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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, November 18, 1868, Image 1

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DURISOE, REESE &.?<?. EDGEFIELD, S. C., NOVEMBER 18, 1868.
.II'!,...,'!,! 1 I,M, IL,". ,1 'I. >.?.><.' I.MH'll ??('?(.'?.?< I I' WI, I I,,' l,H, III ? |, li,.ll |.~
VOLUME XXXIII?-No. 17
PUBLISHED E VEE Y WEDNESDAY MOENljBjB
B T
DTJBI80E, REESE * CO.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
The ADVERTISER is published regularly
every WEDNESDAY-MortNiwa, at THREE DOL
LARS per annum; ONE DOLLAR and FIFTY
CENTS, for Six Months; SEVENTY-FIVE
CENTS fe r Threo Months,-alway* in advance.
?S** AU papers discontinued at the expiration
of the time ftu which thoy have been paid.
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
Advertisements will be inserted at the rate of
ONE DOLLAR and FIFTY CENTS per Square
(10 Minion lines or less,) for the first insertion,
and ONE DOLLAR for each subsequcntinsertion.
.239- A liberal discoant will be made to these
wishing to advertise by the year.
Announcing Candidates $5,00, in advance.
ESTABLISHED 1802. ~
CHARLESTON COURIER,
DAILYNAND TRI-WEEKLY,
J Y A. S. WILLINGTON & CC.
Daily Paper, ?8.00 per Annnm
Tri-W'eckly Paper, 84.0O per Annum
TIE COURIER has onterod on the sixty
sixth y dir of its publication. During this
long period of U? existence, despite the mutations
of fortune and time, it has been liberally sup
ported, whilst inmy of its contemporaries have
been compelled to succumb to financial necessities.
We gratefully record this-evidence of the appre
ci it ion of our jwn, and the efforts of our prede
cossors, to make it .shat it is, and always has
been. ONE AMONG THE LEADING COM
MERCIAL-ANDREWS JOURNALS OF THE
SOUTH, and will renew ?ur exertions to add to
its Hi-uepUbility to the public, iii well as to place
it easily within the re M ch cf all who desire a
FIRST-CLASS CHEAP PAPER. ? .
In furtherance of this purpose we now issue
thc fi t Hy ?nd Tri-Weekly "Courier to our Sub
.i-ri'.rrs, at tho rate of'eight and four dollars per
unnum respectively.
Our purpo.-o is to furnish a first clans paper
upon the most reasonable living prices.
Charleston, Jan 20 tf 4
P
INSURANCE AGENCY.
ARTIES rr ?shin g to Insure their. DWEL
LINGS, GOODS, ?e., can do'so on the lowest
torun, and io the BEST COMPANIES, by call
ing on the Undersigned.
D. R. DURISOE,
Agent for A. G. HALL'S Insurance Agency.
Jan I jjl
PLANTERS' HOTEL.
- AITGTTST,y^CA~-.
Newly Furnished and Refilled,
Uneurpassed by any Hotel South,
Was Roopo-A^iia Public Oct. 8,18C6.
T. S. NTCKERS?N, frop^r.
Jan. 1. tf 1
THE
Corner Drug Store,
AT
No. 1, 3?ark Row,
T. W. CAR WILE.
I HAYE just receivod a FRESH SUPPLY of
GOODS pertaining to my line of business? con
sisting of
Tieinan's LAUNDRY BLUE,
Hurly's WORM CANDY,
Essence of JAMAICA GINGER,
Costar'* INSECT POWDERS,
Hostetfcr's STOMACH BITTER?,
Hall's Sicilian H Alli RENEWER.
Spear's FRUIT PRESERVING SOLUTION,
Mrs. Winslow'* SOOTHING SYRUP,J
Radway's READY RELIEF,
MUSTANG LINIMENT,
Effervescing Sol. CITRATE MAGNESIA,
PHILOTOKEN, or FEMALE'S FRIEND,
Aycr's CHERRY PECTORAL,
Sylvester's BENZINE, or STAIN REMOVER
Reckwiih's Anti-Dyspeptic PILLS,
A. Q. Simmons' LIVER MEDICINE,
CONGRESS WATER,
CONSTITUTION WATER,
Gonuino Old PORT WINE,
SHERRY and MADEIRA WINE.
FRENCH BRANDY,
Fine Family WHISKEY,
Bin inger's Old London Dock GIN,
Fresh SEIDLITZ POWDERS,
CORN STARCH,
COOKING EXTRACTS-Lemon,Orange, Va
nilla and Rose,
Sulphate QUININE,
Sulphato MORPHINE,
Durkee's Concentrated POTASH,
NATRONA SAPONIFIER for making SOAP
Cox's SPARKLING GELATINE, Ac
For Hie Hair*
Mrs. Allen's ZYL AB ALS AM UM,
B. irry'* TRICOPHERUS,
EUREKA HAIR INVIGORATOR,
Antique HAIR OIL,
Bear's OIL and Creole HAIR OIL,
Philocombe POM IDE,
Pure OX MARROW, Ac
For (be Handkerchief.
LUBIN'S GENUING EXTRACTS-assorted,
BURNETT'S FLORIMEL,
Oenuino BELL COLOGNE,
NIGHT BLOOMING CEREUS, Ae.
Fancy Articles*
Higblv Perfumed RICE FLOUR for the Toilet
Pure LILY WHITE,
Lubiu'a TOILET POWDER,
Fancy PnFF BOXES. '
Basin's SHAVING CREAM,
Military Shaving SOAP,
TOILET SOAPS or all kinds.
The very best TOOTH BRUSHES.
Fine assortment of HAIR BRUSHES,
Hat and Clothes BRUSHES,
Dressing COMBS, Fino Tooth COMBS,
Tooth WASHERS and POWDERS, ?tc.
-ALSO
Constantly on band a large assortment of
LAMPS, Limp CHIMNEYS, BURNERS, Ac.
PURE KEROSINE OIL,
N U RSING BOTTLES, improved slyle,
PENS. INK. STATIONERY, .
Faber's LEAD PENCILS, Ac, Ac.
'-<r- All sold for the most reasonable price, bnt
STRICTLY CASH.
T. W. CAR WILE,
At Sign Golden Mortar.
June 23 tf 28
Seed Wheat !
HAVE SELECTED with care different
varieties of SEED WHEAT, which wo offer
for sale.
BRANCH, SCOTT & CO.,
AUGUSTA, GA.
Sept 28 St 4?
ROSE OF CASHMERE.
ANATURAL TINT OF THE COMPLEX
ION. For sale by
TH03. W. CAR WILE,
At Sign Golden Mortar.
Oct 13 tf 41?
CARPETS.
?JAMES G. BAILIE & BROTHEJ
having finished the improvements to their Stor
respectfully invite the attention of their oustt
mers and the publie generally, to their new ac
large stock ot CARPETS, ?c., which they ha;
just received, and are now opening, as follows:
English Brussels and Velvet CARPETS
Heavy Three Ply and Ingrain CARPETS
Venetian, Dutch and Vienna CARPETS
List, Felt and Hemp CARPETS
RUGS, DOOR MATS, BINDING and
THREAD
Woolen CRUMB CLOTHS and WIDE DRUG
GETS
Stair CARPETS, Stair RODS and Stair CR AS]
COCOA MATTINGS and Red Check an
White MATTINGS
CARPET PAPER, HASSOCKS, Ac, Ac.
We are opening a beautiful stock of
Curtain Goods,
REPS, SATIN, DELAINES, DAMASKS, LAC]
CURTAINS
Silt and Wood CORNICES and BANDS
PINS, TASSELS, LOOPS and-GIMPS
MOREENS. TURKEY RED and Chintz CALIC?
PICTURE TASSELS, CORDS and NAILS
Piano and Table COVERS and Table COVER
. INGS.
Window Shades
)f new styles and patterns, and all 's'iies used
nth necessary Trimmings.
Our Stock in -this department is complete ir
?EW PATTERNS. In cur stock ot
Wail .tapers and Borders,
'APER SHADES, FIRE PRINTS and SID?
.IGUT PAPERS, may be fuund the latest pat
ons nnd a largo Stock to select from, and tb<
rices low enough to please.
Floor and Table" Oil Cloths,
Having purchased largely of tbc?o Good?, we
re prepared to ?ncr in all
Quantities and widths of FLOOR OILCLOTHS
And in all quantities of TABLE OIL CLOTHS
STAIR OIL CLOTHS, und OIL CLOTH
OODS.
A beautiful stock of these goods at'LOW
RICES.
CAVPETS Made and Laid, WINDOW
HADES Squared, Trimtotd and -put up, and
IL CLOTHS laid promptly.
JAMES G. BAILIE k BROTHER,
Z ' 205 Broad Street, -
Augusta, Ga.,-Oct. 26 Cm 41
or Moi lo ; As Cheap as tile Chmpesl !-As
Good as the Best I
. JAMES Iv. GLOVER,
wnn
<USEL &. BROTHER
. Wholesale and Retail Dealers
-IN
LINE READY-MADE
9
?"or Hen, Boys & Children's Wear,
FASHIONABLE HATS ? CAPS,
AXD
YB HTS3 FURNISHING GOODS,
No. 250 Broad" St.,
Under Globe Hold,
AUGUSTA, Gr IE Cf.
^acrThe very latest styles in SILK HATS
Iways on band.
A call u respectfully solicited before purcha
ing elsewhere.
Augusta, Oct 12 3m 42
REMOVAL !
ii 1? PlIST
HAS REMOVED HER
/IILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS STORE
From No. 22G to No.*253 Broad St.,
TKO Doom ??ore the old Insurance Bank,
?Vhere she has Opened an Elegant and
Varied Assortment ot'
SATS AH? BONNETS,
OF ALL 1 HE LATJST STYLES,
Pbieh she will sell at thc LOWEST POSSIBLI
PRICES, Wholesalo and Retail.
Augusta, Oct 12 lm 42
PERUVIAN GUANO
E ARE NOW PREPARED to receiv
)rdors for No. 1 PERUVIAN GUANO
vhich we are expecting direct from tho PETi.rj
v-IAN AGENTS, and which wo can GUARAN
TEETO BE PURE, and of FRESH IMPOB
TATION.
Parties buying before its arrival, will bo al
owed a LIBERAL DISCOUNT.
Wc would advise cur friends to send in thc:
Drdcrs carly.
BRANCH, SCOTT & CO.,
208 BROAD STREET,
AUGUSTA, GA.
Oct 27 lm 41
JAS. T. GARDINER
MCINTOSH STREET,
^TJGrTJSTA, GA-,
DEALER IN
PURE
Peruvian Guan?
AND THE BEST
BONE SUPER PHOSPHATES
And for which
,111 Orders will J?cceivc Prompt Attcntio
AT THE L9WEST CASH PRICES.
Augmd.i, Oct 2? Cm 43
Kerosine Oil
JUST RECEIVED
1 Bbl. Standard White KEROSINE Ol
tnrraated to stand tho test of boat 110 degre
and is tbercfoyo non-explosive.
G. L. PENN.
Oct 28 tf 44.
\t Old Times."
'lucre's a 1-Aautiful ??one: on tho slumbrous air
That drifts tirough the valley of dreams ; :
It comos from a clime where the roses we e,
And a tuneful hean and bright brown hair,
That wavod in the morning beams.
Soft eyes of azure and eyes of brown,
And snow-white foreheads are there;
A glimmering Cross and a glittering Crown,
A thorny bed and a couch of down,
Lost hopes and leaders of prayer.
A breath of Spring in thc breezy woods,
Sweet wafts from the quivering pines
Blue violet eyes beneath green hoods,
A bubble of brooklets, a scent of buds,
Bird warblers and damboring vines.
A rosy wreath and dimpled hand, *
A ring and a slighted vow
Three golden links of a broken band,
A tioy track on the snow-white sand,
A tear and a Mnless brow.
There's a tincture of grief in tho boautiful song
That subs on the slumbrous air,
And loneliness foltin tho festive throng,
Sinks down on the soul as it trembles ulong
From a ciime where the roses were.
We heard it first at the dawn of day,
And ii mingled with matin chimes,
Bot yenrs'hare distanced the beautiful lay
And its melody fl iweth from far away,
> And we call it now Old Times. ,
---? ?
A Woman's Coni'ession.
Froo? t?te Picayune.
" A- Few days ago,'.' said Mr.F---,
i " intelligence reached us that a Milan
banker had absconded with an iihmense
amount of money. It was believed
that he hndifled to this country and ta
1 ken refuge in New Orleans. A young
i Ita lian .girl was thc companion" "of. his
; flight. Together-with-a description of
the man was a> miniature of thjs girl.
She was very beautiful, and tho inani
mate ivory pictured a face so winsome
in its youth and.-innocence,- so trustful,
so confiding,. that jny heart ached a? L
looked at it. .
" Months went -by in the fruitless
search for the criminal. If here, his
precautions were well . token, and Iris
concealment effectual.
f* One night a report roached the Sta
tion'that a-'drowned woman had boen
drawn from the liver. She had been
dead but a lew hours, it was said, and
was- elegantly clad, and young .and
boautiful. .
" "Why I; coqld.not"divin^at the time, ;
l?tt I felt a strange desire": to see this
girl.. I mentioned thc fact to Mr. I-,
and wc walked together to the river.
The body was laid out on the pi er, and the
lovely upturned face was magnetic in
its intense beauty. A wealth of black
wet hair fell back from the broad low
forehead, exposing a face rounded and
full in. its. fresh, spring-time beauty.
Tho lona lnshcfr- drooped driVklv- oyov
-?the-pale nrna'Tn'^u^-^
lips had not lost their delicate curve
and crimson stain. The soft milky skin
showed beneath it the olive tint it had
worn in life. The clinging dress but
imperfectly concealed each rounded
limb and the exquisite outline of body.
I felt a strange attraction in looking
at this dead woman. She must have
been unsurpassingly lovely* when life
was instinct in thc frame now so chill.
The warm sun of her native land could
not have b^en more lustrous than her
eyes were then. I felt that I had seen
her before. The conviction grew upon
me as my eyes became rivited on her
features. The face haunted me. For
an hour my memory was at fault, but it
caine at last. Like a flash, recollection
returned.
Site was thc original of the picture.
Eagerly I bent forward and traced
again and again each outline of face
and figure. There could bo no mistake
-the liniaments were the same.
On examining the body it was discov
ered that she had been murdered. A
deep penetrating wound in her side,
made with a small Spanish dagger,,
which yet filled the cavity, disclosed
thc means of her death. This knife
bore the initials E. F. They dir1 not
stand for her name nor that of her be
trayer. It was a costly weapon, for in
the handle was a brilliant of value. I
took the knife to a- jeweler, and asked
him to examine it. The monogram ar
rested Iiis attention at once, rle took
it and examined it closely. Then from
his desk he brought a jewel set in gold,
on which was a lettering precisely simi
lar.
"Where "did you get this?" I asked.
" Frbu a customer of mine."
" A lady ?"
"Yes."
" Where is she to be found ?"
He showed me a direction. It was
that of a lady of fashion ; a^Cuban vis
iting in the city.
I went to her at once. On mention
ing my name she showed me evident
signs of uneasiness, and motioning me
to a private room, begged with white
lips and a faltering utterance, the na
ture of my errand.
I detailed the circumstances briefly
I told her of the ciminal, the flight and
escape, of the dead body ; I showed hei
thc knife, and the ring I had obtained
at the jeweler's.
" Madame," I concluded, " I must
arrest you for murder!"
. "Oh, no ! no, no," she exclaimed, " ]
will confess till ; not mine the sin, no
mine the deed !"
She then told me who the man was
where he lived, and the circumstance!
that occasioned the poor girl's death.
It appears from her statem?ut tba
some weeks before, the banker hat
wearied of the young girl, and hat
abandoned her. He had then- paid hi
court to her, and not knowing his ante
cedents, and judging of him by the sta
.finn he held in society, she had consent
od to marry him. That the eveninj
previous she had been walking wit)
him on the pier. Standing there in th
moonlight, they had been approacher
by a female clad as this one was. Up
braidings and angry reproaches follow
ed. and the girl, in the madness am
frenzy of her distress, threatened to re
veal a secret. The words had scarce!
left her lips when thc man struck he
with thc dagger I held in my hanc
She said ho had taken it from her a fcA
moments, and was toying with it who
the woman caine up.
" When the blow was struck," sh
said, " the woman reeled and fell int
the river I saw her as she sunk beneat
the water, and her white face upturned
in agony yet haunts me Avith its horror.
I screamed and fled. It was the most
terrible sight I ever witnessed."
The woman told her story truthfully,
I could not doubt. But, as I supposed,
the man was gone. He was never heard
of afterwards ; and this little memory
is all that is left of the wrecked and
ruined woman who died beneath the
flood.
-:-? ?-:
Squirt-Guns and Sardines.
A Western landlord, somewhat noted
for his blunders, took it into his head
to get up a bali at his tavern. As he
intended to do the thing up brown, and
have everything on the big auger plan,
he fancied that a -few " store fixtures"
would be a great addition to the bili of j
fare of pork and turkey. He therefore
made inquiry of his friends, and' found"]
t'-iat the Only delicacy in^matket at that
s;ason cf the year .was jardines;-ac
cordingly he sent to.the^rfearest city for
tvro dozen boxes sardines.-;
His -chirography, however, was so
bad as- to make rt read "two dozen
boxes .syringes." "
The night of the party came, and as
supper time drew near the landlord
looked anxiously down the street for
the appearance of the stage which was j
to bring the principal dish on the bill;
At last it ar ri ver I, and with a pack
age for the expectant landlord. . .
Directly , there was a great outcry,
and a sonni of cursing in the bar-room,
j Thc-entire party rushed out to-sec -
what was the matter, and ther?-stood
Boniface,' as mad as a turkey-t!Ock,puif- ;|
ing and blowing with rage.
" Sec there 1" said he, .' seo there !. I
sent to Dubuque foi-" two dozen boxes ' of j
sardines for supper- to-night, and.the
cussed fool sent mc- fwenty-three boxes
of them d-*-d pewter squirt guns, and
says that's-all there was in themarket !"
ALWAYS AN OBJECT OF-CONTEMPT:-.
Diclc''Claiborne, when-parish justicc^of.
Northern' Louisiana, ' officiated with a
dignity that' was slightly appalling to.
the til.lid.
.Vraong the multifarious-duties, and
.powers of.the-parish judge-was that of
auctioneer.' He sold all tho property
ol' succession in his parish.
..- It happened, on one occasion, in sell
ing out the property, of a deceased
grocer? that au unruly parishioner dis
turbed the .order of . the proceedings.
The judge fined hinufifty dollars, and
sent him to jail for contempt of court.
An application was made to him by
an attorney to remit the fine and re
lease tiie prisoner, on the groiy?d itiat
Tr was rio cunTTTTrjrr-m iuu. i,-rrs-rrrc
judge, when fulfilling the office of auc
tioneorj was not a court, and therefore
not an object of contempt.
The judge immediately drew himself
up with all his dignity and conscious
power, and replied :
'. *>ir, PH let you know that I am
judge of this parish--judge all the time,
from the rising to the setting of the
sun, and. as such, always un object of j
contempt !" ?
A Perry SNOUDED.-The resemblance
of some people to dogs is thus illustra
ted :
Mnj?'r T. was a paymaster ia the ar
my, an old newspaper editor, a man of
vast acquirements and brilliant abilities.
He was on duty in Cincinnati during
the war, and for his amusement bought
a choice dog of some kind or other (if
there is any choice among dogs.)
There wa? a young man of the genus
puppy, who had a great desire to culti
vate the major's acquaintance, much to
thc latter's annoyance.
As a' kind of entering wedge to a
friendship, the young fellow hit upon
the felicitous plan of inquiring after the
major's dog whenever he met him.
The latter bore it for six or eight
daySj until his patience gave out.
At last, one morning tue fellow came
up with his usual salutation :
" Major, how's your dog?"
To which the major answered prompt
ly ^-v^o
'. Quite,well, I ih.ank you; how are
you?"
The question was never repeated.
-r
A TOUGH STORY.-There ., ia a place
in Maine so rocky that wh?rii&e na
tives plant corn they look for crevices
in the rocks, and shoot the grains irr
with a musket; they can't raise ducks
there no how, for the stones are so thick
that the ducks can't get their'bills be
tween them to pick out the grass-hop
pers, and thc only way thc sheep can
get at the sprigs of grass is by grinding
their noses on a grindstone. But this
ain't a circumstance to aplace in Mary
land-there: the land is so poor that it
takes two Icildeers to cry " kildeer,"
and on a clear day you can see the
grasshoppers climb up a mulin stalk,
and look with tears over a fifty acre
field ; and the bumblebees have to go
down on their knees to get at the grass ;
all-the musquitoes died of starvation,
and the turkey buzzards were obliged
to emigrate. But there isa county in
Virginia which can beat that-there
the land is so sterile when- the wind is
northwest they have to tie the children
to keep 'em from being blown away
there it takes six frogs to raise one
croak, and when the dogs bark they
have to lean against the fences-the
horses are so thin that it' takes twelve
of them to make a shadow, and when
they kill a beef they have to hold him
up "to knock him down !
A FOWL REPORT-Fred (who Wi
been sent down stairs to entertain the
visitors while his mamma is arranging
her back hair.) " Do you keep, cocks
and hens, Mr. Meekings ?"
Mr. M. " Why do you ask, my
dear?"
" Because my pa told my ma that
you was hen-pecked."
HAD ALL liE WANTED.-" John !
John ! you flop-eared young scoundrel,
what are you crying about V What do
n ; you want?" asked an indignant father
' of his young hopeful, who was making
c ' day hideous with his howls,
o I " Tve got thc bellor ache, that's what
li ! I want."
Tli ?lection of Gen, Grant,
We ip/she a few extracts from our ei
changea--on the result of the Presider
[Fr?re st; Now York Times, Republican.]
Th? Abonni ry may now look for tba
? ! ? ? peace which has been th
?rfLjjf thc Republican party du
ring l^V-political campaign. Genero
Grant>J^uld. have done the party n
gr'eate^ervice- than by giving it thi
idea ajpithis word to inscribe upon it
j bannei*| The turmoil of the. last eigh
! yearjg|?hecome intolerable. Whei
it wanEr in the field, the people bor
it ath^Bong hearts and strong arms
Biif w??Mirthis was followed by fou
yparso?^iolent political distraction
that cois^mtly threatened a renewal o
yanguinary>?fcnfe, popular patience go
exhausted. VAnd when, finally, th
Democratic paS-ty raised a revolution?r
phitfo'rra, from which, we could see noth
mg Dilti stormy future and a tempest
tossed country, there would have Wi
justification for despair ii no means o
escape ?ad been opened ?rp?,., But thi
great so^dior who had formerly, givei
us.peackby his military genius, ngaii
stood forward as the representative o
peace iii the storm of political passion
The country felt the power of the sacr?e
wor?^n$?d rallied round the leader win
could give it hope.
. [Fro?t?'e New York World, Democrat.]
It is'tiot merely as the repr?sent?tT
of a beaten party, pouring oil upon thei:
-wounds"? that we indicate in this tin
vury Vrfsis of our misfortune, arid as wi
believe fif the country's calamity, thi
ardor ai'd the courage, but the desper
ateuCssJulso, of Our struggle. Rathe:
do we'^joclaim in this-inost trying hou:
-spe?lang. for a party serenely securi
of,possessing the future of our country
and of guiding her magnificent des
time's. wKen itself shall have been purg
ed. andjnouldcd for that Imperial tasl
-an u&ikakable confidence in its puis
saut ano*undying youth, which out o
disasteifwill get discipline,,out of mis
.fortuiu$?patience and nnconquerabli
;eo?ra?*^\?ut of blunders wisdom and ?
:scttlea jrill. To this great work, hen
and .niafeiupon a battle field which ha:
been lqa?> do we invite, beneath undia
honors-standards, the youth, tho man
hood -ofjour time.
. [From thc Now York Herald.]
Thejtepublicans hold the field am
rega?n$f?e White House. The Demo
cratiC'jtiaders filing their chances of sue
cess overboard when they made th?i
? eebl? hVminationsin July last, and mon
cspecm.'igaxhen they brought prominent
speaJecrtrmen from the Southern State
steeped to the lips in disloyalty to thi
government, and fresh from the field
where thousands of our Union soldier
laid down their lives to preserve thi
life of the nation. ' With the candidat'
the Democracy selected to carry thei
standard nothing but defeat was to bi
expected, and we suppose that not evei
the most .sanguine' member of the part;
anticipated any other termination ti
the contest than the election of Genera
Grant. " Let us- have peace" is Iii
motto. Wc look now to see these word;
converted into acts-*o see the oliv
branch substituted for the, sword in th
Southern States, negro supremacy quiet
ly uperseded, and such measures adopt
ed as will create harmony ' out of dis
cord in that genial and fruitful portioi
of our country comprised in the State
now suilbring from a mistaken and vin
dictive policy. We look also and hope
fully to this-that after the fourth o
March next there will be a check pu
upon the monstrous corruptions whicJ
prevail in all the departments of thi
government, that economy shall succee?
extravagance in the disbursements o
the public funds, that the public deb
s^all be reduced as rapidly as possible
and that the taxes which press upo:
the people shall be made more easy t>
bear. The people expect that Genera
Grant will accomplish all this, and. if h
fails to do so he will not have complet
ed the purpose for which he is elected
But we have great confidence in Gene
ral Grant.
[From thc New York Tribun?,.Radical ]
This result has been achieved in spit
of Ul the power of the Ferlerai Execu
tiv.e and of the late slaveholding axis
tocracy of theSouth, aided by the mos
"gigantic frauds in naturalization, and ty
?Joting the^aame men over and over til
they weja^dizzy. General Grant is thi
dayHhaehoiee of a decided majority c
the *egfl-voters of every State in th
- Unioij}*ave Kentucky. Maryland, Del:
i ware'j&nd possibly Oregon. Every Stat
' thatijK&gone for Seymour outside c
these'iias been so carried by coercion o
fraud:;' 'We now look for "the adoptio:
of m?ae.res that shall effectually prc
elude ji repetition of these crimes.
[From tbc Journal of Commorco.]
General-Grant is nota Radical, an
we haye the very highest authority fe
sayingVthat it ' his purpose to separat
himself from the extremists, and to ra'
ly round him a strong body of the bel
ter elsss citizens, who shall draw unt
thcm^mgenial allies from all quarter
and become, as they would deserve t
be, the party of the country. He is a
so extremely anxious to verify his part
wa^?^vord, and to lead the country ?
once- to peace a renewed prosperity
; This is his purpose, and no one can den
that it is a noble ambition. Kot hin
j sclf?a^??ol?tician, and with but little e:
; perience or skill in civil life, he do<
! v. A, ?s'we think, at all realize the difi
J culties in the way of such success as 1
: covets. We do not say that he wi
fail ; for he has undoubted pluck, am
besides four years of patronage at con
! mand. he will also have the advice an
1 practical aid of some strong friends wi
do not usually intermeddle with p?bl
affairs!
-??--- t
MUCH of the waler to be obtain*
along the line of the Pacific Railroad
strongly impregnated with alkalies.
! A stage-driver observing a passengi
about to quaff some of it the other da
exclaimed, with a genuine Westei
style of simile :
? " Don't drink that, colonel, for it wi
go through you like the ten commam
1 ment s through a Sunday-school."
Forty Acres a ml a iHnle.
The Sumter Watchman says : " Mr.
Wm. L. Brunson, whose lamented death
we notice on another column, bequeath
ed to bia faithful servant Washington,
upon his death, forty acres of land, a
mule, a wagon/a cow and calf, a fine
stock of hogs and one-half the crop
grown upon the farm the present year
Upon the coming of freedom, Washing
ton preferred to follow the fortunes of
his old master, remaining with him and
^ conducting himself with fidelity and
V faithfulness, and so also did the wife
and family of Washington. . During his
last illness, Mr. Brunson received un
ceasing attention from his faithful ser
vant, who regarded his old master his
best earthly friend and loved him with
the affection of a child for a parent.
This is but one of tens of thousands
of instances which would have occurred
in our country, Jmt for the poisonous in
fluences and wicked teachings of Radi
cal emissaries, by whom the colored man
has been led to suspicion, and to regard
as an enemy his former master, until, in
fact, an antagonism has beeu. created
bstween them, which, in all probability,
can never be obliterated. The colored
main-has. been seduced by these infamous
men from his interest,__and his faith, and
is being steadily lured by the same in-:
fluence to his ruin. The Southern man
has cleared his skirts.
Pretty Good*
Many incidents of an amusing, char
acter happened during the late Avar
which have never found their way into
print, but which are too good to be lost.
The following, wc believe, has not here
tofore met the public eye :
Wash Petty, a notorious bushwhacker
whilst foraging iu Southwest Missouri
with his. followers, rode up to a farm
house -whose owner was known to have
ample provisions for man and beast, but
whose politics were best known to him
self. Petty and his men being dressed
in Federal uniform, were mistaken by
the farmer for " jayhawkers." He be
gan to declare most- positively that he
was a " Union man. God never made
a better." Petty said " we a:e hunting
your sort ; we are rebel bushwhacker*."
Whereupon the farmer changed his tac
tics and declared just as positively that
he was a " Southern man." " Look
here, old man," said Petty, " you don't
know to which side we belong, and you
must take one side or the other, and
stick to it ; if you happen to take thc
wrong side we'll kill you." This stag
gered the man considerably, but after
thinking a minute, he said : "Well; I
Unit! at the- start J waa .a .Union, man,i.'
' tina ? ii ?iicynric ii ic ia a u. a m
lie was left to enjoy his peculiar opin
ions without further molestation.
MARRY HER FIRST.-Many yean
ago, in what is now a flourishing city,
lived a stalwart blacksmith, fond of his
pipe and his joke. He was also fond of j
his blooming daughter, whose many
graces had ensnared the affections of a
young printer. The couple, after a sea
son of billing and cooing, " engaged
themselves," and nothing but the con
sent of the young Indy's parents pre
vented their union. To obtain this an
interview was arranged, and the typo
prepared a little speech to admonish
and convince the old man, who sat en
joying his pipe in perfect content. The
ty^jo dilated on the fact of their long
friendship, their mutual attachment,
their hopes for the future, and like top
ics ; and taking thc daughter by the
hand, he said : " I am now, sir, to ask
your permission to transplant this love
ly flower from its parent bed"
but his feelings over?ame him, and he
forgot the remainder of his oratorical
flourish, stammered, and finally wound
up with, " from its parental bed into
my own." The father keenly relished
this discomfiture of the suitor, and, re
moving his pipe and blowing a cloud,
replied: "Well, young man, I don't
know as I have any obj ectiont provided
you marry the girl first."
-1--? ? ?.-?-:
. ' SFEECH OF BEAST BUTLER-.-Gen.
Butler was greeted by about 3,000 of |
his fellow-citizens, in Lowell, Massachu
setts, to whom he made a brief speech
on the 5th. He had triumphed, he
said, under the motto : Equality of all
men's rights under thc law, by using
freedom's great weapon-the ballot.
He ha;,ed the- glorious triumph of -Re
publican principles throughout the land.
He believed it would bring peace and
prosperity. We shall not loug have
murder after murder and riot after riot.
Look at New Orleans, from which we
have reported 2,500 for Seymour and
276 for Grant. There was a cime, he
remembered, when the people of that
city behaved better. [Applause.] He
felt confident such time would come
once more. Several Southern States
voted for Seymour, or are in doubt, be
cause men's lives were threatened if they
attempted to vote. When Congress meets
as it will in a short time, it will be our
purpose to find a remedy for this kind
ofthing, and if Johnson decs not second
our efforts, though.it may be late in the
day, we will try and provide for him.
[Applause.] _
GOOD.-We understand that the ne
groes of Beech Island, S. C., and ita
neighborhood, are calmly but confident
ly awaiting the division of lands, mules
and other property now held by the
whites. They understand the election
of Grant to bc equivalent to a home
stead, and nothing to do for the rest of |
their natural lives. When their expec
tations are realized and the titles to the
aforementioned property obtained, we
should like to see the omni. The only
way in which any of the poor deluded
creatures will ever become possessed of |
property of any kind, which they can
hold under the light of day, will be by
the " sweat of their brow," and the time
is not far distant when this truth will be
sorrowfully, but sternly realized.-Au
gusta Constitutionalist.
BS?" Mrs. Eliza Garth, of Kew York,
aged seventy-four, has sued Richard
, Howell, uf Flanders, N. J., aged seven
,11 ty-seven, for $5,000, and got it, fortri
i-1 fling with her virgin affections and mar
. another girl.
Our Trailncersi
Now that the election is over, and the
country " saved," according to the Rad
ical " patriots," North and-South, we
may reasonably hope that the misrepre
sentations from which we have so long
suffered, may at last cease. How muop
this species of insidious.warfare has cost
the South.it would be difficult to esti-j
mate. We speak not now of Uncle i
Tom's Cabin which gaye an immense
impetus to the Republican party,-nor j
of thc poems, essays and sermons, innu
merable, which were circulated as tracts,
all over the North and West, and con- j
tributed their share in fomenting the
war ; we refer more specially to the
swarm of'lying newspaper correspon
dents, who were sent out here from the
surrender of Genera1 Lee up to the date
af General Grant's election. These men,
.vith very few exceptions, were obscure
Bohemians, ignorant, ? ippant, and ut
terly devoid of principle. They were
sent for a specific purpose, and knowing
that the surest road to favor with their
principals was to paint men and things
in the most glaring colors, they set to
it with a will, and spared not the
brush.
This line of action subserved.its pur
pose admirably ; ' contributing nov mean
mare instrengtheningihe Radical ranks
in the elections two years ^go, Thei
o?icy of Mr: Johnson was condemned
y the " voice of the nation," as was the
fashionable phrase 0/ that day, the four
teenth amendment was ratified. Next
same the reconstruction acts, und with '
them the great hegira of the carpet
baggers ; from whose ranks the staff of
aewspaper correspondents was constant
ly recruited. A stronger motive was
Qow added-interest, ambition, cove
tousness. Three of the strongest pas
sions of the human heart goaded these -
gentry to the perpetration of. the gros
sest injustice on an innocent people ;
the love of gain, the lust of power, and
ibject and cowardly fear; the latte?
"rom a consciousness of the great wrong ,
they were daily and hourly . inflicting
upon a people wi 0 harmed them not;
The object was tc carry the Presiden
tial election, and now that it is over,
' let us have peace."
Not only were we traduced in the
Northern prints of every description,
the newspaper, the illustrated weeklies,"
the literary magazines and reviews, and
thc ponderous tomes, but their misera
ble caricature was accepted as a faith
ful portrait, by their own people, the
people of England, France Germany,
and the rest of the world. Mr. Adams
nrjrra TCCent-gTIPCV.li..ft- lliiw nilsy, np aim .
oTTnTsr ~TTe sauTTh?t TmTiaa~meTTJCo;
pie from the South all his life, and they
were much like other men. Yet in his
schoolbooks he had learned they were
semi-savages ; in the \ illage newspaper
he read of their cruelties and barbarism;
and though an intelligent and an edu
cated man, one who ought to have
known better, he confessed that these
constant iterations .produced their ctV
feet, even upon his mind. He gave us
the picture of the traditional Souther
ner, blustering, bullying, tobacco chew
ing, pistol brandishing.
Mr. Vernon Harcourt, one of the
leading men in England, better known
as " Historicus" of the Times, a few
week's ago, at the Social Science Con
gress, in Manchester, said :
M Gentlemen who had travelled in the
Southern States have often seen persons
sit down to a peaceful dinner with a re
volver in each coat tail pocket. Of
course, it was only for the purpose of
self-defence, but then it very frequent
ly happened that before dinner was
over two or. three were shot."
In France and Germany, particularly
among the " Liberal" party, we find
the same ignorant prejudice against us.
Our immigrant agents have met-with
little success in consequence. They had
not-only to contend with the current
literature hostile in its tone, ' but found
yet more formidable obstacles in the]
numerous paid agents from the North
west who spread infamous falsehoods to
our prejudice, in order to induce emiT
grants to go to Indiana, Illinois, Iowa.,
&c., and not to South Carolina. We
hope that' this warfare will now cease,
and that the hand of time may be per
mitted to break down this thick wall of
prejudice. A fair race-justice-is all
we ask. We claim no exemptions, no
special favors ; only that which is our
rightful due.
We have beeu so long accustomed to
these calumnies, that we fear some of
our people have at last begun to accept
as truth the verdict Of their detractors.
We are glad therefore that Commodore
Maury, m a recent address before an
Agricultural Fair in Staunton, Va.,
took pains to look into this subject, and
nobly vindicated the Southern peeple
from these foul aspersions.
He said there is nothing more com-,
mon than the assertion that the South
ern people lack energy. It, is- a mis
chievous error. The North is appar
ently more prosperous, because it is'
manufacturing and commercial, the
South agricultural. In all manufactur
ing and commercial communities pro
ducts are concentrated, and there is a
show of life and activity never seen in
agricultural communities, because labor
is there diffused.
Another reason is, that the statistics
showing the rewards of labor at the
North and South are not quito fairly
presented. For instance, suppose that
one of your neighbors, in giving you an
accent of his earnings during the year,
should tell vou that he had housed so
many barrels of corn, which was worth
five dollars a barrel ; and killed so
many hundred weight of pork, that was
worth eight cents a pound ; had so many
pounds of bacon, worth twelve cents ;
but when you come to catechise him a
little closer, you find that it had taken
all of his corn to fatten his pork, and
all of his pork to make hi's bacon.
Now, this is the way with the Kay !
crop of the North, which is worth as
much as the cotton crop of the South, ;
as Governor Scott said in his message '
to the Legislature. In the last returns, '
the hay crop of thc North is put down
at upwards of three hundred millions
dollars ; the value of the live stock at a
little more, and the value of the butter
and cheese at many millions, when thu
hay went to make "it all. There is still
another reason for this apparent greater
prosperity of the North, and the appa
rent show of greater energy and enter
prise there. According to the census of
1790, the population of tho United
States-was very nearly equally divided
between the North and South ; and ac
cording to the returns of the subsequent ?
census, the ratio of natural increase was
greater at thc South than at the North.
But notwithstanding this, the popula
tion of the North, according to the cen
sus of I860, was, in round nuinbar?,
eleven millions greater than' at the
South.
Did it ever occur to you, says Com
modore Maury, when an emigrant comes
into the country, to calculate how much
he adds to. the national wealth, not by
the money which he brings, but bettie
labor which he is able to perform ? 1er
that labor you 'will pay him, at, i. e
least, one hundred dollars a year.' Ho,
therefore, represents an industrial capi
tal of which a hundred dollars a year
is the interest, precisely in the same
way that a steam engine, by the work \
which it is capable of performing, re
resents an industrial capital. The la
or, therefore, of a white man represents
quite as much industrial Capirafas wie
lab6rot^aTnegro did before the war,
which for an able-bodied- man varied
from twelve to fifteen hundred dollars.
Taking oldand young, male and female,
let us suppose that each ?migrant rep
resents an induBttial capital pf lour
hundred dollars. And then we must
weigh these eleven millions of excess of
Northern population as the number of *
emigrants, and the' descendants-of emi
grants, which have come into the coun
try since 1790 and settled at the North
rather than at the South. Multiply
that by four hundred and you have up
wards of four thousand millions of dol
lars, which the North- has, acquired, not- .
from any superior energy of her people,
but merely by the-influx of laborers and
foreigners from abroad. Suppose these ''
eleven millions had settled m Virginia,
what would not have been the wealth
of the State ?--?harleston Mercury.
. ATROCIOUS MURDER.-On .Saturday
last, twr inoffensive colored men, Con
servative in their politics, came to Or
angeburg with a wagon, from the lower -
part of St. Matthews, sold their cotton,
and started on their return home that
evening, with the proceeds; ^partly in
vested ra supplies, in their wagon. Ar
i.Hid uitu... "Toni-iioiei' tnii?gF;-Hie v
camped near the road-side, anet after'
building a large fire, went to sleep. Tn
the night one of them, Stephen L?df
den, was awakened by the report of a
gun, and a sharp shock, and saw some
ono making off through the bushes. Ho
went to his companion, Frank Thomp
son -and found that he had been shot
in the head; and was dead. Stephen
also was wounded in the arm.
No clue has been discovered to the
perpetrators of this barbarous crime. It
is suppose.d that the party or parties
who committed the deed, having killed
but one pf their intended victims, fled
upon seeing the other rise "up, (which
he did, shouting as he rose) in order to
escape detection.-Orangeburg News.
Affairs in Sp&iiuare n?& yet quite
smooth. TEe revolutionairgovernmcnt
has been recognized by England, France
Prussia and Italy, but the managers have
.not yet succeeded in getting a head for
it. Ferninand is said to have declinedr? n
offer of the crown, and the menin r, hose -
gift it is find it difficult to get any one
to take it. The reason probably is that
it might be hard to keep when taken,
for it looks as though there might be
more hot work in Spam before long. Dis
turbances are reported in^Malaga and
.?renadavaud'- troops have been sent
from-Madrid to suppress them, with
what result is not stated. This is signi
ficant, but of course one set of revolu
tionists have a perfect right to put down
another set of-revolutionists, and hang
everyman they can catch. Isabella's
throne would prolnbly have been safer
if she had taken hold of the revolution
ists with a strongc/ grip than she gene
rally brought to hear on them.
SINGULAR" MOVEMENT IN WASHING
TON.-We clip the following from the
Cincinnati Enquirer of the 9th, giving
it for whatsit is worth :
WASHINGTON, November 8, 1868.-A
singular movement has been originated
by certain politicians, having in view
the casting of the Democratic electoral
votes for Grant. It is urged it would '
influence Grant to a conservative course,
to which he is undoubtedly inclined. A
circular letter on this subject has been
addressed to Mr. Pendleton, Governor
Stevenson and Gen. Preston, of Ken
tucky, A. H. Stephens, and prominent.
Democrats of the North. ?he following
is the text of the letter :
WASHINGTON, D. C., Nov. 8,1868. .
GENERAL :-Ic my judgment the wis
est thing the Democracy could now do
would be to throw their entire electoral
vote for General Grant, as an indication
of the fact that, should he pursue a lib
eral, generous and magnanimous curse,
they will sustain him. It would also
have the effect of not leaving him alto
gether in the hands of the adverse fae-,
tion, and would doubtless strengthen
any purpose he may entertain toward
the conservative sentiment of the coun
try. This vote can not possibly do Sey
mour any good, and thrown in the man
ner suggested would, at least, produce
a conciliatory impression.
Very truly, yours, &c.
When a woman says another.woman
has a good figure, you may be pretty
sure that other woman is freckled, or
that she squints, or that she is marked
with the small pox. But if she simply
says, she is " a gc od soul/' you may be
morally certain that she is both ugly
and ill made.

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