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The Nevada Democrat. [volume] (Nevada, Calif.) 1854-1863, September 27, 1862, Image 2

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|U'i4da §cMon«t.
Tlioiitua Uoyce Is our Agent for San t runciH
no. He is authorized to receive advertisements, and
collect and receipt for the same.
A. Ilndlain, Jr., is our Agent for Sacramento,
to receive advertisement* and collect tor the name.
SATURDAY EVENING, SEPT. 27. 1862
ColiloriilaShoultl be Represented In Ihc
War.
Now that the war lias assumed such col
lossal propo tions, aud there is every
prospect that it will coutinuo at IcMt for
one or two years longer, many of the loyal
citizens of California are anxious to have a
hand in it, and only await orders from the
War Department to enrol themselves in the
Union army. The late reverses to the Union
cause, instead of disheartening, but renders
them more determined to sustaiu the Gov
ernment; and if need be, and the movement
is set on foot, we think a regiment can be
taised in the State, of men who will pay
their own passage to New York, provided
they can have the assurance of being mus
tered into the service when they get there.
A few are preparing to go, with the view of
joining regiments from other States, but
they would much prefer to be with a reg
iment made up exclusively of Californians.
We notice by the San Francisco papers,
that the 3d and 4th regiments, (Col. Con.
nor’s and Col Forman’s,) have each mado
application to be taken East, and the offi
cers and men of the 3d have subscribed
some $30,000 towards payiug their passage.
Why not send both of these regiments, and
raise another of picked men to go with
them? The three regiments would make a
bt igade; and California could certainly send
3,000 moo to the war, and have enough left
to keep peace on this coast. It would
probably take three or four months to make
the necessary arrangements to supply the
places of the two regiments, briog them to
San Francisco, aud recruit and drill the
now regiment. In the mean time efforts
could be made to raise money by subscrip
tion to pay the passage of the men to New
York. Doubtless the officers and men of the
regiments would all subscribe one or two
months of their pay, and if any thing was
lackiug when the Legislature met, the State
might b« .cailed upon to make up the de
ficiency. Other States have contributed
largely towards the expenses of war, and
California should be as liberal as her sisters
The brigade could thus be lauded in New
York by the middle of February, without
extra expense to the Government, and be
ready for active operations in the spring.
The arrival of such a force from this
State would have a happy effect at the East,
particularly it they should arrive during a
period of reverses to the Foderal arms.
Their numbers, it is true, would not be suf
ficient to make any material difference in
the result of the contest, but the fact of
their coming such a distance to the support
of the Government would have an encour
aging effect.
There is every reason to believe that the
war will coutinuo until the fighting popula
tion of the rebel Slates are nearly all killed
off or disabled; aud judging from the past,
we must calculate that the Federal losses
during the war will be about equal to that
of the rebels. There is little hope of main
taining the national integrity at a lees cost,
and eveu il that price is paid, it is better
than the eternal war that must follow a di
vision of the republic. This cannot be
accomplished in one or two campaigns, and
the hardest lighting aud most bloody battles
of the wur are likely to Lake place during
next year. In this campaign California
should be represented by at least one
brigade.
Diffkkkkcks pK Opinion. —A San Fran
cisco correspondent of the Sacramento Bee,
says that Phelps heads the list for Senator
among the members elect of the Legisla
ture, aud that Conness is sectmd. The S.
F. Journal, on the contrary, says Conuess
has more positive strength than any can
didate—having 33 votes sure, while no oth
er can count more than 25. A San Fran
cisco dispatch, to yesterday eveniug’s
Journal, says that Park has 55 of the 93
votes that will go into the Seuatorial cau
cus, and will, besides, receive the support
of Conness’ friends. So far Park is ahead
i i the bragging line.
Its Autuorsuh*.—The poem "Three bun
dred thousand more” having been attribu
ted to Bryaut, of tbe New York Post, that
paper says it is not bis, but waa written by
JameaS. Gibbons of that city.
The Proposed Regiment. —A Sun Fran
cisco dispatch to tte Appeal, dated the
25tb, says a telegram was received that
day from Washington, refusing to grant
permission to raise a regiment for tbe East.
The game dispatch says Gen Wright has
telegraphed to tbe War Department, that
in his opinion the regiment had .better not
leave here. What Gen. Wright’s object
can be in making sush representations we
do not know; but we infer that he wants it
to appear that there is a large Secession cl
ement ia Califoruia which requires the
presence of nil the Union men to keep
down. But if his purpose is to keep men
in this State, for fear of an uprising, it w ill
be a failure. It is impossible to keep men
here when so much excitement is going on
at the East, and such tremendous issues nre
to be decided upon the battle field. Those
disposed to go, who have the means, will
pay their own passage, and many other
good men would go if they could raise tbe
money. We have no doubt that enough
men to make up a regiment will leave here
for the war in the next two or three months.
But arriving at different times, they will of
course join different regiments, and their
identity as Californians will be lost. They
would all prefer to join a Califoruia regi
ment, or brigade, and we earnestly bope
that arrangements may yet be made to
send an organized force from this State.
Eastern News— Nothing of special in
terest has been received lor several days
from the theater of war on the Potomac.
At the latest advices tbe Federal and rebel
armies were facing each other on opposite
sides of the river—the liues extending
from Sharpsburg to Williamsport. We hear
nothing of the movements of Ileintzleman,
Sigel and Bauks, who are iu command of
large divisions, nor of tbe immense number
of newrecruits that lately have arriv
ed in Wusbington. This silence relative to
army movements is indicative of a plau to
strike a vigorous blow iu some unexpected
quartar. A semi-official statement gives
the Federal losses in the battle of Antic
tarn at 9,220 in killed, wounded and miss
ing. The rebel losses during their raid in
Maryland are reported at 30,000. Sur
geon-General Hammond, who has returned
to Washington from the late battle field be
tween Manassas and Bull Uun, reports that
our people had buried 3.000 of the rebel
dead left on the field by their friends,
though they held possession of the field af
ter the engagement. lie adds that there
were still 600 rebel corpses to bo interred.
GuERim.i.Aa.— Reports are current that
the secession sympathisers are organizing
guerrilla bauds in this State and Nevada
Territory. There is some reason to believe
that bauds of outlaws are organizing iu the
.mouutaius, to carry ou depredations on au
extensive scale; but they cannot be digni
fied with tbe title of guerrillas. They are
merely robbers, and should be regarded aud
treated as such.
The Los Angeles News, of a late date,
states that there are grounds to fear that
the numerous desperadoes iu that section of
the State may organize a guerrilla baud
for murder aud robbery, and calls the at
tention of the military authorities to the
subject.
The steamer Sonora arrived at the Bay
from Pauaina, early yesterday morning.
She brings passengers and the mails from
New York to the 1st of September. The
New York papers of that date will arrive at
Nevada this evening.
The Cincinnati Gazette says that the sur
plus produce of Ohio, for this year, will ex
ceed the interest ou one tbousaud millions
of dollars, or the interest on the whole uo
tional debt made by the war in the year
from its commencement.
Taxes in Sonoma.— According to tbe re
turns of the Assessor, the total amount of
the assessment vpon property in Sonoma
county Is $3,872,033,00. The total amount
of tax thereon is $73,343,03.
The tug boat Auasbc has just been laun
ched at Sau Francisco. She is called after
an Indian, the chief of a numerous tribe
that inhabited the Sacramento valley when
Capt. Sutter arrived there in 1839.
‘•Lo” on Hand. —Iu the list of subscribers
to the Sanitary Fund at the Dalles, Oregon,
we find “Lo, the poor Indian, $10."
Stockton sent $202 to Archbishop Ale
many io aid of the suffering poor of Ireland.
BY TELEGRAPH.
[special to the demochat.]
San Fkancisco, Sept. 27.
It is rumored here that.the Secessionists
in this State are forming guerrilla bands in
this State and Nevada Territory It is
said they have about ten thousand men en»
listed. The Call attaches great inpoi tance
to the matter, and says it is time something
was done to ascertain the facts.
The steamer Bragdon sprung a leak when
crossing the Bay yesterday, and had to
thtow over three hundred sacks of wheat
to save herself.
Eastern News.
Washington, Sept. 26th.— The Governors
of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Illinois,
Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, New Hamp
shire. and Indiana, arrived here this morn
ing. They congratulated the President on
bis emancipation message, believing it
would be productive of good as a measure
of justice to hnmauity, and sound policy.
It is stated that no proposition was made
at the recent conference for the removal of
McClellan and the promotion bf Fremont
to the head of the army. The convention
was very harmonious, and no interference
with the conduct of the war was thought
or spoken of.
Nothing important from Buell, McClellan
or Rosekrana uj> to twelve o'clock latft
night. The Eastern line is in good working
order to-day.
A Religious View.— The New York In
dependent, which, like all religious papers
views every thing in a religious light, has
the following observations on the progress
of the rebellion:
The first movement of the Public Mind in
America was, to suppress rebellion by acting
within the oruinary lines of our Government
and by forbearing to meddle with the institu
tions of States. This, with the light which we
then had, seemed the wisest course. Events
have made it impossible. There has been a
divine will overruling haman wisdom and turn
ing our best counsels to folly. We have been
defeated in every attempt to eonciliate the Un
ion men'of the South. We have been unable
to conduct a war in the seceded States without
disturbing the frame-work of their economies.
We have been driven, not by any sense of jus
tice, or from love of human right, out from the
necessities of war, to interfere with the relation
of master and slave.
We have conversed at different times
with quito a number of piously-inclined in
dividuals, who take a somewhat similar
view of the war. They believe it was the
diviue will that slavery on this continent
should be destroyed, and that to effect this
result the Lord stirred up the hearts of the
slaveholders to rebellion, thus making them
the principal instruments in the destruction
of the institution to which they are so fa
natically attached. Other?, whose religion
is of a somewhat different cast, regard the
rebellion as the special work of the devil.
The former class have faith that the w&r
will ultimately result in good to the human
race, while the latter, with darker forebod
ings, regard it as of unmixed evil.
Col Forman.-- A few days ago, we allu
ded to a letter published in the Sacramento
Union, aud purporting to come from a sol*
dier in the 4th regiment, accusing Col. For
man of disloyalty, incapacity, etc. The S.
F. Journal, referring to the same letter,
says:
An officer attached that regiment says that
he is satisfied the letter was written by an out
sider, who has a personal spite against the Co
lonel; that Col. Forman is the only officer who
lias caused arrests in Los Angeles county for
disloyal conduct and insults to the flag; and
that he possesses the confidence and esteem of
those under his command. In the letter allu
ded to great fault is found with the Colonel for
telling the soldiers they could vote; if he did
tell them so, he committed no offence though
he might have been mistaken in regard to the
law concerning voting; from the fact that he
told them they could vote, he evidently wished
for them to vote, knowing they would vote for
the Union ticket and secure the success of the
Union candidate. If Col. Forman is a Seces
sionist he would hardly desire a regiment of
Union soldiers to vote in a Secesh county and
thus secure the defeat of the Secesh ticket.
It appears that no less than twenty-nine
applications have been made to the parties
interested in getting up the regiment for
the East, for companies, from different parts
of the State.
At the recent annual commencement of
Waterville College, Maine, the degree of
LL. D. was conferred upon Gen. B. F. But
ler. lie graduated at that institution.
Death of a Ska Captain.- -Captain Davis
of the bark Duke of liothsay, died at sea
on the 4th inst.. while on the way from Liv
erpool to San Francisco.
Gkkahkrtown, In Calaveras county,
which contain* only fifty voters, has con
tributed $404 to the Sanitary Fund.
PROPORTION OF THE DRAFT TO THE ABLE
BODIED Citizens.—A writer in the Philadel
phia Press makes the following estimate of the
proportion of the able-bodied citizens that will
be required for the public service:
Within the last few days 1 have noticed se
veral articles in the public press, in which esti
mates are mode ns to what proportion of the
inhabitants the present draft, including those
already in the field, will comprise. As I believe
them nil to be erroheous, will you allow me very
respectfully to submit the following estimate:
First. I assume the population to be 22,000,000
Less the colored race 000.000
I.eav 21,700,000
Election returns give one-eighth ot the pop
ulation as voters.. 2,712,600
Less clergymen and assistants... .40,000
l,ess employees of the General and
.State Government, in civil ad
ministration of government 86,000
The sick, the maimed and the halt
continually under medical treat
meat and in the asylums 40,000-“ 105,000
Leaves subject to draft . 2,547,500
Having furnished and to be furnished for
the draft 1.300.000
It follows that almost every other able-bodied
man will be required for the public service.
I leave those under 21 years of age to balance
those above 4.5, the former not being included
in the one-eighth ratio.
Anotukk Proclamation. —A Washington
dispatch, of the 26th iiist., gives another
proclamation issued by the President, as
follows:
Whereas, It has become necessary to call
into se r vice not onlv volunteers but also a por
tion of the militia of the States to suppress the
insurrection existing in the United States, dis
loyal persons are not adequately restrained by
the ordinary processes of law from hindering
this measure, and from giving aid and comfort
in various ways to the enemy, it is ordered
First—During the existing insurrection all
rebels and insurgents, their aiders and abettors,
and all persons discouraging enlistments or re
sisting the militia drafts, or offering aid or com
fort to the rebels, shall be subject to martial
law and liable to trial and punishment by mili
tary commission.
Second —The writ of habeas corpus is sus
pended in respect to all persons arrested, or who
are now or hereafter may be imprisoned by any
military authority.
Rejoicing. —As soon as the President’s
proclamation in regard to freeing the
slaves in rebellious States, was known in
San Francisco, enthusiasm was rampant
among the colored population of the city.
The Express Company of Wells, Fargo
& Co., have issued instructions to their
agents throughout the State, to transmit
subscriptions for the relief fund free of
charge.
Died of his Wounds. —One of the convicts
named Brewer, who was wounded at tht
last outbreak, at San Quentin, died of his
wounds a few days ago.
Recent frosts, in the Willamette valley,
have been very dsstrtictive to vegetables,
corn, etc., in Marion, Polk and Yamhill
counties.
Millions on Papeii. —Since September 1st
thirteen new mining companies have filed their
certificates of incorporation in the County
Clerk’s office of this county. The aggregate
capital nominally represented by these compa
nies alone is 7,931,000, and the whole amount
of capital thus represented by companies or
ganized since June 1st, 1860, is greater than
the whole taxable property of California. —[S.
F. Call.
White Swans. —R. B. Woodward, of San
Francisco, has imported a white swan from
England. It is said to be a beautiful bird, aud
the first of its species ever broughtto this State.
Its mate died on its voyage out. Mr. Wood
ward has deterrriined to introduce the bird into
California, and has therefore ordered six white
ones and three black ones from Australia.
Curious Case. —Samuel P. Sterritt, Co. I,
First Michigan,was shot at the battle of Gaines
Mills, the ball entering the right side of the
head,destroying the right eye and passing back
of the left eye, probably destroying the optic
nerve, as the sense of vision is impaired.
He savs he has not suffered any pain from the
wound.
English Bigotry. —The Catholics of Ire
land are about founding a magnificent Univer
sity for the education of the youth of that coun
try. Ihey applied to Lord Palmerston for a
charter for the institution ajnd were refused. A
specimen of the beauties of English rule in Ire
land.
The Government contract for 100 tons of
barley, to be delived at Fort Churchill, N. T.,
prior to November 1st, has been awarded to a
Sir. Perkins, at 13 cents per pound. The
freight alone will cost 8 cents per pound.
Wool. —From February 13th, to August 1st
of the present year there was shipped, through
Tomlinson & Co., Los Angeles, 600,000 pounds
of wool, all the products of that region.
A man by the name of Walker was killed at
Quartinas, Colusa county, on Wednesday last,
by one Richards. The latter gave himself up
to await trial.
Military Pardons, —Several soldiers serv
ing out their sentences at Alcatraz for various
offenses, have been pardoned by Gen. Wright
and restored to the ranks.
To be Hanged.— A murderer named Felipe
has been sentenced to be hanged at San Jose
on the 24th of October.
A Sackamknto Volvntkkk Kii.t.m, _
letter received in Sacramento from Tuc*m
states that Jamas Todd, of Capt. Ford’s comp-/
ny, Fifth regiment, C. V., was killed on S,!„f
0th,’near the Pimo villages, by being shot with’
arrows by Indians, no less than five »trikii tu
rhim as he lay in his bed. lie was a resident
of Sacramento; sickly when he enlisted, hut
the camp made him strong, and he was a good
soldier
TO TUB MIXERS, MECHANICS, AND
I.ABORIKG MEN OE A I, I, CLASSES
IN THE STATE.
THE OLD FAVORITE PLACE OF REPORT— S. Haas
A CO., NEVADA, de-in’ to inlorm tlieir niiiner<ni«
friends, and patrons throughout the Stale, that tinw
are now prepared to .supply you with CLOTHING.
FURNISHING GOODS. HATS jt CAI'S, BOOTS AXP
SHOES this FALL aud WINTER, with SCPKBlUR
GOODS, at reduced rales.
»g~ Their FORMER IMMENSE STOCK has he,.,,
GRF.ATI.Y ENLARGED!
Your patronage is solicited,and entireSATISFai •
TiON GUARANTEED—call and ace.
S. HAAS <S i CO., Nevada,
sep6‘tf.
UR. T. WALTON,
Homoeopathic Physician & Surgeon,
PAYS SPECIAL ATTENTION TO MID
WIFERY, and treats all kinds ot diseases,
Ocularly 6f Females aud Chi idren, the Nerves,
i : t.'lA u ui.:_ i - i
Liver, Kidneys, Hones, Skin, and at diseases Hi.it
arise from any Poison, Virus, Contagion, or from »
Scrofulous, Rhen.nutic Gouty. Dropsical, or l ancer,
oua, Diathesis of the System, and tnuiu e.pecuilh
when of long standing.
Ofltce. on Mill street, adjoining Magnolia llestmi
rant Residence Neal street, Grass Valley.
aep27:tf.
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.
THE FOLLOWING STEAMSHIl'S
will be dispatched in the MONTH
or OCT., 1862:
Oct. 1st.—SONORA W. F Lai’iDi.k, ( otnman r.
Oct. 11.—CONSTITUTION, J. T Watkins. ConmiauV
Oct. 21.—ST. LOUIS, Comman'r.
From Folsom Street Wliarf. at !l o'clock a. m. puoo
tually,
FOR PANAMA.
Passengers will he conveyed from Panama tn A*,
pinwall by the Panama Railroad Company ami Iona
Aspinwali to New York by tin* Atlantic umi Pacila;
Steamship Com (tatty.
FORBES* RAIK(HK.
' Agents P. M. S l'o.,
Corner of Sacramento and LiedesdortT streets. San
Francisco. May 6
NOW IS THE TIME
TO SUBSCRIBE FUR
Smith's Mammoth Naval & Military
MAP OF THE UNITED STATES.
FIR the use of Hotels, Parlors, School'
Offices, Saloons, Ac , Ac. Those wishing copies
can leave their nainesat G. \V. WELCH'S Book statu
—price, 12.00. . P. L. WASH BURN,
Agent for Sierra, Yuba A Nevada counties,
sep'io Aw.
AMERICAN DRY-GOODS STORE!
39 BROAD STREET, NEVADA.
CHINN & COLBY,
H ;
AVE JUST RECEIVED FROM SAN
FRANCISCO, the largest ami BEST SELECTED
stock of
FALL AND SUMMER GOODS,
EVER BROUGHT TO THE MOUNTAINS.
THE DRY GOODS,
WHICH THEY
Offer to the Ladies of Nevada City,
and the Surrounding Country,
—AKK AT —
PRICES THAT CAN NOT FAIL TO SUIT All.
Silk Goods of Every Style,
DRESS GOODS, TOILES PEI.NTFS,
INDIENNES, J AGONES.
SOICR1ES, POPLINS.
SILK AND WOOL SHELLERS,
Irgandies, & Traveling Dress Goods.
OF ALL KINDS.
Brussels and Velvet Carpets.
LINEN OF ALL KINDS.
FRENCH & AMERICAN PRINTS.
GLOVES OF EVERY SIZE AND COLOR.
SILK A WOOL CURTAIN DAMASK,
Vool Damask, Laee A Muallu Curtain
Table Damask,
ROWN AND BLEACHED SHEETINGS,
And a Variety of Woolen Good*.
A LARGE STOCK OF
'rimmings, Mohair, Barege.
MARSEILLES A LANCASTER QUILTS,
Mantillas, Shawls, Embroideries,
BONNETS PARASOLS.
SACKS.
EW STYLE OF ENGLISH
New Styles Mantillas.
NEW STYLE EMBROIDERY.
onnets & Children’s Hat**
Jgj- This permanent stuck of Dry-Good* ■'
gest ever seen in the Mountains ot California*
a bought lor CASH, and we will guarantee to*'
eaper thnn any other establishment * n P 1 * ■
I. LADIES ! Call and examine our Good* beirr
rchasmg elsewhere. Give us one trial.
Nevada, Sept. 4, 1862. CHINN A OOLDV
iROWN’S BROCHLAL TROCHES,
aud Wyukrop’a Iceland Pectoral.
For sale by SPENCE A WICKES
UININK A IODIDE OF POT'S»*-
For sal* by SPENCE A WICKfc.

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