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Edgefield advertiser. [volume] (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, February 12, 1868, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1868-02-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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Ovar the River.
The following beautiful ?ines, full of beauty,
tenderness, and poetici.l imagery, were written by
Miss Nancy Pries:, a " Vactory Girl," in Massa
chusetts :
. fi L
Over the river they beckon to me,
Loved or.es who've gone to the further side,
2 Lo ?leam nf their snowy robes I sec,
But their voices are drowned in the rushing tide.
There's olio with ringlets of sunny gold,
And eyes tho reflection of Heaven's own blue ;
He ?Tussed in the twilight, gray and cold,
Ai.d thc pale mist hid him from mortui view.
We saw no: tho u.igels who met him there,
The ;.;a?c of the city we could not see!
Ov?.r the river-over thu river,
M; brother stands waiting to welcome mc.
II.
Over the river the boatman pale
Carried another-'.hy household pot
lier bruwu curls waved in the geirle galo
Darling Minnie ! I seo her yet
She crossed on her bosom her dimpled hands,
And peacefully entered the phantom bark;
Wo watebod it g'i.lo from the river sand?.
And all our sur.shino grow strangolj* dark.
We know she is Safe on the further side,
Where all the ransomed and angels bo;
Over tho river, the mystic river,
My childhood's idol is waiting for mo.
III.
F.ir nene return from those quiet shores,
Who eros.? with thu boatman cold and pale,
Wu hear the dip of the golden oar.?,
Alni catch a glimpse of the snowy sail
Aad lo! they Wave passed iroui our yearning
hearts ;
They cross thc stroam, and are gono for aye ;
We may not sunder thc veil apart,
That hides from our vision tho gatos of day.
Wo ut. ly know that their barks no moro
May sail with us o'er life's .-tormy sea;
Yet. somewhere, I know, on thc unseen shore,
They watch, and backon, md wait for me.
IV.
And I sit and think, when the sunset's gold
ls dashing river and hill and shore,
I shall one day stand by the water cold,
And list for the souud of tho boatman's oar;
1 shall watch for a gleam of the flapping sail ;
I th ill hear the boat as.it gains the strand ;
I ?hall pass from sight with thc boatman pale
To tb-s butter .-boru of the Spirit Lind ;
I shall know thc loved ones gone before,
And joyfully sweet will thc meeting bc,
When over thc river, the peaceful river,
Thc Angti of Death shall carry me!
TU J] DEACON'S DAUGHTER. <
TiiE STORY OF A BROKEN HEART. ;
*' She loved not wisely, but too well."
It was n balmy, pleasant Sabbath mor- (
ning; so-green and tranquil was our val- <
lev homo, (bat the very air seemed more .
holy than uti ether days. The dew was 1
floating in a veil of mist from the mead- r
ows of School Hill, where the sunshine i
came warmly, while the wild (lowers in i
the valley lay in shadow, still heavy with
the night rain. The trees which feathered 1
thy hillsides were vividly green, and Cas- j
tie Rock towered-a magnificent picture \
-its base washed by the water, and j
darkened by the unbroken shadow, while i
a soft, fleecy cloud, woven and impreg
nated with a silvery light, floated among f
thc topmost chris. The two villages lay ?i
upon their opposite hills, with the deep t
river gliding between. 1 i leo miniature f'
cities deserted by the feet of men ! not a ;i
souud rose to disturb the sweet music of i
nature, for it was the hour of prayer, and tf
there was scarcely a hearth-stone, which, u
at that time, wa* not made a domestic
altar. ?,
At last a deep be'l-tonc came sweeping s
over the valley from the Episcopal stee- ?,
pie, and was answered by a cheerful peal f(
from tho belfry of the new academy. n
The reverberations were still sounding. .|
mellowed by the distant rocks, when the ?j
hitherto silent village seemed suddenly p
teeming with life. The dwelling-houses t.
were flung open, and the inhabitants came ^
forth in happy, smiling groups, prepared n
for worship. p
Gradually they divided into separate ft
parties-the Presbyterians walking slow- ti
ly towards their huge old meetiug-house,
a id the more gaily-dressed Episcopalians
seeking thair more fashionable house of |(
worship. Jt was a plea-ant sight, those ,.
people gathering together for so gooo a
purpose. Old people were out, grand
mothers, with the blossom of thc grave
on their aged temp.es. Children, with ^
their rosy cheeks and sunny eyes, ren- ^
dered more rosy with pride of their
while frocks, pretty straw bonnets, and
pink wreath?. It was pleasant to see the 7?
little men and women striving in vain to j.
subdue their bounding steps, and school |
their sparkling faces to a solemnity be- ?
fitting the occasion. .
There might be seen the newly-married
pair, walking bashfully apart, not daring
to venture on tho unprecedented boldness ^
of linking arms in publie, yet feeling ,
very awkward, almost envying another /
ouplewho led a roguish little girl be- .'
i sic
tween them, she, a mischievous little ' .
thing, all the while exerting her baby V''
strength to wring that chubby hand from
her mother's grasp; pouting her cherry .
lips when either of her idolizing parents S1J
checked her bounding step or too noisy V,
prattle, and, at last, subdued only by in
tense admiration of her red morocco ?!1
shoes, as they flashed in and out like a
brace of wood-lilies beneath her spotted :
muslin dress. Apart from the rest, and an'
lingering along the green sward, which .
grow rich and thick on either part of the NVI
way, another group perchance was gath
ered. Yoting girls, schoolmates and dej
friends, with their heads bending together, wii
and smiles dimpling their fresh lips, all hot
doubtless conversing about sacred themes, Th
befitting the day. Such was the. aspect lh('
of our 'ittle village on the Sabbath, when ni?
the subject of this lit;!e sketch takes us be
to the old Presbyterian meeting-house, or
school, a sombre, ancient pile. the
The academy bell had not ceased ring- stn
ing, when the congregation came slowly ma
in through the different doors of the meet- -i
ing-house, and arranged themselves at stil
wiil in the square pews which crowded den
the body. The minister had not arrived wh:
-a circumstance which occurred to some tha
of the congregation as somewhat singular, ter]
Twenty years ho had been their pastor, Sal
and during that time never kept his con- pro
grcgation waiting. che
At length he appeared at the southern boll
entrance, and walked up the aisle, follow- ble.
ed by his gray?h?aded old deacon. The I
minister paused at the foot of the stairs, bee
and with a look of the most deep and re- bra
spectful reverence, held 'he door of the thal
u deacon's seat," while the old man passed eye
in. That little attention went to the doa- bur
con's heart ; he raised his heavy eyas to beg
the pastor with a meek and heart-touch- goo
ing expression of gratitude that softened of t
many who ?oohed at it, even to tears. ren
The minister turned away and went up wit!
the stairs, not in his usual sedate manner, I tion
but hurriedly and with unsteady footsteps, beei
When he arrived in the pulpit, those who i prec
sat in the gallery saw him fall on his ! old
hands, and pray earnestly, and, it might ! his
be, to weep, for when he arose his eyes 1 fron
were dim and flushed. He ?
Directly after the entrance of the min-1 wen
ister and deacon, came twn'females-one,
a tall, spare woman with thin features,
and bespeaking long and continued, but
meekly endured suffering. There was a
beautiful and Quaker-like simplicity in
the black silk dress, the snow-white hand
kerchief, with the corners drawn under
the ribbon strings in front, and pinned
smoothly to the dress behind. '
Her gray hair was parted neatly unde;:
the straw bonnet, and those who knew
her remarked that it had gained much of
its silver since she had last entered that
door. In her arms the matron bore a
rosy infant, robed iu a long white frock,
and an embroidered cap. A faint color
broke into her sallow cheeK, tor thong',
she did not look up, it seemed to her as
if every eye in that assembly was turned
upon her burden. Ti ey were all her
neighbors-many of them kind, truthful
fi'tends-who had sat with her at the same
communion table for years. Yet she
could not meet their eyes, nor force that
tinge of shame from her pure cheek, but
moved humbly forward, weighed to the
dust with a sense of humiliation and
sulfering.
A slight, fair creature waiked by her
side, partly shrinking behind her all the
way, pale and drooping, like a crushed
lily. It was the deacon's daughter, and
the babe was hers, but she was unmarried.
A black dress and a plain, white vandyke
supplanted the muslin, that in the d3ys
of her innocence had harmonized so
sweetly with her pure complexion. The
close straw bonnet was the same, but its
trimming of pale blue was displaced by
a white satin nbbon, while the rich and
abundant brown curls that had formerly
dropped over the neck, were gathered up
und parted plainly over her forehead,
?ne look she cast upon the congregation,
then her eyes fell, the long lashes droop
ing to her burning cheek, and with a
downcast brow she followed her mother
10 a seat, but not that occupied by thc
Md de.'.con.
There was a slight bustle when she en
tered, and many eyes were bent on her,
i few from curiosity, more from com
miseration. She sat motionless in the
?orner of the slip, her head drooping for
rard, and her eyes fixed on the small
lands that lay clasped in her lap.
After the party was seated, a stillness
.rcpt over thc house ; you might have
leard a pin drop, or the rustle of a silk
Jrcss, to the extremity of that large room.
?Vii at once there arose a noise at the
Joor opposite thc pulpit ; it was but a
footstep ringing on the threshold stone,
ind yet the people turned their heads
md looked startled, as if something un
common was about to happen. It was
roly a handsome, bpld-looking young
nan, who walked up thc aisle with a
?aughty step and entered a pew on the
.pposite side from that occupied by the
nother a'nd daughter, and somewhat
?earcr thc pulpit.
A battery of glances was levelled at
lim from the galleries,, but he looked up,
md even smiled, when a yoting lady by
vhom he seated himself drew back, willi
. look of indignation, to the farthest cor
ler of the pew.
The old deacon looked up os these bold
iiotsteps broke the silence ; his thin cheek
.nd lip became deadly white, he grasped
he railing convulsively, half rose, and
u'll forward with his face on his hands,
nd remained motionless as before. Well
night the wronged old gentlemai yield
jr a moment to the infirmities of human
ititure even in thc house of God.
That bold man who thus audaciously
utruded in his presence, had crept like a
hepard to his hearthstone-had made his
inocent name a by-word, and his daugh
sr, the child of his ag\ a creature fol
ien to bandy jests about. Rut for him,
lat girl, now shrinking from tho gaze of
er old friends, would have remained the
ride of his home, an ewe lamb in the
riurci? of God. Through his wiles she
ad fell from the high place of her rcli
ious trust, and now, in thc fulness of her;,
enitoncc, she had come forward to con
iss her fault,- and receive forgiveness of
ie church she had disgraced.
The old deacon had Jost his children,
ne by one, till this gentle girl alone was
:ft to him ; he had folded a love for her.
is latest born, in his innermost heart,
11 all unconsciously she had become to
an idol. The old man thought it was
? punish him that God had permitted
;r to fall into temptation; he said so.
jscechiii?ly, to the elders of the church
hen, at her request, he called them to
.ther, and made known her disgrace
e tried to take some of the blame upon
rnself; said that perhaps he hail been
ss indulgent thar, he should have been
id so her affections had been more easi
won from her home and duty-that
: feared he had been a proud man
?ritually proud, but now he was more
?ruble-and that his heavenly Father
d allowed this thing to chasten him
e end had been obtained ; he was a
tkened old man, but could say, " The
ll of God be done." Therefore he be
iiglit Iiis brethren not to cast her forth
her disgrace, hut to accept her confes
>n of error and repentance ; to be mer
ill and receive her back in the church.
: went on to say how humbly she had
.pt to his feet an? prayed him to for
re her ; how his wife had spent night
er night in prayer for her fallen child,
i so he left her in their hands, only en
Ating that they would deal mercifully
th her, and he would bless them for it.
Willingly would the sympathising el
rs have received the stray lamb again
thout further humiliation to thc broken
irted old man ; but it could not be.
e ungodly were not unwilling to visit
: sins of an individual on a whole com
mit)'. The purity of their church must
exacted.
From the time of the church meeting,
poor man bent himself earnestly to
engthen his child's good purpose. He
de no complaint, and strove to appear
lay, to be-resigned and cheerful ; he
1 continued to perform the office of
.con, though the erect gait and some
it dignified consciousness of worth
t had formerly distinguished him, ut
y disappeared. On each succeeding
?bath his brethren observed some new
stration of strength. Day by day his
ek grew pale, his eye dim, his voice
low, and his step more and more fee
t was a piteous sight-a man who had w
n remarkable for bearing his years so m
vely, moving through the aisles of w
; old meeting-house with down-case cc
s, and shoulders stooping as beneath a T
den. At last, the mildew of grief sh
an to wither up the memory of that an
J old man. When the first indication se
his appeared, thc hearts of his breth
yearned towards the poor deacon, pe
i a united feeling of deep commlsera- ov
. The day of Julia's humiliation had mi
i appointed, and the Sabbath which de
iecjed it was a sacramental one. The Le
deacon was getting very decrepit, and pe
friends would have persuaded him mi
i performing the duties of the day. his
shook his head, remarked that they to
3 very kind, but be was not ill, so I hei
they permitted him to bear the silver cup
around, filled with wine, as he had done
for twenty years before, though many an
eye filled with tears as it marked the
trembling of that hand, which more than
once caused the cup to shake, and the
wine to run down its sides to the floor.
There was an absent smile upon his face
when he came to his daughter's sept. On
finding it empty, he stood bewildered,
and looked helplessly around upon the
congregation, as if he would have inquired
why she was not there. Suddenly he
seemed to recollect ; a mortal paleness
overspread his face. The wine cup drop
ped from his hand, and he was led away,
crying like a child.
Many of the brethren visited the afflict
ed mau during the next week. They al
ways found him in his orchard, wandering
about under the happy boughs and pick
ing up the withered green apples which
the worms had eaten away from their un
ripe stems. These he diligently hoarded
away near a large sweetbriar bush, which
grew in a corner of the rail fence. On
the next Sabbath he appeared in the
meeting house accompanied by the min
ister as we have described, to be outraged
in the house of God by the presence of
the man who had desolated his home. It
is little wonder that even there his just
wrath was for a moment kindled. The
services began, and that erring gkl lis
tened to it as one in a dream. Her heart
seemed in a painful sleep; but when the
minister closed the Bible and sat down,
the stillness made her ^tart. A keen
sense of her position came over her. She
cast a frightened look toward the pulpit,
and then sunk back pale and nervous.
Her trembling hand wandered ?n search
of her mother's. Thc old lady look
ed on her with fond grief, vshispered
soothing words, and tenderly pressing
the little hand that had so imploringly
besought her pity. Still the poor girl
trembled and shrunk in her stat, as if
she would have crept away from every
human eye.
The minister arose, his face looked
calm, but the paper which contained the
young girl's confession shook vio.cntly in
his hand as he unrolled it. Julia kn?w
it was her duty to rise. She put forth her
hand, grasped the carved work of the
seat, and stood up-right till the reading
was finished, staring all the time wildly
in the parson's face as if she wondered
what it could be all about. She sat dow
again, pressed a hand over her eyes, an
seemed asking God to give her strength
The minister descended from the puJpi
for there was another ceremony yet.
baptism of the infant. The gentle, errin
girl was to go up alone with thc child of
her shame, that it might be dedicated to
God beforo the congregation. She arose
with touching calmness, took the babe
from her mother's arms, and stepped into
the aisle.
She wavered at first, and a keen sense
of shame dyed her face and very hands,
with a painful flush of crimson, but as
she passed the pew where young Lee was
sitting, an expression of proud anguis
appeared on her countenance, her eyes
filled with tears, and she walked steadi
forward to the communion-table, in front
of her father's seat.
There was not a tearless eye in that
congregation. Aged, stern men, bowed
their heads to conceal the sympathy be
trayed there. Young girls, careless, light
hearted creatures, who, never, perhaps
dreaming of the frailty of their own na
tures, had reviled the fallen girl, now
wept and sobbed to see her thus humbled
Young Lee became powerfully agitated
his breast heaved, his face flushed hotly
then turned very pale, and at last he
started up, flung open the pew door, and
hurried up the aisle with a disordered
unnatural step.
"What name?*' inquired the parson
bending towards the young mother, as
he took the child from her arms.
Before she had time to speak, Lee was
by her side, and answered in a loud, stern
ivoice :
41 That of his father, James Lee."
The trembling of the poor girl's frame
was visible through the whole house
her hand dropped on the table, and she
leant heavily on it for support, but did
not look up The minister dipped his
hand into the antique china bowl, sprinkled
the baby's forehead, and a clear voice
pronounced the name. A faint cry broke
from the child as the cold drops fell on
his face. The noise seemed to arouse all
the hitherto unknown and mysterious
feelings of paternity slumbering in the
young father's heart. His eyes kindled,
his cheeks glowed, and impulsively he
extended his arms and received the infant
His broad chest heaved beneath its tiny
form, and his eyes seemed fascinated by
the deep blue orbs which the little crea
ture raised smiling and full of wonder to
bis face. Lee bore his boy down the
Aisle, laid him gently on his grandmother's
ap, and returned to the pulpit again
lulia had moved a little, and, overcome
-viih agitation, stood leaning against *.he
?ailing of the pulpit. Lee bent his head
ind whispered a few words, and held
brth his hand. She stood for a moment
ike one bewildered, gave a doubtful,
roubled look into his eye, and laid her
land in his. ile drew her gently to the
able, and, in a respectful voice, requested
he minister to proceed with the marriage
ervicc.
The pastor looked troubled and irreso
ute. The whole proceeding was so un
xpected and strange, that even he lost
ll his presence of mind.
"A publishment is necessary by our
aws," he said, at length, casting a lock
t the deacon ; but the old man remained
lotionless, *vith his hands clasped over
3e railing, and his head bowed upon
lem. Thinking him too much agitated to
peak, and uncertain of his duty, the di
me lifted his voice, and demanded if
ny one present had aught to say against
marriage between thc two persons st?nd
ig before him.
Every face in that church was turned
ri the deacon, but he remained rnient,
lotionless, so the challenge was unan
vercd, and the minister felt compelled
> proceed with the ceremony, for he re
lembered what was at first forgotten,
lat the pair had been published accord
g to law, months before, when Lee had.
ithout giving reasons, refused to fulfil
ie contract.
The brief but impressive ceremony
as soon over ; and with an expression of
ore true happiness than had ever been
itnessed on his fine features before, Lee
inducted his wife to her poor mother,
he poor bride was scarcely seated.when
Al
d burst into a passion of tears, which
emed as if it never would bo checked.
The congregation went out. The young
opie gathered about the doors, talking
er the late strange scene, while a few
?tnbers lingered behind to speak to the
aeon's wife before they left the church,
?e and his companion stood in their
w looking anxiously towards the old
m. There was something unnatural in
motionless position, which sentn thrill
the old matron's heart, and chained
? to the floor, as if she bad suddenly
J
late
A
fini:
WA
A
unit
turned to marble. The minister came
down the pulpit stairs and advanced to
the old man, laid his hand kindly upon
the withered fingers clasped over the
railing; he turned pale, for the hand
which he touched was cold and stiffened
in death ! The old man was feeble with
grief, and when Lee appeared before him,
his heart broke amid the rush of its feel
ings.
A Happy Woman*
" What are you singing for]" said i
to Mary Maloney.
,l Oh, I don't know, ma'am, without it
is because my heart feels happy."
" Happy, are you, Mary ? Why, let
me see, you don't own a foot of land in
the world."
"Foot of land is it?" she cried, with a
loud laugh. " Oh what a hand ye be
after a joke. Why, sure, I've never a
penny, let alone a fut of land."
" Your mother is dead ?"
" God rist her so wi, y is," replied Mary,
with a touch of genuine pathos. " Thc
Heavens be her bed."
"Your brother is still a hard case, I
suppose."
" Ye may well say that, lt's nothing
but drink, drink, and bate his wife-the
poor cray ture."
41 You have to pay y our sister's board ?"
" Sure, the bit crayture ! and she's a
good little girl, is Hinny, willin' to do
whatever I axes her. I don't grudge the
money that goes for that."
" And you haven't many fashionable
dresses either ?"
" Fash'nable, is it ? Oh yis, I .put a
bit of whalebone in me skirt, and me
calico gown spreads as big as the [eddies.
But then you say true ; I haven't but
two gowns to my back, two shoes-to me
fut, and wau bunnit, Darrin' me old
hood."
" You haven't any lover?"
" Oh be off wid yez ! catch Mary Ma
loney wid a lover these days, when the
hard times is come."
" What on earth have you to make
you happy ? A drunken brother, a poor
helpless sister, no mother, no lover-why,
where do you get all your happiness ?"
" The Lord be praised, miss, itgrowed
up in me. Give me a bit uv sunshine,
a clean flure, plenty of work and a sup
at the right time, and I'm made. That
makes me laugh and sing. And thin, if
troubles come, I try to keep ray head up.
Sure it would be n sad thing if Patrick
McGuire should take it in his head to ax
me ; but the Lord willin' I'd try to bear
up under it."
-??
How TO HAVE A KIND HUSBAND.-A
correspondent of the Home Journal gives
a recipe for making or keeping a good
natured husband :- ' Keep his linen in
prime condition, with the requisite degree
of stillness ; never let him know the want
of a button ; give him well-broiled beef
steak, wholesome bread, and a sparkling
cup of coffee for his breakfast; keep
squalling babies and broken crockery out
of his sight; do not annoy him with the
blunders and extravagance of'Biddy;'
greet his evening arrival with a clean,
lightsome face, well-combed hair, and a
welcome kiss; have ready a cheerful sup
per, a bright fire in the grate, an easy
chair, with comfortable gown and slip
pers ; be merry, and tell him some agreea
ble news; finally, give him a well-made
bed in a cozy chamber."
THE PIANO.-Next to books there is
no inanimate thing in the house that can
produce so much profitable pleasure as a
piano. A library and a piano are sym
bols of high cultivation. These two
spread that nobler banquet where the
soul is fed, without fear of gluttony or
dissipation. As books bring into our
daily circle, as familiar companions, thc
noblest spirits that ever wrought on earth,
and permit us to rear our children under
the influence cf thc noblest natures, so
the piano, with simple incantations, brings
up from their sleep the noble brother
hood of song, and persuades them to
dwell among us.
-? ?
If you are poor, don't let folks know
it or they will discover in you a thousand
blemishes, a host of defects, which would
never be discovered, or at least never
talked of, if you kept a high head, and
carried yourself as if you had ten thou
sand dollars instead of ten cents at your
command. It is as natural for the world
to hold poor folks in contempt, as it is
for a cat to steal cheese.
Voltaire says, " man loves life, yet he
?nows he must^die; spends his existence
in diffusing the miseries he has suffered
jutting tile throats of his fellow-creatures
br pay-cheating and being cheated.
The ~ulk of mankind are nothing more
han a crowd of wretches, equally crimi
lal, equally unfortunate. I wish I had
?ever been born."
omiting House Calendar for 1868.
!50 21 *5i ?"HI mg?! i ?i gi HI Si HI ST?
- S e S R 2 5 S HS ol? ? aa t
: i Tk ; '-Isl ll"! T nHaSI ji
" .'"ll 2j 3: 4jj " ll 2; 31 4
?< 5. 6 7| Si 9 IO ll ? 5 ff 7 81 91013
I 12 13 14 15 lt 17 18 r 12|13 14 1511617118
! 19 20 il 22 23 24 25 ?' ! 1??20 21 22 2:i 24 25
! 26l27'28,20 30 31 '... j26 27,28?29?3o!31 ...
......L.L.I.j il j....I...... ... i
J 2| 3 4| 5 ff 7; 8,1 >! 2 31 4| 5 fi' Tl 8
i ??10 ll ll 13 14 15 i g 8 10 ll?12 13 14 15
f 16 17|18?19 20 21 22:? . 18 17 18 19 20 2?|22
: 23 24?25 26 27;28?29'l 23:24 25,26^27 28 29
... ... [.:.............. s? si.
ll 2 3? 4! 5 ?j 7:1 ... ... 1? 2 3 4 5
! 81 9 10?H'12!13 14 ' ? ff 7. 8 9 10 ll'l2
15ll? IT Vi? 20 21 ? y hz?14 151? 17 18il9
22 23 34 25126 27 28 ?20 22 22,23 24 25,26
29?30 81 ... ... ... .J 27 28,29'30.
.J. 1 2 S 4 .i 2 3
. fil 6 7 8 Oliolll1! o? 4 5; 6 7 8 9 10
13 13 14 1618 171 IS] 3 ?11,12:13 14 15 16 IT
19 20 21?22 23:24l25l: Il8,19;20 21 22 23 24
20 27 28;29 80 ... ... ?25 28,27;28 29 30 31
.LL ! 2 ......LL..
, 3 4 5| 6 7 8 9 J 1 2.31 4 5 ? 7
' ?olll 12 IS 14 15 10 fl 8> 9 ?o'll 12 13 14
.17 18 10?20 21?22i23 ? f 15?16 17; 18 19 20 21
24 25 36 27 28 30 80 j22:23l24!25 28 2? 28
31. . . . ?29,3oL.|... , "
... ] 2 3? 4 5 6?| ... ... 1? i 3 4 'fi
7 8 ?10 11 12 13 m 6? 7) 8 9 10 U|12
14 15 16 171810 20 p 13|l4 15 16 17 18?19
21 22 23?24!25 26.27 ?20 2l?22 23 24 25!26
28 20 30|...j...|...|...|| ?27,2S!29 30 81 ?
F. A. BRAHE,
t His Old Stand 194 Broad Street,
AUGUSTA, GA.,
kFFERS AT THE VERY LOWEST PRI
' CES, to suit tho times, a large Stock of
NE GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES and
lAINS. FINE JEWELRY, FIRST CLASS
A MONDS, known as old Mine Stone?, and a
ry larga assortment of Sterling 8ILVER
ARE. Also, a large lot of FANCY GOODS,
tfr. BRAHE having just returned from Eu
>e will again pay personal attention to the
?PAIRING of WATCHES and JEWELRY.
Vugusta, Dec 23 _lm 52
Fisk's Metallic
?urial Cases.
[1ST received n lot of FISK'S CELEBRA
TED METALLIC BURIAL CASES_of the
ist styles.
Iso, on hand, of my r?wn manufacturo and
ih, a beautiful assortment of MAHOGANY,
LNUT, POPLAR and PINE COFFINS,
ll of which I am selling at LOW FIGURES,
STRICTLY FOR CASH.
AI. A. MARKERT,
Next door to Ad vorticor Osloe.
?16 tf f
/
WE HAVE JUST OPENED AND ARE OFFERING AS LARGE AND AS
CHEAP A STOCK OF DRY GOODS,
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, as was ever offered in this city. We do not mention
prices, but assure the people that no house can or will sell Goods Cheaper than we.
H. P. RUSSELL & CO.
AUGUSTA, GA.
Nov. 3, 3m 45
Established 1845.
a
? TUTT
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE
-DEALER IN
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, PAINTS, OILS,
DYE-STUFFS, SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS,
AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES,
261 Broad Street, Augusta, Gai,
HAS NOW IN STORE one of the most complete Stocks in the South, to which
he respectfully invites the attention of Merchants, Physicians and Plantors.
The Stock embraces everything to be found ina FIRST CLSSS WHOLESALE
DRUG HOUSE, both of American and Foreign production, which is offered at
prices that cannot fail to please.
Having had an experience of twenty-two year?, in thc Drug Trade in Augusta,
he flatters himself that he fully understands the wants of thc people.
Merchants are assured that they can purchase thei* supplies from us?t NEW
YORK PRICES, freight and expenses added.
All that we ask is an examination of our Stock and Prices.
Oct 23 3m 43
SOUTHERN SHOE HOUSE !
M. COHEN,
1821-2 Broad St., -AND- 2S i Broad St,,
Opposito Augusta Hotel, Under Central Hotel
-A.TJGrXJST^.3 GEORGIA,
WISHES to inform his Friends and Patron? that he is receiving and has constantly
on hand one of the
Largest Stocks of Boots and Shoes
Ever brought to this City. He will continue to sell as usual CHEAP FOR CASH.
It has been his desire, and he has thus far succeeded, in keeping A First ? J ass
Boot and Shoe Store, where all styles of Boots and Shoes will be kept.
He is constantly receiving and always on hand a large supply of
T, -MILES & SONS' CELEBRATED PHILADELPHIA SHOES
For Gents, Ladies, Misses and Children. My Stock consists in part of
Ladies and Misses Cloth Congress BOOTS, Gent-s Fine Calf Dress BOOTS,
Ladies and Misses Cloth BOUTS, Gents Fine Calf Water Proof B00T8,
Ladies and Misses Kid Congress BOOTS, Gents Fiue Calf Dress Congress BOOTS,
Ladies and Misses Kid BOOTS, Gents Fine Calf double .?ole Congress BCOTS,
Ladies and Misses Morocco Cosy BOOTS, Boys and Youths BOOTS and SHOES of
Ladies White Kid and Satin SLIPPERS, Every Style.
Ladies Toilet SLIPPERS,
For Plantation Wear.
Fine Heavy Wax BROGANS, different qualities.
Fine Heavy Kip BOOTS.
Extra Size Women's and Men's SHOES.
MY MOTTO ALWAYS HAS BEEN " B.UIGK SALES AMD
SMALL PH0FIT3."
And all I ask is to call and examine my Stock before purchasing elsewhere. No
Charge or Trouble to Show Goods.
{^"Remember the places.
M. COHEN,
1824 Broad St., opposite Augusta Hotel and 234 Broad St., under Central Hotel
Augusta, Nov 18 lot 47
SADDLES, HARNESS, LEATHER,
AND
SHOE FINDINGS !
ALBERT HATCH. CHAS. G. GOODRICH.
HATCH & GOODRICH,
No. 271 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.
Jjp: INVITE THE ATTENTION OF OUR FRIENDS AND THE PUBLIC
generally to our full and complete stock of
SADDLES, BRIDLES,
HARNESS, TRinVKS,
WHIPS, COLLARS,
HARNESS MOUNTINGS,
HORSE BLANKETS,
LEATHER OF ALL KINDS, SHOE FINDINGS,
ind a well assorted lot of
BELTINGS.
We would be happy to receive a call from all our frieuds at cur new stand, No.
71 Broad Street.
HATCH & GOODRICH.
Augusta, Oct 22 . 3m 43
OtROCOSXljOSiSfc
O'DOWD & MTJLHER1N,
283 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.,
?AVE NOW ON HA?D FOR THE FALL -\NTD WINTER TRADE
ie largest and most complete Stock of ?R?CER1E? in the City. Our Stock
wing been purchased before the advance ifn Guie!, wc ure pivpsred to sell
-A.S LOW -A.S TBIE LOWEST.
[^"Merchants and Planters and Planters v vsiting our City would do well to call
?fore purchasing elsewhere.
Augusta, Oct 22 3nl 43
?o the Boot and SUoe Buyers fif
South Carolina !
THE EMPIRE
tQOTAND SHO
Great Reduction in Prices !
WE ARE SELLING ONE OF THE LARGEST AND BEnT SE LEGTE
)cks of BOOTS AND SHOES ever opened in tiis City. A/i experience
renty years, and buying strictly for Cash, enables u? to sell ov'f Goods from
I to 35 per Cent Cheaper than any other House.
J?gr*Call and examine. A trial will convince. Goods freely shovn, and one
ce asked.
MILES' CELEBRATED BOOTS AND SHOES always on hoad. Also,
GOD'S CELEBRATED BROGANS, and all other Manufacturer's work of
e.
HR. CARROLL wishes his old friends and customers I? understand that
re is no Shoddy or Paper Stuffed Shoes kept in this EstablishnuMit. Our G?ods
warranted.
ggr?0rder3 respectfully solicited.
ROBERT CARROLL,
WITFf
E. Jp. BLODGKETT fit; CO.,
lUgusta, Nov .4
202 Broad Stj;eet3 Augusta, G ?" t?U
DISSOLUTION.
TTHE firm of GRAY, MULLARKY k Co. is this
day dissolved by mutual consent. Parties having
any demands against the firm will present them
for immediate payment. All those indebted will
please settle at their earliest convenience The
books and notes will bo found at tho old stand,
228 Broad street.
JAS. A. GRAY,
AUSTIN MULLARKY,
JAS. H. MULLARKY.
ATJGUSUA, GA.. January 6,. 1863._
Partnership Notice.
TPHE undersigned havo this day formed a Co
partnership under tho style and firm of MULLAR
KY BROTHERS, for tho purpose bf transacting
a WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRY GOODS
BUSINESS, at tho store lately occupied by L
KAHN k Co., No. 262 Broad street, where they
will be pleased to see their friends and the public.
AUSTIN MULLARKY,
JAS. II. MULLARKY.
JASOARY, 1st, 1SC8.
Co-Partnership Notice.
JL HE undersigned have formed a Co-Partner
ship under Che firm name of JAMES A. GRAY k
CO., for the purpose of transacting the GENERAL
DRY GOODS BUSINESS, at tho old stand of
GRAY, MDLLARKY k Co., 228 Broad street, Au
gusta, Ga.
JAMES A. GRAY,
WILLIAM DELANE,
' JOHN TREANOR.
AUGUSTA, GA., January S, 1S6S.
ESTABLISHED IN 1850
THE Subscriber would respectfully inform the
tho citizens of Edgefield and the surround
ing country, that ho keeps a SPECIAL ESTAB
LISHMENT for the REPAID of WATCHES
and JEWELRY. All work entrusted to his care
will be executed promptly, neatly, and warranted
for ons year.
At his Store will be found one of the largest
Stocks of
Gold and Silver Watches,
Of tho best European and American manufacturo
in the Southern States, with a select assort
ment of
RICH AND NEW STYLES ETRUS
CAN GOLD JEWELRY,
Set with Diamonds, Pearls, Rubies, Oriental Cor
nets, Coral, &c. Also,
Solid Silver Ware,
Consisting of
TULL TEA SETS, WAITERS, ICE
AND WATER PITCHERS, CAS
TORS, GOBLETS, CUPS,
PORKS, SPOONS,
And everything in thc Silver Ware line.
FINE SINGLE AND DOUBLE BARRELED
GUNS.
ColtV, Smith & Wc?ton's, Cooper's, Remming
ton'?, Sharp's, Derringer's
PISTOLS*
And many others of tbe latest invention.
FINE CUTLERY, SPECTACLES, WALKING
CANES, PERFUMERY, PORTMONAIES,
AND FANCY GOODS
Of every variety to be found in a first class Jew
elry Establishment.
Ai PRONTABT,
Ono Door below Augusta Hotel,
163 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.
Oct 1 Gm 40
Closing Ont
AT
COST ?
ELIAS COHEN,
268 Bioad Street,
A-Ugusta, Georgia,
?NFORMS tho public in general that ho hus
concludod to chango his Business exclusively to
DRY GOODS, and consequently bas doterrninct
to sell his ENTIRE STOCK of
Clothing:,
Gents Furnishing Goo???,
Boots and Shoes,
Hats, Caps, kc,
-AT
FIRST NEW YORK COST
AND SOME
Below Invoice Price !
^3r7~Cull and examine my Stock beforo pur
chasing. I guarantoo full satisfaction.
Also, on hand a full linc of STAPLE and
FANCY DRY GOODS, which I offer at VERY
LOW PRICKS.
Augusta, Nov 25 2m 4S
ESTABLISHED IN 1845.
GUNS, PISTOLS,
Cutlery* &c.
1 HAVE JUST RECEIVED, and have in store,
a full supply of thc above articles, imported direct
from the English manufactories, and offer them
at price.11 to tuit tho time-, consisting of
DOUBLE-BARRELED GUNS, all qualities
and price.?. Among them are a number of POW
ELL'S CELER RATED MAKE, in cases.
SINGLE-BARRELED (JUNS, Foreign and
American.
Coif, Remington, and other Repeating PIS
TOLS.
POCKET KNIVES of Rogers and Wcsten
aolm's mike, a splendid assortment.
A f?w doun Rodgcrs'bost TABLE CUTLERY.
SHOT BAGS,POWDER FLASKS, and GAME
BAGS.
E.'v's Waterproof Gun and Pistol CAPS.
El'y's GUN WADDING, all qualities.
FIXED AMMUNITION for all sized Pistols.
METALLIC CARTRIDGES for all sized Guns
md Pistols.
BLASTING POWDER and SAFETY FUSE.
Kentucky. Riflo and Sporting POWDER, in
ecg? and can-.
150 Bags SHOT, nil sizes.
A fino stock of RIFLES, of my own make, of
, superior quality.
REPAIRING done in a superior manner and
rarrautod, at 215 Broad street.
Ei U. RODGERS.
Augusta, Nov. 5, 3m 45.
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY
EDGEFIELD, S. C.
rllE Subscribers respectfully announce that
thoy nro now prepared to do all work in thc
OACH MAKING and REPAIRING BUS1
ESS that in ly bo entrusted to them, in a work
anlikc mumer, and with neatness and dispatch
Wo havo on hand a few CARRIAGES andsu
irior BUGGIES,of our own manufacture,which
e will se'l low.
Allkind.-of REPAIRING done promptly and
arranted to giro satisfaction.
$&~ki wc sell ONLY FOR CASH, ourpriccs
r unusually roasonnblo. All we ask is atrial.
.S? J IT El & J OXES.
Mar 7 tf \%
Money Wanted.
PHE Subscriber wisher nil those indebted to
?rn to bear in mind that ho now wants his dues
-hard-earned dues for wor'. that should havo
sen paid long, long ago. Those who respond to
lis appeal promptly will confer a favor on mo;
lose who fail to respond promptly, will most as-'
irodly havo to .?eulo tho samo with an Officer
ted with authority to force'payment.
H. PARKER.
Jan 7 St 2
AGENT WANTED FOB THE *
6RAYJASKET8f
AND HOW THEY LIVED, FOUGHT AND
DIED FOR DIXIE,
WITH
Incidents and Sketches of Life in
the Conlederacy?
Comprising Narrative of Personal Adventure,
Army Life, Naval Adventure, LTomeLife, Par
titan Daring, Life in the Camp, Field
and Hotpttal, Togtthtr xoith the Songs,
Ballads, Anecdotes and Humorous
Incidents of th: War for
Southern Independence.
There is a certain portion of tho war that will
novcr go into the regular histories, nor bc embo
died in romance or poetry, which is a very real
part of it, and will, if preserved, convoy to suc
ceeding generations a better idea of the spirit of
the conflict than many dry reports or careful nar
ratives of events, and this part may be called the
gossip, the fun, tho pathos of the war. This il
lustrates tho character of the leaders, tho humor
of tho soldiers, thc devotion of women, the brave
ry of men, tho pluck of our heroes, the romance
and hardships of thc service.
Tho Valiant and Brave Hearted, the Picturesque
and Dramatic, tho Witty and Marvelous, the
Tender and Pathetic, and thc whole Panorama of
the War aro hore thrillingly portrayed in a mas
terly manner, at once historical and romantic,
rendering it the most ample, unique, brilliant acd
readable book that the war has called forth. ?
Amusement as well as instruction may be found
in every page, as graphic detail, brilliant wit,
and authentic history, are skillfully interwoven
in this work of literary art.
Send for Circulars and see our terms, and a full
description of the work. Address,
JONES BROTHERS k CO., Atlanta, Ga.
. Jan. 30 2t 5
NOTICE
SHAY SCHOOL TEACHERS!
SuNDAY SCHOOLS can be supplied with the
following Books, AT COST, by applying at the
Store of B. C. BRYAN, Edgcfieli C. H.
S. S. Celebration Hymns, /
New Sunday-School Primer,
Infant Class Question Book,
Little Lessons for Littlo People,-Part I.
Little Lessons for Littlo People,-Part II.
Brief Catechism of Bible Doctrine.
Child's Question Book on thc Four Gospels.
Part I.
Child's Question Book on the Four Gospels.
Part II.
Questions on the Four Gospels,-with Harmo
ny,-for Biblo Classes.
The Psalmist
The Psalmody.
Notes on tho Gospels.
Malcom's Bible Dictionary.
Child's Scripturo Question Book.
Bibles and Testaments.
" Kind Words,"-S. S. Paper, monthly, at $1
for 10 Copies.
Any Books needed by Tc:.chcr.s, or religious
Books desired by any persons, will be procured
at short notice, and supplied at Cost by the un
dersigned.
Testaments and Catechisms given to those who
arc not able to buy, when application is mado
through any S. S. Teacher known to B. C. Bryan,
Agent of the Depository.
For any information, address
L. R. GWALTNEY, Chair.
Ex. Board of Edgeficld Association.
Nov 20 tf 47
State of South Carolina,
EDGEFIELD DISTRICT,
IN TUE COURT OF ORDINARY.
WHEREAS, Patrick M. Sevens and his wife
Martha L. Stevens, have filed their Peti
tion in thc Ordinary's Oflicc for tho District and
State aforesaid, praying that t. paper purporting
to bo thc last Will and Testament of Iverson
L. Brooks, dee'd., late of saic. District, may be
proven in " Due Form of Laie." And it appear
ing to my satisfaction that S. Virginia, wife of
W. F. Ayer, and H. Josephina, wife of Ashley
C. Hood, resido from and beyond thc limits of
this State: It is therefore ordered and decreed
that thc said parties, together with all and singu
lar the heirs and distribuiros of tho said Iverson
L. Brook?, deceased, be and appear at thc Court
of Ordinary to be held at Edgeficld Court House,
fur Edgeficld District, on Monday, the 30th day
of M:iroh, 1363, to show cause, if any they can,
why said paper should not bc proven in "Duo
Form of Law."
Given under my hand and seal, this 30th day
of December, A. D., lSf>7.
W. F. DL RI50E, [L. S.]
O. E. D.
Jan 1 ' 3in 1
State of South Carolina,
EDGEFIELD DISTRICT,
IN EQUITY.
Sylurs Morse and wife,
vs.
E. T. Adams, ct. al.
BY virtue of an order of the Court in this cause,
all and singular thc creditors of JAMES T.
ADAMS, dee'd., are required to render and provo
their demands before mc by the Fourth Monday
in February next, or clso bo barred of all interest
in the decree to be rendered in this cause.
Z. W. CARWILE, c.E.E.B.
Jan lfi, 1S6S, _ 5t_4_
State of South Carolina
EDGEFIELD DISTRICT,
IN ORDIN?R Y.
?Y W. F. DURISOE, Esq., Ordinary of Edge
field District.
Whereas, Z. W. Carwile, C.E.E.D. has applied
to mo for Lottcrs of Administration, with Ure Will
annoxed, on all and singular the goods and
chattels, rights and credits of Charlos Powell,
lite of tho District aforesaid, dee'd.
These aro, therefore, to cito and admonish all
and singular, the kindred and creditors of tho
said deceased, to bo and appear beforo mc, at our
next Ordinary's Court for the said District, to bo
holden at Edgeficld C. H., on the 4th day of
Mar. next, to show cause, if any, why the said
administration should not bc granted.
Given under my hand and seal, this 23d day
of Jan., in tho year of our Lord ono thousand
sight hundred and Sixty-eight, and in thc 92d
year of tho Independence of tho United States
jf America.
W.F. DURISOE, O.E.D.
Jan. 29 6t 5
AT OO?3T ?
AHE Undersigned has on hand a very HAND
SOME LOT of
Metallic Cases and Caskets,
?Yhich ho is now SELLING AT COST, trans
?ortation added. Also, a largo and elegant stock
if COFFINS of his own manufacture, embracing
L11 styles and sizes, which he offers at prime cost
>f material and manufacturo.
C5TParties buying Cases or Coffins will have
ho usc of my HEARSE free of charge.
_^S?*Tcrms, strictly Cash.
J. M. WITT.
June 25 tf 26
Furniture !
NOW ON HAND and for salo ot REDUCED
RATES, a good assortment of
(Vhich in point of manufacture, finish and price,
?annot fail to give satisfaction to p.rcbasers.
^SsTFumituro bartered for ALL KINDS OF
COUNTRY PRODUCE, and good trades given.
J. M. WITT.
Juno 25 tf 26
[ HAVE A NICE LOT OF LADIES* WOR
STED DRESS GOODS which I will sell at
30ST FOR CASH. Also, many other articlos
to suit thc times.
Call and oxamino for yourselves.
B. C. BR TAN, Agt.
Jan 7_lim_2_
Fresh Arrivals !
rHE subscriber is in receipt of a f resh and full
t.tuck of
3hoico SUGARS, COFFEE, TEAS, CHEESE,
1ICE, GOSHEN BUTTER, BACON and LARD,
?UTS of all kinds,
lONFECTIONERIES in variety,
?OBACCO, SEGARS, Ac, Ac.
13t All for sale LOW, FOR CASH.
S. II? MANGE T.
Jan. 22 tf 4
Old Papers!
FOR Salt at this Office a large lot of OLD
NEWSPAPERS. For sale in parcels to suit
ur otasen.

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