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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, August 22, 1872, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1872-08-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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Home Is Where There is One to Love L's.
Home's not merely four square walls,
Though with pictures hung and gildod ;
Homo is whore Affection calls.
Filled with shrines the heart hath
builded. ;
Home! Go watch the faithful dove
Sailing neath tho heaven above us ;
Homo is where there's one to love
Home is where there's one to love us.
Homo's not nierolv roof and room.
It need? som?thinsr to endear it ;
Home is whore the heart can bloom- ?
Whore there's some kind lip to cheer it.
What is Home with none to meet.
None to welcome, none to erect us ?
Home is sweet-and onlv sweet-. -
When there's one we love to meet us.
THE STORY OF A WOMAN'S LIFE.
" Good morning, Mrs. Morton. T
just, run in a moment to inquire if a
bit of news*I have heard b? trup. Tf
is too incredible for me to believe,
for with all your practical idea? of
life, I "cannot think you would carrv
your peculiar notions to. such a length
as this."
" Pray what have I been doing now.
MT. Ellis?" said Mrs. Morton, as she
qnielV arose and offered her visitor
a chair. " Your words and looks are
ominous. Have I committed snob a
breach of propriety that Madam
Grundy bas found it necessary to
hurl her thunder of escommunjetton
against me? Come, silence mr ?P?
pens* quickly;" and with a pleasant
smil? the lady awaited her visitor's
revelation.
"Why, lam told that yon hf.ve
actually apprenticed Belle to a pnb
. lisher, in order that she may become
a compositor. Every one was falkiner
about, it last evening at Mrs. Wilson's
party, and all thought it a great pity
thar so beautiful and accomplished a
qirl as Isabelle Morton should be
withdrawn from that society she is so
well fitted to adorn,- and. immured
within the walls of a dingy, old pub
lishing-house, simply beca?se her
mother chooses to sacrifice her child
to that Moloch of her'?-work. As
for me. I cannot think you are so
blind to .your only daughter's inter
est?."
" Yes. it is true," said Mrs. Mor
ton, glancing np a moment from uer
work, for her fingers werp ever busy
with something. " But I see nothing ?
in this to create such a profound sen
sation. Belle is. not lost to society*; '
she will have many hours for recrea
tion, and wi?l thus be enabled to
meet any reasonable demands society
may make upon her."
" No doubt she will. Is it possi
ble, Mrs. Morton, you do not know
ihat you are effectually banishing
yuur daughter from .sovieiy ? For, ot
course, much as I do deplore such ?
state of affairs, ' our set' could never
recognize an humble type-setter as
one of themselves. This is ali wrong, j
I admit, but public opinion regulates j
these matters, and one must drift with ?
the current, you know. Belle has j
just graduated with the highest hon
ors, and with her lovely manners and
fresh young face, might command the
most eligible mutch in the city. It
is absolutely cruel to sacrifice the
sweet girl in this way !"
.! Well, Mrs. Eliis, I take up the
gauntlet society has thro vn down,
and shall fearlessly perform what J
conceive to be my dui} ,? though I am
never again recognized by one ol !
t hose with whom I am accustomed to
associate. Out upon these aristocratic j
notions about work, imported from
lands where despotism grinds with j
its iron heel the laborer and his off- j
spring. What business have Ameri
caps harboring such ideas. '? It is =->}
aim to make of B^?le an independent
self-reliant woman. As to marriage.
1 am not at all concerned about thai
The loan who would scorn her haw]
because that hand was abie to earn
fair possessor's support, I would scorn
to receive into my family. It is my
desire that she may grow up a noble
useful woman, fitted lo reign a very
queen in the hearts of husband and
children, should heaven bestow, sueh
priceless gifts upon lier. At tb* ?ami
time. I want her character tobes,
symmetrical thur should she nevei
xu^.'i one who appreciated her, sb.
may cheerfully lill up this great v?id
iii ber life by devoting herself io
collie /.obie pursuit. I think parente
Commit a grave- error in not practi
cally educating ?ieir daughters as
weil as their ions. In it, and not ii.
legislation, may be found the solution
io the vexed question tba;. i? now agi
tating our sex ali over the land, and
breaking ont in dicion ten ced iain
mufings everywhere."
" 0, it is ali very well for people
io work whos- necessities requite ii,
?said Mrs. Ellis ; " ont .Celie i.- yous
only 'child, and will inherit youi
large fortune. '.VLtiit need has the
to work ?' '
. 41 Because ?h-v will be happier il,
she is usefully employed. Beaides.
the wheel ol' fortune is a revolving
one, and thougn to-day we may Oe
rolling in luxury, to-morrow may
find us.cru-mcd beneath the Jugger
naut ul l?i.'ii lune. Listen while i
briefly ?el?tc cae story of my early
womanhood. I would I might write
it as with ? pen of fire upon the brain
ol every mother in the land ! Oh, I
cannot tell you what, an intense in
trest I feel in the young girls grow
i?g up around me. My heart yearns
to urge them to make a specialty o't
whatever their inclinations promt,
them most to do, and then concentrate
every effort upon that one pursue
until they can excel in it. Bot to
my story : I was the daughter ol
wealthy parents, the y ) ingest child
by several years, and, of course, H
great pet. Of au extremely delicate*
organization, my kind and indulgent
mother shielded me from every hard
ship, and I grew into womanhood a |
l ovice in the art of honsekeepiug.
Fr-. tu a child I was passionately fond
of :< ixding, and at school excelled in
all mv si?uira. Pleased with the
progress I made, and proud of my,
z::~"-~
attainments, parente and te;l
Urged me forward, stimulating
ambition with words of encou
ment, until, at the immature a
18, I graduated, the most bril
girl in M:idam B-'s school,
' carrying off, amid the plaudi
! friends and acinainranoes, theb<
' of mv ola cs But ?In?! Twa
perficial in many things, for wh
had been easy for me to comrai
.lessons, I found it equally eas
mp to fcrgpt them Keenly"^
feel this dpfact. and. in order to
fpcf myself. . T wished, after? lea
school, to teach but so bitterly
mv narents n-pr-ncp this that I yie
fo #hpi*T* wich nc. and retrirnpd h
T "olnnppd into n round of ea
and arfiu<5pmpnt. and from this T
of excitement T pmnr^ed thp hri<
one whom mv friends, did not
upon with favor. The young,
waspn emplovpe in awholosalp h
in the City of N. He WSR poor,
possessed a well-cultivated ir
Unfortunately, howpver. hp hai
chosan trndp or avocation. Idle
had made mp a dreamy visionary
ins. and there was a. ?ort of ch
ahoiif hpginninff lifn in poverty,
would hp so di->l'M?*-fn! to foil i
:!id for hi^n T lov^d ?o fondlv. '
is all Vf ry 00.1 nti ful in theory,
in practice also, wh^re there are
?'ronp hnnds kn ppr^brm the lal
but close application tn rh? dpok.
V-tjvnrViins" the unwho1.-corop <?irv
hud. serionnlv imn'i!-<,d my hucha'
health. We had married at a t
when neither was ctrong enoug?i
battle with the stern "realities of
Dependence upon "hp ?al try o
clerk or bookkeeppr in a lirge it
very precarious for a family It
a year of unprecedented hard tir
necessitating great economy in b
ness. Hundreds lost their sitnath
and my husband among the rest. 2
then began that vain search for i
ployment. For every vacancy th
'were Bcores of applier nts, and ;
invariably received the answer, " t
sons of experience wanted." Oh
can n?vor forget that weary trai
.P and down the streets, jostled
a crowd s cold and heartless aa
?viv s* ji.es under one's feet. I
vied even the ?er\*ant girls ;-b
alas! the mysteries of the cuis
were as Greek to me, and I dared ;
apply for so menial a situation
theirs. ' My poor husband was
wretched health, and almost frenzi
at the thought of the misery and d'
radatiou he had brought upon hi
For his sake 1 hid my aching he
i tiehind a smiling face. One nil
after he had retired, -in hanging
! his coat, a vial dropped from I
1 pocket ricking it up, I found
labeled ' Laudanum,1 and then I kn
that he was beset with the terril
temptation to take his own life. F?r
tug the vile drug into the street,
sank down on my k ee-, and 1 O i
God ! lead him not into temptatii
but deliver him Iroia evil,' was t
prayer that went up from my agoniz
ueart. liow desolate I felt. In t
midst of a great city, friendless, we
nigh peuuiless, and, worst of a
haunted with the dreadful lear tb
my husband would commit suicic
From the time we would separate
the morning untii we fiiet again
night I lived in u state of absolu
torture. At length, despairing
finding* anything in the city tod
.ve turned our laces countrvwar
feeling that ourslender stock of mon?
ii'ould 1 ;.st longer ;nan in town. Air?
:imy weeks-ol painful anxiety, w
? u= band found H situatiou in a sina
i?.igp. willi just sai?ry. enough l
keep the woi:: from t; e door. Ho
I longed to >k> : -i'ueiuiug to betti
j oiy: condition ; Lilt, alas! what cou!
! 1 do ? I might have had a tine mtisi
class in the village but while I piaye
aid Hang very -wed. I was not prof
?jelit. enougii ill music lu teaci. it SIU
cssfuliy. Oh, i.ow I wished J hit
i given Hie time tu u i bad
I French and Latin. Ni any an h^:.
lol hard study had 1. given thos
omiiciitar, and what practical Hil v uh
j .age bad they been to inc ? i nev?
! lUet any French people with waoiu .
I uuitid converse, and Uad never bee?
. lOie ?o secure a class ia either lau
?uage, while ali tue whue my knowi
e*jg?. was befouling rusty oy non hie
it l? pammi to recur io tins periot
j ul my lile; i Si'as so unhappy, J
I u?pci'l* ^ ev ttj duj to '?.e ia.i'Ui^
Ua?Uiilttl uid Oe .lOie Cy attend U
usiue >. Finally, driven lodespeia
.jil o) uur iiii?lui times, i. l?auiveu LC
? ?'? KOIU&IJIt,? or die in tue attetup
j .I'tlacbed (.^ibe nOU?e We OueUUleu
was a large lil ior gafdeuing pur
poses, und ? luaue up my mind tiiui
out- o? that bit oi^eaitn i would Ui?
our fortunes or, au least, a living witL
. juy own h:? ods. 1 made horticulture
a d flor'culture a s'uily, and brushed
ip my knowledge ol chemistry, it
.vutrJjturd work and small profits the
first y**ar; but having once put in*
hand to l?e plow, i never turned
: back, fur t?tde vv?.? lou ii?i?tly sup
plied w::)j tri>l? vegetable- "mi ?ruits,
and what wa? better, my step bad
grown elastic, ray- vye bright, and
my cheek rounded wiiL health, My
ku.-band, too, found many a spare
m"??ent from basiufse.to assist me,
nd in doing so found himself grow
ing strong and well again. Oh, bow
iiiippy we were1 ..ur*-iy there isa
ligmty iu labor unknown to ease !
How proud f felt when I received
I the returns from my first shipment ot
vegetables to the nearest market 1 I
counted it over and over^ it
seemed to possess a value that had
never attached to money in the old
.lays when father had lavished it so
freely Upon me. Then I would have
?thought nothing of spending such a
palrry'pum upon the trimmings of a
?ingle.dress; now every penny was
hoarded with a miserly care, for we
had resolved upon having a home of
our own. Well, io be bna?? ?ach
year 1 aitempted something :
first a poultry-yard, then the
of bees, and so on-until, bef
were hardly aware of it, our
was paid for, and wein easy c
stances.
" I had carefully concealed
trace of our adversity from i
rents. I think I would havt
rather than have gone home
gar. Now that the dawn ol
perity had set in, I wrote,
them to come and see the little i
haired girl that, like a sur
danced through our home,
came. Father accustomed t
broad acres, was astonished :
products of my small plot of g:
He declared I was the best farr
knew of, and should have g
scope for my powers. He hoi
fine large tract of land adjoinii
ground*, that happened to be fe
just then, and made me a deed
This is the origin of the countr
you visited la-1 Summer*, and ad
so rani'h. Belle is y une horti
instand an*ac*complisbed housek
Should s e ever he thrown upc
own resources in the country
could make a living, and I wis
to be Equally as independent in
We came to town to superi ten
education. She thinks her fo
journalism, and desires, in ad?
to this, to become a practical pr
And now. can you wonder,
Ellis/after my experience, that
trying to haye'her avoid tire *
that WP!1 nigh mude mj young
failure ?"
" No. indeed. Mrs. N?QH n
honor vou for it. T have been ?
ly benefited by the narration of
?arly troubles, ami I think yon
soe the result of it in tb* fi
training of my own daughters.".
From the Banner of the South and I
ere' Journal.
Curing Pea Vines
Pea vine hay should be cnn
'such a manner as to preserve, o
tain the leaves on the vines as f
possible. If dried in the sitn,
leaves drop off .ind are lost. \\
cm vd in the shade with a fre>-. ci
lat'nn of air, the leaves Will rei
on toe vines, unless the viues are
turing fruit, in which stage we
it impossible so to cure them
save the leaves.
A very common and a satisfac
plan of curing, . is to stack the vi
as soon as wilted a little, aroui
tree top, or brush-stack, as it is cal
The leaves ?nd twigs are trimi
from a tree top, or a sapling, the c
of the branches cut off, leaving
arms on, and through which thev:
are arranged. The sapling mus
course be stuck firmly in the gro
so as not to fall down or be blt
down by the wind. The vines she
be placed in good shapely* stacks,
as to shed water.
The rail pen plan is also a g
one. Build the pen two rails hi
and throw across it a flooring of ra
build up four or five rails higher, ?
then fill up with the fresh vines ; tl
lay another nooning, build up *
fill in as before, and so continue
the pen is ten or twelve feet hi
when it uiusr. be roofed over lik
shuck pen, for protection.
By either* ot these methods, f
circula ihn ol' air is secured, wilie!
necessary, while only the -outside
the pile or'stack is exposed to I
sun.
Another method we fiu'l detail
in an old journal is as lui lows,
the first place procure *ix pos s, (gre
pine poles ?viii answer,) eigut h
Jong; bore in each post, with at'
inch auger, three hole? two feet apai
beginning with th? fii-st hole, tv
feet from the lower ground end
each post; insert ill ;he boles pill
?.ne toot long mid- ol hickory
tx.er - : ? ' Wnud ; ?:,V. vt? ??e YtOi
hifl.*? . ?vlig i<y '..ni >. ;< Th
will ^ivvv'iirree po* m .. '?inc
.ii': -t.. k ... .i di l'aient illjo, li.tr
i et apart one way by lour ?eet tl
titer ;adig tii<? na]es-two feet de>*j
'lldp'ltUlig 111 the pu.<l?, Illili il
pines io Lhe inside. Next proem
wei ve poles six tech feet long, med
am siz-, piaoe lour ol' the nules ?.
'the lower row ol pines, two o?.
side, hipped at lite centre pOSt>. J ii
stack is then ready lor the hrsc ; ?y?
of vines-coinim-nce slacking b
grasping the roo' ? >.'l ol as UI?HI;
trines ud a man eau i. -.mlle with boti
Hands, throwing liie uni s nero..* bot]
pule:, il long enough to extend, leav
ing-about cue loot ol' vines ut tin
rooted, outbide the poi.es; m thi.
way pass up and down on one sid?
and then .on the other of the stack
ll the vines arc not long enough ti
reach across from one pole to thi
other, it makes no difference, its th*
space wili soon fill up as the stacking
pr igresses. When the space between
the first and second row ol pines i
well filled, lay. up four otherside
poles as in the hist instance, being
careful to keep the outside of the
stack perpendicular, with the 'obiter
end ol' the vines about one loot out
side of the poles.
.In pulling Up the vines and i;. car
rying them to the stacie, care should
be taken to keep the roots compact
and even. After filling lo the thud
row .o? .pines and placing the last
I poles, continue the stack in the same
j manner until nearly completed, when
it wiil be necessary for the stacker to
get on top, and give it a rounding
shape so as to throw off water. .
Green pea vines stacked in this
mariner will keep perfectly sound
and sweet in the open field, until
after the gathering of corn and make
hay far superior to any grass ever
mown North, East, or West.
.. -, ?
It is said we have great bodies of
waste swamp and pine lands. Il
theBe were in Illinois, would they be
waste? The pine land.- v uki be
alive with saw-ai??, and whuu the i
tirab?r was cut o?F they wou
white with sheep. The oak, asl
gum of the swamps would find
way to Europe to supply the def
cy of walnut and mahogany, an
swamps, embanked and dra
would be converted into mea
finer than Illinois can now boast
It is not soil, climate, prodin
markets in which we are defii
but in capital and population.
And how did Illinois get'her ]
lation and capital ? By imuaign
But yesterday her territory w
wilderness-to-day she ia a j
State. And how did she secur
migration ? By creating foreign t
cies, by flooding Enrope Tvith t
and pamphlets illustrating her rei
ces, by devoting herself tn imm
tion as the paramount interest ol
land-holders.
And if Georgia would gain
same results, she must adopt the s
measures. It is a subject of
. gratulation that this .vital subj
again attracting the. attention nf
Legislature. By gua ranted-,
rect steam lino to Europe, by cr"
a. Bureau of immigration, *vr *t
lishing proper Immigrant ! 'KLUL
offering inducements to foreign c
tal by temporary but liber j .
tion of taxes, by causing ?uch pi
entions {o be diffused in F.urop
will not only refute slander, bat
velop our opportunities of favor
investment, they will mai tl wi
sion memorable in thp hi*tor\
Georgia.-C. W. H. in The Pla
tion.
-iiwing (;ras.
Mr. Chas L. Flint, the we"' i. ?i
writer on grasses, advocat ; tl
seeding alone, and generally la ti
the summer or fall,' and asserts :
1st. That early fall Seeding w
out grain should .be adopted in pi
tice in preference to seeding in spri
j 2d. That, as a general rule, i
j poor economy to take any grain c
! either with or immedi tely j.roce 1
the seeding down to grass. That
grass being the ultimate and pay
crop, it is bad practice to reduc ..
land by the draft which a grain c:
makes upon it.
3d. That wherever from any 1o
reason it becomes." desirable to tak
crop of spring'grain, it is more P
nomical.to sow the grain aloneju.!
spring, and to plow up the stub
aud sow the grass seed alone in 1
early fall.
4th. That in case3 where it see
desirable to sow grass seed in'april
it is better to BOW it alone and let
[take its chances, without compclli
it to struggle for existence under t
disadvantages of a grain or any ott
crop.
5th That in seeding d- wu in A
gust or early in September, we i
hollowing nature as to time, awl ".
unless the ground ?6 already ric!, ?ii
in high cpndition, it is necessary
give the eeed the benefit of au a
plication of manure on or near t
surface to which the seed is applie
6th. That in the selection of seed f
mowing lets and hay, we shou
choose varieties to mix, that blosso
a! or nearly at the same time, ar
not mix very early and very late v
rieties together.
These propositions are clear -t.
pasily understood. I be?eva .: ...
adaption and# application : prn?r<
upon every farm in Maw i >..
would largely increpe th
hay crop and materi.viv 1 . PI
prosperity of our agricultor".
I Oxen on th*1 ?&m.
A correspondent o'' tb- G rm:
town Telegraph gifrcs, lineup ott
reasons why oxen Buotiid be ?'??d n
the farm in place of horses, .ha foi
.lowing :
Many iuiall farmers try to i
:beir land with one ':'-." ? le'.
i;i depth isall in i
. ivlfui '-i manure i.- hu! :~
[.v ri i** il w hew th"i" mit
ul .?? bushel : tl- . .!i
clop? made wi f h but lilli'-- cai li
cultivation nf.the sum?is 1 --t -
great expense for want of exp^riaieii
: 1 Knowledge, and ljei:"j ;.>.?
against biking ?dvi'je -t:.ce*aiu
larmer?. Gu the majority A far:u
:n wy immediate vicinity moru ? L.t:<
t third of the expense is worn !?
wasted. A pair oi oxen will ploug
as much in a day and follow it as .-.
pair of horses and jhe cos? is bm
fifty pet cent, of horses. A boy ot
fourteen can handle the oxen and the
plough with more-ease and pleasure
than a man can with his span of
li orees.
He thinks that 'thc managers of
our ucrieultural fairs should give th**
work-ox. more attention. Ile suva
that while large premiums are being
unid lor thc different breeds of hor
re?, ranne for draught, some foi gen
ii: uieu'< use and some' for 'In- rice
course, and large premiums ior fan- y
ii?-, and for overgrown Cow li?, the
ux is been ovorlooked. ' " Tin.? ox is
capable of being improve'"; une Knv-,
drud per cent. Then a';,iy wi.i n
average capacity can ern . 1 '
lather or employer a much i ;:r :
sum than a hireling mau who w..-c
the hours instead of ilia enirloyt'i
interest." Were large premiums <.f
lered tor the best trained ox, lie t!iini<s
we should soon see them used on the
lund at least two to one of the horse
THE POLE CAT.-:This is the way
Josh Billings talks.
My friends did-you ever examine
the fragrant pale .cat clusly ?
I guess not; they are o kritter thai
won't bear examining with a nr TI >? ?
scope.
They are butiful beings. ' ii v
deceptive.
Their, habits are phew, bn< .p\f\ 'e
They bild their houses out ol'. ..<..'.,
and their houses have but one di?r
tew them and that iz a ir:>.,i d or. .
When they enter their nou.-."? t' "v
don't shnt the doer ?if er them I (
They are called pole cuts i?*ki?U8tj j
it iz not convenient to kill luUu ?uh j
aklub, but,a poje, and the lo.ngervthe
pole the more convenient.
Writers on natural history disagree
about the right length ov the pole
tew be used, but. I would suggest
that the pole be about 395 feet,, es
peshily if the wind iz in favor of the
pole cat.
? have kaught skunks in a trap.
They ar enzier tew git into a trap
than tew git out ov it.
1i taking them ont of the trap
great judgment mus be had not tew
shake them up ; the more yu shake
them up the mora ambrosial they be
kum.
One pole cat in a township is enuff,
espeshily if the wind changes o?ce
in awhile.
A pole fat's skin iz wuth two dol
lars in market, afterit iz skinned, but
it iz wuth three dollars and fifty cents
tew skin him. ?. ?
This iz one way to make 12 shill
ings on a Wf| day.
T?e Absurdity of lt..
It is* all verv well for the poets to tell.
By way of their songs adorning,
.>f milkmaids who rouse to manipulate
COWS, ;
A t fi\ve o'clock in the morning ;
Arid f- moony young mowers, who bun
dle out of" doors
Tit'..'charms of their straw-bods scorn
ing
Bet'T" br?:ik of day? to make love and hay,
At /ive o clock in the morning !
Bot, between meand you, it'sall untrhc
?V?lfev< nor n w?rd they utter;
r i "vt milkmaid alive does the linger of |
. Fi VP
Brin - H aux-or even bring batter,
{"h? p'?or sleepy cows, if told to arouse,
Would di. HO, pprhaps, in ;i horuiu" ;
But th* hweet country giris, would they
show their curls
At live o'clek in themorning?
lt may not be wrong for the man 'in thc
S..11H- '..
Or . moon-if anxious to settle,
To kneel -<n wet grass, and pop, but alas!
TV. . it if !io popped down on a nettle ?
Tor what could he soe What was under
A lift knee >
Ay in ?;-ite of my. friendly warning,
FjKvont out of bed, and his house and
bend
At live o'clock in the morning?
Ic ia ?Ul very well such stories to tell,
But it I were a maid all forlorn-ing
And a lover ?ho?ld drop in the clover io
pop;
At liv?; o'clock in tho morning;
If I liked him, you see, I'd say,"please
call at three;"
If not, Pd turn on him with scorning ;
" Don't.come hore, you flat, with conun
i drums like that,
At five O'clock in the morning."
Fresh Arrivals
.OF
BACON, CO H NJ
FLOUR, &c.
50 HHDS. C R. Bac?n Sides. ' I
50 '? " Shoulders'.'
50 " D.S. Sides.
50- " *' Shoulders.
25 Casks Hams.
10,000 Bushels Corn.
50 Boxes D. S. shoulders.
50 " .* C. lt. Sides.
500 Barrels Flour, different grade?.
i5? Tn I is Lard.
"j Tierces Lard.
5' <1h?AU TVA, duty off.
15U . -?vrels Molasses.
100 HU- .???/>.. ?',
20 Barrels Amber Drip Syrup.
20 " Si'ver " ""
50 ." . Golden .
50-HLids. Deuiarara Sugar.
25 " P. R.
100 Barrels Ex. C.
50 " A
25 " Crashed and Powdered
Sugar.
100 *; Yeliow Sugar.
100 Bags Kio CohV.
50 Pockets Java Coffee, to'besold
low, d'i?y '.vjtl soon be eli"
200 Gti??? l'icli?u.-1. si/es?.
' 50' Gross Milichos.
.. ''0 (loxes Unidles.
\'j ) '* No. 1 *":u?t|?.
i o') ' Pule 4
ioO .. Starch.
!5? Suda,
iOO Ji- ;v; Bud e;*.
2v?0 i? roo i us.
50 lio:. iuljjvjco i! prudes. ' .
1 ' '.'.? ? .lu" Tob':!'
.-?tl :v[ Jh.'i:!?..< Dickens Segura
20 . Georgia Chi. r's
IO/1 Our Cuoit.-e '.
20 ' various gradea . "
ld B u re?a ifcikir Whisky.
'15 " Corn *. cop
. j er (ii>?:lic!.
. .? '.? tibis. Ryeand Bourbon Whis
ky, var.piw grades.
50 i . --es Schnapps. ,
15 Quarter Casks Sherry, Pori
M uhira Wines,
10 hligib Cask- Imported Brandy.
5 Pipes Holland Gin.
25 C.,.?k* Porter.
25 " Ale;
WITH A FIL1
Ol' all other Goods,, too numerous to
mention, but usually found in a first
class Grocery --tore.
For sale by
; M. 0'DOWD & co.
June 25, tf 27
PLATT
Are continually receiving
LARGE AND COMPLETE STOCK?
-O f
Acvv Furniture !
Comprising all tho
LATEST STTJLES ANO PATTERN
-Of
Par.p?, Chamber, 0inki(j Room
And
WTiqg '. FtaiVlTrRE s
Flt?M Tl PK HIGHEST GRADE
TO THE LOWEST.
S.?K? sehsli^'.f; every article of PURNI
. UiiE .rui|i>'..,..i to furnish ?.House ur
utiice complete.
Call and examine nt our Ware'.Rooms.
Undertaking' !
Always on hand, at'tho lowest prices,
UeautifBi i a-kcis and lases,
Of our own manufacture..
rnvrr BBOTHEBS,
: 21iiand 214 Broad'Strecl,
AUGUSTA, GA.
July 2 ly 28
ror Slicrifi*.
Al tho solicitation of many friends I
.espeet'ully offer myself as a Candidate
ror tho omeo of Sheriff of Edgeliold
2ouniy (uyihe approaching election, and
:' elected :>lcdgo myself to perform the
hide's of th? oflko without fear or favor.
, FRANK HOWARD.
A.Jgl . tt &
Hew Goods for Summer
. , BL L ?. BAL .
Wholesale daft Be tail Dealer in
ITS Broad Street, Aiigiasta, Ga.
HAVING again returned from New York I have now in ^lor? a handsome
selection of ail the
NOVELTIES OF THE SEASON!
In ?0RESS GOODS, PERCALES, PIQUES, LAWNS, MUSLINS,
PRINTS, I have the choice ?d' all the new styles in "-Dully Var lens,''
." Maryposa.'' " Yoserni'^s," &c, &c.
N*EW CA-SIMERF.S. SKILLS. JEANS, COTTONAD?Si &c.
. All tin? new stvler. iii PARASOLS ar? fairly represented, '
SASH RIBBONE in all coloi-s,'Embroidered, Plaid and Plain,
New TRIMMING RIBBONS, TRIMMINGS and BUTTONS'/' .
New Styles of S TR VW ii ATS for Ladies, Misses, Gens and Boys, of the
latest, shape in Regatta, Gazelle, May Flower, School, Lacea, Hurdle, Har
vest, Franconia, &c.
A full assortment of SHOES' fresh from the Factory,
The latest fashions in READY MADE CLOTHING, &c.
All of which I have manked so lbw as to secure QUICK SALES,-to'
m ike you laugh in* your sh ep .and dream of good living. .
?l. L..A. BALK,
. I7?r Broad Street, Augusta,. Qa.
May8 ' 2m 20
tf??RE YOUR LIFE
IN THE
Brooklyn Life Insurance Co.
Of New York.
Cash Capital and Assets, Over $2.000,000.
1. Because it is acknowledged to be perfectly solvent by all Insurance
Commissioners.
2. Because it is the cheapest. '? ? \. .. " ;.
3v Because it endorses the Surrender. Vahic on its-Pelicies, in Dollars
and Ce??s, for' ten consecutive years,
According to the statement of the rates of the different Life Insurance
Companies of ?rtt-class standing iu the United States, made by "The .Uni
versal," in its advertisement entitled " Pacts arc Stubborn Things,'' and
published in 'the Bdgeficld Advertise)', ii appears that the Mutual Rates
of the Brooklyn are Cheaper than those of any named Company.
For instance, according to that statement:
lc thu Bjo?Vlyo
" " ?quitable.
j At tbe aire of 20: At the age of 30
?150 ?2(J0
I Will Insure ? Will Insure
At the ai;e of 40
, ?250
Will Insure
Balance In favor of the Brooklyn
In the Brooklyn..*..
" " Piedmont & Arlington.
Balance in favor of the Brooklyn.!
In the Ilrooklvn.
?. " New York Life.
Balance in favor of tha Brooklyn.!
.In the Brooklyn.v.....
" " Carolina.Jaie.
Balance in favor of the Brooklyn.
In the Brooklyn.
" " yEtna.
Balance in favor of tho Brooklyn..
tn the Brno! lyu.
" " Cot'on SU?e?.
Balance in favor ot -the Brooklyn,.!
In the Brooklyn.....:.
M " Sfc'LotuVMuaml.
Balance in favor of the Brooklyn
In ?he Brooklyn....'.,
" " Southern Life.
Balance in favor of the Brooklyn.
In the Brooklyn.
" '* Knickerhockei
Balance in favoi il die Brooklyn,
$8,875 73i
' 7,541 47?
$1,3*1 2rf'
88.875 43
S, I.-.5. J?;
>;.. 27'
Tfii 47j
s;..a*!
.38.875 :;'
?.503 4l|
? '72 32?
?8,875 7:?
1 ?8,420 9fl
?44S 77
?8,875 73
6,453 .'!)
. ?120 27 j
88,875 7*1
8w41 86
m ?T?
83,875 73
8,015 73
?:r>o '00'
88,875 73
8,005 50
?210 23!
8y,25o-eo(
8,810 57
?140 12
89,250 09?
s.Fio r?7j
34-l't 12!
33,250 w.
^,bl0 OOj
.8440 cor
$9,250 (?0?
S.841
$408 90
?5,250 09
8,798 94
$151 75
?0,259 ti!':
8,810 57l
?140 12
89/2.50 69?
??41 73i
?0,250 60
8,877 55
?373 14
I
39.250 09
8,1*39 30
.?011 39,
? 88,389 27
7,9li7 2
8402 05
88,389 27
' 7,987 22
. *402 05
88.388 S!
7,937 22
8402 OS
?a,;.-?''
7,010 40
$8,3*.' 27
8,10- '1'
$2S] 17
$3.3$fl 27
7.0S7 22
?40- '. i
?8,380 _
7,91* ?i;
S472 ?
?8,33.:> 27
7,930 50
?152 77
?3,389 27
7,859 10
8530 17
In the Brooklyn.
In the Univorsal
STOCK RA.TES.
At tho ajro.of 30,
?200 will insure
. SI 1.750 00
.v. li,.7J(J Ol
At the age of 4'*),
8250 will Ins uro
.8*0,051 00
10.200 90
8385 (?0
Bal. in favor ol' tho Brooklyn ut stock rates ?::5:'. 90
The greatly advantageous feature of the Brooklyn in endorsing the Sur
render Values upon its Policies, tn Doll irs and Cent--, for ten consecutive
yaws, has met with unqualified praise from thc most celebrated Anieriqan
Actuaries, as also from the Press, East, North and South.
The H"n EUzur Wright, who is admitted to be the greate* : Insurance
Matliimatit-'ian and Actuary in America, congratulating The Brooklyn
!?jxn: Mi i new and distinctive feature, says, among other things, "I am
pat Mehl arly ;.'.' -<i by your departure in the right direction from the j
mJinury- mct/iod of computing thc Smrreiuh?' Values." "Ono of the great
est drawbacks to the popularity of Life Insurance, has been thc disap
pointment and dissatisfaction of retiring Pqlicy holders, at the smallness
of thc surrender value paid," &o. "AU this would have be?n prevented
hy *a distinct nUUcment on Ute Bolicy. in adoance, of the sum to bc paid."
This statement, it will be .seen, The Brooklyn makes in dolla/s and
'.cuts, so that there can be no mistake. . * .
Reart Wliai ftoutfteru Papers say of ? ?ifs Peat ?re :
The Sentinel, (Haleigh, Nb-rlh Carolina,) Jan; Si, ISO'J.-"This^rea
f?uturc of cash surrender values is KU 'improvement I hat'signalizes the er
in Lite Jtisurance."
Sun, (Cohimhns, Georgia.)-"There i.- no Letter Company in i lie land
a comparison with other corporations of a similar character, will convince
all of the SMperior safety in laking risks with Thc Brooklyn Life."
J ispatch, {St. Louis, JA?..) Jan. 7, 1S69.-" A Policy 111 The Brooklyn
Life is thus "wo ri li so much in -ready money. This is the only Life Chm
puny in the country that hus curried (his excellent feature (ol endorsing
the cash sun ender values in: doli? rs and cents,) into its business." "Foi
icy holders beitlg donLly' 0-sured, the system cannot fail 10 become very
popular."
It will be seen that we assert nothing in'tito above, adverlir??ient, bul
make a simule statement of the superior advantages of Thc Brooklyn, as if
appears from ?isinfefested parties.
The Hon. M. L. Bonham lias bein associated with us in the General
Agency of The Brooklyn for this Sr,te. . .
m\U% B?C0S & BUTLER,
General Agents and Managers.
.Qfiice over the Citizens' Savings Bank, Coinmbja, 8. C.,
And at ?dfiefie?d S. C. March 20tf
Strange,
tim
Twenty Genf J or: the
SAVED BY PURCHASING HEY GOODS FROM
Hi
i&2
QF AUGUSTA, GA.,
INHERE the BEST VARIETY and QUALITY OF GOODS in the
'ity arc to be found. And where .ve ry thing, from a ?Spool of Thread to
the finest Silk Dress, may be purchased'
Ohe p^r Than in any Other House in the City.
Sent d-wn EVERY WEEK hy Old Man CHRISTOPER from New
?"ork. This Week, for instance,- ' .
1500 yards S riped and Chene BARAGE are offered at 5 cts. per yard.
2500 yards Striped JAP. POPLIN, at ?$J cts per yard.;
3000 yards Plain JAP. POPLIN, at 15 cts. pecyard.
1200 Honey Comb QUILTS at $1 each.
Star-Write Jor Samples and.Quotations of Price?,.to '
CHRISTOPHER G&AY & CO.
Aag?i?rA, April 17 Sm 17
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
BOOKS, STATIONERY, MUSIC,
A. N" 13 P TC GR I O D.I C A lu S,
l$'? BROAD STREET, AUGUSTA. GEORGIA.
Manufacturers' Agent pud Wholesale Dealer in all kinds of Blank'Books,
for Mercantile use, including Ledgers; Journals, Day. Books, Records/Pasa
Books, Memorandum Books, Time Bodies, Drawing and Scrap Boolrs; Auto-.
graph'Books, Copy, Cyphering and Exercise Boo?s, for School use, &C.,<S?C.
. The Writing Paper?,'including Cap, Letter and Note, American,
English and French, Ruled and Plain, Stamped and Unstamped.
The stock- of Einvelope? embraces Letter, Note, .and -Official sizes,'of
all colors and qualities, besides a full line" of General Stationery, including
all the innumerable minor items for use in the Counting Room. W
Also, many article's that would be appropriately designated as Fancy Sta
tionery. .. . .
. In . the Book Department, will be found: the Standard.Text Books for Schools
and Colleges,.-Dictionaries, Bibles and Prayer Books, Music Books,, ?nd a
large assortment of Juvenile and Toy Books, and a-well selected stock in
General Literature.
In the-Miscellaneous Stock,'in which we deal, we can offer to tuyers as
favorable -terms as any estabiishmentin the trade. :
A'new Price List will soon be issued, which will .enable purchasers to 4
make selections and order by mail,-if desired. Such orders will? receive
prompt and careful attention, since the most thorough system marks th a
mode of doing business in this establishment.
Augusta, April 3ri872-15m3
H. W. ADDISON,
LAWYER.
LAW RANGE, EUGEFIELD, C. H.
Brick Office, formerly office of Mo
ragne <fc A.ddisoii. . .
Jan. 1, . . ly . 2
Law Notice.
THE undersigned have formed a Co
partnership forth* PRACTICE OF RAW
in Midfield County, and the Counties of
the Fifth Circuit, under the name and
style.of MAGRATH d' ABNEY.
They Will alsc Practice in the Courts of
Trial Justices for these Counties.
THOMAS P. MAGRATH,
JOHN R. ABNEY.
Edge'field, Dee. 13, tf 61
~--r-1 --y
JOHN E. BACON; JEFF. D. TALBERT.
. BACON & TALBERT,
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW,
Will practice in Edge?eld and adjoining
Counties. * .
Edgefield C. H., Apr 2 t5ml5
M. L. BONHAM. It. G. BONHAM.
BONfflAM Sc BONHAiH,
Attorneys .at Law,
Office, at Edgefield C. ?, S. C.
Jan 24 tf 5
~W. H.. SHAFFER,
Dentist,
HAVING located' at Edgefield offers
his Professional Services to thc cit
izens and sur/ounding country. Office at
thc laie residence of S. S. Tompkins, Esq.
. Feb 28. tf 18
Refreshing Soda Water!
Thc t/i ji' s Pmigft It!
Tim Gentleman Like li ?
EvcrybjSly Drinks It i
My S?por . .50011 !'.;ujt is now in fol!
? ?lust, atid otana.- ready at all hours ot
day to furnish customers with de
Rightful Arctic SODA WATER, flavored
,vith the best and purest SYRUPS.
Prompt attention given to every one.
A. A. CLDiBY.
May 22 tf 22
Vinegar! Vinegar!
IT is au impossibility to make GOOD
PICKLES without theusoof GOOD VIN
EG AR. All persons in want of.stteh an
article eau lind it at the Drug Store ol'
A A. CLISBY.
Ho hus inst' received Two Barrels
Wiiite WINE and Pure CIDER VINE
GAB.
Also, a fresh assortment of Pickling I
SPICES of all kinds.
Juno 12 . tf 25
The Chicago Farm Stoups |
* * -ASP
Patent Poreduin-t?ncd Iron Cylinder Pumps
For CNtcrns and Weils of any Depth.
? -/mm mt
Aie Chesp, Durable and Efficient
OVETt ^,000 SOLD.
EVERY PUMP WARft ANTED. .
Any Person Can Set Them.
Sold everywhere by dealers in Stand
vrd Farm Machinery, Hardware'and
Plantation Supplies.
Descriptivo Catalogues sont on appli
cation. 'For terms, address the manu
acturors. .
J. F. TEMPLE & SONS.
CHICAGO, III.
May 15 ' 3m 21
W03^ .SOUTHERN
MONTHLY MAGAZINE,
" .' ito? DoBara per Annum.
64 PAGES REAWNG MATTER.
30 PAGES ADVERTISEMENTS.
WALKER, EVANS & COGSWELL, tr
D. WYATT AtKEBT,
CHABLE8TON.S. C,
B. M. TALBERT, Agent ut ?Ugencld
Spurt House, S. C.
^arch? ly*ll \l
es
Jtfy Soda Fount
|S opened for tho -Season. To all who
1 will patronize my Fount I promise
food and puro SODA WATER, as cold
is icc. My SYRUPS shall be of .the
hoicest kinds. A liberal patronago so
icited. W. A. SANDERS.
MayS, tf 20
Gin Repairing !
rar- E are now,ready to Overhaul and
FY Repair all kinds of Cotton'Gins
at short notice, and at "reasonable rate*.,
W. GASTON & SON,
Ridgo Spring, S. O, June 12 ii 25
j Special- Notiecs.
BM WAYS'BEADY BELIEF
CL HKS THE WORST PAWS ,
In from One to Twenty Minutes.
-NOT ONE HOUR
Aller reading this advertisement need any one
SUFFEE "WITH PAIN. *
BADWAVS BEADY BELIEF IS A CUBE FOB '
EVEEY l'Ai?.
It wa? the fut aad Ia UM
Only Pain Remecty
Thatlnsunlly itope the most excruciating pt ina, al
lays Infjunmations, and eurea Congestions, wte lier
of thc: Lungs, Stomach,'Bowel?, or other glands or
organs, by one application.
IN FEOM ONE TO TWEHTY MIN UTE8,
No matter how violent 'or- excruciating the pain tho
BUEUMAT1C, Bed-rlddet., Iiifinurcrlppled, Ner
vous, Neuralgic, or prostrated wtih diaeas? may suffer,
RAD WA Y'S READY RELIEF
WILL AFFOBD INSTANT EASE; * >
INFLAMMATION OF THE KIDNEYS.
INFLAMMATION OF TBE ULADDEE.
INFLAMMATION OF TUE BOWELS.
CONGESTION OF THE LUNGS.
SOLE TI1E0AT, Dli HCULT BBEATH1NG.J
PALPITATION OF THE "
UYSTEUICS,CEUCP, DIFTUEKIA. .
CATABBH, INFL?
HEADACHE. TOOTHACHE.
NEUEALQIA, BIIEUMAT15M
COLD CHILLS, AGUE CHILLS.
The application or the 'Heatly Relief to tho
part ur paru where th? pain or difficulty oxlrl* wil
afford ease ami comfort.
Twenty drops lu half a tumbler of water will in a
few mumeuu euro CBAMPS. SPASMS,- SOUB
STOMACH', DLABBHBA, 1) YS ENTEE Y, WIND
IN THE BOWELS, and all INTEBNAL PAINS.
Travelers should always carry ? bottle of It ad -
way?'? Mendy Urlief wlth.thcmJwcw drops
In water will prevent sickness ornaina from change
of .water, lt ls better than French Brandy or Bitten '
aa a stimulant. ? .
Pevor and Aguo. .
: FEVEE AND AGUE cured for fifiy cents. There"
Is nul a remtrdia! agent in Hi? worlo that will cure
Fwvor aud Agu?", and all ?Aber Malarious, Bilious,
Scarlet, Typhon:, Ytilo*. ?.-?1 ?i'.ttr Fevers (aided
by Eadwa)'s Pills,) so quick as UADWAVS BE
LIEF. Fihy cents per boult.
HEALTH F?E AU TY ! !
si'EONG AND PU UK ElCli BLcuD-INCUBASE
OF FLESH AN l> WEIGHY-< LEAKSK1N AND *
BEAUILFUL CUMPLEll.-N SECUKED TO
ALL t . -
DU. ?&A?WA\?
.Aa MAUL HIE MOST ASTONISH lN G - CUBES:
SOl?lUCiC, ?OrliM'ih ABE TUE CHANGES
TUE BOU? L'NDEUGoES. U?DEE TUB IN
FLUENCE OF HHS i ELLY WONDERFUL
MEDICINE 1 HAT
tVEilYjAY AN INCREASE IN FLESH
ANO WEIGHT IS SEEN ANO FELT.
THE G?EAT JBL??? PUfilFTEE!
Ecery drop oj the SASSPAKILLIAN BESOL
DEN'!' eo&MHtic?tU* through the Blood, Skeat,
Urine, and utUrjiuids and juices of ike system the
?ei-jor a/ life, for itrejxiirs the vastes of Vie body
mith new v. uu suu'id material, Scrgfula, Syphilis,
Gmiumption, O'taudular diseases, Ulcers tn the
'throat, MouVi, Tumors, ?'odes in- Vie Glands ansi
otker parts of the ?jstem, Hore Byes, 61 tumorous
diickargesfiom the Bars, und the tear st forms of
Skin distuKis, Bruj/ttons, Sever Sores, Soald Beau,
Hing Worm, ?ult iUieum, Bsysijttlas, Ache, Black .
S/Mits, Worms in Vf tlesli, litmors, Cancers in Ute
iVuinb, and nil ir.tukenltig und painful discharges,
Mg/tt Sweats, Lots of S/term antl all mutes of the
iijep. tneijtle, <ire witleia Vie curative rango of this
wander o/ Jindera Chemistry, and a few days'ute
will prove to any person using it for either qt these
orin* of disease its potent power to cure them.
If Un: patieut, dally becoming reduced by th e wsstos
and decomposition that Is continually progressing ,
succeeds iu arresting these wastes, and repairs Us
?::me wiUt new material made from healthy blood
and this the SA ESPA BILLIAN will ana does secure
-?caro is?ertaiu; for Wucn once this remedy com
mences Its work of purification, and succeeds In di
minishing the foss of wastes, its repairs will I: rapid,
sud every day Hie patient will feel himself growing
bcuer and stronger, the food digesting be. i;r, appe
tite Improving, and flesh and weight Increasing.
Not only does the SAR8AP*MI.I.ISH BDOLVKXT ex?
eel all known remedial agents In the cure of Chronic,
Scrofulous, Constitutional, and Skin diseases; but lt
is thu only positive cure for '
Kidney & Bladder Complaints,
Urinary, and Womb diseases, 'Gravel, I? abete*,
Dropsy. Stoppage of Water, Incontinence .of Urine.
?rlghrs Dlse-^se, Albuminuria, and in all oases where .
there ure brick-dust deposits, or the .water ia thick,
Blondy, mixed with substances like the white of aa
egg, or threads like white silk, or there la a morbid,
dark, bilious appearance, and white bone-dust de? -
posits, and wilta there is a pricking, burning seata
lion when passing water, and pain in the Small ot
the Back and along the Loins.
DR. HADWAY'S
Perfect Purgative Pills,
perfectly tasteless, cierran tty coated with sweet (rc rn,
|)urgc, regulate, purify, cleanse, and strengthen.
Itadway's Pills, for tho ?ure of all disorders el the
Stomach, Liver, Bowels, Kidneys, Bladder, Nervous
lisiases, Headache, Constipation, Costiveness, Indi
-cation. Dyspepsia, Bdiousuess, Bilious Fever, In
latnmalion^'f die Bowels, and si! Derangements or
he Internal Viscera. Warranted to effect a positive *
Hire. Pur.Jv Vegetable, containing no mercury
Hi?erais, or deleterious drugs.
X?T Observe tho following symptdms resulting
rom Disorders nf the Digestive Organs:
Constipation, inward Piles, Fullness of tho Blood
n tbe Head, Acidity of the Stomach, Nsutea, Ilcan
mrn. Diigusi of Food, Fnilne?8 or Weight in the
stomach, Sour Eructations, Sinking or Fluttering at
he Pit of the 8t?.mach, Swimming of Hie Head,
lurried and Dlfflrult BrtHUhlng.
A few do?-* of EAD WA Y's PILLS wOl fte? the
ystcin from all the above named disorders. Price*
!"5 cents per Box. SOLD BY DEUGGISTS.
HEAD "FALSE AND TBUE." Send one letu
<amp to EADWAY ii CO.. No. 33, WAKRKX
i r H K KT, Cor. Church Street, New York. Infor?
nation worth thousands ?ill tn ecol you.
Jalyi * 1?
i'OUTZ'S
CELEBRATED
This preparation, long and favorably
known, will thoroughly re-invigorate
broken down and low-spirited horses,
by strengthening and cleansing th?
stomach and intestines.
It is a sure preventive of al', disease!
incident to> this animal, such as L NG
EVER, GLANDERS. YELLOW
TATER. HEAVES. COUGHS, DIS
EMPER, FEVERS, FOUNDER,
OSS OF APPETITE AND VITAL
NERGY, tte Its use improves
te wind, increases the appetite
Ives a s mooth and glossy skin-and -
nnsforms the miserable skeleton ?J
itc ? fine-looking and spirited horse.
To keepers of Cows this prepara
tion is Invaluable. It ls a stare pr?
ventive against' Rindernest, B>sV>fr
Horn, etc. It has been proven ty
actual experiment to increase tnt
quantity of milk and cwo tret ly
per cent, and make the butter fina
and sweet. In fattening cattle, il
ives them an appetite, loosens their hide, and make*
icm thrive much faster.
1
In aU diseases of Swine, such, as Coughs, Ulcers in
te Lungs, Liver, kc this article acts
i a specific By putting from one
alf a paper to a paper In a barrel of i
rill the above diseases will be erad ?
itedor entirely prevented. H gi ven
i tune, a certain preventive and ,
ore for the Hog Cholera. '
DAVID Et FOPTZ, Proprietor,
BALTIMORE? Bid.
For sale by Drugtrhrts ?ad Storekeepers throughout
be United State*. Ca?adas and Strath .America.
Fur salo at Edgefleld Hy A. M CLIS
JY. - Feb 27 ly 10.
"Tait's Medicines,
r\S hand a large supply of Tqrl's SAR
J.SAPARILLA and QUEEN'S,DE
LIGHT. ' j*
Price ?1 per bottle.
Qr* L. PENN, Druggist
Uv I tf 19

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