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The Nevada Democrat. [volume] (Nevada, Calif.) 1854-1863, December 03, 1856, Image 1

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YOL. IY, NO. 9.
NEVADA DEMOCRAT,
PUBLISHED EVERT WEDNESDAY MOUSING,
BT I. J. B.OLFE ft CO.
OFFICE-BROAD STREET, NEVADA,
T E R5f S i
For one year, in advance, 99
SU month*, " 99
Three moutiis, 3 L. .
Single Coplee. M rU
BUSINESS CARDS.
KO S ENH El M & BEO.
WATCHMAKERS AMD JEWELERS,
AtTD DlilJIU IN
Wttthri, Jewelry. Wimondi, d(e.
At their Old Stand, Main Street, Nevada.
Moan aossMfim, aaaoN aoiae*BB«,
r. 8. GOLD DC ST BOUGHT AT THE HIGHEST MAR
ijtrr trice. wf
CHAS. W. YOUNG,
nmnmmsu or
CALI FORM IA JEWELRY,
WATCHMAKER,
-iNU—
DEALER IS’ FIS’K WA jri/XS, JEWELRY, DU
MOS’D H’URK. dr.
Junction of Main and Commercial Street*. Nevada.
CHAELES W. MULFORD,
BjIIKE R,— At hi* OH Stand, on Main Street,
Nevada. I will pav the highest price* for GOLD MIST,
GOLD BARS, and COUNTY ORDERS; will procure Drafts
parable in anv of the AtUntic States. Canada, or Europe,
m sums to suit; forward Dust for Coinage at the U. S.
Branch Mint, and if desired, will make advances on the
aame
SIGHT CHECKS on DRKXEL, SATHKR k CHURCH, San
Ersncirro, ATTAR. tf
WILLIAMSON & DAWLEY,
BANKERS, and dealers in GOLD DUST—No. 30 Main
Street. Nevada, . . .
DRAW BILLS OF EXCHANGE at sight, in sums to suit
biurchasers, on
CHAS. MORGAN Si CO.. NEW YORK,
DARBY A BARKSDALE, ST. LOUIS.
■SIGHT CHECKS on San Francisco or Sacramento, at par.
4mr*Qi R'KSILVER. BY THE FLASK OR 1‘UUND. [tf
F. MANSELL,
Sign and Ornamental Painter,
All work promptly attended to, and 111 the best style of
the art. Commercial street, above Tine. Nevada. SO-tf
THOMAS MABSH,
SIGN AND ORN A MENTAL PAINTING,
No. 10 Omunfirinl Street, Nevada. 42*1 f
KIIUIITl T R£ \V AREROOMS.
JOHN McFAELAND,
DKAI.RK IN
mcnsmitE, HKDS, m atrasses, pillows, pil
low CASES' SHEETS, rfr.
No. 14 ('omniorriftl Street. Nevada. 21-tf
iTANTOji UVCKNKR, C. Wll.SON 1I1LL,
ni;( K\ER JL HILL,
JAVINIJ a-unwiated them<«dve* togelher in the practice
"l of the Iaw, will attend promptly to all businea* con
led to their care in Nevada and adjoining countie*.
Omen—Overt'. W. Mullord'* Hanking House. Main at.,
t’eva-la.
Julv 2, 1*6*.—43-tf
. YANT, DAVID HBLUBN.
BELDFa.V YANT,
AT TOR iV K Y S AT I. A W.
Om«ie.—No. 4 Second etory of Alban's Brick Building
fi-tf.
Owner Broad an«l Pine Strata, Nevada.
K. I. THORNTON, Jr.,
ATTORSKY AN1) COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Ornen—In KeHev'ii Brick Building, t'ommercial "Ireet,
below line afreet, Nevada.
51 tf
WM. P. ANDERSON,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Omc*—Eront Room, up atairs, Driuocrat Building. Broad
atrset. Nevada.
J
I . CALDWELL
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Omen, No. in Bt< knki.i.’m Block, Broad £rr. Nevada.
Nevada, Aug. 27, 1*6*.-
a. a. chaae.
tf
<;eo. a. hut.
CHASE Ac HIPP,
AT TOR N E YS A T L A W.
Orrm—Front Room, up stair*. of liemoerat Office. Broad
lltreet, Nevada.
FRA.'KIff J. DrWH, HRJIRT MIRIWTH.
DVXK & MEREDITH,
a ttorxkvs asd counselors a t la w
Omen—Second Story of Alban's Brick Building, corner
Hr«a4 and I*in« Streets, Sernda.
I. a. H’OOffNEIA, WM. M. STFWABT,
MeCOKNEY.L A STEWART,
ATTOR SKY'S ASD COUNSELORS! AT LAW.
Will prartire in all the Courts of the Fourteenth Judicial
District, and in the Supreme Court.
OmcB—Crittenden’s Brick Building, Main Street. [4-tf
W. O. von POEI.I,MTZ WI. D
PHYSIC! AX A HD SURGKOK ,
Tenders his jiroltoiiiotial services to the citizens o JNeva*
da amt vicinity.
Orms—At Frank Thayer's Drug Store, No. 14 Commer
cial street. [3-tf_
“OVERTON,
FHT8ICIAN AND SUlldEOX.
Obki—Alban's Brick Building—rear of the Drug Store—
Nevada. 40 tf
Mr ROBE RTS, PIN8TON Ai CO.,
A' h' V A D A ,
DEALKKS IN
Family Groceries, Pn.vl.lnn>, Wines, I.l
qnors, and Miners HappUrl.
KILBOl'RN’S CORNER, Opposite A. Bock k Co’a, corner
Pine and Commercial street*,
w. s. a’ramsts. j*. n. rrNsioE, jvo. nnwoM.
BLACKMAN, HOWARD k CO.
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS I*
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
WINES AND LIQUORS,
83 Clay Street,
Mvm Battery and Front, one Door East of the Railroad
Ifoute.
.SAX FRANCISCO,
SRT Orders from the interior command our particular
jtUutloo O. P. BLACKMAN,
CHAS. WKBB HOWARD,
» ly C. H. BLACKMAN - .
AMERICAN EXCHANGE CIGAR STORE,
Comer of Main and WashingUtn StreeU,
f ■ 'HE Undersigned keepe constantly on liand the dioteest
JL brand! of Havana CIGARS, together with the bent ar
ticle! of Chewing and Smoking TOBACCO. For sale, whole
pale and retail. [62-tf] A. WITK0W8K1.
■■gyftflPALMER& McKENNEY,
NEVADA CARIRAGE SHP!
No. 10 Wasbimgtor st.. abotr Frisbes’ Rdctauraitt.
ftf Particular attention paid to REPAIRING, -R
Wheelbarrow! kept on hand, and lor Dale.
Aag. 18, 1866. 40 tf
S. E. WITBISGTON. A. C. BR.VTLT,
WITHINGTON & BENTLY,
DEALERS I.M
French and American Paper Hangings,
WINDOW Shades, Bran* Cornice, Gold Moulding!, Paint*
Ac. Painting of all kind*, and paper lunging execu
ted in the beet style, at short notice.
40-tf No. 7, Broad street, Nevada.
D.& B. L ACIIMAN,
A"0. 60 BROAD STREET, NEVADA.
—DEALERS LV—
Harwarv,
Stowes,
Tin-Ware,
Crockery, Ac. Ac.
„ NV All kinds of Tin Ware made to order. -M
Sept. 1850 —49 5m D. k B. LACHMAN.
JOB PRINTING, OF ALL KINDS, N'EATLT EXh
euled at this Oflice.
THE NEVADA DEMOCRAT.
TRAVELING
C ALIFORNIA STAGE COMPANY.
nriHE STAGE? of this Company will leave their Other, at
1 Frubie'a old Stand, Nevada, a* follows:
FOR RACRAMK-NTO.
leave* Nevada at 1 o’clock, A. M., and arriving at Sac
mento In time for the 2 o’clock boats for San Francisco.
Also, at 4 o’clock, A. M., running via Auburn, as an Ac
commodation Line to Sacramento.
FOR WARYSVII.1.R.
leaves the above named Office every morning at seven
o'clock, A. M., passing through Grass Valley, Rough k
Ready. Empire Ranch, and Long Bor, and arriving in Ma
rysvilk- at 3 o'clock P. M.
FOR FOREST CITT, nOWNTEYlI.LF.. PATTER-SON, WOLMET’S,
MOORE’S, AND ORLEANS FLATS.
leaves every moaning at 8 1-2 o'clock A. M.
JAMES HAWORTH.
Pres’t. C. 8. Co.
W. 8. McRobertr, Agent, Nevada. [tf
NEVADA di WASHINGTON STAGE LINE.
ON AND AFTER JANUARY 1, 1868, the above line will
run as follows:
leaving the office, at Friable's old Stand, Nevada, at S
o’clock, A. M, passing by Mountain Spring House, Morgan’s,
Cold Spring. White Cloud, Gold Hill and Alpha, aiTiving
at Washington by one o'clock in the afternoon.
It is the nearest and best Route to Washington, Omega,
Scotchman’s Creek, Poor Man’s Creek, and Eureka.
Returning,—The Stages will leave the South Yuba Hotel.
Washington, every morning at nine o'clock, and arrive at
Nevada by one o'clock P. M., connecting with the Cali
fornia Stage Co's Coaches for Auburn, Sacramento, Marys
ville and Shasta.
Office—South Yuba Hotel, Washington.
A. S. OIJN, Proprietor.
W. 8. McRohkrtr, Agent, Nevada. [34-tf
Spring and Summer Arrangement.
TELEGRAPH LINE.
Six florae (hache$ from Nevada to CamptonriUe.
ON AND AFTER APRIL 15th. the above line of Stage*
will leave the Office of the California Stage Company,
at Krisbie’s old Stand. Nevada, every morning, at seven
o’clock, A. M., running by Oak Tree Ranch, Son Juan, and
lie**’ Crossing, arriving at Caraptonville at 1*2 M.
Returning—The Stages will leave the National Hotel,
Cnuiptonville, every morning, at seven o’clock, A. M.. and
arrive at Nevada in time to connect with tlie California
Stage Company's Line of Stages for Sacramento City, Ma
rysville and Auburn.
Express Matter promptly attended to.
A. IVaGENER, Proprietor.
W. S. McUouerts, Ag’t. Nevada. [33-tf
EMPIRE LIVERY STABLE,
Broad Street, Nevada,
M
lv on hand
GEORGE MAY, Proprietor.
THE UNDERSIGNED WOULD INFORM HIS
friends and tlie public generally, that he lias
become Proprietor of the EMPIRE LIVERY
STABIJC, and as he designs keeping constant
A Stock of Fast Horses,
Would respectfully solicit the patronage of the Public.
jfSf Horses kept by the Day or Week on the most rea
sonable terms.
20-tf GEORGE MAY,
LIVERY & SALE STABLE.
V.l IX STREET, NEVADA.
J. A. LANCASTER. FORMERLY OF THE
Metropolis Stable, would inform his friends
and the public generally, that he has added
extensively to hi.-* already I-arge and Klc
gant establishment of Homes, Buggies, Saddles, Harness.
Arc. &c.-r-they are now prepared to furnish as fine turn
outs as ran be fonnd in the State.
Well trained fleet and easy Saddle Horses, well equipped
for Ia«lie-i or Geutlemeu wili be ready at all times.
A long experience in the business nnd an earnest desire
to retain the confidence of his friends, lends him to be
lieve he will be aide to give general satisfaction.
Particular attention pale! to Horst s on Livery
Carriages always in readiness with careful drivers for the
use of Balls. Parties, Ac. &c.
The quality of our stock will permit us to say that those
necking pleasure, or engaged on business would do well to
give us a call. J. A. LANCASTER.
Nevada. Aug. 20. 1856.—46-tf
JVOTICK TO TEAMSTERS,
WAGON ROAD from Nevada to Downieville, by wav of
KOI II NSON \S CRf tSSIN( i .
This Road is in fine condition, and presents the shortest
mute and best road for Packers and Teams to all the vari
ous settlements along the Divide, between the South and
Middle and the Middle and North Yubas, by way of Hess’
and Emery’s Crossings.
The Road also affords the nearest route for Packers and
Travelers from Sacramento, by way of Rough k Ready,
Grass Valley and Nevada, and the mines further South, to
Poor man’s* Creek, Nelson’s Creek, and all the mining re
gion north of Nevada and Downieville.
This Road is as easily traveled as that between Sacra
mento and Nevada. Four horses can readily draw from
three to four thousand pounds of freight, from Nevada to
the top of the hill at Downieville, w hen the road is not ob
structed bv heavy rains or snow.
W. E. ROBINSON, Proprietor.
Juno 11th. 1856—40-1 y*
BOOTS AND SHOES.
S MAYERS k WM. R. CY)E, (successors to I*. ,!. Espen
• eclieid.) comer of Main and Commercial Streets, would
respectfully inform the public that they have purchased
the large and well selected Stock of BOOTS ANH SHOES,
contained in the above establishment* and hope by strict
attention to business to merit a share of the public pat
ronage.
Having just received from Ssn Francisco a choice and
well selected stork of Boots and Shoos, ladies' and Misses’
Gaiters, Buskins. Slippers. Children’s Shoes, ifcc., Ac., they
would respectfully invite all those wanting any thing in
the above line to give them a call, as they believe, for va
riety, quality and cheapness, their stock is unsurpassed in
the mountains.
Repairing done on the shortest notice, in a workmanlike
manner, and on the most reasonable terms.
S. MAYERS.
Wm. R. COE.
Mk. f*. Maters, late of Grass Valley, and Wm. R. Coe,
formerly of the Broad Street Boot and Shoe Store, have
purchased my entire stock of Boots and Shoes, and I would
cheerfully recommend them to the public as gentlemen
every way worthy their support, and would respectfully
solicit for them the patronage of my old friends and custo
mers. [32-tfJ I*. J. ESPKX3CHKID.
$10,000 WORTH OF FLRITUYRE l
rm H ENTIRE NEW STOCK. THE LARGEST AMD
best selected ever brought into the mountains,
all of which will be sold cheap for CASH, con
HHH stating of
Bedsteads of all sires;
Cane and Wood Seat Chaim;
Cane and Wood Seat Office Chairs*
Dining, Card and Center Tables;
Extension and Reading Tables;
Office Desks and Furniture;
Barber’s Chairs; Wash Stands;
Looking Glasses of all sices;
Cane Seat and Back Arm Rockers and Nurse Chairs;
Mattraases: Pillows; Pillow Cases;
Sheets; Comforters; Feathers, kc.
The undersigned would respectfully invite the attention
of their old customers and the public generally to their
new stock of goods
On the Corner of Pine and Commercial its M
Where by strict attention to business they hope to merit a
liberal share of public patronage.
46-tf ABBOTT k EDWARDS.
Great Destruction of Property by the late
Fire $1,500,000. New Stock on hand.
NEVADA SHOE STOBE.
Commercial Street, Next Door Below Landecker't.
J, F\ HOOK would respect
fully inform his old customers and the soS
public, that he has recently purchased a large and well as
sorted stock of BOOTS li SHOES and lias BKOPENED hie
store on Commercial Street, (neat door below Landecker’s
Brick Store) where he will be happy to serve all who may
give him a call.
He has a full stock of Ladies' and Misse*' SHOES, Gent.
E’ine BOOTS and GAITERS. and a splendid assortment of
MINING BOOTS, constantly on hand.
REPAIRING done on the shortest notice.
The ladies and Gentlemen of Nevada, are respectfully
invited to call and examine my stock.
Aug. 26th,—47-tf. J. V. HOOK.
BRENTAKO & FIKTH,
Con>kk Maix axn Firm Stkkkth, Nonui Sax Ji-ax,
Nevada County,
WHOLESALEAND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Clothing, Gente Furnishing Goods,
Boots and Shoes, Hats,
Blankets, A India Rubber Goods.
KEEP constantly on hand the largest and best Selected
Stock of Clothing Ac., in all its various branches to
be found in any Mountain town. The citizens of San Juan
and surrounding towns, will find it to their advantage to
give us a call, and examine the PRICE and QUALITY be
for* purchasing elsewhere. BRKNTANO A FL'RTH.
North San Juan, Sept., 8, 1866.—18-tf
JOHN BOUE,
FRENCH INTERPRETER AND TRANSLATOR,
MONEY 8ROREK.
f' 1ENUINE French Wine*, Cognacs, Ac. The very beat
VJ Ground Ctyflfo in the City.
Persons who wish to get a fair interest fyr tbeir money
wift do well by calling at hi* office.
J. B. can *pare one or twp honr* in the afternoon, and
will give lemons to Ladies and Gentlemen in the French
language aud Fenraaoship Terms moderate.
3 tf No, 13, Ikoad street. Nevada.
NEVADA, CALIFORNIA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 3, 1856.
GROCERIES.
SAN FRANCISCO GROCERY AND PROVI
SION STORK.
MOTTO!
"Small Profit* and ftnlfk Returns.”
The undersigned would respectfuu.y soijcit
the attention of the Families and Miner* of Nevada and
vicinity to their well selected stock of Family
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, dse.,
Which cannot be <■ veiled in quality, and at the lowest pri
ce*. One of the firm constantly being in San Francisco,
affords us unequalled facilities for purchasing, by which
means we feel confident to be able give
GENERAL SATISFACTION AS TO PRICES.
We have also on hand Mining Implements of best makers.
N. B.—Hotel Keepers, Restaurants and Country Dealers,
would find it to their advantage to give us a mill before
purchasing elsewhere.
A. ALEXANDER.
N. IL—All Goods rellverrd Free off Charm.
No. 3ft Broad Street, BickneU’s Building. 48-tb
T. ELLARD BEANS ft CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, q,ue*nsvrare,
Mining Tools, Ac., Ac.
At the old favorite Stand of HAMLET DA VIS.
IN the Fire-Proof Block of Kidd snd Kno*. op[>o*it* the
United Btates Hotel, 62 Broad Street, Nevada.
HOTEL AND FAMILY STORES,
In every variety and of the choicest qualities.
*#-GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE'S*
September 17th, 1846—50 tf
LANDEKER A GATZERT,
—DE.tir.KS IS—
Qroceriei and Provisions,
Keep constantly on hand a fuix supply of
all articles suitable for the Market, in their
Fire Proof Building, on Commercial St.
Where they will be happy to wait upon all that visit them.
J. 8. I.ANDKKER resides at the Bay, where he is con
stantly purchasing for the house here, and no effort* shall
be spared to always keep on hand a full assortment of the
best quality, which will be sold at a low profit.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE
Call and see for yourselves. J. S. I.ANDEKER.
Nevada, Sept.' 18d6.—48tf BA11.EY GATZKRT,
BUY FRESH HEALTHY FIX>UR !!
THE XEVADA FLOUR MILLS ARE MAKIXG THE
bat Flour in this Staff ,
MINERS and others who wish rood Flour, will do well
to enquire for that made at the above Mill. Nearly
all the merchants keep it for sale.
—FOR SALE AT THE MILL—
Ground Bnrlry,
Middlings,
Shorts,
And Bran.
46 tf W. J. TILLEY.
GREGORY ft SPARES.
HAVING removed to their new stand in Kidd A: Knox's
building on Pine at., one door above the U. S. Bakery,
are prepared to wait upon their old friends and customers,
and the consumers of Grub generally, according to Gunter.
Having a large and well selected stock on hand consisting of
GROCERIES,
PROVISIONAL
MIXING TOOLS,
CROCKERY WARE,
HARDWARE,
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE, Ac., &r.
We feel confident that we can please, and sell goods aa
low as the lowest, but not lower, as some have it. We
give a general Invitation to call and see us.
Oct. 29. 1856.
E . DE YOUNG*. CO.,
WHOLESALE AM) RETAIL DEALERS IN
Groceries, Provisions, Liquors, Crockery
AM) GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
No. 65 Broad Street --- - ------- Nevada.
HAS ON HAND the following articles, which will be sold
at a small advance for the ready GASH.
Hams in brine,
Extra Clear Pork,
Extra Clear Bacon,
Ixrd, in kegs and tins,
New Goshen Butter,
Brandy,
Gin and Whiskey,
Porter and Ale,
.Schnapps,
Port and Claret Wine*,
Cal. Butter, in hk 101b. tins Champaigne Wine,
New Orleans Sugar,
('rushed Sugar,
Bar Sugar,
China No. 1 Sugar,
Carolina Ktcc,
Cliiua Rice,
Boston Syrup,
Lemon Syrup,
Assorted Syrups,
Black and Green Teas,
Sperm Candles,
Adamantine Candles,
Can Eruits, iu all varieties, I<amu Wicks,
Tobacco, of various brands,
Cigars.
Barrel Hour,
8. R. Flour,
Plain Hour,
Potatoes and Corn Meal,
Brooms and Shovels,
Hatches, Axes and Files.
Knives, Forks ami Spoons,
lick and Axo Helves,
Hoes,
Hill and Castile Soap,
Starch,
Cant pit inc,
lamp Oil.
Iron and Tin Ware,
Wrapping k letter Paper.
Smokad Beef,
Cal. and Goshen Cheese,
Nails, assorted sizes,
Shot, Powder and Fuse,
lanterns.
Cal. and Chili Beans,
Bayou Beans,
Ground Coffee*,
Java and Rio Coffee,
Cotdu Rica Coffee,
Dried Apples,
Chili Peaches,
Salt, In Hacks and boxes,
Barley and Wheat,
Jellies and Jams, in glass,
Red Herring,
Cocoa Shell,
Tatmioca,
Indigo, Maxe, Nutmegs,
(.loves. Ginger. Alsnire,
Pepjier and Mustard,
Cream Tartar,
Saleratus,
Washing and Raking Soda,
VenniciTla and Macarona,
Mackerel,
Yeast Powders,
Pickles, in kegs and glass,
(Yan berries.
Tomato Catsup,
Pepjier 8auco,
Assorted Sauces,
lie Fruits,
Quicksilver,
jriinn ami «»iua. .u I.Ainp Glasses.
Also a variety of other articles too numerous to mention.
Our endeavors shall not be required to please those that
should favor us with a call for any of the above art cles, or
we defy competition for the quality and pricks of our
“ All Good* purchas'd vf tor, delivered FREE OF
CHARGE and noth punctuality. "6*
k Deyoung & co.
Nevada, fVspt. 1856 —1 if
JESSE S. WALL & BROTHER,
DEALERS IN'
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
Miner’* Supplies, Preserved Fruit*, Liquors, Ac.
No. 55 Broad Street, Nevada.
HAVING completed our new fire-proof building, we are
now receiving the largest Stock of Good* ever brought
to this place. Having plenty of room, and being secure
against fire, it is our intention to keep on hand at all times
a full assortment of all articles to be found in similar estab
lishments. which will be sold to Miners and Families
On Use most Reasonable Terms.
Our Stock consists in part of the following asasortment of
Family Groceries, Ac.
'500 Qr. Sacks Hour;
10,000 Um. Potatoes;
*,000 Lbs. Hams;
3,000 Lbs Goshen butter
3,000 I.bs. 9. C. Hams,
100 Bibs. Flour;
3,000 Lb*. Side Bacon;
1,000 Lbs. lard;
With a complete stock of SUGAR. COFFEE, TKA. RICE,
TOBACCO, FKES11 FRUITS, HARDWARE, OUKENSWARE,
\ST GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE
We invite the attention of Country Dealer* to oar large
stock of Goods. As we liavc unusual facilities for purchas
ing, we are confident that we can sell on such terms as will
make it to their advantage to trade with us instead of
going below for their supplies.
J. S. WALL A BROTHER, Broad Street.
September 16, 1*56—tf.
KEYSTONE MARKET.
THE SUBSCRIBERS liaving just completed their New
Store, near the foot of Main and Broad streets, beg
leave to'inform their friends and the public that they have
now removed to the above Stand, where the}' are prepared
to serve their old customers and the public with
The Choicest Meat* nnrl Vegetables
which can he fonnd in the Market, and at prices low enough
to be in keeping with the times.
We kill none but American cattle of the best quality,
and keep always on hand a good supply of meats of all
kinds. KENT A MCALLISTER.
Nevada, August 20th, 1846—16-tf
Fresh Meat! Fresh Meat!!
CITY MARKET,
Broad Street, Nevada.
JAMES MONROE would inform his old customers
and the public generally. u.at he has re-established his
MEAT MARKET on Broad Street, and is ready to furnish
good Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal and Vegetables as before the
fire. He will he happy to wait on all. and assures them
that he designs keeping the best meat to be found In Cali
fornia. Nevada, August 20, 1850.—16-tf,
UNITED STATES BAKERY,
Pine Street, first Door below Kidd A Knox’s Brick Store.
THE UNDERSIGNED, having rebuilt and fitted np their
BAKERY, on the site of the old stand, are now pre
pared to furnish their old customers, and all who may give
them a caR, with all kind* of BREAD and CAKE at prices
to suit the times.
BOSTON BBOWN BREAD AND GRAHAM BREAD of a
very superior quality, constantly on hand; also,
Pratt, Lemon, Found and Sponge Cake.
Wedding Parties, Families and Restaurants supplied with
every variety of Breed and Pastry usually found in New
York Bakeries, at wholesale prise*.
A good assortment of PIE FRUITS, JAMS, JELLIES,
FIGS, PRUNES. TAMARINDS. STRAWBERRIES, Ac.
KW FRESH EGGS and CHEESE constantly on hand 'SR
12 tf DREIFOSS A LEPPERT.
Wo»«tr IVrwtpaprr*.
The Newspaper Record, recently published by
Messrs. Lay « Brother, contains an immense
mass of interesting facta iujrelation to the origin
and progress of that tremendous engine for good
or evil—the Newspaper Press—in the Old and
the New World. From this valuable work we
glean a few facts in relation to the pioneer pa
pers in this country.
The first attempt to establish a newspaper, In
North America, so far as can be ascertained,
was made in Boston in 1690. A copy of prob
ably the only number of this journal is in the
the State paper office in Loudon. It is dated
September 26, 1690—a sheet of four quarto pa
ges one of which was blank. It was devoted to
a record of passing events—foreign and domes
tic. It was spoken of by the Legislative author
ities as a pamphlet, which “came out contrary
to law, and contained reflections of a very high
nature.” This pioneer journal was printed by
Richard Pierce, for Benjamin Harris.
In 1690, Gov. Fletcher, of New York, caused
Wm. Bradford—who came to this country with
William Penn—to re-print a London Gazette,
containing an account of an engagement with
the French.
But the first regular American newspaper was
undoubtedly the “Boston News Letter,” which
was commenced on the 24th of April, 1704, by
John Campbell, a Scotchman, who was the Post
master of Boston, and also a Bookseller. It was
twelve inches by eight, two pages folio, with
two columns on each page, and printed in small
pica type. The publisher set forth its claims as
follows: “This News Letter is to be continued
Weekly; and all persons who have any Houses,
Lands, Tenements, Farms, Ships, Vessels, Goods
Wares or Merchandise, Ac., to be sold or let, or
Servants Runaway, or Goods Stole or Lost, may
have the same inserted at a reasonable rate,
from twelve pence or five shillings, and nut to ex
ceed; who may agree with John Campbell, Postr
master.” Notwithstanding these sirong induce
ments to advertisers, the News Letter did not
abound with advertisements, for sometimes it
had one but about as often none. At the end of
fourteen years, the circulat ion of the paper w as
only three hundred copies. When it was six
teen years old, the publisher gave notice that
copies would lie printed on a whole sheet of let
ter paper, one half of which would be blank, on
which letters might be written.
In 1719, a new postmaster had been appoint
ed, and in December of that year, he started the
second Anglo-American newspaper—the “Bos
ton Gazette,”—William Brooker, proprietor.—
The last News Letter took umbrage—(some
thing that does not need shaking before taking)
—at the “introductory advertisement” of the
Gazette, and this was the exciting cause of the
first of those terrible newspaper wars that now
so frequently convulse editors and communities
in this country.
The third American newspaper, was the
“American Mercurie,” which appeared in Phil
adelphia, on the 22d of December, 1719, from
the printing office that Wm. Bradford had estab
lished, and which was then under the control of
liisson.
The fourth—the “New England Cournnt”—
was established at Boston, August 18th, 1721,
by James Franklin, elder brother to Ben, the
immortal. Mr. Franklin, as a reason for a
third newspaper in Boston, stated that the News
Letter was “a dull vehicle of Intelligence;”
whereupon, Campbell said Franklin “was a jack
of all trades and good at none.” The Cournnt
responded tartly in what the News called “hob
bling verse.” This war of words stimulated
Campbell to publish his Letter for two months
on a whole sheet. In 1722, Campbell sold his pa
per to B. Green, who died in 1733. when John
Draper, his son-in-law, took it aud continued its
publication until 1744, when he died, and his
widow continued its publication until 1776.
It was then discontinued.
The Boston Gazette, with various publishers,
was continued till 1762.
Frauklin was an independent mau in spirit, if
not in purse—and the Couraut was an out-spo
ken paper. The Legislative Council accord
ingly took the Couraut into consideration, and
its publisher was imprisoned for four weeks, but
this did not crush the spirit of the journal, the
Council insisted that the contents should be su
pervised by the Secretary of the Province.—
Frauklin refused to submit his “copy,” and the
paper was issued with the name of Benjamin
Franklin as publisher, who was then an appren
tice in his brother’s office. The Courant died
in 1727.
The fifth Anglo-American newspaper—the
“New York Gazette -appeared Oct. 16, 1726,
printed by William Bradford, who, though at
that time sixty-five years old, continued to pub
lish it seventeen years, when he sold it to Jas.
Parker. Files of it are to be seen in the libra
ry of the New York Historical Society, and it is
said to be a neat specimen of typography.—
Printers' Register.
Tkhpest at Los Anoei.es.— On Wednesday,
our locality was visited by a tempest of such vi
olence, long continuance, and its effects so de
structive, as seldom before has been experienced
by even that much revered Individual; the old
est inhabitant.
In the morning, the usual breeze sprung up,
but before two o’clock it gave indications of
becoming a gale. From that time it increased
in violence, and by noon it raged, a furious
tempest. Nor did it abate its fury till night
shrouded the earth in darkness.
The dust and sand were lifted from the earth,
and carried along, a continued cloud, envelop
ed everything, and obscuring every object from
sight. The houses on the opposite side of the
street at times could not be discerned.
All travel on the roads was suspended. So
thick was the cloud of sand, that from noon the
sun became obscured. Teamsters could not
keep the road, all efforts to guide their animals
being fruitless. Many of them could not find
out, even by groping on the ground, whether
they were on the road or on the open plain.
In the city, awnings disappeared in the early
part of the day. Houses were unroofed; sheds,
stalls and stables were ruthlessly knocked about.
Indeed, nothing but the most substantial build
ings resisted the storm.
In fact, from the beach at San Pedro to the
coast range of mountains, nothing was visible
but clouds of sand.
The worst of it is, that the sand was deposit
ed in places several feet deep on the pasture
lands, thus inflicting the severest calamity on
stock-owners, by depriving the cattle of what
little food they were able hitherto to pick off
the already parched and Imre pasture grounds.
The amount of injury in this district is incalcu
lable.
Such a miserable, melancholy day has not be
fore been experienced, and we hope we never
again shall be called upon to endure so disagree
able an infliction.
A similar tempest, but not so violent, occur
red In this vicinity, in March, 1845, rendered
memorable by being the day on which was
fought the battle of Cabnenga, between the Cal
ifornians under Pico, and Micheltorcna's forces.
—lot Angela Star. •
How to Know Them, —The be$t and most
certain method we know of to tell wbat a man’s
political opinions are, Is to look at his hat—If it
is new, the chances are ten to one that he is a
democrat; if his boots are also new. you need !
make no enquiries about him, but set him down
as certain.— Maryu'itte Express.
Central American Combination*.
A correspondent of the San Francisco Ikrald ,
writing from Granada, says :
The hostile relations existing between Nicar
agua, and the adjacent Governments have pre
sented continually a threatening aspect since
the rash invasion and humiliating exodus of the
Costa Rican army. The abdication and flight
of President Rivas tended to aggravate the dis
order of the country, and to menace it with vio
lent civil and political eruptions. The unwar
rantable treachery of the chief officer of the
Government and a majority of the ministers of
State, and the capture and execution of Sal
azar, the master spirit of the treasonable fnc
tionists, were inch proofs of crime and retribu
tion as could not fail to provoke the mutual an
imosity of the betrayer and betrayed, and in
spire an eager emulation for retaliatory recom
pense. The Nicaraguan traitors, with charac
teristic ingratitude, arraying themselves against
their American allios and benefactors, wooed
the sympathy and substantial aid of the neigh
boring States of Central America, with the per
fidious design of expelling from the country
those whom their necessities required; the mal
contents and conspirators succeeded in effecting
an offensive and defensive league with Guate
mala and San Salvador, and a contribution of
forces was levied from each of those States to
unite in waging an exterminating war against
the Americans in Nicaragua. That the despot
ic government of Carrera should have affiliated
with the project of opposing the growth and
prosperity of liberal institutions is compatible
with all its antecedent history, but that San
Salvador, the centre of liberalism, the first al
ways in Central American reform, and years
ago ambitious of annexing its fortunes and iden
tifying its fame with the great Republic of the
North, should co-operate in a war so wholly op
posite and repuguunt to all its former aspira
tions, is strange and inexplicable. The fact
however, exists, and San Salvador, uniting with
Guatemala, its hereditary foe, has precipitated
a war with the Patriot party of Nicaragua, its
hereditary friends and allies. The negotiations
of the RivaH conspiracy faction, resulted in the
forced levy of a thousand troops from Guate
mala, four hundred from San Salvador, to
which was added six hundred from Leon—the
head-quarters of the conspirators—and a few
hundred Legitimatists or Cliamorristas from the
different towns and haciendas of Nicaragua.
Murder and Robbery on the Plains. —On
Thursday of last week, a man by the name of
Paul Merely arrived in Placcrville, says the
American, from off the Plains in a very destitute
condition. Mr. Merely left .Salt Lake with some
fifteen companions, who with him furnished
teams, and were near the Sink of the Humboldt
on the 15th Oct., when during the night, ihey
were attacked by a large band of Indians, head
ed by two white men. They resisted to the best
advantage. Two of their companions were kill
ed during the night, and after daylight, two
more. The others then tied. Mr. Morc
ly was driving a team, and when the buv
ages got all the party had besides, they took
the team he was in charge of, stripped him en
tirely naked and permitted him to proceed.—
Mr. M. traveled in this condition some four days
without food—he finally obtained some clothing
but no shoes—when he arrived at the trading
post of Mr. Black. Other emigrants have also
suffered.
Russia. —The St. Petersburg correspondence
of the London I’oit says:
.‘‘A joint stock compauy has just been formed
at St. Petersburg, under something more than
government patronage; for the greater part of
the shares have already been taken by various
members of the Imperial family, and by some of
the more ancient and powerful Russian nobility.
Twenty commercial screw steamers of the lar
gest class, are to be built in the first instance.
Some of them will be constructed in America,
some in Englaud, and a few in the Gulf of Fin
land.”
The discovery of coal, of a most excellent
quality, in the Ural Mountains, in Russia, is
confirmed beyond doubt.
A Striking Confirmation of Scripti rk.— One
of the most interesting of the monuments of an
cient Rome, is the triumphal arch erected to
commemorate the conquest of Jerusalem by Ti
tus, who after the destruction of the temple,
made a triumphant march to Rome, bringing
with him a long train of captive Jews, and the
rils, among which were the sacred vessels of
temple. This procession is represented in
the sculptures on the beautiful arch, which thus
furnish an illustration of the Bible no where
else to be found, these being the only represen
tations that exist of the sacred vessels, the table
of the shew-bread. the golden candlestick with
its seven branches, and the silver trumpets used
by the priests to proclaim the year of jubilee.—
The Roman Senate and people little thought
when they erected this monument to a defied
emperor, that they were erecting a monument
to the true God, in the verification of prophecy
and divine history. A recent traveler says, not
one of the Jews of Rome, of whom there are
about 6,000 will even at this day pass under
the arch of Titus, although it spans one of the
thoroughfares of the city; they shun it as a me
morial of the subjugation of their nation, which
has never been retrieved, and regard it with
aversion.
The following from the New York Ijtft Illut
tratcd, embraces two of its rough and tum
ble sketches of characters that appear in the
streets of New York :
“A straight, trim-built, prompt, vigorous man
well-dressed, with long brown hair, beard and
moustache, and a quick watchful eye. He steps
I alertly by, watching everybody. Charles A.
1 Dana, the chief editor of the New York Tribune
i a man of rough, strong intellect, tremendous
! prejudices iirmly relied on, and excellent inveu
j tion.
Down on the other side goes one with a dry,
! spare, hard visage, black eyes, and huge white
beard of somewhat ragged appearance. lie
strides along regardlessly, and rapidly—a
book in his hand, a thought—and more too—
inside of his head, a most rustical straw hat out
side of it, turned sharp up behind and down be
fore, like a country boy’s, and a summer coat
streaming liag-like from his shoulders. It is
William C, Bryant. The white bearded scrawny
I striding old gentleman is, if not our foremost
I and noblest poet,' abreast with the most; and
; moreover, a strouir, valient, and uncompromis
j iug—and more yet, and rarer—an absolutely
fair and courteous, political newspaper editor,
; on what side it is unnecessary to say.
.
A Question. —The following question is now
lie fore the Hitchabobpackwack debating soci
ety ;
“Which has ruined the most men—giving
credit or getting trusted!” We shouldn’t won
der if this led to a considerable wrangle.
The Clamor J'ublico, mentions the arrival of a
Frenchman at Los Angeles, who fought at Se
tapol, and afterwards receiving his discharge,
started for the United States, He left France
with only the sum of $80. From Santa Fe to
Los Angeles, he had journeyed alone and on
foot.
Working Cheap.— Dr. John Hastings acts as
City and County Physician at San Francisco,
free of charge.
WHOLE NO. 165.
VARIETIES.
Indian's about Marysvikle. —General Sutter
has furnished the Marysville Herald the follow
ing returns of the Indians in that vicinity, ac
cording to tribes. The aborigines are rapidly
becoming extinct. According to this authority,
there are of the Hock tribe, at the rancheria
near Hock farm, ten men. seven women, and
three children; of the Yukulmey, seven men,
four women, and one child; of the Olash, ten
men, nine women, and one child. The number
of the Yubas will not vary materially from one
hundred —men, women and children.
Broke Jau The Oroville Record says that
two prisoners escaped on Saturday night, from
the jail in that place. They dug their way out
with a pewter spoon. The Record says tile
quality of the mortar is about the consistency
of “ chicken-feed ” made with corn meal and
water. This is accounted for from the hricks
having been laid during the hot weather of last
summer, which being perfectly dry, absorbed
the moisture from the mortar, leaving nothing
but a crumbling mixture of dry lime and sand
to hold them together.
The Minnie Rifle.— A proof of the great dis
tance a Minnie rifle will carry a ball has been
given at Madgcburg. Some soldiers were firing
at n tnrgct at l,000paces; laborers were at work
700 paces beyond, which was thought to be a
safe distance; but one of the poor fellows was
mortally wounded by a bullet. A sheep has
been accidentally killed in England, withl the
Enfield rifle, from a distance of 2,500 yards.
Heavy Police Business. —In Boston, Daniel
Gilmore, a little boy, admitted that he had sto
len thirty cents worth of bread from Mr. A.
Sandford. Ho was fined three dollars and costs.
In the continued case of John Fisher, the de
fendant plead guilty to stealing three blankets
of the value of $3, property of the inhabitants
of the city of Boston. He was sentenced to the
House of Industry for five months.
Claims Against Adams A Co.— On Saturday,
Nov. 22d. Gilbert A. Grant, referee, made a re
port to the Fourth District Court of San Fran
cisco, from which it appears that the claims
against the firm of Adams & Co. amount to
$1,155,494. The creditors have until Saturday
Dec. 6th. to show cause why the report of the
referee should not be confirmed.
An English Miseil— Daniel Dancer, when
lie had £3,000 a year, used to beg a pinch of
snufT from all of his friends, and when the box
was full bartered its contents for a tallow can
dle. But his parsimonious ingenuity appears
contemptible in comparison with that of the
Russian miser, who learned to bark that he
might avoid the expense of keeping a dog.
Judgment aoainst the Folsom Estate.— On
Saturday morning, Nov. 22d, in the U. S. Cir
cuit Court, the jury in the case of the United
States vs. the Executors of J. L. Folsom, re
turned a verdict in favor of the United States
for the sum of $186,658, with interest from Nov.
14th, 1855—amount due by deceased on his ac
count as Quarter-Master.
Mexico.— The True Californian is informed,
by private letters from Mexico, that President
Coraonfortlias made offers to England and the
United States, to sell the province of Sonora,
Lower California, and a part of Chihuahua, for
the purpose of relieving the enibnrrasments by
which he is surrounded.
Population of Cuba.— The population of Cu
ba iB estimated at the present time, at about 1,-
600,000. Of these 650,000 are white, 750,000
are slave black, and about 200,000 free black.
By a royal order of 12th March, 1837, free col
ored people were prohibited from landing in
Cuba, on any pretence whatever.
Suicide.— A man named nenry Debring com
mitted suicide in San Francisco on Tuesday the
18th inst. by shooting himself throngh the heart
with a revolver. The deceased was a native of
Germany, aged thirty-two years. He was sup
posed to have been insane.
Large Woolen Factort. —At the Bay State
Mills, in Lawrence Mass., there are annually
manufactured 400,000 shawls, valued at up
wards of $1,500,000. The mills consume 40,000
pounds of wool in a day, or upwards of 12,000,-
000 per year, requiring annually the fleeces of
at least 3,000,000 sheep.
Thf, Mariposa Grant. —It is stated that the
Board of Supervisors of Mariposa countv have
assessed the great Mariposa grant of Col. Fre
mont at $1,000,000, the taxes on which, at the
present rate of taxation will amount to upwards
of $17,000.
Walking Match.-- James Ken novan and an
Englishman, named Trainor, are soon to have a
walking match, in San Francisco, for $500 a
side. They are to walk together, and the first
who stops shall have lost the bet. The champi
on’s belt also goes in.
Suipment of Specie. —The Panama steamer,
John L. Stephens, which sailed on the 20th nit.,
took out $2,075,331 in specie; the Nicaragua
steamer Orizaba took $263,711 —making a to
tal of $2,349,042.
Centennial. — The centennial annlverslty of
the introduction of printing into New Hamp
shire, was recently celebrated in grand style at
Portsmouth, in that State.
Promit.— The city of Sacraroento'sent per last
steamer by Wells, Forgo A Co., to the house of
1 Weils, Fargo A Co., in New York, the sum of
$63,000, to pay the coupons of January, 1857.
Fillmore and Fremont.— Fremont has car
ried four caunties in the State—Santa Clara,
Almeda, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo;
and Fillmore only two—Yolo and Colusa.
Emigrants. —There arrived in the city of New
York the present year, up to the 15th of Octo
ber, from all foreign ports, 111,395 emigrants.
To the same date in 1855, 111,032 arrived.
Water Strike. — Posters have been lately
stuck up in Oroville oalling for a meeting of
the miners, to take into consideration the high
price charged for water.
Fast Building.— The Chicago Times says that
three thousand seven hundred and fifty build
ings have been erected in that city since the
commencement of the present year.
Petrified Tree. —A petrified tree was found
in Santa Rosa Valley last week, at the depth of
twenty-five feet below the surface.
The Comet again Seen. —The states
that the comet was seen from San Francisco on
Monday morning, Nov. 25th, at 4 o’clock.
The Oregon Papers are again agitating the
question of applying for admission into the
Union as a State.
Funds on Hand— The County Treasurer of
San Francisco, reports the funds oo band M
amounting to $28,587,08.
Dr. Scott. —The Trustees and congregation
of Calvary Church, San Francisco, have reftwed
to accept the resignation of Dr. Scott as pastor.
Ole Bull. —Ole Bull is lying dangerously ill
at the Sulphur Springs, Iowa.
Mr. Rix, Assemblyman from Humboldt, was
elected by a majority of one vote.
At it Again.— Wirsen, the snake charmer, is
again giving his exhibitions.
The number of deaths in San Francisco dur
ing the last week, was 24.

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