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The Nevada Democrat. [volume] (Nevada, Calif.) 1854-1863, July 17, 1862, Image 2

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I'honuia Boyce is our Agent for San 1 riuici*
<o. He la authorized to receive advertisement*, and
t ollect ami receipt for the tame.
A. Bndlam, Jr., i« one *>r Sacramento,
lo receive advertiKements and collect for the same.
THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 17, 1862.
For Superintendent of Public Instruction.
j. D. STEVENSON.
A Mee**»g of the Democratic Central
CoHXrmt* for Nevada county will be held at Nevada
oa Monday next, July 21»t. Tlio Committee will
meet at the office of J. I. Caldwell, Esq., in Flagg’s
brick building, at two o’clock, P. M., und a full at
tendance is requested.
T. T. DavgNroRT,
Nevada, July 17, 1862. Chairman.
Gukkiixa Opkbatioxs.— The late move
ments of the guerillas in Kentucky and
Tennessee, and the re-capture of Baton
Rouge by Van Dorn, are doubtless designed
to divert the attention of tbe Government
and prevent reinforcements being sent to
McClellan. Tbe mere temporary occupa
tion of one or more towns in Tennessee,
by a rebel band, can have no effect upon
tbe result of tbe contest, but if by threaten
ing Nashville and other places, they can
induce the Government to strengthen these
places, instead of reinforcing McClellan,
tbe rebels will bavo accomplished the ob
ject? intended by the recent raids. Mur
freesboro, which was captured by the rebels
on the 13tb lost., is thirty miles south-east
of Nashville, by tho railroad. It wus held
by tho 11th Michigan and 3d Minnesota
regiments, both of which, according to tho
latest report, had surrendered. There was
considerable cxcitemont in Nashville, and
it was reported that Gen. Kirby Smith was
advancing on tbe city with 15,000 men.
Bishop Simpson*, of the M. E. Church,
preached at Carson City last Sunday. Many
of the citieeus were so well pleased with his
discourse that they requested him to remain
and preach on Tuesday evening; but other
engagements prevented bis complying with
the request. He was intending to return
to California by way of Lake Bigler, where
he purposed slopping a day tor two to view
the scenery.
Lout Mail. —A late mail from Carson
Oily to Aurora was lost near Sulphur
Springs. It was being packed through on
borse-back, and the pack turned, when the
animal became frighted and ran away. At
last accounts neither the horse nor mail
bad been found, and the prospect of finding
either was not very good.
This San Joaquin. —The Stockton Inde
pendent is informed that the water in the
upper San Joaquin is again rising rapidly.
In many places tho banks are overflowing
to such an extent as to oompel people liv
fag near the river to remove to higher
ground for safety.
Hot Wkatiikr. — Monday last was the
warmest day we have had this season. At
Nevada the mercury in the thermometer
ranged from 90 to 92 degrees for several
hours during the afternoon; at Sacramento
it was up to 93, and at Marysville to 101
degrees.
Static Faib. —We have received from Mr
O. C. Wheeler, Secretary of the State Agri
cultural Society, a complimentary ticket
of admission to tbe Annual Fair, to be bold
at Sacramento on September 30th, and Oc
tober 1st, 2d and 3d.
Bullion.— Tbe Carson City Ago estimate?
that about 1,000 pounds of bullion is daily
shipped from that place to California. This,
we presume, is mostly silver, and is worth
about $26 a pound.
Mkhcki) Banner —We bnve received tbe
first number of a paper, entitled as above,
lately started at Snelling, Merced county.
It is published ami edited by Robert J. and
Rowena Grauico Steele.
Reported Indian Outubbak.— The Vir
ginia City Enterprise, of Tuesday lust, says;
Late yesterday evening news came in from the
1'ruckee thnt the Indians hud commenced driv
ing off stock. It was also stated that the set
tlers were gathering into Stone’s, for the pur
pose of taking measures for the defense of their
property. They have about fifty muskets at
.''tone's place. This is perhaps a mare rumor.
Gov. S rAMSOHD offers a reward of $250 for
the arrest and delivery to the Sheriff of San
Luis Obispo of one Aaron C. Inman, convicted
in the aforesaid county of murder in the second
degree, but who escaped before sentence w as
passed upon him.
Drownbd.—A little boy about 4 years old,
only child of John A. Butler, of the City Brew
ery, m Marysville, was drowned near the steam
bout landing on Feather river, July 12th.
The Conflacfttlon Bill*
The overland telegraph inform* ua that
the collocation bill ha* passed both House*
of Congress, and await* only die «ignature
of the President to become a law. The only
provisions of the bill which have bcon tele
graphed to California are those relating to
the negro; and as agreed upon by the Con
ference Committees of the two Houses it
provides a* follows: All slaves of persons
engaged in the rebellion coming into onr
line*, and all found at places heretofore oc
cupied by rebel*, shall be forever free.
Slaves escaping are not to be delivered up
until the rightful claimant makes oath of
loyalty, and persons in the military and
naval service are not to bo allowed to de
cide on tb« validity of claims for slaves, on
penalty of dismissal from the service. The
President iH authorized to employ as many
persons of African descent for the suppres
sion of the rebellion as he may deem ad
visable; and is also authorized to make pro
vision for the colonization of the blacks be
yond the limits of the United Stales. The
President is also authorized to extend par
don to rebels, on such conditions as may
be deemed expedient for the public welfare.
It is called the “Confiscation Bill,” but we
do not know in what shape it passed, or
whether it contemplates concealing any
property except slaves.
The bill will not have any material ef
feet upon slavery, for the institution is
being abolished about as rapidly as it could
be if the whole Federal army was engaged
In that work exclusively; but it will have
the effect, if possible, to raise up a more
determined opposition to the Government
in the rebel Slates. The bill was passed to
conciliate the radical abolitionists of the
North—a squad of theorizing agitators,
who have for years been howling about
slavery, and who are as d'-serving of the
halter as the rebel leaders themselie*. In
no respect can a sweeping confiscation law
bo of any advantage to the Government,
and the only effect it can have will be to
prolong the contest.
Loots Napoi.eon and the War in Amkiu
ca. —A private letter from Paris, by a per
son attached to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, according to the Loudon Post
says:
Louis Napoleon’s opinion is, that the prose
cution of any war on so gigantic and expensive
a scale as the American war must necessarily
be of short duration, and stop one day or other,
crushed under its own weight. Louis Napo
leon’s idea is, that any intervention on the part
of a European power would, in the present cir
cumstaces, delay rather than hasten the sus
pension of hostilities, and hence that Europe
ought, for the sake of peace, forbeur to inter
pose at present in the American conflict. Par
isians acquainted with our politics look upon
the formation of a peace party in the North as
one of the eventualities of tne summer cam
paign and trust that for the next fall election
thut party will have strong supporters among
the newly elected candidates to Congress. The
general feeling in Europe is that the coming
summer will not prove favorable to the North
ern arms, and that the climatic influences in
herent to thnt season will try our power of en
durance more than the loss of a dozen battles.
The letter concludes hy stating that nothing
will be done by European cabinets in reference
to American atTairs before summer is over and
the next fall elections known.
Want Him Rkmovkd.— The people of
Ormsby county, Nevada Ter.,do not appear
to be entirely satisfied with their District
Attorney, M. D. Larrowe, and want him
removed. The county Commissioners. at
a late meeting, adopted the following peti
tion to the Governor:
To Ills Excellency, Gov. J. IV. Mye —Dear
Sir: The Board of C unty Commissioners of
Ormsby county would most respectfully ask
that your Excellency will remove the present
District Attorney, and appoint some one who
will not, like the present incumbent, allow him
self to be employed in cases against, and do all
he can to the disadvantage of the county, and
embarass the county officers in the discharge
of their respective duties.
Tiik Emancipation Qcichtiox.— A Wash
ington dispatch of the 14th inat., to the N.
Y. papers, says:
The border State representatives were in cau
cus on Saturday night, to decide upon a reply
to the President. They say, as regards his
emancipation offer, it is not practicable nor
specific. It proposes a change which enn only
be done through State Conventions, and to ob
viate delays in organising State action, they
think the offer should be made directly to indi
viduals, and then the question would be at once
solved. Congress could at once appropriate
money, und the people would show their will
ingness to aid the Government even at the cost
of a radical change in their social organization.
Tick Okhoon Tbmjgr.vph.—The Portland
(Oregon) correspondent of the Bulletin, writes:
Mr. Strong, formerly of your State, is moving
along with the Oregon telegraph between here
Yreka. The beginning pole was planted here
during the spring, and now he is pegging along
through the grass-shires of this valley, some 75
mil’s to the southward. It is expected that it
will be up and in working order, to the south
ern terminus this fall, nml then we can shake
hands with the Bay city by lightning.
■nv TEZiEOhJlAFIZ.
TO THB DEMOCllAT.]
Sax Fiuxpwco. July 17.
The Ocean Rover, fifty day? from Hong
Kong, brings news of the advance of rebls
on Shanghai. They were repulsed by the
French and English troops. The Chiue-e
Buffered severely, and the allies none.
The American bark Looloo was wrecked
on Roundabout Island, and afterwaids
struck by lightning and consumed.
The Ilong Kong Press docs not know of
any rebel privateers in Chinese waters.
.Mauysviu.k, July 17.
The second stage, via the lleiwies* Pass,
arrived this morning, making the trip in
23 hours.
Sac'hamkxto, July 17.
A Chinaman named Ah Kow was mur
dered in this city lust evening, on I street.
Tiie Coroner’s jury rendered a verdict that
Ah Kow dird from the effect of a pistol
shot, tired by A'i Yuen. The murderer is
in jail.
The report over the Eastern line to-day
is unimportant. Nothing from McClellan
or Hulleck.
IjKTTLill FROM VIRGINIA CITY.
Virginia City, July 16, 1862.
Ed. Democrat: —Some time having elapsed
since you have heard from this side, I deem it
but my duty to write, although there don’t seem
to be much to write about.
The California stage started out yesterday af
ternoon, for the first time, over the llenness
w ith a fair showing of passengers. We burned
no powder over it. yet you could see delight and I
satisfaction depicted, in “raised letters” on the
“phiz” of every citizen who loves his country
and owns no toll-roads, stations, or mortgages
on the Placervillc “cork screw” route. The
enterprise so long talked of and so long “hum
med and hawed” over, we look upon now as a
fixed fact. We are rejoiced, not only because
it takes us over an easier grade, more direct,
much shorter and in lees time, but because peo
ple can now get to Virginia without being rob
bed in Carson City, a place made purposely to
rob them on their way to this place.
Among the many brick buildings that are
now in progress of erection l have only time
to mention that of Albert Mnu, an old resident
of Nevada City. It is *o be two story, one story
already finished, situated on B street, and an
ornament to the city. Mr. Mau is all enter
prise, and so is Sadler, who is connected with
him on this side of the slope.
Lammon & Co. will either build or set up a
brick this fall coming, not before, the sun is so
hot! Don’t infer that we’re lazy, for our tobac
co emporium is open every morning by nine.
Nevada men are coming all the while, some
on a visit and others to take up a permanent
residence. C. Willson Hill and “Ould Grimes”
made a flying visit. The wnter could not have
agreed with C. Willson nor the whisky with
Johny, their stay was so short. “Bud” Cross
?ot in last evening, looking a little care worn.
Ic made the trip in three days to Hunter’s
Crossing on foot, which I think is good time,
for one not used to walking. He promises me
to give you a full account of his journey over.
Joe Undeiwood, « member of the tonsorinl
art, was shot dead this morniug at Carton City
by another “contraband ” Can learn no par
ticulars.
Cutting and shooting in this city is no longer
tolerated. Since Perry and Uirdsall were ap
pointed policemen, hut little skirmishing has
been done. No sooner does n “chief make a
“whoop” than he is “snatched" and marched
off to the calaboose, to take a hraiing before
one who is about us stringent as Judge Coon
“used to was." Yours, Lemmons.
Military Ckitu isms.—Aii intelligent 8f>
well us distinguished officer of the army
writes from the battle-field to a friend in
New York aii interesting letter,from which
here is a paragraph or two. In view ol
current criticisms, they may not be out ol
place here:
A good general requires Infinitely more abil
ity , more consideration and forethought, than
arc necessary for a good admiral. His respon
sibility is, indeed, very great, and always in a
ratio corresponding with the force he com
mands. Besides strategy, the mimitise of field
operations, the details of camps, their selection
and protection, the movements and safety of
his long trains of commissary, hospital and
ordnance storrs are of the first importance, and
upon his ability to move and protect these must
depend the advance of the army itself. His dif
ficulties in a wet season, especially in swampy
or mountainous regions intersected by running
stTnms, and more especially when pursuing a
retiring enemy who leaves naught but waste be
hind, are much increased, and must really be
very perplexing. With this foreknowledge 1
am disposed to make every allowance for our
young generals, fully convinced that, while
seeming to substitute caution for celerity, they
are still doing all for the best. Gens. McClel
lan and Hnlleck are unquestionably scientific
and able men, and their caution as command
ers has only been in proportion to their sense
of the responsibility resting upon them; whiht
l’ope and Mitchell as subordinates, acting upon
a less extended scale, both in men and objects,
have felt themselves free to dash off in Napo
leonic style, striking where least expected, and
with results usual to a surprise.
Military Dkfaci,ter. — Quartermaster
Lieut. A. C. Sheldon of the regiment of Wash
ington Territory volunteers, whose office was in
San Francisco, absconded on the last steann r
with #1,600 of government money. He was
formerly Quartermaster's Sergeant ofCrrinonvs
cavalry company, 2d Regiment, but was trans
ferred and promoted, lie is said to have been
rather a “fast” young man.
The Ituinboldt Mines.
Wo hove been permitted to publish the
following extract from a private letter writ
ten by a miner at Star City, in ihe Hum
boldt country, to o friend in Nevada :
Our mining operation* are progressing rap
iilly. People, and teams loaded with provis
ions, are now coming iti good earnest. 1 he ex
pressman reports seventy-two teams on the way
from Washoe, and eleven have just arrived with
provisions from Red Bluff.
Tunnels are being run in every direction. I
have been offered and refused $6,000 for my
contract on the Franklin and Sheba ledges.
Our tunnel on the first extension north of the
Franklin and first extension north of Sheba has
proved the richness of these ledges. W e have
struck a lead of the richest mineral in the
Franklin, and the mineral from the first exten
sion north of Sheba is pronounced by all to be
equal to the original, several tons of which you
will remember assayed in California $900 per
tun. The first extension south of the Sheba is
being opened under the supervision of Mr.
Fewell; six men arc at work night and day
The Empire Tunneling Co. are still pushing,
forward with energy. The Crown Point, Dan
Webster, and Last Chance ledges have come
into notoriety through late developments. The
North Star (or the Eleven Ledges) rates high,
and can be sold readily for cash.
Moneyed men are continually dropping in,
nnd some sales at high figures have been made.
A quarts mill has arrived at Buena Vista, be
longing to J. C. Fall. The Pruitt Brothers, of
San Francisco, have been here for some time,
and have a smelting furnace in operation. They
also have a mill on the way. We have four
Spnuiards at work smelting rock, and they pro
duce the silver, but their process is slow and re
quires too much wood.
Star district still takes the lead of all others,
though the Buena Vista has some fine gold
leads. The Star boys are very independent,
and treat speculators with an unconcern that
rather astonishes them.
We now have a line of stages running to
Washoe; they make the trip m and back once
a week. The proprietors are Messrs. Sales &
Barber. Fare from Carson City to this place,
twenty dollars. A. R. Bateman, our old ex
pressman, is still on the route, and makes as
good time as the stages. We have preaching
every Sunday, by O. N. Brooks, of California.
Yours, C. L. P.
Fkom thk IIkopknkd Soutukux Pokts.
—A New York letter of June 16th nays;
Our advices from the re-opened Southern
ports are auspicious; the advances of Northern
merchants toward a resumption of business
relations with their old correspondents being
received generally in a spirit that indicates a
general resumption at no distant day. There
are many Southern merchants, it is true, who
still hold' back, and who, like the military, de
clare that they will never yield, but die in the
last ditch. But most of these, it is said, arc
parties who have not yet been tendered an op
portunity to yield; and it is confidently predic
ted that they too, like their military defenders,
will gtucefully yield when the alternative is
presented to them of the much-vaunted last
ditch or unconditional surrender. Mortified
pride has much to do with their obstinacy; hut
they will manage to get rid of this, or at least
to smother it, when they sec their next door
neighbors driving once more a lucrative busi
ness, while they themselves are foolishly con
tinuing in a course which, if persisted in, must
eventually lead them to the poor house. At
tire date of our latest advices there were sever
al vessels loading at New Orleans for Northern
ports, and others for ports in Europe. A schoo
ner from that city arrived at Boston oh Thurs
dap, bringing a cargo of tar and spirits of tur
pentine, which had been shipped by the brother
of Gen. Butler.
Skchkt Association. —The Saciumento
correspondent of the Placer Hcnruld writes
thus:
The tax payers for $1,000 and upwards, have
organized themselves into an Association. The
object of the organization is to provide ways
and means to protect themselves against the
payment of illegal debts, in whatever form they
may exist. This Association will be fully or
ganized by the Fall election, and each candi
date, will, no doubt, be brought under its con
sideration. Whoever the Association indorses
will, doubtless, be successful. Our eity finan
cial aH'a ; rs will hereafter enter into every can
vass until our debts are provided fur in some
way. Holders of bonded indebtedness, or float
ing, or illegal contraction, are not safe in
their investments. If Sacramentans are ev
er able to meet their honest debts, they will do
well.
Ml’itDBit.—The Humboldt Times, of the
12th inst., says; A man by the name of Day
was murdered on New River, about two weeks
since, by another named Davis. Both were
nert, and were alone at a cabin when the diffi
culty took place. Davis, after committing the
murder, went up the creek and told of it, and
when the miners repaired to the spot they found
Day horribly mutilated, with no less than eight
stabs, either one of which would have proved
fatal. Davis is now in jail, in Weaver, await
ing his trial. He is represented as being a ve
ry bad man; and from all the information we
can gather, the murder was cold blooded. Day
was an old man, and well known in the vicinity
of Bunker Hill, Klamath county.
MARRIED.
At the Cal ho Ic Churcl , in thin city. July 17th,
b.' Rev Father lia ton. Mi. John i kkiiam and Miss
JOtl/NNA ill I'O.Nfl LL, lolll of Bed Do. .
U1KD.
In tbin city, July loih, Mr. Arcribald JIcAlli*-
tkr, ai;i'il i b mt H7 years.
MR S. A U.KK'H PREPARATIONS
for tl e hai , for sale 1 y
SPENCE * NICHES.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
OKAI.IOI) I’HOPOSAI.S H IM. BE RE
CEIVKL) bv the Board of Supervisors of Neva<la
county, until the Hint Monday in August, 18fl‘,2, fui
the diction ofan addition to (bo County Hospital, in
accordance with a plan and specifications, which
may l>e seen at the office ol |)r. K. M. Hunt, in
Flagg’s brick building, corner of Broad and Pine
streets, file proposals must be handed to the Clerk
ol the Board, on or before the first Mondav in At gust
next. By order of the Hoard. T. H. ROI.FE,
Nevada, June 'Jfl, lBO'J,
President
PHILADELPHIA
DRY-GOODS STORE.
No. 44 Brunei Street.
PIONEER
DRY a O O D S S T O It E,
N3. 35 MAIN' STRF.CT.
New Store and New Goods.
JACOB ROSENTHAL,
Has Just Receive.!
At his New Store on Broad Street,
A TREMENDOUS STOCK OE
DRY and fancy goods,
Which he uo\* Offers For Sale,
25 Per Cent. Cheaper than Other
Dry Goods Stores In Nevada.
rTill IS IS NO BLOWING—IT IS A FACT
which can be substantiated bv hundreds wh>,
are daily purchasing g<*'d-> of me. Attention is in
vited to the following prices:
15(H) yards Calico at 9 cents per yard.
5000 yards Menirauc Prints at liij* cts.
5000 yds bleached Muslin from 10 to 20 ef*.
500 yards of Bareges at 25 cents per yard.
258 Silk Presses, $10 to $75 apiece.
50 Fine Bonnets, at 5 dollars each.
300 Shaker Bonnets at 25 cents apiece,
1000 yds China Matting, 25 cts per yard.
Embroidery of Every Variety!
REMOVAL. —Reineniher I have removed my
new Store ft tew door* below the old xtand.
Nevada, .July 1&. JACOB KO.SEXTIIAL,
LUDLOW’S PATENT JARS.
For Preserving Fruits, Vegetables, Ac.
THF.SK CANS, OK JA IIS, ARK SF.LF
SEAI.ING, and are accompanied by printed di
rent ions for puttiug up different kinds of fruits and
vegetables. For sale at A. G. PIER’S
jyl5-3l* Crockery Store. Commercial Street.
FOR SALE! CHEAP FOR CASH.
SMALL COTTAGE AND LOT
on Aristocracy Hill, opposite the resi- jjjjil
deuce of Pr. R. M.’ Hunt. The cottage con
tains Parlor, Bedroom, Kitchen and Out
houses. Lit, 50 feet frontage by 200 I eel deep, with
upwards of SIX) feet of water pipes, laid on exclu
sively to the cottage. Yeuit an blinds, kc. Cottsy?
is uader rent for eight dollars per month.
Apply to F. MANSELL,
Broad st.. Next Poor to Hook A I-adder House.
jvl5.
WANTED.
A MAN AND WIFE—THE MAN TO
work at mining, and his wife to cook for a tew
miners. Apply at the Telegraph office, Nevada.
julS.
Dr. 0. POND,
Surgeon Dentist,
(Successor to Dr. Levason,)
OFFICE —IN KELSEY’S BUILDING,
OVER A. BLOCK’S CLOTHING STOKE.
orner of Pine dc Commercial streets,
NEVADA, CAL.
jyl-tf.
JOSEPH BROTHERS,
THE OPPOSITION STORE,
Cor. of Uronci A Pine Streets,
NEVADA,
ARF. CONSTANTLY RECEIVING
NEW and FASHIONABLE STYLES of
SPRING & SUMMER CLOTHING,
Of Every Deacrlptlon.
Nevada. May 9th, 1R61.—t
A. BLOCK, 8. FL'RTH, E. BLOCK, J*.
A. BLOCK & CO.,
Corner of Pine & Commercial Streets.
N E V ADA.
FASHION RESTAURANT,
NO. 62 BROAD
ST.. NEVADA.
( Formerly the St. Leon Restaurant.
MONAHAN Sc FLYNN, Proprietor*.
Bf The oldest. Deatest, best and cheapest Rff
taurant in this city.
KENNEDY’S MEDICAL DISCOVB*'
and Salt Rheum Ointment—fur sale by
SPENCE * WICKES.
iylO. « Broad and 56 Pine st*., Nevada.

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