washington st., above Fkjshies* Restaurant.
Particular attention paid to REPAIRING ,
Wheelbarrows kept on hand, and for sale.
Aug. 18, 1856. 46-tf
CL E. WmnXGTON. A. G. BBNTLY,
WITHINGTON & BEJNTRY,
DEALERS IX
French and American Paper Hanging*,
WINDOW Shades. Brass Coniine, Gold Mouldings, Paints
kc. Pointing of all kinds, and paper hanging execu
ted in the best style, at short notice.
49-tf No. 7, Broad street. Nevada.
D. & B. LAC UMAX,
XO. 80 BROAD STREET, XEYADA.
—DKALKIIS LV—•
HJtrw.rr,
Stove.,
Tl n-Ware,
Cvwkcry, to. to.
O' All kiinla of Tin Ware made to order
Sept. 1856—49-3m D. & B. LACHMAX.
Wholesale and Retail
LIQUOR STORE.
Main street, near Commercial, Nevada.
TIIE undersigned would inform the public that he lias
now on hand a most extensive assortment of the
Best Liquors
Ever brought to this market. Having rebuilt his Fire
Proof Building, with an excellent Cellar under it, he has
every facility for keeping any amount of Goods. He will
keep a good supply of
WHISKEY, BRANDY, GIN,
WINB3, PORTER, ALE,
ALE, CIDER, kc., kc.
Also—All kinds of Case Liquors, Cordials, Syrups, kc.
Which have been selected with the greatest care by com
petent judges, and which will be sold as low or lower than
any other establishment in the place.
He will continue the manufacture of SODA at his old
place, which is an article to well known too require recom
mendation.
Dealers and others wishing to purchase are respectfully
invited to eall and examine my stock.
46 -W J. M. FLURSHUTZ.
THE NEVADA DEMOCRAT.
TRAVELING.
cAlifomia stage company?
THE STAGES of this Company will leave their Office, at
Frisbie's old Stand, Nevada, as follows:
FOR SACRAMENTO.
Ia'AvPs Kevatln at 1 o’clock, A. M., and arriving at Sac
hiento in time for the 2 o’clock boats for San Francisco.
Also, at 4 o'clock, A. M., running via Auburn, as an Ac
commodation Line to Sacramento.
FOR MARYSVILLE.
I.caves the above named Office every morning at seven
o’clock, A. M., passing through Grass Valley. Rough k
Ready, Empire Ranch, and Long Bar. and arriving in Ma
rysville at 3 o’clock P. M.
FOR FOREST CITY, DOWNIEVILLE. PATTERSON, WOLSEY’S,
MOORE’S, AND ORLEANS FLATS.
Leaves every morning at 01-2 o'clock A. M.
JAMES HAWORTH,
Pres't. C. S. Co.
W. S. McRoberts, Agent, Nevada. [tf
NEVADA & WASHINGTON STAGE LANE.
ON AND AFTER JANUARY 1, 1856, the above line will
run as follows:
leaving the office, at Frisbie’s old Stand, Nevada, at 8
o'clock, A. M, pausing by Mountain Spring House, Morgan's,
Cold Spring, White Cloud, Gold Hill and Alpha, arriving
at Washington by one o'clock in the afternoon.
It is the nearest and best Route to Washington, Omega,
Scotchman's Creek, Poor Man's Creek, and Eureka.
Returning,—The Stages will leave the South Yuba Hotel.
Washington, every morning at nine o'clock, and arrive at
Nevada by one o'clock P. M., connecting with the Cali
fornia Stage Co’s Coaches for Auburn, Sacramento, Marys
ville and Shasta.
Office—South Yuba Hotel, Washington.
A. S. 01JN, Proprietor.
W. S. MclloRKRTF, Agent, Nevada. [34-tf
Spring and Summer Arrangement.
TELEGRAPH LINE.
Six Jlurse Cuacht * from Nevada to Gamptonvitte .
ON AND AUER APRIL 15th. the above Line of Stages
will leave the Office of the California Stage Company,
at Frishle's old Stand, Nevada, every morning, at seven
o'clock. A. M.. running by Oak Tree Ranch, San Juan, and
Hess’ Cross!ug. arriving at Camptomille at 12 M.
Returning—The Stages will leave the National Hotel,
Camptoiiville, every morning, at seven o’clock, A. M.. and
arrive at Nevada in time to connect with the California
Stage Company's Line of Stages for Sacramento City, Ma
rysville ami Auburn.
jr*- Express Matter promptly attended to.
A. WAGENER, Proprietor.
tV. S. UcUonERTS, Ag’t. Nevada [33- tf
EMPIRE LIVERY STABLE,
ILoad Street. Nevada,
THE UNDE
7£rrs a ' ul 1
f T> \ become Prop
A. STAR Lie, and
GEORGE MAY, Proprietor.
TUK I'N'DKIMONKI) WOULD 1NK0HM HIP
the public generallv, tliat he has
iprietor of the EMPIRE LIVERY
and as he designs keeping constant
ly on hand
A Stock of Fast Horses,
Would rosjjectfully solicit the patronage of the Public.
j(To~ Horses kept by the Day or Week on the most rea
sonable terms.
20-tf GEORGE MAY,
LIVEKY & SALK STAHLM.
-1/ the Fix A <f Boulder dred, near Ferre's Banking House.
J. A. LANCASTER. FORMERLY OF T1IE
Metropolis Stable, would inform liis friends
and the public generally, that he has added
extensively to his already large and Ele
gant establishment of Horses, Buggies, Saddles, Harness,
kcx kc. —they ire now prepared to furnish as fine turn
outs as can iw found in the State.
Well trained fleet and easy Saddle Horses, well equipjied
for ladies or Gentlemen will 1m* ready at all times.
A long experience in the business and an earnest desire
to retain the confidence of his friends, leads him to be
lieve he will be able to give general satisfaction.
Particular attention paid to Hornes on Livery
Carriages always ill readiness with careful drivers for the
use of Ralls, Parties, &c. kc.
The quality of our stock will permit us to say that those
seeking pleasure, or engaged on business would do well to
give us a call. J. A. LANCASTER.
Nevada, Aug. 20, 1856.—46-tf
NOTICE TO TEAMSTERS.
WAGON ROAD from Nevada to Downieville, by wav of
ROBINSON’S CROSSING.
This Road is in fine condition, and presents the shortest
route and ln*st road for Packers and Teams to all the vari
ous sett lenient* along the Divide, between the South and
Middle and the Middle and North Yubtis, by way of Hess'
and Emery’s Crossings.
The Road also affords the nearest route for Packers and
Travelers from Sacramento, by way of Rough k Ready.
Grass Valley and Nevada, and the mines further South, to
Poor man’s’Creek, Nelson’s Creek, and all the mining re
gion north of Nevada and Downieville.
This Road is as easily traveled as that between Sacra
mento and Nevada. Four horses can readily draw from
three to four thousand pounds of freight, from Nevada to
the top of the hill at Downieville, when the road is not ob
structed bv heavy rains or snow.
W. E. ROBINSON, Proprietor.
June 11th, 1850—10-ly*
BOOTS AND SHOES.
S MAYERS & WM. It. COE. (successors to P. J. Espen
• school.) corner of Main and Commercial Streets, would
respectfully inform the public that they have purchased
the large and well selected Stock of BOOTS AND SHOES,
contained in the above establishment, and hope hv strict
attention to business to merit a share of the public pat
ronage.
Having just rewired from San Francisco a choice and
well selected stock of Boots and Shoes, ladies’ and Misses’
Gaiters, Buskins. Slippers, Children’s Shoes, kc. . kc.. they
would respectfully invite all those wanting any thing in
the aliovc line to give them a call, as they believe, for va
riety, quality and cheapness, their stock is unsurpassed in
the mountains.
Repairing done on the shortest notice, in a workmanlike
manner, and oh the most reasonable terms.
S. MAYERS.
Wm. R. COE.
Mk. S. Mayers, late of Grass Valley, and Wm. R. Coe,
formerly of the Broad Street Boot and Shoe Store, have
purchased my entire stock of Boots and Shoes, and I would
cheerfully recommend them to the public as gentlemen
every way worthy their support, and would respectfully
solicit for them the patronage of my old friends and custo
mers. [32-tf] P. J. ESPKNSCHEIP.
$10,000 WORTH OF FURITUNRE!
ENTIRE NEW STOCK. THE LARGEST AND
best selected ever brought into the mountains,
all of which will be sold cheap for CASH, con
sisting of
Bedsteads of all sizes;
Cane and Wood Scat Chairs;
Cane and Wood Seat Office Chairs*
Dining. Card and Center Tables;
Extension and Reading Tables;
Office Ite.sks and Furniture;
Barber’s Chairs; Wash Stands;
Looking Glasses of all sizes;
Cane Seat and Rack Arm Rockers and Nurse Chairs;
Milt trasses; Pillows; Pillow Cases;
Sheets; Comforters; Feathers, kc.
The undersigned would respectfully invite the attention
of their old customers and the public generally to their
new stock of goods
On the Corner of Pine mid Commercial at a.,
Where by strict attention to business they hope to merit a
liberal share of public patronage.
46-tf ABBOTT k EDWARDS.
A. BLOCK & CO.,
(CORNER PINE AND COMMERCIAL STS.. OPPOSITE POST OFFICE,)
Wholesale ami Retail Dealers in Clothing, Gents Furnishing
Goods, Blankets, Domestics, dr.
HAVE AGAIN OPENED at their old Stand, and are now
receiving and opening an entire NEW STOCK OF
CLOTHING. Ac., kc., to which they especially invite the
attention of the citizens of Nevada and the surrounding
country.
We are now prepared to exhibit the best selected Stock
of Clothing to be found, and at lower prices than ever be
fore offered—FOR CASH.
Our mode of doing business will lie the same as heretofore
One Price, and no Deviation,
thereby saving of time to both purchaser and seller—in all
cases the lowest price will be named at once.
We return our most sincere thanks for the very large
patronage which lias heretofore been bestowed upon us,
and our liest foot sliall be put foremost to merit a continu
ance of the same.
A. BLOCK k CO.
Nevada, August 20th, 1850.
RANCH FOR $ ALE .
THE undersigned offer for sale their RANCH, situa*«d
between Montezuma and Columbia Hills, on the South
Yuba, consisting of four hundred and eighty acres of land,
surveyed and recorded according to law. The Ranch is
partly fenced in. and rails enough are made to fence it all.
A good House, Barn, Outhouses, kc., have been built on
the main road leading from Robinson’s Bridge to the mi
ning towns above. Six tons ol Hay, at least, can be cut
on the Ranch each year.
Also, a set of MINING CLAIMS, on Little Shady Creek,
about a mile below the Ranch, with sufficient water to
work them in the winter season, free of cost. The Claims
pay twenty dollars to the hand per day, and will last for
three seasons more. Persons fishing to purchase the
claims can have the privilege of prospecting them.
The Ranch and Claims will be sold separately or together
cheap for cash. Apply at the Ranch, to
45 3m* JOSEPH AGGELER A CO.
NEVADA, CALIFORNIA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 22, 1856.
GROCERIES.
GREGORY & SPARKS.
CAN BE FOUND AT PRESENT, NEXT DOOR ABOVE
the Journal Office, on Main street, where we have in
store a Rood assortment of
GROCERIES,
UAKKNSAVARK,
HARDWARE,
AND MINING TOOI.S,
All of which w ill be sold IX)W FOR CASH, and delivered
free of charge any reasonable distance from town.
The consuming community, and our friends, are respect
fully requested to call and examine our stock.
Aug. 15. 1856. 46-tf
SAN FRANCISCO GROCERY AND PROVI
SION STORE.
MOTTO !
“Small Profits and Quick Returns. 1
rpHE UNDERSIGNED WOULD RESPFX7TFUIJ.Y SOLICIT
the attention of the Families ami Miners of Nevada and
vicinity to their well selected stock of Family
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, &c.,
Which cannot be exelted in quality, and at the lowest pri
ces, One of the firm constantly being in San Francisco,
affords us unequalled facilities for purchasing, by which
means we feel confident to be able give
GENERAL SATISFACTION AS TO PRICES.
We have alao on hand Mining Implements of best makers.
N. B.—Hotel Keepers, Restaurants and Country Dealers,
would find it to their advantage to give us a call before
purclmsing elsewhere.
L. SHARP & CO.
No. 35 Broad Street, Bicknoil's Building. 46-tf.
L.VXDEKER & GATZEIIT,
—DEALERS Df—
Groceries and Provisions,
KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND A FULL SUPPLY OF
all articles suitable for the Market, in their
Fire Proof Building, on Commercial St.
Where they will be happy to wait upon all that visit them.
J. S. LANDEKER resides at the Bay, where he is con
stantly purchasing for the house here, and no efforts shall
la* spared to always keep on hand a full assortment of the
best quality, which will be sold at a low PROFIT.
ft®- GOODS DELIVERED FREE -fcft
Call and see for yourselves. J. S. LANDEKER.
Nevada. Sept.' 1856.—48-tf BAILEY GATZERT,
K . D E YOUNG & CO..
WHOLESALE A.VD RETAIL DEALERS IN
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, Crockery
AXI) GENERAL
No. 65 Rron<l Street ■
MERCHANDISE.
■Nevada.
H
AS ON HAND the following articles, which will be sold
at a small advance for the ready CASH.
Hams in brine.
Extra Clear Pork,
Extra Clear Bacon,
lard, in kegs and tins,
New Goshen Butter,
Brandy,
Gin and Whiskey,
Porter and Ale,
Schnapps,
Port and Claret Wines,
Cal. Butter, in 5 A: 101b. tinsChampaigne Wine,
New Orleans Sugar,
Crushed Sugar,
Bar Sugar,
China No. 1 Sugar,
C arolina Rice,
China Rice,
Boston Syrup,
Lemon Syrup.
Assorted Syrups,
Black and Green Teas,
S|>erm Candles,
Adamantine Candles.
Can Emits, in all varieties, Lamp Wicks,
Tobacco, of various brands,
Ogars,
Barrel Hour,
S. It. Flour,
Ida in Flour,
Potatoes and Corn Meal,
Bi »nis and Shovels,
Hatches, Axes and Files.
Knives, Forks and Spoons,
I*icl; and Axe Helves,
lines.
Hill and Castile Soap,
Starch,
Cam phi no,
lamp Oil,
Iron and Tin Ware.
Wrapping A letter Paper.
Smoked Beef,
Cal. and Goshen Cheese,
Nails, assorted sizes.
Shot, Powder and Fuse,
1 Antonis,
Cal. and Chill Beans,
Bayou Beans,
Ground Coffee.
Java and Rio Coffee,
Costa Rica Coffee,
Dried Apples,
Chili Peaches,
Salt, in sacks and boxes,
Barley and Wheat,
Jellies and Jams, in glass.
Re<l Herring,
Cocoa Shell,
Tappioca,
Indigo, Maze, Nutmegs,
(loves, Ginger, Alspice,
Pepper and Mustard,
Cream Tartar,
Saleratus,
Washing and Baking Soda.
VermiciUa ami M&carona,
Mackerel,
Yeast Powders,
Pickles, in kegs and glass,
Cranberries,
Tomato Catsup,
Pepper Sauce,
As,sorted Sauces,
Pie Fruits,
Quicksilver,
.vuivo ... I-amp Glasses.
Also a variety of other articles too numeroiiH to mention.
Our endeavors shall not he required to please those that
should favor us with a call for any of the above articles, or
we defy competition lor the quality ami tricks of otr
GOOD’.
ft®- All Goods purchased of us, dtlivtr&l FREE OF
CHARGE and with punctuality. “6ft
E. deYoung a co.
Nevada. Sept. 1856,—1-tf
nMz; d
33 Broad Street, Nevada,
Offer to the trade the largest and best se
lected stock of Merchandise to lie found In this city, at
the lowest market prices for CASH.
All Goods sold by us delivered free of charge in and near
town.
P ROVISIONS.
Billing’s Hams; New York and Boston Sugar cured do.
Oregon Hams; Oregon Bacon;
pork in whole or half barrels; New York Bacon;
Pork in whole or half barrels; New i
California and Oregon smoked Beef;
Tlios. Hope A Co. selected Orange County Butter;
Jay L. Adams A Co. “ ** “ “
I An’.; Flour.
GROCERIES.
A full and complete assortment of all descriptions.
ALE AND PORTER.
Tennant’s and Byass’. in quarts and pints.
XXX New York Stock Ale, in hlids. and half barrels,
brewed expressly for the California market.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Genuine Havana, various choice brands;
Domestic, various choice brands;
Fruit Tobacco;
Let Her Rip Tobacco.
CASED GOODS.
Adamantine and Sperm Candles; Soap,
Assorted Jellies,
Catsup,
I .onion Syrup,
Pine Apple Syrup,
Gome Syrup,
Strawberries,
Pine Apple,
Fresh Apples,
Pears.
Quinces,
Lobsters,
Turkey,
Chicken,
Green Cora,
Orgeat,
Oder,
Oysters,
Pickles,
Blackberries,
Pie Fruits,
Wolfe’s Aromatic Schnapps,
Annisetta,
Sautern Wine,
Hock Wine.
Claret Wine,
Champagne. Heidsick.
CliAinpapne. Minin's Cabinet,
Raisins,
Ginger Wine,
Vermouth,
Wormwood Cordial,
Masa shine,
Kindi,
Rasberry Syrup,
Strawberry do.
Brandy Peaches,
LIQUORS AND WINES.
Old Pinett Cartilleon A Co. Brandy,
L Sazerac DeForge,
A Brillioun,
I/mis I/.* Burton A Co. Vintage 1805,
Yin I/mis.
Bcrcoit Trioch'o A Co. -
J. A F. Martcll,
Marett A Co..
Champagne. United Vineyard Proprietors,
L. Seignette,
Meders A Wolfs’ Swan Gin,
Jamaica and St. Croix Rum,
New England Rum,
Old Reserve and Bourbon Whiskey,
Scotch and Irish Whiskey,
Old Tom,
Pale and Brown Sherry, in wood and Glass,
Old Madeira, in wood and Glass,
Old Port, in wood and Glass,
For sale by
TEAL A CO.,
51 -tf 33 Broad Street, Nevada
JESSE S. WALL & BROTHER,
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
Miner'* Supplies, Preserved Fruits, Liquor*, &c.
No. 55 Broad Street, Nevada.
HAVING completed our new fire-proof building, we arc
now receiving the largest Stock of Goods ever brought
to this place. Having plenty of room, and being secure
against fire, it is our intention to keep on hand at all times
a full assortment of all articles to be found in similar estab
lishments, which will be sold to Miners and I am dies
On tlie most Reasonable Terms,
Our Stock consists in part of the following asssortinent of
Family Groceries. Ac.
3,000 Lbs. S. C. Hams,
100 Bibs. 'Tour;
3,000 IJ: *e Bacon; I
1,000 Lbs. Lard;
With a complete stock of SUGAR, COFFEE, TEA, RICE,
TOBACCO, FRESH FRUITS, HARDWARE, QUEENSWARK,
ftOT GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE
600 Qr. Sacks Flour;
10,000 Lbs. Potatoes;
8.000 Lbs. Hams;
3,000 Lbs Goshen butter
We invite the attention of Country Dealers to our large
stock of Goods. As wo have unusual facilities for purchas
ing, we are confident that wo can sell on such terms as will
make it to their advantage to trade with us instead of
goiug below Cur their supplies.
J. S. WALL A BROTHER, Broad Street.
September 16, 1866—tf.
POLITICAL 81UN8,
PENNSYLVANIA AND THC N0TRHWK8T
The Pennsylvania and north western papers
come to us laden with the most cheering accounts
for the democratic cause. The people of the
States northwest of the Ohio, formed out of the
generous bequest of Virginia, with generous
hearts seem determined to remember the noble
conduct of‘Old Dominion,’ and to stand by her
in the struggle for equal rights. For that is
now the true issue, the equal l ights of the States
of the Union. They know uo contest between
the North and the South, but standing close by
the constitution, the Union, aud that great first
principle which lies at the foundation of both,
State equality, they are resolved to rebuke the
spirit of fanaticism which wyuld outrage them
all.
WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA.
A great democratic gathering was held at
Pittsburg on the 10th of last month. The Pitts
burg Union, of the 11th, says:
“Our great mass convention in this city came
oft' yesterday, and we cannot attempt to describe
amid the din, dust, and confusion still around
us, the numbers and enthusiastic feelings of the
thousands that were in attendance. At a very
moderate estimate, we set it down that there
were not less than twenty thousand people on
the convention ground. The heat of the day
and the clouds of dust flying having rendered
it uncomfortable to march in procession, the
great proportion of the people proceeded to the
grounds by the cars, carriages, omnibuses, and
private conveyances, but, notwithstanding all
this, the procession was grand and imposing.
PENNSYLVANIA WII-L DO IlEli DL'TY.
Before the election in Maine was held, an in
telligent citizen of Philadelphia wrote as follows
to the editor of the Portland Argus :
“We expect to lose Maine. 1 doubt if you
appreciate suflieieutly there tin one terrible
truth that the election of Fremont is, per se, the dis
solution of the Union. It would not merely en
danger the Union and leave it doubtful, but this
question is now as distinctly before the people
as if union or disunion was upon their ballots.
In order to elect Fremont, lie must receive 149
northern electoral votes. In that event the out
lawry of the southern States proclaimed by the
sectional convention at Philadelphia will have
been confirmed by the northern people, aud a
political geographical division will have been
accomplished. The rest would speedily follow.
But, thanks to the steady character of the peo
ple of this good old State, they are destined, as
1 firmly believe, to ward oft' the danger. Fre
mont is comparatively so weak that no attempt
lias yet been mode to form a Wad repulican
electoral ticket here. The Americans have
formed a Fillmore ticket, and the black repub
licans are endeavoring to make an arrangement
with them; but the attempt, 1 venture to say,
will prove vain. But whether they unite or
whether they divide, the result will be the same.
Along the frontier counties of the State, border
ing on Maryland and Virginia, which would
probably be the border counties in case of dis
union, very great changes have taken place in
our favor.”
omo in a ni.AZE!—twenty-five thousand demo
crats IN COUNCIL.
The following telegraphic despatch, (says the
Ohio Statesman of the 10th.) received last even
ing from Seneca county, is another evidence of
the monster democratic meetings that are tak
ing place all over Ohio, and so cheering to the
hearts of the friends of our grent aud noble
Union.
“Let no one hereafter doubt the patriotic de
votion of the people of Ohio to the Union of
these States. Such a universal outpouring of
the democracy as is witnessed day after day in
Ohio has had no paruicl in the history of our
politics. We have seen good, great, and enthu
siastic meetings, but nothing equal to what is
now witnessed in every part of the State:
Tiffin, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1856.
“S. Medary: Immense democratic assemblage
here, estimated fully twenty-five thousand pres
ent. 1‘ugli, Vullandigham, and Gaston all
speaking; five stands. First procession one hour
and three-quarters passing the Shawau house; af
terwards a procession of two miles in length on
road from Sandusky and the north. The city is
literally overflowing with people. Great en
thusiasm.
“I)em. Central Committee.”
THE CANVASS IN MICHIGAN —THE STATE SAFE FOR
BUCK AND BKECK.
The great democratic mass meetings recently
held at Kalamazoo and Pontiac—in point of
numbers and enthusiasm without a parallel in
the history of the State—must satisfy every
candid mind as to the real state of public feel
ing in Michigan. We are indebted to a corres
pondent of the New York Day Book for the
subjoined interesting account of these remarka
ble popular demonstrations:
“The great democratic meeting at Kalamazoo
and Pontiac, last Friday and Saturday, far ex
ceeded in number the anticipation of the most
sanguine. The Kalamazoo meeting numbered
not less than 30,000 people, brought together
from the western counties of the State.—
Speeches were made by Messrs. Breckinridge
and Preston from Kentucky, Daniel S. Dickin
son from New York, Bright from Indiana, Cass,
McClelland (Secretary of Interior,) Felch, La
throp, Stewart, and others of our own State.—
At Pontiac, Messrs. Breckinridge, Preston,
Dickinson, Cass, aud Felch, spoke to ail im
mense multitude, numbering not less than 25,-
000. Both meetings were characterized through
out with the greutest enthusiasm. At Pontiac
our friends had prepared an old fashioned bar
becue, which is a new feature in meetings in this
section. At both places Mr. Breckinridge was
received with most tremendous cheers from
more than 20,000 stout democratic lungs, which
were echoed, and will be re-echoed, over the
prairies of Michigan till the 4th of November
shall send back the glad sounds that Kentucky’s
gallaut son fills the second place in the gift of
the American people, while ‘Old Buck’ stands
at the helm of the good old ship, Constitution.
“I must notice one incident of the Pontiac
meeting. The States were represented by young
ladies dressed in white, eacli 'rearing a banner
with the name of a particular State upon it. In
this groupe Kansas was not forgotten, but she
also had her representative in the person of a
beautiful young girl, not rolled in black, as the
black republicans would have done, but in gar
ments of spotless white, and a garland of flow
ers upon her head. It is needless to say that
the young Kansas was greeted with loud and
continued shouts, while the roar of camion wel
comed her to the confederacy of States untram
meled by the provisos of sectional fanatics.
THE CANVASS IN ILLINOIS. —COLONEL RICHARDSON
IN THE FIELD.
At the grand democratic mass meeting at Rock
Island' on the 0th, there were upwards of seven
thousand democrats present, notwithstanding a
severe rain storm prevailed at the time, Both
Judge Douglas and Col. Richardson addresed
the meeting with great power and effect. The
editor of the Chicago Timet, who was present,
says:
“We do not believe that any body of men ever
displayed more devotion to political truth than
the gallant democracy of Kock Island city and
couuty in standing six hours unprotected* in a
rain, to hear the principles of their party ex
pounded.”
A correspondent of the Chicago Timer, thus
notices a large and enthusiastic democratic rally
in Bureau county:
“Without any previous effort, without having !
imitated the example of the Lovejoyites, and
scoured the country to drum up the people
without having given the matter extensive pub
licity, and without making any attempt to draw
the people from the neighboring counties, but
by simply stating that “Old Dick” aud other
speakers were to be here, W’e had the largest
meeting of Bureau county ever before assembled.
It is estimated that about five thousand people
were present. The procession was a mile and a
half long, notwithstanding a very large propor
tion of the people, who arrived in town before
it was formed, hud unhitched their teams, aud
did not join in the procession.
“The number present would have been much
greater, and the procession would have been
much longer, had not the meeting at Morris
been held on the same day. Many democrats
from the eastern portion of the county went to
the Morris meeting to hear Douglas and Van
Buren. 1 am informed that teventeen wagon-load «
went from one towuship alone!”
At the great demonstration at Freeport up
wards of ten thousand persons were present
After noticing at length this glorious rally of
the democracy, a correspondent of the Times
says:
“Col. Richardson, the gallant, glorious “Old
Dick,’ the'next governor of Illinois, took the
stand, and in his own eloquent, plain, and
straightforward manner showed clearly the dis
union and destructive tendencies of hypocritical
black-republicanism on the one hand, and on
the other that the principles of the democracy
of to-day were the principles of a Jefferson, a
Washington, a Madison, a Monroe, and a Jack
son, and identically those the observance of
which has made our country what it is.”
“Old Dick' has a way of proving his positions
by the record. If ever a noble hearted patriot
of clear head and true courage lived, Col. Rich
ardson is one. He was followed in an eloquent
manner in the German language, by Mr. Louis
Schade, of Washington, D. C. Dr. Leib, next
occupied the stand. Then followed Hon. R. S.
Moloney, the candidate of the democracy of the
1st district of Illinois for Congress.
“Dr. Moloney is a very able and excellent
public speaker, and on this occasion he made
one of the best and strongest political speeches
to which we ever listened.
“So closed a day long to be remembered iu
Old Stephenson.”
All'll I rn nt Pniinmn.
An election was recently hekf in Panama for
Governor, which resulted in the election of Sr.
Bartolome Calvo, by a majority of seven thous
and votes over Sr. Diaz. The election was at
tended with great excitement.
The partizans of the Diaz faction, were ex
citing the negroes to rebellion; and, but for the
presence of U. S. vessels of war at Panama,
there is little doubt but they would have suc
ceeded in reducing the city to ashes, and mur
dering all the inhabitants ere this. Business
had been at a perfect stand-still for the past
week, stores were closed, peaceable men are
obliged to go armed, and no man’s life was safe.
The government lias been threatened by an
armed mob of organized negroes, who boast that
they will sack the city and murder the white
population.
The Star and Herald of October 1st, says ;
“We hoped that the legal election of Sr. Bar
tolome Calvo, would have ended the state of
suspense in which the city has been kept. In
this w’e have been disappointed. When the
hour of meeting of the Legislature arrived yes
terday, (ID,) the members who had absconded
from the House for four days, and whose places
had been refilled after so much delay, present
ed themselves and took possession of their seats
and among them was the Vice President, Ur
rutia Aniuo, who had the hardihood to seat him
self in the presidential chair.
This step led to a violent discussion in the
House, which resulted in the drawing of weap
ons and the wounding of one of the members.
The Assembly was broken up, open violence
was threatened by the Diaz faction, the police,
national guard and a large body of volunteers
were called out, and the negroes were dispers
ed. The boats from the Independence and St.
Marys were prepared, and lay off the town all
the afternoon in expectation of an attack upon
their countrymen, and the greatest excitement
prevailed throughout the city.
Up to the hour of going to press however, no
encounter took place, although one is momenta
rily expected.
Commodore Mervine has, with the consent of
the Governor, placed a guard of Marines on
shore to protect American interests, and will be ■
compelled to keep them here until these troub
los are settled.
The populace outside the walls are no more j
subdued now than they were before the arrest
of their political leaders —they still have their j
arms—they still have those men amonst them
who, when the opportunity serves, will rouse |
their courage, and still worse, those fiend
ish and brutal passions which always have char- \
acterised a rising of the negro race,
To add to the uneasiness of the Americans at
Panama, it is rumored that the United States
vessels will soon be called away, to attend to
affairs on the Mexican coast.
A Hivr to Church Sleepers. —At the ortho
dox church in Westminster, Mass., on a recent
Sunday, the clergyman, an aged minister, was
preaching from the text —“I speak as unto wise
men; understand ye what I say.” He advanced
as far as “thirdly,” when he observed that many
of his hearers, overcome by the heat of the day,
had fallen asleep. Stopping his discourse, and
wiping the perspiration from his furrowed brow,
he exclaimed, “My friends, as the day is sultry
and oppressive, I will stop awhile, and re
quest the choir in the meantime to sing the tune
‘Coronation,’ commencing. ‘My drowsy powers
why sleep ye m>V ” The effect of this innova
tion, as may lie supposed, was to completely
destroy any disposition to sleep which might
have prevailed among the congregation. The
hymn concluded, the minister resumed his dis
course.
Jews in the Austrian Army. —According to
the Altgemeine Zeitung, there are 12,000 Jews in
the Austrian army, of whom more than 600 are
officers, surgeons with the rank of officers, aud
members of the auditing department. A great
portion of the remainder are subalterns, many
of them owing their positions mainly to the fact
that they can read and write German, an ac
complishment not very common in the Austrian
army, which is necessarily composed of various
nationalities.
WHOLE NO. 159.
One tvho died without Living.
M. Faul Legrand died at Dijou, in Burgundy,
at the age of seventy-one, leaving the follow
ing memoir, whereby he proves that he has not
lived:
All that is suffering, sorrow, ennui, despair,
desire, regret, should be deducted from life, be
cause we should ourselves have deducted it had
heaven permitted. When three years old 1 was
weaned; at six l could speak but badly; at seven
I split my skull; at nine I> was cured. I must
therefore extract nine years from my existence;
for surely to drink a nurse’s sour milk, not to
speak, or badly, to split one’s skull, is not liv
ing. At the age of nine I began my studies.—
Owing to my cracked skull, my bead was a hard
one, and 1 proved stubborn to tuition. I re
quired two years’ labor to spell the alphabet.
1 was indebted to letter Z alone four score hun
dred lashes; the other twenty-three letters made
a complete martyr of me. At the age of twelve
I could read, but my body was mangled with the
alphabet sears. An attempt was made to teach
me Latin, and I lost my French in the experi
ment. At fifteen I knew nothing at all, and a
forced diet of bread and water had reduced me
to the condition of a skeleton. Six years more
had therefore to be deducted. At sixteen my
father made me a notary’s clerk. There com
menced a new species of martyrdom. I got up
at six, swept the office, lighted the stove, was
drubbed by the taller clerks, uud my father
overwhelmed with complaints against me, de
prived me of iny dinner. This sort of life I led
for five years, and from life I will positively de
duct them. At twenty iny father, quite disgust
ed with his son, put me on board a ship at Cher
bourg. I washed the deck, dfupt up the top
mast, mended the sails, and received thirty
lushes a day on my back. This was endured for
four years. At twenty-four my father made me
a haljerdasher. I married Mademoiselle Ursulc
Desvousins, a turner’s daughter. Her portion
consisted of thirty thousand livres, mortgaged
upon a sugar estate in St. Domingo. The day
after the wedding I found out that my wife had
a wooden leg, made by father-in-law, the turn
er. The poor woman made a thousand apolo
gies for her infirmity, and I pardoned her out of
regard to her marriage portion. The St. Do
mingo blacks rose against the whites, and burnt
the marriage portion, and the wooden leg was
left to me. At thirty I lost my wife in conse
quence of a scrofulous disease in her real leg.
I spent six years of marriage repenting every
minute. What folly 1 committed in taking that
leg! 1 therefore deduct these six years from
my life. Having, as everybody else, slept a
third part of my life, I deduct 24 years, of sleep,
and I am now below the right reckoning, for I
was a great sleeper. A year lost, adding min
ute to minute, in searching for the keys of my
desk, which I was continually mislaying. Does
one live when he looks for a key ? Three years
lost in having myself shaved and powdered, Ac.
Five years lost in suffering toothache, two infla
inations of the chest, with relapses and conva
lescence. Three years lost in saying, -“What's
o’clock?’’ “we have bad weather to-day;” “‘how
do you do ? “how is your lady?” “‘I have a
bad cold,” "Marlborough s’en va-t-en guerre—
what mud in the street—what a winter this
year!” Six months lost in having the mud
brushed off one, and six in brushing one’s hat.
One year of endurance of the entire acts of the
theater. One year lost in listening to tbo mod
ern dramas, the cJitfd' oeuvre of genius not under
stood. One year lost in complaining of salt
and tasteless soups, of cutlets too much or too
undone of indi . sfom or hard eggs. Total 71
years, I beg leave to declare that in giving up
the ghost 1 do not give up anything worth
keeping.
Cultivation ok Cotton in Algeria —The
growth of cotton in Algeria forms the subject
of a rather interesting report from Marshal
Vaillunt to the Emperor, which was published
in the Moniteur. In this document the Minister
of War recognizes the good effect of the decrees
of the 16th of October, by which an annual prize
of $20,000 was allotted, for live years, to the
liest cotton-grower in the Franeo-Afriean colo
ny; and for three years, commencing with 1854,
the whole cotton produce of Algeria was order
ed to be purchased by the State, at a fixed price
beforehand, and advantageous to the producer.
In consequence of this encouragement, the
growth of cotton has increased, and it has been
proved not only that tbe plant flourishes in
many districts of tin; colony, but tlmt its quality
is comparable to that of the finest produce of
the United States. A prolongation of the ad
vantages assured to the producer is suggested,
and it has accordingly been decreed that the
Government w ill continue to purchase the whole
of the Algerine cotton until the crop of 1858
inclusively. It may not be uninteresting to our
manufacturers to watch the progress of this
fresh field, which, judiciously nurtured by the
French Government, may, perhaps, ere many
years have passed, compete for their custom
with the vast cotton grounds of the States. It
is yet too soon to risk a prediction as to what
Algeria may do in this way; but present ap
pearances are favorable, and doubtless France
will neglect no means of converting iuto a pro
fitable colony a territory which has hitherto
served but as an expensive training ground for
her soldiers.— London Tim?*.
Cholorokoh'i in Poisoning.— The Rochester
Democrat, of Sept. 15th, records a case of acci
dental poisoning from strychnine in which cholo
roform was successfully applied to relieve the
terrible spasms of the patient. The person took
four grains of strychnine in mistake for another
powder. As soon as the mistake was discover
ed, an emetic was given. Two large emetics
taken in quick succession, failed to produce
vomiting. The patient was convulsed with the
severest forms of tetanic spasms. His jaws were
firmly locked, and it wus impossible to open his
mouth to administer remedies. The approach
towards his mouth caused a recurrence of the
spasms. Choloroform was applied, which reliev
ed the spasms in about three minutes, and stop
ped them completely in ten minutes, when a
third powerful emetic was given. If the cholo
roform application was remitted, the spasms in
stantly returned in full force, so that it was
found necessary to keep the patient constantly
under the influence of the Kinesthetic. In about
ten minutes after the third emetic was taken,
vomiting was produced. The patient was kept
under the influence of cholo Morin till the next
morning. During tbe time .hat the spasmodic
action was controlled by the choloroform, the
system had opportunity to throw off the poison
that had been taken up by tbe absorbents, and
when that was effected, tin* patient was out of
danger. He hail retained his conseiousnes dur
ing the whole of the period that he suffered from
the effects of the poison.
Arrest ok Two Robbers. —The Mariposa Ga
zette says : “Last Sunday’s stage brought Mr. A.
F. Noles, Constable from Sonora, having in his
charge John Riley, alia* Jaek Cowan, alias Tex
as Jack, alias Jack Price and Robert Poor.—
They were arrested in Sonora, on a charge of
assault with deadly weapons. They are also
eharged with robbing a Chinaman near Ridley s
Ferry, on the Merced river, and have been
lodged in our jail to await their trial for the
above offence.”
J. G. Hubert Sanders. —The Courts of _ San
Francisco are proceeding with the legal business
of this alledged swiudler, upon tbe presumption
that his reported death at sea is true.

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