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The Nevada Democrat. [volume] (Nevada, Calif.) 1854-1863, November 26, 1856, Image 1

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VOL. IV, NO. 8.
NEVADA DEMOCRAT,
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY MORNING,
BY I. J. ROLFE & CO.
OFFICE—BROAD STREET, NEVADA,
T E RM S I
For one year, in advance, 9®
Six months, „ ....
Three months, "
Single Copies, - a cts -
BUSINESS CARDS
ROSENHEIM & BRO.
WATCHMAKERS AND JEWELERS,
AX'D DEALERS IX .
Watches, Jewelry, DI«mo«d», &e.
At their Old Stand, Main Street, Nevada.
HOSES ROSENHEIM, AARON ROSENHEIM,
p. S.—GOI.D DUST BOUGHT AT THE HIGHEST MAR
KET FRICK. 46 ' <f -
CHAS. W. YOUNG,
MAxrrAcrcRKR or
CALIFORNIA JEWELRY,
WATCHMAKER,
AND —
DEALER IN FIXE WATCHES. JEWELRY, DIA
MOND WORK, iLc.
Junction of Main and Commercial Streets. Nevada,
CHARLES W. MULFORI),
BA N K K R,— At his Old Stand, on Main Street,
Nevada. 1 will pay the highest prices tor Gold) Dlsl,
GOLD BARS, and COUNTY ORDERS; will procure Drafts
payable in any of the Atlantic States Canada, or Europe,
in ’ sums to suit: forward Dust for Coinage at the l. ..
Branch Mint, and if desired, will make advances on the
'"*S10HT CHECKS on DRKXEL, SATHER A CHURCH, San
)r rnneiggo. AT PAR.
WILLIAMSON & DAWLEY,
BANKERS, and dealer* in GOLD DUST No. 30 Muir.
Street. Nevadan. .... . *
»SJOHT CHECKS <*» <5*rriion, Morgan. I viit A* Ralston,
Sac r* turn to. AT PAR. . ,
BILLS OF EXCHANGE oo New York or St. I/ous, at the
J 0 *arGUR Ksn .rr.R. bv tiif. fiask or rouNiu [tf_
F. MANSELL,
Sign and Ornamental Painter,
All work promptly attended to, and in the best style of
art. Commercial street. above Pine. Nevada.
THOM AS'MARSH,
SIGN AND ORNAMENTAL PAINTING,
No. 10 Commercial Street. Nevada. i£_1_
FIRN ITU RE W A K E R O O M S .
john McFarland,
PE.AI.ltU IN
rcRsrruRE, beds, matrasses, pillows, pil
low CASES, SHEETS, *■■■
No. 14 Commercial Street. Nevada. 21-tf
HTANTON BUCKNER, C. WII-SON B1LI.,
BUCKNER A HILL,
HAVING associated tlie.ii.elves t.-redos' in the practice
of the Liw. will attend promptly to all biisincs, con
11,fed to their care in Nevada and adjoining counties.
Okficf Over C. \V. Mulibrd’s Banking House. Main st.,
Nevada.’
July 2, 1856.—PMf
GEO. W. YANT,
I>AV!D BEI.DKN.
BKLDEN Y.WT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
firmv.. No. 4 Second atury of Alban n llnck Building
Corner Brood and Pine Streets, Nevada. C tC
H. I. THORNTON, Jr.,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LA (Y.
Office— In Kel ev's Brick Building, Commercial street,
below Pine street. Nevada.
51 If
WM. E. ANDERSON,
attorney and counselor at law.
Office— Front Room, up stairs, Democrat Building. Broad
street. Nevada.
J . I . CALDWELL
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR A T LA IF.
Office, No. 10 Bicknei.l’.s Block, Broad st. Nevada.
Nevada, Aug. 27, 1850,—47-If .
*. II. CHASE. OKO. R. Ill PF.
CHASE & HUPP,
AT TOR NE YS AT L A W.
0,-ftk— Front Boom, up stairs, of Democrat Office, Broad
Htreet, Nevada.
HAM IN J. DUNN,
HKNKY MEREDITH.
DUNX & MEREDITH,
A TTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS A T LA W
Office—Second Stor\ of Alban’s Brick Building, corner
Broad and Pine Streets, Nevada.
J. R. M’CONXKLL, WM. M. RTF WART,
McCOXKELL & STEWART,
ATFJRNEYS AXD COUNSELORS AT LAW.
Will practice in all tlie Courts of the Fourteenth Judicial
District, and in the Supreme Court.
Office—Crittenden’s Brick Building, Main Street. [4-tf
AV G. von POEIjliNITZ, M. D.
r h ysicia n and surgeon ,
Ten iers his profeesional services to the citizens o J Neva
da and vicinity.
Office—At Frank Thayer's Drug Store, No. 14 Commer
cial street. [3-tf
OVERTON, ~
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
OFFICE —Alban's Brick Building—rear of the Drug Store—
Nevada. 46-tf
MeIlOBERTS, PtXSTOX <fc CO,
NEVA DA ,
DEALERS IX
Family Groceries, Provisions, Wines, IjI
quor«, and miners Supplies.
KILBOURN’S CORNER, Opposite A. Block & Co’s., comer
Fine and Commercial streets.
w. a. m’roferts, m. h. ftxwtox, jxo. pattlson.
BLACKMAN, HOWARD & CO.
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
W I N E S AND LIQ.CORS,
85 Clay Street,
BeUoeen Battery and Front, me Door East of the Railroad
SAX FRANCISCO,
trg- Orders from the interior command our particular
attention. 0. P. BLACKMAN,
House.
8 lv
( HAS. WEBB HOWARD,
C. H. BLACKMAN.
AMERICAN EXCHANGE CIGAR STORE,
Comer of Main and Washington Streets,
[XHE Undersigned keeps constantly on hand the choicest
brands of Havana CIGARS, together with the best ar
Licles of Chewing and Smoking TOBACCO. For sale, whole
sale and retail. [5‘2-tf] A. WITKOWSKI.
PALMER& McKENNEY,
JVEVADA CAR I RAGE SUP!
No.' 10 WASHINOTON ST., A hove FRISRIES’ RENTArRAXT.
Particular attention paid to REPAIRING, 'St
Wheelbarrows kept on liand, and for sole.
Aug. 18, 1856. #6-tf
d, K. WrTHINGTON. A. O. BKNTLT,
WITHINGTON & BENTL.Y,
DEALERS IN
French and American Paper Hanging*,
WINDOW Shades. Brass Cornice, Gold Mouldings, Paint*
fcc. Painting of all kinds, and paper hanging execu
ted in the best style, at short notice.
49-tf No. 7, Broad street, Nevada.
D.& B. LACHMAN,
NO. 60 BROAD STREET, NEVADA.
—DIALERS IN—
Harnrare,
Stove*,
Tin-Ware,
• Crockery, &c. Ac.
49* All kinds of Tin Ware made to order. [email protected]
Sept. 1856. 49 3m D. fc B. LACHMAN.
f c. —— — —
Pep?. PRINTING, (IP AIX KINDS. NKATLY EXE-
THE NEVADA DEMOCRAT.
TRAVELING
FOR RACRAME.VTO.
Leaves Nevada at 1 o’clock, A. M., and arriving at Fac
ineuto in time for the 2 o’clock boats for Fan Francisco.
Also, at 4 o’clock, A. M., running via Auburn, as an Ac
commodation Line to Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA STAGE COMPANY.
tHE STAGES of this Company will leave their Office, at
Frisbie’s old Stand, Nevada, as follows:
FOR MARYSVILLE.
leaves the above named Office every morning at seven
o’clock, A. M., passing through Grass Valley, Rough k
Readv. Empire Ranch, and Ixmg Bar, and arriving in Ma
rysville at 3 o’clock P. M.
FOR FOREST CITY, POWNTKVILLE, PATTKRSOV, WOLSEY’S,
MOORE’S. AND ORLEANS FLATS.
Leaves every morning at 6 1-2 o’clock A. M.
JAMl* HAWORTH,
Pres’t. C. S. Co.
W. S. McRobkrts, Agent, Nevada. [tf
NEVADA & WASHINGTON STAGE LINE.
ON AN1) A ITER JANUARY 1, 1866, the above Line will
run as follows:
leaving the office, at Frisbie’s old Stand. Nevada, at 8
o’clock, A. M, passing by Mountain Spring House, Morgnn’s,
Cold Spring, White Cloud, Gold Hill and Alpha, arriving
at Washington by one o’clock in the afternoon.
It is the nearest and best Route to Washington, Omega.
Scotchman’s Creek, Poor Man's Creek, and Eureka.
Returning,—The Stages will leave the South Yuba Hotel.
Washington, every morning at nine o'clock, and arrive at
Nevada by one o’clock P. M.. connecting with the Cali
fornia Stage Co’s Coaches for Auburn, Sacramento. Marys
ville and Shasta.
Office—South Yuba Hotel, Washington.
A. S. 01JN, Proprietor.
W. S. McRohekts, Agent. Nevada. [34-tf
Spring and Summer Arrangement.
1ELG6KAPH LING.
Six Horse Coaches from Nevada to Camptonville,
OS AVI) ALTER APRIL loth, the alx>ve Line of Stages
will leave the Office of the California Stage Company,
at Friable’# old Stand, Nevada, every morning, at seven
o’clock, A. M., running by Oak Tree Ranch, San Juun, and
Iless’ Crossing, arriving at Camptonville at 12 M.
Returning—The Stages will leave the National Hotel.
Camptonville, every morning, at seven o’clock, A. M.. and
arrive at Nevada in time to connect with the California
Stage Company’s Une of Stages for Sacramento City, Ma
rysville and Auburn.
Ai* • Express Matter promptly attended to.
A. WAGENER, Proprietor.
W. S. McRomnrr*. Ag’t. Nevada. [33-tf
EMPIRE LIVERY STABLE,
Broad Street, Nevada,
GEORGE MAY, Proprietor.
THE UNDERSIGNED WOULD INFORM HIS
friends and the public generally, that he has
become Proprietor of the EMPIRE LIVERY
STABLE, and as he designs keeping constant
ly on hand
A Stock of Fast Horses,
Would respectfully solicit the patronage of the Public.
Horses kept by the Day or Week ou the most rea
gonable terms.
20-tf GEORGE MAY,
M
LIVERY & SALK STABLE.
M A IN STREET,\ NE VA DA.
,T. A. LANCASTER. FORMERLY OF THE
Metropolis Stable, would inform his friends
and the public generally, that he has added
extensively to his already Large and Ele
gant establishment of Ilorses. Buggies, Saddles, Harness,
Ac. Ac.—they are now prepared to furnish as line turn
ouN as can be fonnd in the State.
Well trained fleet and easy Saddle Horses, well equipped
for 1 ndies or Gentlemen will be ready at ail times.
A long experience in the business and a?i earnest desire
to retain the confidence of his friends, leads him to be
lieve li* will be able to give general satisfaction.
Particular attention paid to Horses on Livery
Carriages always in readiness with careful drivers for the
use of Balls, Parties, kc. kc..
The quality of our stock will permit us to say that those
seeking pleasure or engaged on business would do well to
give us a call. ' J. A. LANCASTER.
Nevada. Aug. 20. I860.—16-* f
NOTICE TO TE A DI8TERL
TXT AGON ROAD from Nevada to Down Seville, by way of
\ V R< »BINH >N 'S <WJHST X(J.
1 his Road is in fim* condition, and presents the shortest
route and Inst road for Packers and Teams to ail the vari
ous settlements along the Divide, between the South and
Middle and the Middle and North Yu has, by way of Hess’
and Emery’s Crossing 4 *.
The Road also affords the nearest route for Packers ami
Traveler# from Sacramento, by wav of Rough k Ready,
Grass Valley and Nevada, and the mines further South, to
poor man’s Creek, Nelson’s Creek. and all the mining re
gion north of Nevada and llownieville.
This Road is as easily traveled as that lietween Sacra
mento and Nevada. Four horses can readily draw from
three to four thousand pounds of freight, from Nevada to
the top of the hill at Pownieville, when the road is not ob
structed 1)v heavy rains or snow.
W. E. ROBINSON; Proprietor.
June 11th, 1856—40 ly*
BOOTS AND SHOES.
S MAYERS k WM R. COE, (successors to P. J. B>pen
• seheid,) corner of Main and Commercial Streets, would
respectfully inform the public that they have purchased
the large and well selected Stork of HOOTS AND SHOES,
contained in the above establishment, and hope by strict
attention to business to merit a share of the public pat
ronage.
Having just received from Pan Francisco a choice and
well selected stock of Boots and Shoes, 1 Julies’ and Misses’
Baiters, Buskins. Slippers. Children’s Shoes. kr.. &<*.. they
would respectfully invite all those wanting any thing in
the above line to give them a call, as thev believe, for va
riety, quality und cheapness, their stock Is unsurpassed in
tin* mountains.
Repairing done on the shortest notice, in a workmanlike
manner, and on the most reasonable terms.
H. MAYERP.
wm. r. cob:.
Mn. P. Mayf.rs, late of Grass Valley, and Wm. R. Coe,
formerly of the Broad Street Boot and Shoe Store, have
purchased my entire stock of Boots and Shoes, and I would
cheerfully recommend them to the public as gentlemen
every way worthy their support, and would respectfully
solicit for them the patronage of mv old friends and custo
mers [32-tf] P. J. ESI'FNSCHKIP.
$10,000 WORTH OP FTJRITUNRE!
ENTIRE NEW STOCK, THE LARGEST AND
best selected ever brought into the mountains,
. all of which will be sold cheap for CASH, con
1 sisting of
Bedsteads of all sl7.es;
Cane and Wood Seat Chairs:
Cane and Wood Peat Office Chairs*
Pining, Card and Center Tables;
Extension and Reading Tables;
Office Desks and Furniture;
Barl#.*r’s Chairs; Wash Stands;
Looking Glasses of all sizes;
Cane Seat and Back Arm Rockers and Nurse Chairs;
Mattrasses; Pillows; pillow Cases;
Sheets; Comforters; Feathers, kr.
The undersigned would respectfully invite the attention
of their old customers and the public generally to their
new stock of goods
On the Corner of Pine and Commercial at*..
Where by strict attention to business they hope to merit a
liberal share of public patronage.
46 tf ABBOTT k EDWARDS.
Wholesale and Retail
LIQUOR STORE.
M;dn street, near Commercial, Nevada.
rYlHE undersigned would inform the public that he has
X now on hand a most extensive assortment of the
Best Liquors
Ever brought to this market. Having rebuilt his Fire
proof Building, with an excellent Cellar under it, he has
every facility for keeping any amount of Goods. lie will
keep a good supply of
WHISKEY, BRANDY, GIN,
WINES, PORTER, ALE,
ALE, CIDER, &c., Ac.
Also—All kinds of Case Liquors, Cordials, Syrups, Ac.
Which have been selected with the greatest care by com
petent judges, and which will be sold as low or lower than
any other establishment in the pUce.
He will continue the manufacture of SODA at his old
place, which is an article to well known too require recom
mendation.
Dealers and others wishing to purchase are respectfully
invited to call and examine my stock.
46 tf J. M. BLURPHUTZ.
BRENTANO & FURTH,
Corner Main and Flume Streets, North San Jcan,
Nevada County,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Clothing, Gents Furnishing Goods,
Boots and Shoes, Hats,
Blankets, k India Rubber Goods.
KEEP constantly on hand the largest and best Selected
Stock of Clothing Ac., in all its various branches to
be found in any Mountain town. The citizens of San Juan
and surrounding towns, will find it to their advantage to
give us a call, and examine the PRICE and QUALITY be
fore purchasing elsewhere. BRBINTANO k BURTH.
North San Juan, Sept., 3, 7856.—48-tf
TRUNKSS TRUNKSII TRUNKS!!!
TORTY DOLLAR TRUNKS, FOR SALE BY SOL KOHL
: MAN, No 45 Main 8treet, Corner Conmercial. Brick
uibling. opposite American Exchange Nevada.
NEVADA, CALIFORNIA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 26,1856.
GROCERIES
SAN FRANCISCO GROCERY AMD PROVI
SION STORE.
MOTTO!
“Small Profits and Qjalelc Returns.”
The undersigned would respectfully solicit
tlic attention of the Families and Miners of Nevada and
vicinity to their well selected stock of Family
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, Ac.,
Which cannot be exelled in quality, and at the lowest pri
ces. One of the firm constantly being in San Francisco,
affords us unequalled facilities for purchasing, by which
means we feel confident to be able give
GENERAL SATISFACTION AS TO PRICES.
We have also on hand Mining Implements of best makers.
N. B.—Hotel Keepers, Restaurants and Country Dealers,
would find it to their advantage to give us a call before
purchasing elsewhere.
A. ALEXANDER.
N. B.—-All Goods cellvered Free of Charge.
No. 35 Broad Street, BicknelPs Building. 46-tf
T. ELLAED BEANS & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, Queens ware,
.Mining Tools, &c., &c.
At the old favorite Stand of HAMLET DA VIS.
IN the Fire-Proof Block of Kiiiit and Knox, opposite the
United States Hotel, 52 Broad Street, Nevada.
HOTEL AND FAMILY STORES,
In every variety and of the choicest qualities.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE-®,
September 17th, 1856—50-tf
LANDEKER & GATZERT,
—DKALKRS IN—
Groceries and Provisions^
Keep constantly on hand a full supply of
all articles suitable for the Market, in their
Fire Proof Building, on Commercial St.
Where they will be happy to wait upon all that visit them.
J. S. LANDEKER resides at the Bay, where he is con
stantly purchasing for the house here, and no efforts shall
be spared to always keep on hand a full assortment of the
best quality, which will be sold at a low profit.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE -fc*
Call and see for yourselves. J. S. LANDEKER.
Nevada. Sept, 1856,—48-tf BAILEY GATZERT,
E. UE YOUNG & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, Crockery
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
No. 05 Broad Street--- -----------Nevada.
H
AS ON HAND the following articles, which will be sold
at a small advance for the ready CASH.
Hams in brine.
Extra Clear Pork,
Extra Clear Bacon,
lard, in kegs and tins,
New Goshen Butter,
Brandy,
Gin and Whiskey,
Porter and Ale,
Schnapps,
Port and Claret Wines,
Cal. BuMer, in 5 A 101b. tins Champaigne Wine,
New Orleans Sugnr,
Crushed Sugar,
Bar Sugnr.
China No. 1 Sugar,
Carolina Rice,
China Rico,
Boston Svrup,
Lemon Syrup,
Assorted Syrups,
Black and Green Teas,
Sperm Candles,
Adamantine Candles.
Can Fruits, in all varieties, Lamp Wicks,
Tobacco, of various brands,
Cigars,
Barrel Flour,
S. R. Flour,
Plain Flour,
Potatoes and Corn Meal,
Brooms and Shovels,
Hatches, Axes and Files.
Knives, Forks and Spoons,
Pick and Axe Helves,
Hoes,
Hill and Castile Soap,
Starch.
Cam phi ne,
Limp Oil.
Iron and Tin Ware,
Wrapping & Letter Paper,
Sin ok ad Beef,
Cal. and Goshen Cheese,
Nails, assorted sizes.
Shot, Powder and Fuse,
lanterns.
Cal. and Chili Beans,
Bayou Beans,
Ground Coffee,
Java and Rio Coffee,
('ostft Rica Coffee,
Dried Apples,
Chili Peaches,
Salt, in sacks and boxes,
Barley and Wheat,
Red Herring,
Cocoa
Tappioca,
Indigo, Maze, Nutmegs,
Cloves, Ginger, Alspice,
Pepper and Mustard,
Cream Tartar,
Saleratus,
Washing and Baking Soda,
Vermicilla and Macarona,
Mackerel,
Yeast Powders,
Pickles, in kegs and glass,
CYanberries,
Tomato Catsup,
Pepper Sauce,
Assorted Sauces,
Pie Fruits,
Quicksilver,
Jellies and Jams, in glass. lamp Glasses.
Also a variety of other articles too numerous to mention.
Our endeavors shall not be required to please those tliat
should favor us with a call for any of tjie above articles, or
we defy competition for the quality and prices of our
goods.
Alt Goods purchased of us. delivered FREE OF
CHA RGE and with punctuality.
e. Deyoung & co.
Nevada, Sept. 1856.—1-tf
33 lirond Street, Nevada,
Offer to the trade the largest and best se
lected stock of Merchandise to be found in this city, at
the lowest market prices for CASH.
All Gotsls sold by us delivered free of charge in and near
town.
PROVISIONS.
Billing's Hams; New York and Boston Sugar cured do.
Oregon Hams; Oregon Bacon;
l’ork in whole or half barrels: New York Bacon;
California and Oregon smoked Beef;
Tlios. Hope & Co. selected Orange County Butter;
Jay L. Adams & Co. “ “
Lard; Flour.
GROCERIES.
A full and complete assortment of all description*.
ALE AND PORTER.
Tennant’s and Byass’, in quarts and pints.
XXX New York Stock Ale, in hhds. and half barrels,
brewed expressly for the California market.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Genuine Havana, various choice brands;
Domestic, various choice brands;
Fruit Tobacco;
1s t Her Itip Tolmcco.
CASED GOODS.
Adamantine and Sperm Candles; Soap,
Assorted Jellies, Catsup,
Fie Fruits, Lemon Syrup,
Wolfe’s Aromatic Schnapps, Pine Apple Syrup,
Annisetta, Gome Syrup,
Hautern Wine, Strawberries,
Hock Wine, Pine Apple,
Claret Wine. Fresh Apples,
Champagne. Heidsick, Pears,
Champapne, Munn's Cabinet, Quinces,
Raisins, Lobsters,
Ginger Wine, Turkey,
Vermouth, Chicken,
Wormwood Cordial, Green Corn,
Masashine, Orgeat,
Kirsh, Cider,
Rasberry Syrup, Oysters,
Strawberry do, Pickles,
Brandy Peaches, Blackberries,
LIQUORS AND WIN ES.
Old Pinett Cartilleon & Co. Brandy,
I. Sazerac DeForge,
A Brillioun,
Louis Le Burton & Co. Vintage 1805,
Vin Louis,
Bercoit Triocho k Co.
J. k F. Martell,
Marett k Co..
Champagne, United Vineyard Proprietors,
L. Seignette,
Meders k Wolfs’ Swan Gin,
Jamaica and St. Croix Rum,
New England Run),
Old Reserve and Bourbon Whiskey,
Scotch and Irish Whiskey,
Old Tom,
Pale and Brown Sherry, in wood and Glass,
Old Madeira, in wood and Glass,
Old Port, in wood and Glass,
For sale by
TEAL k CO.,
61-tf 33 Broad Street, Nevada.
JESSE S. WALL & BROTHER,
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
Miner’s Supplies, Preserved Fruits, Liquors, fcc.
No. 55 Broad Street, Nevada.
[TAVING completed our new fire proof building, we are
tl now receiving the largest Stock or Goods ever brought
> this place. Having plenty of room, and being secure
gainst fire, it is our intention to keep on hand at all times
full assortment or all articles to be found in similar estab
shmentx. which will be sold to Miners **nd Famihea
On the moat Reasonable Terms.
Our Stock oonBists in part of the following asssortment of
amily Groceries, fcc
500 Qr. Sacks Flour;
10,000 Lbs. Potatoes;
8,000 Lbs. Hams;
3,000 Lbs Gosben butter
3,000 Lb*. S. C. Hams,
100 Bibs. Flour;
3,000 Lb*. Side Bacon;
1,000 Lbs Lard;
U. WV LI)» UOSUCU UUIVCI * 1 . ' n
With a complete stock of SUGAR COFFEE, TEA, RICE,
1BACCO, FRESH FRUITS, HARDWARE, viUEENSWARE,
«- GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE
We invite the attention of Country Dealers to our large
ock of Good*. As we have unusual facilities tor purchas
g, we are confident that we can sell on such term* a* will
ake it to their advantage to trade with u* instead of
dng below for their supplies.
, J. 8. WALL fc BROTHER. Broad Street
September 18 1W6 —tf.
Pour Great Men.
It is a remarkable fact, that the career of four
of the most renowned characters that ever lived
closed with some violent or mournful death.
Alexander, after having climbed the dizzy
heights of his ambition, and with his temples
bound with chaplets dipped in the blood of
countless nations, looked down upon a con
quered world, and wept that there was not
another one for him to conquer, set a city on
fire, and died in a drunken debauch.
llaunibal, after having, to the astonishment
and consternation of Rome, passed the Alps;
after having put to flight the armies of the mis
tress of the world, and stripped three bushels of
gold rings from the fingers of her slaughtered
knights, and made her very foundations qnake
—fled from his country, being hated by those
who once exultingly united his name with that
of our God, aud called him Hannibal—died at
last by poison, administered by his own hands,
unlamented and unwept, iu a foreign land.
Csesnr, after having conquered eight huudred
cities, and dyed his clothes in the blood of one
million of his foes; after having pursued to
death the only rival he had on earth; was mis
erably assassinated by those he considered his
nearest friends, and in that very place the at
tainment of which had been his greatest am
bition.
Bonaparte, whose mandate kings and empe
rors obeyed, after having filled the earth with
the terror of his name, deluged it with tears
and blood, and clothed the world with sack
cloth, closed his days in lonely banishment, al
most literally exiled from the world, yet where
he could sometimes see his country’s banner
waving over the deep, but which could not or
would not bring him aid.
Thus four men, who, from the peculiar situa
tion of their portraits, seem to stand as the
representatives of all those whom the world
called oukat— these four who, each in turn,
made the earth tremble to its very center by
their simple tread, severally died—one by in
toxication, or, as some suppose, by poison min
gled in his wine—one by suicide—one murder
ed by his friends —and one in lonely exile.
Black Hole of Calcutta.
There are many persons, no doubt, who have
never heard the origin of this often quoted pas
sage; for them and others who may have per
haps forgotten the subject, we copy the follow
ing article which tells the whole mournful story:
Lord Clive, while a Colonel of the British ar
my, commenced his career as founder of the
British 'empire in India. Full of honors and
wealth he returned to England, but being de
feated in getting into Parliament, in 1755 sailed
under the King’s command, again for India, the
company appointing him to the Governorship of
Fort St. David. But the very day he stepped
into the gubernatorial chair, at Madras, the
Bengal Nabob took Calcutta. Then came that
chapter of unheard-of cruelty, familiar to ev
ery child who has learned to read his story
books. The tragedy of the Black Hole occur
red in 1756, just a hundred years ago.
The dungeon was but twenty feet square.—
Midsummer heat was parching India. The lit
tle garrison thought it all a joke, when they
were ordered to go in; but to refuse was to die,
for Surujahul Dowlak's orders must be obeyed ;
prolonged suffering was better than instant
death; they entered, one hundred and forty-six
in all. The door was closed, the small aperture
admitted neither light nor air. When they be
gan to exchange breaths the startling truth
burst u])Ou them. The air already was almost
putrid; they shrieked, they yelled in mortal
agony; they screamed for water and then killed
each other over the cup which passed through
the grating. While the poor prisoners were
biting and squeezing each other’s life away—
gasping for air, for water, for anything to re
lieve them of their agony—the jailers laughed
and danced in pure delight. Holmeil, the high
est in rank, offered the jailer heavy bribes; but
no, the ' Nabob was sleeping, and no one dared
to wake him. In the morning, when the de
bauch was slept away, he ordered the dungeon
door to be opened, and out staggered twenty
three swollen, distorted living corpses! One
hundred and twenty-three were piled up—a pu
trefying mass of men—all shapes and forms
were represented in the death struggle. The
English woman who survived was sent to the
harem of the l’riuce of Moorsbedcbad. Hol
mcil was saved and tells the tale. The dead
were burned on the spot, but the harrowing pic
ture did not move in the least the granite dispo
sition of the human tiger. The horrible deed
reached Clive, and the celebrated battle of Plas
sey showed the inhuman Nabob that it was a
foolhardy thing to trifle with the feelings of
Englishmen. The soldiers fought like bulldogs;
revenge stimulated them on, and the Nabob’s
army of 60,000 strong was broken like a reed.
Clive lost but twenty-two men.
Turkish Character.— It was said by Gibbon
most truly, that the Turks have been, since the
Conquest, encamped, not settled, in Europe.
They amount to a fourth, or a third at the ut
most, of the populatiou of the Sultan’s domin
ions. They are scattered in very unequal pro
portions over its surface. In some parts they
form a tolerably thick agricultural population.
In others, as in Constantinople itself, they are
engaged in the trades and manufactures of a
large city. But no where do they exercise those
extended operations of skill and thought which
bring men together, cause them to rely on each
other, give them the habit of combined peace
ful action, and impart to them the intelligence
and the energy on which alone a strong com
monwealth is built up. The Armenians are
their bankers; the Jews their dealers; the Greeks
their merchants. The very organization of the
people seems to have denied them those finer
qualities, both mental and corporeal, which fit
men for the superior branches of industry.
A Turk’s Qngers, Dr. Walsh quaintly observes,
seem all to be thumbs; be has no manual dex
terity for any delicate employment, and his
mind is as unfit for subtle operations as his body.
The Turks neither write nor print (with the ex
ception of bombastic poetry and still more bom
bastic history.) They do not build but destroy.
They show no wish to adorn the soil which they
inhabit, or to connect in any way the existence
of the present generation with posterity. Their
object in this world seems to be mere animal
existence, as completely as that of the beasts of
the field. Their religious sense is deep, endur
ing, exalted; but it is a religion which deadens
and stupifies the intellectual faculties.
A Successful Missionary.— Several years ago,
when the persecution against the converted
Armenians in Turkey was raging with viru
lence, the Rev. Dr. Hamlin, the missionary
there, set up a steam flouring mill, chiefly at his
own expense, where the poor refugees might
find employment, Dr. H. personally superintend
ing its management. On the occurrence of the
war, Dr. H. made a bread contract with the Bri
tish Government, the profit on which amounted
to nearly $25,000, all of which Dr. Hamlin has
devoted to the cause of missions in Turkey. He
has purchased several churches for the native
converts, and provided and sustained preachers,
and set on foot other large-sighted and liberal
measures from bis own resource*. His move
ment in behalf of the Bulgarians, while in Lon
don, has resulted in sending two missionaries to
that field and an unlimited supply of Bibles.
Hebrew, Israelite and Jew.
It may not be amiss to give some explanation
of these various names by which we are now
recognized, inasmuch os what appear as synon
omous mark different epochs in tbe original his
tory of the naticn.
The oldest expression, Hebrew, denotes ‘‘pas
sing over;” wherefore, Abraham, who came
from Mesopotamia, was called the Hebrew; or,
perhaps because of his descent from Eber. The
sons of Jocktan having been called Ebrews, be
sides the Israelites, who have thus been denoted
exclusively, ever since the time of Moses, may
possibly confirm this latter opinion. See the
note in Rev. J. Leeser's edition of the Bible,
which is reliable authority. Had not this ap
plication of the term been made exclusively to
the Israelites, since their flight from Egypt, tbeu
would all the posterity of Eber be denominated
Ebrews, being Peleg aud Yoktan. and their de
scendants. Abraham was the fifth generation
of Peleg; and from Abraham descended Isaac
and Ishniacl. The name ‘‘Hebrew” being given
to Abraham, of necessiiy his offspring became
entitled to the same; and by genealogy tbe Ish
maelites of Asia as fully merit the appellation
‘‘Hebrews,” as the descendants of Isaac and Ja
cob; which, however, is not accredited from
pnrtiality, the name being presumed to descend
only through the favored sons.
The term “Israelite,” is derived from “Israel,”
meauiug the “Prince of God” —the name given
to Jacob by the man with whom “he wrestled
until .the breaking of the day;” and the name
“Israel,” is as often used to denote the nation,
as the term “Israelites,” the people. All the
sons of Jacob became “Israelites, and, neces
sarily, “Hebrews,” from their descent; yet, if
we account the persons who lived prior to Ja
cob, Israelites, we commit a chronological error.
The term “Jew,” is derived from “Judah,”
signifying “I will thank the Lord,” and was the
name of Jacobs’ fourth son. It is the term most
frequently applied to the Israelite nation, and
has, in some measure, been brought into disre
pute as a name stigmatised by prejudiced gentile
writers; for many have thought fit to malign
the race for the very faults which they forced
upon them.
Levi, the third son of Jacob, with Judah, are
the only two sons that the tribes of which are
recognized to be still in existence, the other ten
having become lost. Their descendants should
be properly known, respectively, as Jews and
Levites. The former classification is lost; but
the latter prevails to distinguish them from the
tribes of Priests who are the offspring of Aaron.
The Levites and Priests are recognized to this
day, in the synagogues. Levites, properly, are
not Jews any more than Jews are Levites; yet,
the term “Jews” is applied to the whole race.
We simply intend to point out the epoch
when each name became engrafted upon the na
tion, and illustrate the appellation.
The term “Hebrew” is now Wised mostly to
refer to the language: as we say, the Latin lan
guage of the Romans. The term “Israelite” is
used in respectful addresses to one of the nation.
The term “Jew” is used generally, and at times,
in reproach, while the man of true faith adopts
it in order to banish the false prejudices which
surround it. — Voice of Israel.
Akkaiii m Vienna between Col. Pearson, of
California, anp the Arch-Dcke Cuahi.es.— The
following letter has been received by the New
York Herald in reference to a recent difficulty
which is reported to have taken place at Vien
na between Colonel Pearson, of California, and
His Imperial Highness the Archduke Charles:
Vienna, Sept. 21, 1850.
An affair has just occurred here which has
caused a good deal of excitement in fashionable
circles.
Col. Pearson, of California, who arrived here
the other day from Moscow, felt desirous of in
specting the government buildings, and for that
purpose applied for the usual authorization.—
lie was informed tlmt no one but niemliers of
the European Congress of Sciences, then in ses
sion in this city, could be admitted.
On receiving this reply, he applied to be re
ceived as a memlter of the Congress, stating
that his diploma had been destroyed in the great
fire at San Francisco. His demand was com
plied with, and he was treated with the greatest
consideration by all the members of the body,
with the exception of the Archduke Charles,
who took exception to his admission on the
ground of his having no diploma.
Col. Pearson felt himself aggrieved by the
manner in which the Archduke's objections were
made, and felt it due to his honor to call on the
latter for an explanation. The Grand Duke be
haved in the handsomest manner on the occa
sion, and the difficulty was amicably settled.
These are the true facts of the affair, which,
no doubt, have by this time reached you through
other channels.
Liabilities of Members op the Vigilance
Committee. — We copy the following extract
from an aiticle iu the New York Journal of
Commerce, on this subject:
“Wherever they are found, they can be held
to respond in damages to parties injured. In
whatever State they may take refuge, they are
liable to be seized and carried back to Califor
nia, on requisition of its Governor, to be there
arraigned on criminal process. The Governor
may refrain from’making the requisition, in de
ference to a predominant public sentiment at
home, which might prevent a conviction there; !
but the liability remains. Every member of
the vigilance committee who was present and
concurred in the execution of Cora, Casey,
Hetherington and Brace, is liable to answer for
the crime of murder. Every man among them
is individually liable in damages to each of the
persons who were exiled or imprisoned by the
committee. It matters not whether he actively
concurred in the sentence of the committee or
not. The fact of his being a member of an as
sociation combined for unlawful acts, and pre
sent at their commission, makes him accounta
ble for the consequences. That this iu no theo
retical liability, the recent arrest in this city of
the president of the vigilance committee dem
onstrates. We point to it with no exultation
at the fulfilment of our warning, which declared
them no where safe from punishment, short of
a refuge in the ranks of Walker’s army: but to
illustrate the peril aud the folly which even
whole communities of men incur and commit,
when they attempt to defy the law, and to set
themselves up above its power.
More Court Etiquette.— The English seem
to have a particular horror of anything yellow.
Professor Maban shocked the assembly at the
Queen’s levee by his yellow vest, and now some
Americans at the Court of the Emperor of Rus
sia, have disturbed the nerves of the correspond
ent of the London Daily New*, by wearing yel
low plumes in their chapeau. He says they were
the most stared-at individuals In the place,
which is nothing singular, for a live Yankee
generally manages to make himself noticed
wherever he goes. An equal breach of eti
quette, in the correspondent’s opinion, was that
the Americans, on leaving the imperial pres
ence, turned their backs upon the Emperor.—
He congratulates hi« country that Englishmen
only retired with their faces to royalty, walking
backwards like a crab.
The man who “couldn’t stand it any longer,"
has taken a seat, and now feels qaife comforta
ble.
WHOLE NO. 164.
VARIETIES.
Locusts at Shanghai.— Letters from Sbang
lme mention an extraordinary flight of locusts
which had passed over the city, continuing for
several days, and coming apparently from the
northwest. On the afternoon of the 17th Sep
tember, they literally darkened the air for about
an hour, but all day it was one continued flight.
Millions upon millions fell into the river. The
French frigate Virginie saw them, it is said,
fifty miles out at sea. There had been plentiful
falls of rain, but the locusts had committed
frightful ravages upon the grain crop; and, al
together, the season had been a most unfortu
nate one for the poor Chinese —first, the long
drought, and then this plague of locusts. The
natives say such a sight has not been witnessed
these fifty years.
Is rr so?—It is a proper belief that the age of
trees can be determined by the “rings’’ or grains
that overlie each other in their trunks. Mr.
Joshua Howard, of Maryland, disputes the fact.
He says that these rings counted on the section
of the tree are not of annual growth, are form
ed one at every full moon in the growing sea
son, and at the latitude of Maryland five a year.
This he has frequently proved by felling trees,
the age of which he knew. The extraordinary
age given to trees by the popular rule has made
many persons doubt whether it is true.
Hebrew Cemetery.—' The Israelites of Mokel
urane Hill, ns we learn from the Chronicle, have
fenced in a lot of ground in that place, with the
intention of using it hereafter as a burial ground
for their dead. The enclosure is to be beauti
fied with trees, shrubbery, See. The Chronicle
aptly remarks, that nothing speaks higher for a
community, or evhibits a greater degree of re
finement and civilization, than a correct and
proper degree of respect for the last resting
place of those who were lately among us, and
whose memory should be honored and cherished.
Decidedly Cool Operation. —One of the work
men upon Greene's rifles at the Massachusetts
Arms Company's works, was so unfortunate,
some time since, as to slit the thumb of bis right
hand upon a circular saw. Concluding, upon
inspection, that the member was used up, he
coolly went back to the saw. and bolding the
damaged thumb with his left hand, made a clean
amputation of it, and then proceeded to have it
dressed by a surgeon.
The New Cent Piece, recently finished at the
United States Mint, Philadelphia, is the size of
the old half cent, and is composed of fifty-seven
parts of copper, seven of nickel and one of zinc.
It has a light appearance, with a faint red tint,
and is in beautiful contrast with the American
silver and gold pieces, and will not, as the cent
did, tarnish them by contact. The weight of
the new is only sixty-two grains—that of the
present copper cent is one hundred and sixty
eight.
Steam on the Red Sea. —The Viceroy of
Egypt has determined to establish steam com
munication between various points on the
shores of the Red Sea, and has chartered a
steam navigation company, with a capital of
ten millions dollars, of which the government
will furnish three millions. The enterprise will
bo under the direction of Mustapha Bey,, the
nephew of the Viceroy.
Not Disappointed.— The Sacramento Union
says—“Fillmore men didn’t expect anything
from the elections in Pennsylvania, Indiana aDd
Ohio, and they have not been disappointed.”—
If that is so; then the Fillmore orators in Cali
fornia “lied like the devil,” for every one of
them proclaimed that Fillmore would carry
those States.
Robbery in San Francisco. —The house of
Adam Mengis, keeper of the Rassette Market,
corner of Market and Sutter streets, was enter
ed uliout 2 o’clock on Tuesday morning, Nov.
18th, and roblicd of $1,600 in gold coin. The
money had been placed for safe keeping under
the matting in his parlor, and was taken with
out awaking the family asleep up stairs.
Fashion and Religion. —The New York
Churchman laments that so many chnrchmen
are not “cheerful givers,” but give grudgingly
or sMntedly to church charities; and attributes
the pause of this delinquency to “extravagance
in female finery,” the expenditures for which,
the Churchman avers, are as $1,000 to $50.
The Tirf — Unprecedented Time. —A trot
ting match took place over the Union Course,
L. I., recently, between Flora Temple [and Tae
ony—mile heats—Flora to harness—Tacony un
der the saddle. Flora wou, distancing Tacony
the first heat. Time, 2:24! the fastest heat ev
er trotted.
Debt of Mexico. —The public debt of Mexico
is as follows : Foreign debt, $51,208,250; do
mestic debt, $40,000,000; diplomatic conven
tions, $11,430,562. Total, $102,688,912. These
debts entail an annual charge of $3,933,360 on
the finances of Mexico.
Some artists are pandering to the tastes of
the San Franciscans, by regaling them with,the
doings of the Vigilance Committee on canvass,
in the shape of a panorama. _ The exhibition
takes “hugely,” with the vigilance sympathi
sers, and will make a fortune for its owners.
Appointment of Receiver. —Mr. Crockett has
been appointed Receiver of tbe assets of Page,
Bacon A Co., in place of Messrs. Naglee and
Parrott. The appo’ntment was made by Judge
Hager, of the Fourth District Court, on Tues
day. Nov. 18tb.
Suicide of an Editor. —Mr. N. B. Dowson,
one of the editors of the Davenport (Iowa) Ga
zette, cut his throat with a pocket knife, on the
14th ult. He was a gentleman of fine talents,
was formerly connected with the press at Zanes
ville, Ohio, and fell a victim to intemperance.
The oldest One.— Rev. Dr. Spring is the old
est clergyman in New York. He has occupied
his pulpit forty-six years.
Their Use. —The true use of cockroaches, as
all truly wise people have known for years, is
to flavor fine old Burgundy with.
Manufacture of Watches —The number of
watches manufactured annually in Neufcbatel,
Switzerland, may be calculated to be from
100,000 to 120,000, of which about 35,000 are in
gold, and the rest in silver. Now, supposing
the first, on an average, to be worth $30, and
tbe others $4, it would represent a capital of
$1,390,000, without taking into consideration
the sale of clocks and instruments for watch
making, the amount of which is very large. The
United States of America consume the largest
quantity of these watches. With the exception
of gold ami silver for the manufacture of the
watch cases, the other materials for the con
struction of the works of mechanism of the Neuf
chatel watches are of little value, consisting
merely of a little brass or steel. The steel is
imported from England, and is reconed the best
that can be procured, the brass is furnished by
France. With respect to gold and silver, tbe
inhabitants of Neufchatel have had for a long
time no other resource but to melt current eoin,
until they received gold from England, which
the English merchants reoeived from California.
The number of workmen who are employed in
watch-making Is estimated at from 18,000 to
20,000, but it is difficult to arrive at the extfit
number, .as tbe population employed
the business in their own bon**' -»‘ TJ

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