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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, November 16, 1871, Image 2

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BT D. Ri DURISOE.
EDSEFIELD, S. fej NOVEMBER 16, 1871.
_
VOLUME XXXV.-No. 47.
New Fall Dry Groods.
H. L. ?. BALK,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
DEY GOODS,
172 Broad Street,
Augusta, Ga.
I- AM now opening a CAREFULLY SELECTED Stock of
One vard wide English and American PRINTS, for Dresses, Shirts, Curtains, ?tc
Black ALPACA of the best makes-Black French SILK,
English, French and American DRESS GOODS, Opera FLANNELS,
JEANS and CASSIMERES for Gents and Boys wear,
White and Colored Cotton FLANNEL,
All wool Plain and Twilled FLANNEL, in Red, White, Gray and Blue,
White and Colored BLANKETS and QUILTS,
SHAWLS and CLOAKS in great variety,
Table DAMASK, TOWELS, NAPKINS,
RIBBONS, TRIMMINGS, BUTTONS, GLOVES, STOCKINGS and SOCKS,
Innen Cambric H'D'K'FS, Umbrellas, <fcc.
* ZS* Plaid and Striped HOMESPUNS, WOOLENS, Brown SHEETINGS,
SHIRTINGS, OSNABURGS and DRILLINGS, / Sell at Factory Prices!
Also, the best makes of CORSETS, HOOPSKIRTS, UNDERGARMENTS,
SHIRTS, COLLARS, Knitted Woolen SHAWLS and HOODS.
ty An experience of thirty years justifies me in asserting that 1 can Buy as
Cheap,as any one-AS I BUY ONLY FOR CASH!
*5rl can Sell as Low as any one-AS I SELL ONLY FOR CASH.
In my establishment every" article ls marked with the lowest price thereon, and
no one bi my establishment'is allowed to ask more. This insures justice tu ail cus
tomers, because all can buy my Goods at the Very Lowest Marked Price:
jjS^My assortment is most Complete in all the Departments. - \
Those at a distance who^wish to avail themselves of all tho/-?o advantages, but not
having the time to come in person,"can send an order, and save, besides the time,
EXPENSES and FAWE.T An Extra Discount of Five Fer Cent ! ! on all orders,
off from the price every ode pays, in orderto reduce their freight expenses on same.
' I guarantee satisfaction, and should any article not come up to expectation, it can
be returned, and the,money will be refunded. It Ls not necessary to send the
money with the order, as it can be collected on the delivery of the Goods.
.JHrCut out this advertisement, aud be sure to give me a call. Or, iu sending ah
order, address
H. Ii. A. BALK
?i?fmii
Sept 26
172 Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.
2m ' 40
Carolina
NEW DRY GOODS STORE.
Domestics at Factory Prices !
POWELL & MULLER,
No. 189, Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.,
Next Door to Constitutionalist.
Wi
E have just opened our New Iron Front Store, with a large and com
plete Stock of
SILKS, MEROOES, EMPRESS CLOTHS,
ALPACAS, BOMBAaOESj POPLINS,
DELAI*!*, CLOAKS, SHAWLS,
BLANKETS, COMFORTS,
BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, JEANS, KERSEYS,
RIBBONS, SASHES, GLOVES. HOSIERY, NOTIONS, ?c.
Having bought our Goods where they were Cheapest, we intend selling
them at the Lowest Prices.
POWELL & MULLER,
No. 1S9, Broad Street, Augusta, Ga.
P. S.-"We would be glad to see our friends and acquaintances, and tin
public generally, and we here assure them that every effort will be used to
give entire satisfaction.
WALTER POWELL, formerly of Barnwell, S. C.
WILLIAM MULLER, formerly of Columbia, S. C.
Augusta, Oct ll tf 42
Kew Fal
Mar
DS? GOODS
3G2 Broad Street,
AUGUSTA, GEOEGIA,
BEG to inform their Friends and Customers of Edgefield and vicinity
that they have now Received their EXTENSIVE STOCK of
DRY G-OOD
For i?ie Fall Trade of 1871 !
These Goods are all of the FINEST and BEST DESCRIPTION OF
QUALTY, the Purchases being very Heavy, and all for CASH, have been
bought with Extra Facilities and Advantages, andar? wei! worth the in
spection of Visitors to Augusta.
To the Cash Wholesale Trade they offer the most liberal
inducements, feeling assured that all purchases made at their Establishment
cannot fail but give complete satisfaction.
MULLARKY BROTHERS,
DRY GOODS MERCHANTS,
Broad Strasfc, Anigusta, G-eoro:ia.
Sept 13 3 3ra 69 3S
W. D. TURNER And Dr. W. NICHOLSON,
Of Edgefickl, S. C.,
"WITH
A. Brandi
BDOTS, SHOES, HATS, TRUNKS, VALISES,
UMBRELLAS, ?DO.
324 Broad Street. Opposite Planters Holel,
A VG US TA, G KO h GI A.
JG?*Prices guaranteed as Low as any House in thc City.
Oct 18 3m
43
J. H. BENNETT.
J. W. THURMOND.
BENNETT A THURMOND,
Grocers
-AND
Commission IE
131 Broad Street, Augusta, Georgia,
RETURNING thanks for the liberal patronage heretofore extended tc
them, would respectfully e nounce to their friends and the public generali)
that their Stock of Crroceries, and Plantation and Fami
ly Supplie** is now FULL AND COMPLETE; and that thev an
prepared to supply their customers with EVERY ARTICLE in their Line
of the Best Quulity. omi at Trices as Lmv os flit T.dioesf.
Their Stock consists in part of BACON, LARD. SUGAR, COFFEE
SALT. MOLASSES, TOBACCO, B AGG INO, TIES &.c, &<..
^?trift pc-rsmi'>l;Mt.f?ntion given jto the frALE OF COTTON and al
other Produce entrusted to their care.1
?Augusta, Sept IS ?'["'? .Sm 38
?fir: ,<;?
69 Liberty^Street, New York.
The Original Stork Life Insurance Co. of the United States.
OFFICERS:
WILLIAM WALKER, President.
HENRY J. FURBER, vice-President JOHN H. BEWLEY, Secretary.
GEORGE L. MONTAGUE, Actuary. E. W. LAMBERT, M. D., Med. Ex.
This Company Oilers the Following Important Advantages to those
About ?Sffee?fEg Mi>Hra?iee cn their lires:
1st. Insurance ai Stock Units* "bcir-^' iroui 20 to 30 Per
Cent, less than the Rates .charged by Mutual Companies.
2d. Each Policy-holder is regarded as a Stockholder to the
extent of one Annual Premium on his Policy, and will share
in the Profits o? the Company to the same extent as a Stock
holder-owning an equal amom.t of the Capital Stock.
3d. Every Policy issued by the Company is non-forfeitable,
and contains a Clause stating its exact Surrender Value.
BEFORE INSURING YOUR LIFE OR ACCEPTING THE AGENCY OF ANY
COMPANY
READ TE1JE FOLLOWING*
A lengthened experience has demonstrated that the rates of Premium ordinarily
charged by Life Insurance Companies are from twenty-five to thirty per cent, in excess
of what are necessary for a safe and legitimate conduct- of the business. In other
words, carefully anil prudently-managed Companies? charging ^Mutual" rates have
been able to return to their policyholders from 25 to 30 per cent, ol the amount charged
for premiums.
When Life Insurance Companies were first organized, the reliability of the data
upon which the premiums were constructed had not undergone the test of experience.
11 was thought, therefore,;. nore than common prudence to adopt a scale of premiums
which would, in any event, meet all the presumed and unforeseen contingencies of the
business.
As long as the matter was involved in some doubt, it was better to fix thc rate too
high than to incur the risk of making it too low ; because, in the former case, the error
could be easily remedied, at least in part, by returning to the policyholders, at certain
intervals, such portion of the premium charged as was found' unnecessary for. the
purposes of the business and the complote security of thc Company.
Experience, however, having satisfactorily demonstrated that these-Tates are excess
sive, what- possible excuse can there be fWr maintaining them ?
Availing themselves of this experience, thc Directors and Managers of the Universal
Life Insurance Company, at its organization, adopted a scale of premiums in accor
dance therewith, and which has proved to*bc fair and adequate, and all that was
necessary to meet the requirements of the business! These premiums are about twenty
five per cent.-lower than tb ose* charged by -Mutual Companies.
It also appeared, inasr .ucii as the rate.? so established were as near as could possibly
be determined fair rates, and not in excess of what Insurance has previously cost the
Policyholders in Mutual Companies, that any profits arising from prudent manage
ment justly and properly belonged to the stockholders of the Company, for the risk
incurred Cy them in truj^eri?kitig the Business.
Experience ha* shown that tin ie a:<- sounvs ol' profit in the; practice o? the business
which theory will mi 'admit ot h. ..uuriuVivd as clements in (Le calculation of the
premiums. Tl; ?? ri -.??'.- ?feorii fi guying in the mortal- of the members of a Com
pany owing to thc s . dicaJ ctiorrnfg iorilives; a gain in interest on the investments
of thc Company over lbj;?;>.--.tined ii: lb" calculation of its premiums, the profits
derivable from the lap* lig i ?id susf?tftj?f >.- Policies by the members, and from other
minor sources.
Profits from these sources, in a Company possessed of a capital of ?200,001), and do
ing a fair amount of business, would give to tho stockholders dividends'largely iii o.\
cess of what were counted on by thc Directors of the Universal at the time of its
OTganizat?on: They have,; theretor&j oatWiunoa to ' divide ar??orjg fl:?.- policyholdiTs bl
Hie Company a large part of the profits accruing from tho sources name.!, ail of which
have heretofore been divided among thc stockholders.
The plan adopted for such division is as follows : Every person who may hereafter
insure with lie Universal w Al, for the purposes of division, be treated as a stockhol
der to the extent of one Annual Premium upon his Policy ; and will share in Ute profils
of the Company toprecise/y 'he soin?' extent as a Stockholder oxvimj an equal amount
of thc cap ital slock.
By this system of Insurance; original with the Uu'iccrsal, the policyholder secures
the following important advantages :
FIP.ST. Insurance ai Ike regular, '' Slock'' rates, requiring a primary outlay of
about twenty to thirty per cad. tess-than thal charged by Mutual Companies, and
which is equivalent to 3 yearly " dividend'' paid in advance of that amount on mu lui
rates. This low cost of insurance is worthy bf attention! Since its organization this
Company has received in premiums from its policyholders the sum of $1,517,000. To
eli'ect the same amount of insurance in a Mutual Company would have c-'st them an
initial outlay o? v2,?t'0.0UU. Dy allowing its policyholders to retain in their own pos
session this excess bfl^SoSjOOOl the Univ---ai has virtually paid them a "dividend ' ol
HS-3,000, and paid it, too, in advance, instead of at thc end of one or more years, lt
is 'inpossible i-o-find-anyexample-of a Mutual Company furnishing insurance at so
low a cost by returning lo its policyholders an equal amount upon similar receipt.
SECOND. Participa'ion in the legitimate profits of (he Company, upon a pian which
secures to the ])olicyholders the same treatment which Dirxtors and titockhohh rs a ward |
to themselves. This system of'participation, id connection with tho low " stock" rates
oi premium, must necessarily secure to the policyholders even* possible advantage to
be derived from prudent and careful managt mein.
The low rates of premium compclieconouiy, and, independent of participation,
guarantee to the policyholder his insurance at a rate which is nb) in excess of the cost
in well'managed mutual companies ; while* by-the proposed plaii of .participation in
what may be considered the legitimateprofits of the business, the cost will be still
further diminished.
Thus by the combined advai tagt s a rising from low stock rate and participation in
thopront* it is confidently believed thai:.:;- UNIVERSAL LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY oilers insurance ul its :. wes! practicable cost.
jy^jg" Those of the existing Policyholders who desire to participate in the Profits
under the new Plan c;:n do so ! y making application to thc Head Office, or to any of |
the Agents of the Company.
Thc Company is in a sound finum ' condition
Kallo of Assets lo Liabilities 136 to 100.
JUS-GOOD RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED, who will deal direct with
the New York Office, and lo whom full General Agents' Commissions will
be paid.
GEO. B. LAKE, General Agent.
May 24 2m22
N"ew P1 a 11 Goods !
Grauiteville, S. C.,
Desires to inform his Friends and the Public Generally that
he has just returned from the North with the LARGEST,
BEST, MOST DESIRABLE and COMPLETE STOCK OF
GOODS that he has ever brought to this market, consisting in
part of
SUPEEB DEY GOODS
BOOTS AND SH ES,
HATS, CAPS, TPtTJJSTKIS, "VALISES/
Hardware and Cutlery,
BAGGING, TIES AND WAILS,
SOLE LEATHER, CALF AND KIP SKINS,
BACON, LARD, SUGAR, COFFEE, TEA, CHEESE, RICE, SYRUP,
MOLASSES, MACKEREL, BUTTER, SALT, CANNED FRUITS,
TOBACCO, SEGARS, CANDLES, SOAP, STARCH,
In fact Everything usually found in a First Class Country or Village Store.
COTTON consigned to me for sale in this market, will receive my perso
nal attention, FREE OF COMMISSIONS.
Graniteville, Oct 4 3m 41
GRAND PRIZ? DISTRIBUTION
TICKETS TO THE CONCERTS
. - ' ?F THE . 'inn : . v gg^j
i IM Mi) iaiffl MMTIOI,
Readv for sile.find delivery; ; O refers promptly filled.
<eaaarJ\<* M TOMPKINS, At?ent.
octn - .. Ut, . V ' - tr ' 42
Over the Bars.
'Twas milking time, and tho cows came
up
From the meadows swcot with clover,
And stood in the la?e, while pretty Jane.
Had'a quiet chat with the drover
Such a quiet chat that it scarcely seemed
That a single worn was spoken ;
While a magie spell with thc night dews
fell, '
. And the rythm' of song was unbroken
Thc cattle stood ut fco lover's sido,
Without any show ol' vexation,
As though impressed that a nvc bar rest
Was-a paff of their rest oration.
And as Jane listened to thc notes that
came
Right under the $ars and over,
Her heart-took wing, the silty thing,
And nestled up close to the drover.
Shc.heard him sayihis home was poor,
-That .he'd nothing but love to give
her;
And she smiled content, as though
.Love had spent .
I Every arrow he Bad in his quiver ;
She smiled content, when the evening
air .7 :
With voiccfrof birds arc ringing,
And her lips confered that a lowly nest
! Should never prevent her singing.
So over.the bars the lovers lean,
In the joy of their sweet communion;
And their looks; declare that poverty
ne'er
Shall be a bar to their union ;
0, sweetestmusic, go thread your rhymes
Now under the haas and. over !
Where p""Ctty Jane,"in the fragrant lane,
Bewitched the heart of the drover.
The Question of thc Over Issue of
Bonds.
As our readers may presume, [says tho
Colombia Phoenix] we have not the hon
or of Governor Scoffs confidence Nor
does the Phccnix iutervicw people whose
statements, airer; ?hoy are made, may
just as well bo defined false as true. As
his Excellency is now arraigned -before
thc bar of the public, and has boen pla
ced, by tho New .York World in thc
criminal's dock, it is proper that his da
fence be heard. The correspondent of |
tho Charleston Courier has interviewed
Gov. Scott. About the only practical
piece of information he gives, is that ar
rangements have b?eu made to take the
financial agency.of thc State from the
present agent and "place it in thc handsof
the Union Trust'; Company, of New
York. That Is, GOT. Scott ct Co. propose
to lock the stabio doors fter the horses
of tho State have ?cen stolen; and he,
porhaps, not theT^?st notorious in thc
band of the Radical olficials who have
grown fat and waxed saucy upon the
bleeding and mutilated body of pros
trate Carolina. Why, wc a.sk his Excel
lency, did you mako Kimpton your li
nancial agent in-New York, and place
millions of State sc.uriii-s in his un
known hands, without exacting even a
bond from him, such as an assistant
cashier gives in ono of our city banks?
Yon and your advisers, we say to his
Excellency, are responsible in law and
morals for all that the State of South
Carolina may lose from thc great conspi
racy- financial-whereby unknown mil
lions may perhaps have been added to
thc public debt o?jSoulh Carolina. Is it
.enc that ?ib'rpu/>rrvr~.\-<-TiITh iiiJB fcTflte
may now bo over ?20,000,000? If so,
can our poor and plundered people pay
$1,500,000 per annum interest on that
debi, and, besides that sum, the current
expenses of thc Government? Whither
are wc uri Ming? Whither sails thc ship
Ol* State? .'.ml what says tho Attorney
General of the State';' Have you no du
ties in this cris:? to discharge? rf thc
State luis been plundered-if tho treasu
ry has been invaded-as we know is the
case-is it not the duty of the Attorney
General to proceed against the plunder
ers? Where frauds were alleged in
New .York, Gov. Hoffman put his At
torney-General to-work. If Scott is no
Hoffman, is it also the eas-' that Cham
berlain is no Champlain? Wc said that
this man Kimpton would cost thc Slate
at least ?1,000,000.
Is it that our estimate was very mode
rate? It looks very much like it. Alas
for South Carolina,- when swindlers and
robbers prey upon her, and then ide
themselves under thc United States flag!
Scott oe Co. plunder, our people, and then
call upon Grant, and he puts them under
military rule !
-- .??>? -
A Horrible Crime.
From the Louisville Ledger.
Wc aro called upon to record another
of those horrible crimes that have of laic
become so frequent, and which shock by
their atrocity ali who hear them. On
Tuesday Highton the Turnpike between
New Albany and the Charlestown road,
a negro attempted to violate the daugh
ter of Mr. Amos Stacey a highly respec
ted citizen of Clark county, Indiana The
screams of the terrified girl, and her
struggles to free herself from the black
fiend who had seized her, were heard by
the family of Mr. Stacey, whose resi
dence was near by, and the father started
to the rescue of his child. But he had
proceeded but a short distance when he
fell dead from heart disease, brought on
by the startling danger and excitement
produced upon him by it
The would-be ravisher, in thc excite
ment that followed, succeeding in mak
ing his escape, and thc girl was saved.
Thc neighborhood was alarmed, and
search made in all directions for thc
black liend, but he succeeded in evading
pursuit, and got safely away. Tho en
tire neighborhood in which Mr. Stacey
resided is in an intense stale of excite
ment, and there ?snot the slightest doubt,
if thc negro is arrested, that ho will at
once be sining up to the nearest, tree,
without judge or jury. Mr. Staeoy was
a most excellent citizen, and his death
under such terrible circumstances has
raised the passions of the people in that
vicinity to the highest pitch, and ?twill
not bo safe for any negro who rnny be
found loafing around that vicinity for
sometime to cc mc.
Fifty Years in the Field.
Thc New York Observer is about cel
ebrating ils jubilee, entering upon ita
fiftieth year in 1872. It is one of the old
est newspapers ip tho country, one of
tho ablest, and one of the most steadfast
and fearless In maintaining thc truth iii
religion, thc right in morals, and honesty
in all public and private affairs. It an
nounces for the comine year, the publi
cation of the second volume of ils Ycar
Book ; a vast repository of information,
statistical and otherwise, relating both
to Church and State, which will be sent
free to all who pay their subscription for
1872. This volume last year was worth
the subscription price of the paper, and
tho Publishers promise a more complete
Year-Book for 1872. Specimen copies of
the paper, with Prospectus for thc Year
Book, sent free on application from any
source. New Subscribers will receive
tho paper free until January 1st,
-1 -ri itt* tts-t
pty- Real fidelity may he rave, but it
exists in the bear'. They only deny its
worth mid power who never loved n
friend, nor labored to make ono happy.
?-ty The young men of Darlington
1 have made up a purse of one hundred
1 dollars to bo given as a premium at their
next county fuir for ?bo best cup of collei
. made and.served up on.tho ground;
. open lo all unmarried young ladies.
M herc and How Cheap White La
bur may bc Obtained.
OFFICE OF THE S. C. )
LAND & IMMIGRATION ASSOCIATION, I
ACADEMY OF MUSIC BUILDING, |
CHARLESTON, S. C., Nov. 6,1871. J
^JTo the Editor of the Advertiser .--We
have received the enclosed letter in rela
tion to obtaining and forwarding EngUsh.
laborers and settlers, and as wo consider
it a matter ol'public interest to tho South,
wo desire that you would give it publici
ty. We have also received many letters
hom persons residing in some of the
Northern and Western States, making
ilumines for lands that can bo purchased
by actual settlers, as to th air character,
location, price, terms, health, dec; and
also inquiries from others who desire to
move South, and obtain employment as
agricultural and other laborers, as to tho
amount of wages that would be paid,
and other particulars.
Willi thc view ol' promoting immi
gration, wo invite all persons - who de
sire to obtain reliable white labor to send
in their orders to us, in conformity with
the terms of the accompanying letter,
and stilting tho amount of wages they
would pay, and we will forward their
orders lree of charge.
Wu would also invite land-owners in
healthy localities, who may desiro to
dispose ol' lands to actual settlers, to
make propositions, giving the number
of acres, location, adaptation for difl'er
eut crops, price, terms, character for
health, and all other particulars that may
bo important, and we will do idl in our
power to carry out their views.
Wc are, very respectfully,
BUTLEK, CHADWICK, OAKY & Co.
How and , Where to Obtain Immi
grants.
THE UNITED STATES EMIGRATION "I 1
AND BANKING AGENCY,
9G FINSBURY CIRCUS, LONDON, ENG.,
Septem ber 28,1871. J
Messrs. Butler, Chadwick, and Gary &
Co Charleston, S. C.:
DEAR SIRS-Your esteemed favor of
August 18th is duly received, and would
have been replied to by return mail, had
not the letter remained over for the wri- |
ter of this (our Mr. Reed, who is in
America,) to answer.
In thu tirst place, let us assure you
that our sympathies and best wishes are
with you and your State, and we shall
be happy if (through yourselves or any
other way; we can be of any service to
her or yourselves.
s * ? ? ? - *
As regards emigrants, wo can assure
you that there are no better and nobler
set of men than the farmers' sons, gar
deners, <tc, of this country, and now
that thc Alabama business is settled, we
eau send you just as many of the very best
of these people as you can handle. Some
have just enough to pay passage, others
not enough, requiring aid, say to tl.e ex
tent of JtlO each, to be paid out of their
wages. Some have a few pounds to spare;
again, some others have quite a pretty
amount of money, say ?250 to $1500.
Some even $:??U0 to ?5000.
Now, if we can get you to aid some,
say to thc extent of ton dollars per head
-i hat is per adult-to be afterwards re
paid, and for which we take a duo bill,
(to bc sent to you,) payablo on demand,
you can have all the good, square, hon
?5t? capable, sobor, intelligent, hard
working people you want.
Can wu say more ? We send none whose
capacity and character are not good, and
this wo take, care of. Ain?ng the thou
sands we send, we think it would be
difficult to find a bad character. It is
tho cream, the bonn and sinew we se
lect, not the profligate, worthless or in
dolent.
We shall be happy to do all we can to
servo the purpose you have in view, and
will send the people to you hy our lino
of steamships running to Norfolk and
baltimore, and forward them to Charles
ton by rail, unless you prefer sending
-onie'one lo Norfolk to meet and take
Lai ties on to Charleston. Let us hear
from you at your early convenience, and
let us hear ail you can do and will do for
such people, as' wc may send you.
O * O ' ? * *
We remain, dear sirs, yours faithfully,
(Signed) REED <fe KEMI.
LINCOLN'S EMANCIPATION PROCLA
MATION.-A Washington letter-writer
thus refers to tho burning of tho eman
cipation of Lincoln :
It is announced that thc original copy
of Lincoln's proclamation, by which the
people of the South wore robbed of four
hundred millions of dollars worth ol
property, was consumed in the Chicago
lire. It is further stated that this pre
cious document cost the people of Chica
go twenty-five thousand dollars. Now
can any one tell how tho people of Chi
cago got possession of an original docu
ment, which belongs to the archives of
the Government, and who got the twen
tv-five thousand dollars ?
?&r The Macon (Ga.) Telegraph, under
the heading of " Grand Collapse of South
Carolina Carpet-Baggism in Wall street,''
says: " It will be seen hythe morning
dispatches that the carpet-bag plunder
ers of South Carolinaare in New York
endeavoring to cover up their tracks and
secure their plunder. According to thc
World, who has looked into tho matter,
over twenty millions of State bonds have
boen printed and fraudulently issued
fir tho negotiation of which thc Finan
cial Agent holds claims against tho State
to the amount of $4,000,000. Scott issues
a manifesto claiming that niue millions
of these bonds have never been signed
or issued ; but who cn believe a word of
what he says? We fear the old State is
gone up at last-a victim alike to Radical
fraud and tyranny. Tho best wo can
hope for is, that thc money loss will fall
on the Radicals who back such whole
sale swindling with Government bayo
nets. Sure!j" thc deviot' fraud and vil
lainy has broke loose, and isragingopen
mouthed all over tho country,"
J?A?- A gentleman of this city some
lime ago had been dealing in chinquapins
and was about to get overstocked. He
concluded to inform those he was buying
from that he could not take any more
from them, and accordingly sat down to
indite thom a noto to that elfe ct. He got
along very well until he came to the
word '. chinquapin" and hero ho was
stumpped. He made two or three efforts
but failed every time. At last a bright
idea struck him, and he wroto his note
thus : " Please don't send me any more
of theso tl-d things"-enclosing two
chinquapins. Wo presume the note was
understood.
THE So CALLED KU-KLUX.-The Prov
idence (R. I.) Herald says:
Thc Ku-Klux business in South Caro
lina has had everything to make it pros
perous. Thc law is in the hands of
shirtless rascals who have passed from
their proper place, the gutter, to tho bench
by the aid ol' negro votes ; "loyal" vil
lainy is permitted to run riot unchecked,
and if there is aught to be wondered at it
is that the number of outrages is not ten
fold greater than it is. Wo go agalpst
the violences attributed to tp.e KuKlux
as strongly ns thc Journal of any of thc
Rndipfd papers, but where M loyalty"
shields every crimo and "disloyalty"
amounts merely to an opposition to Re
publican misrule we, do not blame UK
people for availing themselves of thc
law within their reach-thc law of sch
defence. If tho Government is really
sincere in its professed wishes to re es
Uiblish a permanent prosperity and pea?
in the South why does it not depose th?
thieving carpet naggers who exercise of
ficial authority in the disaffected dis
tricts? Nine-tenths of them as richlj
deserve hanging aa common highway
men.
Brevities and Levities.
par An enthusiastic editor, speaking
of a new prima donna, says : " Her voice
is as soft as a roll of velvet, and as tender
as a pair of slop shop, pantaloons."
?2??"Sunday morning, an intoxicated
man went into one of the New Haven
churches and listened intently while the
soprano was. singing a solo. Alter she
had liiiished, he got upon tho seat, and
waving his hat shouted " Bully for you !' '
The fellow heard the rest ol ihe music
outside.
?&~ A new source of Radical revenue
was tapped in Washington the otlier day
by lining a man, a Republican, nve dol
lars mr " cursing Presioent Grunt.'! It
is thought by some that this might be
inaae u very prolific source of revenue
for the Radicals if cases ot the kind could
bu maue generally available.
??r SUCCESS.-If a mau would com
mit an inexpiable olien&e against society,
targe or small, let bim be successful,
riley win iorgivc bim any crime out
mat.-Dickens.
L&r Tuc lellow who called tight boots
comfortable, delcnuea his puoition by
saying they made a mau lorget ail his
other miscues.
??r- Josh Billings says, "1 am violent
ly opposed to aiUeut speerits aa a bever
idge, but lor manulactuiin pia poses 1
think that a little of it tastes gooO."
jZSJ- The Lake Village (N. H.) Times
mentions a man who sent twenty-five
cents for a "splendid steel engraving of
Andrew Jackson," and got a postage
stamp.
?ser An old Indian, who had witnessed
the effect of whiskey lor many years,
said abarrcl labeled " whiskey" contain
ed a thousand songs and fifty fights.
%?r A story is told cf a soldier, who,
about one hundred and fifty years ago
was frozen in Siberia. The last expres
sion he made was, "It is ex-" He
then froze as stiff as marble. In the sum
mer of 1860, some French physicians
found him after having lain frozen for
ono hundred and fifty years. They grad
nally thawed him, and, upon animation
being restored, he concluded the sen
tence with "ceedingly cold."
^serMrs. Stowe says that "mother
hood to the woman who has lived only
to be petted and to be herself the center
of all things, is a virtual dethronement.
Something weaker, fairer, more delicate
than herself comes-something for her
to serve and care for more than herself."
GARY & ?ART,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND SOLI
TORS IN EQUITY,
Will Practice in the Courts of the State,
and Augusta, Ga.; and also in tho V. 8.
Courts for South Carobna. .
Edgefield, S. C., Oct 4, 3m
JOHN BAUSKETT,
U toni ev and Counsellor at Law,
COLUMBIA, 8. C.,
TVlLL Practice-in Edgefield, Lexington,
Barnwell nnd Richland.
Columbia, Mar 8 ly ll
WK GOODS !
THE Subscriber is now receiving his
Stock of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS,
To which ho invites all to call and ex
imine for themselves, as I SELL FOR
CASH, and will SELL AS CHEAP AS
THE CHEAPEST. Now in Store
A nice lot of Winter CALICOES,
Printed DELAINES,
Plaid POPLINS, Striped POPLINS,
Colored SERGES,
Ladies' Velvet HATS, Trimmed, and
Untrimmed,
Velvet RIBBONS,
Bonnet RIBBONS and PLUMES,
1 Balef?orth Carolina PLAIDS,
1 " Brown SHIRTINGS,
Sea Island SHIRTING,
KERSEYS, JEANES, CASSIMERES,
Geo. PLAINS, LINSEYS,
White and Bcd FLANNELS,
Opera and Canton FLANNELS,
Bed TICKINGS,
Bleached SHIRTINGS and SHEET
INGS,
Men's, Bovs, Youth's and Children's
HATS,
Ladies, Misses', Mens, Youths and
Childrens SHOES and BOOTS, of all
kinds,
Gloves, Hosiery, Handkerchiefs,
Ladies SHAWLS, Large and Small,
GROCERIES, all kinds, j
HARDWARE and CROCKERY.
FANCY ARTICLES, NOTIONS, and
all other articles kept in a Dry Goods
store.
B. C. BRYAN, Agent.
Oct. 4 tf 41
BEST BAGGING AND TIES
Notice to Planters !
w E are now receiving, and aro pre
pared to furnish our customers,
Ho. 1 Bengal Bagging
And
"??POW Ties,"
In quantities to suit their requirements,
and would be glad to have your orders.
All who have no Brand to mark their
Cotton, if they will so state when they
order Bagging and Ties, we will send
them free of charge,
^-Orders left with Maj. Z. W. 0*R
wiLE or Capt. T. W. CARWILE, at Edge
field, S. C, or sent direct to the House,
will receive early attention.
WARBEN* WALLAGE & ?0.
Augusta, Aug 2 tf 32
Branch, Sons & Co.
COTTON FACTORS
-And
Commiss'n Merchants
Office:
Planters1 Loan & Savings Bank,
Warehouse :
Campbell Street,
Augusta, Gr A?
CONSIGNMENTS respectfully solici
ted, and Liberal Advancesmade on same
Bagging, Ties and Provisions furnish
ed . Customers at lowest rates,
Storage on most favorable terms in the
large and commodious Warehouse of the,
Planters' Loan ?fc Savings Bank.
Augusta. Sept 13 3m 38
Lamps. Lamps,
Chimneys. Chimneys.
6Dozen LAMPS now In Store, and
moro to arrive, of the batest styles,
with tho Improved- ' Burner, : which is
warranted to give a better light, and is
more durable than any ever offered in
this market.
Our CHIMNEYS are superior for du
rability.
Call and examine for yourselves.
MARKERT d CLISBY.
;Sept20 KW tf tijfc
C. K. HENDERSON t BRO.,
GRANITEVILLE, S. C.,
v ' Vi* -~. ?tr. or-??! Wo j ,Lnr \t1&t*&'J*& ~ ?
EG-to inform their Friends and Customers of EdgefieldaM agacent
Counties that they: are now/?p?niag their Stock of
FALL AND WINTER GOODS.
And take great pleasure in proclaiming it the BEST SELECTED and
MOST COMPLETE STOCK they have ever offered.
These Goods were bought in New York and Baltimore, from tie Best
Houses, and for Cash for which we obtained a liberal discount, and are
therefore enabled to SELL VERY CHEAP, and this we intend to do.
We keep EVERYTHING usually found in a First Class Village
Store, such as
Dry Goods and Notions^
Ready Made ClotMng,
BOOTS ABD SHOES,
Hardware, Tinware, Crockery*
BAGGING AND TIES,
BACON, LARD, FLOUR, MEAL. COFFEE, SUGAR, MOLASS??, ?
SYRUP, RICE, MACKEREL, SPICES, SOAPS, SODA, &c.
' . ! ll f>: .' ri ...<.. ,vT*tiba' --?7
Also, a full line of SHOE FINDINGS, Sole' LEATHER, Kip. and Calf
SKINS, &c.
??-We are at the same old place on the Comer, and most cordially invite
all to call and examine our Goods and Prices.
??"We continue to SELL COTTON in this market Free of Commissions.
C. k HEADERtfOX,
F. B. HENDERSON.
Grantville, Sept 20 3m 39
Cjrrand Opening
' OF / ; :
MILLINERY OOOBS,
ON TUESDAY, OCT. 10th, 1871,
AT
MRS. LECKIE'S,
Augusta. Ga.
HAVING just received the HANDSOMEST STOCK OF GOODS it has
ever "been my pleasure to exhibit to my customers and the .Ladies generally,
I take this method of informing them that on Tuesday? Oct. ?Otli,
I will open all the. Latest styles of French BONNETS and HATS, and
the Ladies may rest assured that I will, on that occasion, offer the LARGEST
and FINEST STOCK OF GOODS in my line ever offered in this City.
My Stock consists in part of Rich and Elegant Pattern BONNETS and
HATS of the Latest styles imported.
Rich and Beautiful Sash and other RIBBONS,
French FLOWERS, very choice and fine,
American FLOWERS, ;very pretty,
Ostrich PLUMES and TIPS, all 'colors and prices,
Lace COLLARS and SLEEVES,
Linen COLLARS and CUFFS,
Real Hair BRAIDS, CURLS, CHIGNONS, &c, &c, of all the latest styles, a large
and splendid Stock.
Immitation HAIR BRAIDS, CHIGNONS, SWITCHES, &c, &c.
Tortoise Shell, Jet and Gilt JEWELRY, a fine assortment of fhe leading designs.
A lew Sets of Coney and Alaska Mink FURS, which my customers may rest as
sured are fresh, having been selected in person this season.
VELVETS, SILKS, LACES, CRAPES, Children's Merino HOODS, BOWS,
SCARFS, and in short everything kept in a Millinery Store.
Thanking my Edgefield Friends and public generally lor the very liberal patronage
heretofore bestowed, I respectfully solicit them to give me a call this season.
MRS. LECKIE,
171 BROAD STREET,
AUGUSTA HOTEL BUILDING.
W AUGUSTA, GA.
Oct. ll 2m 42
JAMES W. TURLEY,
DEALER IN
First-class Dry Goods i
OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTBC FABRICATION. >
HAVING spent many weeks in New York during the Summer, collecting
together the best and newest styles of FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FAB
RICATIONS, I have great pleasure in announcing that I have NOW
OPEN full lines of
PALL Al . WIM DM GOODS,
Which I will distribute to my customers at CONVINCINGLY LOW
PRICES.
The accumulated experience of many years, together with my intimate
acquaintance with the wants and tastes of our people, gives me superior ad
vantages as to PRICES, STYLES and QUALITY.
I beg^ to call special attention to the departments of DRESS GOODS,
SHAWLS and CLOAKS, which are unusually attractive.
??"DOMESTIC MANUFACTURED GOODS always at Lowest Prices.
JAMES W. TURLEY,
Third Door above Globe Hotel, AUGUSTA, GA.
Sept2G If 40
New Cotton and Produce
WAREHOUSE.
... . .'f y.
The Planters' Loan & Savings Sank.
ji?i
Subscribed Capital, 61,000,000,00!
THE WAREHOUSE OF THIS*BANK, corner of Reynolds and
Camp bela Streets, Augusta, Ga?, is now ready to receive COT
TON. " '' . :- ?>... OM
LIBERAL CASH ADVANCES will be made upon Cotton in Ware- .
house, or upon -Railroad Receipted
P irties Storing Cotton^jvith the Rani will be farnished-with receipts for v
same thatwill be availaole.injAw city or any other for borrowing money.
The Bank is prepared at all tim es to make Loans^ on Produce br Prov'i
siom, on the most.reasonable terms. a
Parties would do well to apply afcithe Warehouse, or communicate with
the Officers.
CHAS. J. JENKINS,- President.
JNO. P. KING,: Vice-president.
T. P. BRANCH] Cashier.
>.Auguste, .Sef&gO. . ? tf ? 89

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