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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, August 02, 1883, Image 2

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las. T. Bacon. Titos. J. Adams.
EDITORS.
E. KEE8E? Corresponding Editor.
Edgefield, S. C., Aug. 2. 1883.
Can We Safely Spare Two Hundred
Thousand Negro Laborers ?
The summer meeting of the State
Agricultural and Mechanical Society
and State Grange took place in Ma
rion last week. The discussion of the
labor question was the main point of
interest, and Senator M. C. Butler,
who was present, said that this' was
the great question for the farmer.
"We should not mince matters in
this discussion. The labor of this
country is becoming more unsettled
every year. There has been no time
since 1865 when the labor has been
more unreliable than now. It is ad
mitted by the colored men. even that
those born since freedom are becom
ing more and more worthless. We must
get a supply for this deficiency. We
could safely spaie two hundred thous
and of the negro laborers. Let them
go into Kansas.and elsewhere if they
wish. We could follow the example
of Mr. Crayton and get Germana.
There is too much cheap labor. Some
have been driven by necessity to pro
cure machinery and use it them
selves. They have not ten mouths
now to feed where they should have
had one. Experience is good for us
all. Go upon the farms and give
them personal supervision. Land in
New Jersey which was worth $1 per
acre is now worth $100 per sere. He
waa sorry to believe that the laborers
we have are not making progress in
this country. The white race caunot
afford to be handicapped by such a
drag upon them, and must use all
labor saving machines and get rid of
an army of drones. There is no ques
tion of so much consequence to the
progress of the State. There should
be no question between capital and
labor. No question is so grave as thal
of maintaining the efficiency of our
labor. There is no more beneficent
purpose for the use of brain than the
tilling of the soil.
Senator Butler said furthermore, I
wish to elicit discussion. I have done
all in my power to show that I had
reluctantly come to the conclusion
that negro labor is not reliable or
progressive. Has it advanced, as it
should have done ? The Lien law was
passed to meet the exigencies of the
occasion. No people got so much
benefit from this law as the colored
people. We have kept them going
at our own expense. Can we afford
to continue this ruinous system ?
Will they never be able to stand
alone ? ?They are as bad off to day as
when they started in 1865. It is not
a question of sentiment, but one of
interest, which concerns us and our
children. It is not a question of how
many bales of cotton this or that man
can make, but there is no parallel in
history where a people bas stood by
an inferior race as we of the South
have done. But we must do simple
justice tp ourselves, and must strive
every year more and more to make
ourselves independent of them. There
is no man but will admit that such
labor in becoming more and more in
efficient. How are we to meet this
question ? To my mind we must do
aa some of our friends have said, that
is, put a homogeneous race in their
p^CeaT^Strtrhalf of'the cotton of the '
South has been made by white labor.
What becomes of these people when
we take the protecting intelligence of
the white man away from them ?
They rettograde to a condition that
no one could have dreamed of. Let
that labor take charge of this country
and you have a howling wilderness in
the place of plenty. The colored man
has not made the progress which your
speakers have noticed so forcibly here
to-day. I do not decry negro labor,
but I want to see this country inde
pendent of it. We cannot rely upon
them alone. The great progress in
this country is due to the white la
borer and not to the negro. One who
has labored in the cause of education
of the negro said " that he could go to
a certain point but all beyond that
made him topheavy, and that he has
not made one step forward morally."
I have been forced to admit, against
. my will, to say that the time bas
come for us to look for some way out
of this difficulty. We have progressed
in spite of fate. If they want to go
to Indiana let them go. You will
never have any material increase in
your white population until you get
a material diminution of the colored
man. When you put the foreigner
into competition with the negro he
does not stay, he goes, and so would
you. He has no people to associate
with. I think twenty years is experi
ment enough. We cannot afford to
carry this incubus on our shoulders.
They must keep up with the course of
progress or must be left behind.
Selling Liquor to a Man of Known
Intemperate Habits.
M On Thursday morning the City
Council heard an appeal from the
Mayor's Court in which a barkeeper
.in town had been found guilty and
fined for furniehing intoxicating liq
nor to a man of known intemperate
habits. The council sustained the
findings below, and the defendant
gaye notice of appeal to the Circuit
Court.-Anderson Journal.
We are delighted by the action of
the Mayor of Anderson, and sincere
ly hope that it will be imitated by
many other Mayors. The saloon keep
er who deliberately sells liquor to a
drunkard, a drunken man .or a boy,
violates the laws, and the rules of
morality and humanity, and ought to
be prosecuted and severely put ished
whenever the proof can be obtained.
We do not believe the State has any
right to say whether a citizen shall or
shall not drink whiskey, but she has
a right and is bound to protect thoee
of her citizens who from infirmity,
previous indulgence or youth are in?
capable of taking care ot themselves.
If our friends of the temperance so
cieties would abandon the prohibition
issue for a time and devote their ef
forts to^stimulating the prosecution
of such cases as that in Anderson,
they would do a vast amount of im
mediate, practical good.-Greenville
Daily News.
Damned Scoundrels!
WASHINGTON, July 25.-Col. Jack
Brown, of Georgia, is one of the most ?
prominent of the Southern Republi- ]
cans in this city. Yesterday he had j
occasion, in looking after the interest
of a client, to call upon the Postmas
ter General. He was horrified upen
being told by Mr. Gresham that he i
regarded Southern Republicans as ?
" J-d acouadrele."
-For the Advertiser
Col. W. li; Folk Writes us from
toe Sor. h Carolina Mountain?.
HENDERSONVILLE, N. C., Joly 26.
DEAR ADVERTISER: We left home
Thursday morning, one week ago, for
the mountains of Western North Car
olina. Boarded the traiu at Trenton,
and had a fine opportunity to see the
crops along the Ridge. They were
good, bat beginning to need rain sad
ly. At Columbia we exchanged cars
for Hendersonville, N. C , there be
ing in waiting a special car destined
for the mountains. Had a delightful
ride from Columbia to Alston, al
thongh nothing especially interesting
outside. Dined on board the train at
2 o'clock. After dinner we began to
take the census of the passengers on
board. Jost back of os sat two bright
girls going to Glonn Springs to spend
the summer-f.he Misses Mitchell,
from near Batesburg. They will cer
tainly make thg boys either joyful or
sad, if they remain there long, so
winsome are their laces.
No sooner had we gotten through
playing the "agreeable" here; before
we were accosted by Hon. William
Munro of Union, S. C , and after that
we began to swim in the sea of poli
tics until he left us at Union, his
town. What we said and intend to
do we cannot tell you now.
For the encouragement of our farm
ers,^ let me say just here, that the
crops through Union and Spaitanburg
Counties, and through this whole up
country, are poorer than we have ever
seen anywhere, and poorer, they say,
than they have been in twenty-five
years. The dry weather is the cause.
At Spartanburg, (our old home, we
mightsay, for four years of our "teens"
were spent here) we find a bustling,
stirring little city, full of people, busi
ness and pleasure. After exchang
ing trains and shaking hands with
casual acquaintances, the "all aboard"
word is given, and off to the moun
tains we go ! And in the train there
is scarcely standing room-laughing
women, talking men and crying ba
bies, accompanying the monotonous
rattle of the train. As usual here
comes the inevitable drummer for the
hotels-with flaming cards and per
suasive eloquence. And, in this con
nection, we must pay our especial re
spects to one who calls himself Jarbo,
alias Jumbo. We do this in order
that others seeing our examples may
profit by them. We have just got
rid of these nuisances, and we can
now begin to view the prospect over.
The train moves carefully along
around the huge abysmal gorges, at
the rugged base of mountain on moun
tain, like a grand panorama, unfold
ing in its sweep beauties wild as when
they first fell from the hand of God.
We know nobody nor anything un
til we get to Tryon, a station on the
Spartanburg and Asheville Railroad,
where, much to our gratification and
surprise, we uaw one lady on a mule
bowing to us several times, who is
very familiar in all her beauty and
vivacity to the people, of our town,
once Mrs. Georgia H., now Mrs.
Wright, of Columbia. They say the
Tryon Hotel is a good one, and we
are sure the scenery is fine. Up we
go, until we get to the real climb of
the railroad, the grade in the road
where, with heavy trains, they have
to uncouple and take up one box car
at a time, or use two "engines to get
us over the mountains. To look at
it, it seems nearly as steep as the bill
in front of Dr. Jennings'. At Salu
da, another station, among the spec
tators we see Gov. Bonham and lit
tle Frank, which makes ijdptl like
we were nearer home thaf?We were.
Arrived at Hendersonville at 8
o'clock, and find comfortable quar
ters at the Fletcher House, on Main
6treet. The table is the beet in the
town-supplied as it is from the line
farm of the proprietor, who lives ten
miles from here on the road to Ashe
ville. Really the air U fine. Sleep
ing nedor blankets in July is a fact.
Flies and musquitoes are at a dis
count, and it is glorious to know yon
have got them where you can rule
them. No sweltering in the sum
mer's heat, no punting and blowing
and pulling off coats, and donning of
linen dusters, to keep life in you up
here! The water is splendid.
Rested from the heat and fatigue
of travel, we drive out in the after
noon of Friday to see the residences
of the Charlestoniaus around Fiat
Rock-a little town about four miles
from here. We passed, cn route, the
mountain residences of Barker, Tien
holm, and others, and we dismounted
at the gate leading into the residence
of the Rev. Mr. Drayton, sn Episco
pal divine. The grounds, hot houses,
plants, and rare trees in here, and
the terraced lawns, remind ns of a
veritable Scotch Residence. From
this poir t you can 6ee the Memmin
ger residence on a high hill, fronting
a sloping lawn covered with grass and
browsing cows-encircled partially
by a pond-now undergoing repairs
by and under the immediate super
vision of the Hon. C. G. Memminger
himself. In the distance, command
ing a grand view, is "the Coxe House,"
here known-built as it is said by one
Joe Coxe, a rich fellow, who made
certain promises to a young lady of
this place, but which were broken up
by bia enraged mother. The hand
some residence is now owned by So
licitor Jervey of the Charleston bar.
On our return therefrom we passed
by the Henry Middleton house-who
had to leave it in all its grandeur and
beauty, because he killed a ruffian,
who attempted to rob him of some of
his earthly treasure. Back again to
the hotel, prepared for supper. Al
rest again.
.'n the morning of Saturday, while
sitting in the veranda, we SJC the
sweet, smiling face of a lady well
known to our society-Mrs. Beall, of
Augusta-coming to see us. At home
again, as she is so peculiarly charm
ing everywhere.
On Sunday we drive to the Tower
- four miles over and on top of the
mountains-to see, as the notices
stuck around here say-the Kingdom
of this world. This is a thing gotten
up by a Northern man-to swindle
the foolish traveler !
This is a pleasant little town, and
a good plaje for over-worked men
ana invalid women, who need qui
etude and rest. We are just now
getting the keys to the secrets of the
mountains, and when we get back
from Caesar's Head, Buck Forest and
Brevard, we will give yon nome of
the fat things of the mountains, inas
much as you have taBted the " lean"
in this letter. W. H. F.
lt ls True
That tho "Bonanza Saloon" keeps the
iest grado of Wines, Whiskies and Cold
Drinks that can be found anywhere.
Iou W, COSDON.
/
/
From the CJironicle <?. Constitutionalist.
Tile Street Railroad.
Importgut Natter.
OFFICE OF THE AUGUSTA AND SUM- ]
MERYILLE KAILROAD COMPANY, I
AUGUSTA, GA., June 25, 1883 J
Editors Chronicle:
In the Chronicle and Constitution'
alis/ of Sunday, the 24th , is a com
munication signed " M," and dated,
" Edgefield C. H., S. C, June 20th,
1883," which contains a clause com
posed of charges which are so utterly
the reverse of fact, and so grossly un
just to the Augusta and Summerville
Railroad Company, (" the city street
car line"), that, of course, I ask space
to deny a"iH disprove tho assertion
made.
It is stated that the farmers of
Edgefield say "that the Charlotte,
Columbia and Augusta Railroad add
five cents on each hundred pounds to
their freight rates to Augusta because
the road is-required to pay that much
for the privilege cf crossiug the City
Street Car Line."
Now the written contract between
the Augusta and Summerville Rail
road Company (the " City Street Car
Line") and the Charlotte, Columbia
and Augusta Railroad Company, un
der which all business between these'
two companies has, tor many years in
the past, been conducted, and which
is binding upon both companies lor
many years to come, after defining
the term "Local Freight of which
the point of orgiual shipment or of
ultimate destination ia the City of
Augusta," sets forth " that the Char
lotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad
Company shall be required to pay to
the Augusta and Sumraervilie Rail
road Company (the 'City Street Oar
Line') nocharges whatsoever on Local
Freight."
This local freight is exactly the
branch of business embraced in the
assertion of" M." Any one id capa
ble o? understanding that, by these
terms, the Augusta ano! Summerville
Railroad Company is, by written con
tract, prohibited from making any
charge whatsoever against the Char
lotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad
Company, upon any pioduce or mer
chandise brought to the Augusta
market, or upon that which is shipped
from the Augu-ta market over the
Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad. The same exemption from
charge by the Augusta and Summer
ville Railroad Company is enjoyed by
all the other railroads entering the
city of Augusta in addition, I assert
the act, that the Augusta and Sum
.mervillt Railroad Company has never,
from the first day of its existence,
made any charge on freight which
even approximated to the rate of five
cents per one hundred pounds. The
rates of this company do not reach
one-third ofthat amount; and these
cannot, under any circumstances, be
imposed upon freight brought in for
sale in Augusta, nor upon freight sold
in Augusta and shipped by railroad
out of the city. On that kind of
freight, the Augusta and Summerville
Railroad Company does not charge as
much RS one cent fora thousand tons.
It charges nothing whatever, and in
addition, permits the entirely free
and unlimited uee of its track for that
purpose. In proof of my ?issertion,
I append the last report of the Char
lotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad
of dues to the Augusta and Summer
ville Railroad Company. All others
contain only the same items.
Report.
C., C. & A. RAILROAD COMPANY, ")
AUDITOR'S OFFICE.
. COLUMBIA, S.^.rMuy s\-i4^%=*4^
J. J. Davies, Esq., President A. d':
A. J'. R. Co., Augusta :
DEAR Sir.-Below please find state
ment of account due your company
by us for month of April, 1883:
Pounds.
ToLnauge to Georgia R. 1,092,149
Tonnage Lo Central R. R. J Ol,121
Tonnage to P. R. & A. R R. 70,4Gn
Tonnage to A. ? K. R. ll 7,840
l1277,r.78
At 1 io. per 100 pounds $101.03
Lees labor account load
ing .ind unloading car? 0 93
$181 07
Yours truly,
?"Signed ) JOHN CHAKI, Auditor.
This report, as is easily seen, em
braces only through freight, and in it
there p not. on? pound of the freight
on which " M" says that the "City
Street Car Line-chargea five cents
peron? hundred pounds." On the
Litter, (the local Iruight) I again as
sert, it charges nothiug.
Respectfully, JAS. J. DAVIES,
Prcs't A. & S. R. R. Co.
I fully concur in the above state
ment of Mr. -Tas. J. Davies, President
of the A. & S. R. R Co. No charge
whatever is made on any freight
destined for Augusta,or shipped from
Augusta. The only charge made by
the A. & S. R. R. Co. is on " through
freights" for points beyond Augusta.
D. H. VANBUREN,
Agt. C. C. & A. R. R. Co. .
If Properly Asked,
Hon. Geo. D. Tillman has not given
his views on the subject of the Speak
ership, hut would no doubt do so if
properly asked. We venture to say
that be has wise and statesmanlike
reasons for preferring Mr. Randall,
and that he would not have t<? repeat
any of Mr. Dibble's arguments, when
testifying to the faith that is in him.
-Augusta Chronicle,
Sunstroke.
There are many remedies suggested
for this species of sickness which ie
liable to occur now at any *day-any
cool headed man or woman canrelieve
the sufferer at once and without fear 1
of any evil consequences. The method ,
is simply and easily carried out. The 1
following is all there is to do :-Drag '
the body into the nearest shade; ?
place it in a sitting position against !
a wall, a tree, or anything that will j
be a support for the back ; loosen the '
foliar of the shirt or dress ; throw ice j
coid water over the head copiously; ?
give a pretty still" dose of essence of
Jamaica ginger-say an ounce .or
mure to a half glass of water. Keep
ap the application of water after the
ginger has been given, but moderately, ]
ind it need not be ice cold. Let the
patient have plenty of airarouud him,
n an hour's time he will get up and
ivalk home or io a street car. This is
ill the treatment necessary and it is
jased on common sense. The oppres
sion on the brain caused by the heat
s relieved ly the cold water, and the <
jlood is sent from the head to the ^
iody. The ginger (if-not obtainable (
inmediately, brandy will answer, A
bough the essence ot ginger is the T
d?ngest stimulant and quickest) pre- \
rents anemia, or lack of blood, by
itimulating the vessel? and Fending
rash blood back to the brain.
mm
-Z.-?J
MARIUED, by Rev. S. Leard, at "1
luae, on Sunday, July 20th, ROBEH
DUKES and FANNIE BLALOCKj
originally of Edgefield County, S. (J
??utaarg.
In Memoriam*
EDDIE PENN DRVORE, first-1
of J. K. and BKTTIR P. DKVORK,
born Dec. 29, 1870, and died July 22, :
4 Those whom the god's love die yo j
So we felt when we heard of the auf
death of this noble boy. A more" _
ly, industrious, gentle, lovable boj
have never known. In all those tra!
character which give promise of ut
and honorable manhood, he was a bj
tiful model. Singularly truthful,
gent in business, obeying his parent
all things and kindly disposed toi
every one, he was at once a doting n
er's joy and pride, a fond father's he]
and hope-a universal favorite.
" In the midst of life we are in de;
What a striking illustration of this tl
in tho case of EDDIE PSSTS ! At3} o'cl<
p. m., Saturday, h ' left his father's sj
where ho had been aiding him in m
ging potatoes, and ran for his gun"
was soon, in company with a yoi
friend and some colored boys, oil* in pj
suit of sport. lu a brief half hour,
little neighbor, in tho excitement of
c iase getting ready to lire, accident
let the hammer slip just in time to s?
the contents of the gun into a fatal pl!
All was done that could be; but toj
avail, in nine short hours the spirit
taken its Hight into the presence of G]
On Sunday afternoon the lithe, hi
some little form was laid beside the]
crad dust of a little auntie and near
precious remains of a lovinggrandnu
er, to await the general resurrect^
May the consolations of the gospel of]
sympathizing Redet mer bo sweet
abiding to the grief-stricken parents.
"God moves in a mysterious way.
His wonders to porform ;
He plants his footsteps on the sea,
And rides upon the storm.
".Judge not tho Lord by fee hi o sens
But trust him for his grace;
Behind o frowning providence,
He hides a smiling fae?.
"His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
Tho lind may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower."
ht
we
[ts of
ful
,u
s
TAX NOTICE,! ?
MY Books will be open for JIM S|1
tion of Taxes from tho jS
ber to .Ute. .St h at Edgefield JflflB^rag
of Taxes : For State Tax, ^ jpFsjCoiH
ty, 4 mills; for Pt?t^?dtSbtedn?ss, ?
one mill ; for School Tax, 2 mills ; lH
Deficiencies, 1 mill ; for itailroad Tax.fl
mills. I will be at the following pla<H
on the days mentioned to collect tn
Taxes, viz: H
Sept. 10, at Trenton,
" ll, Johnston.
" 12, " Ward's,
" 13, " Ridge Spring,
" 14, " Holson's X Road.i,
" 15, " Watson <fe Bro's. Storo.fl
" 18, " Laudrum's Store,
" 19, " Holder's Store, fl
" 20, " Clark's Hill,
" 21, " Modoc, fl
" 22, " Red Hill,
" 25, " Aft. Willing,
" 2?;, " Canghman's Store,
" 27, " Kinard & Bro's. Store.fl
" 2?, " Puiifoy's Store,
" 2i), " Crouch's store. fl
From the 1st October to tho 0th fl
Kdgefleld c. II. fl
Oct. 8, at Coleman's X Roads,
" 9, " Richardsonvillfi, fl
" 10, " Haltiwanger's Store, fl
" ll ..v. 12, Burst's Store, fl
" 13. at Dr. D. a Tompkins's,*
" 15, " Pleasant Lane,
" 10, Longmires,
" 17, . " Plum Branch,
" 18,, " Parksville, i
" 19, ?? Talbert's Store, 1
From the 20th to the 31st October at
Edgefield C. H., at which time my BooksJ
' JAS. MITCHELL, Treas. E. C. I
August 1, 1883.- 31.54
Legal Warning.
ALL persons aro hereby forewarnj
not to give employment to Jol
Rainsford, as he.is under contract with
the undersigned for the year 1883, ah
has left my employment without cg
Aug. 1, 1882.-3134*'
1) OLA ND CHINA and BEP.ioJ?lRll
PIGS for sale. Apply to
Dr. H. PARKER,
July 31,--313-1] Edgefield. S. C.
Administrator's Aotice.
ALL persons having any CLAIM]
against tho estate of MID, E.
BEXLEY, dc.c'd., are notified to prase J
them to mo duly attested, within ll|
time prescribed by law, or they will
barred. All persons owing said Est?
are notified lo make payment to nie.
JAR. C. LOWREY,
Adni'or. Est Mrs. 15. E. Bexley!
July L'.R>, lS.S3.-3t.'M
WOFFORD GOLLEG]
SPARTAN BORG. S. C.
The thirtieth Collegiate year will
gin October 1st, 1883. Students who i
ter late labor under great disadranta
Board in private families ?12 to $10 I
moi. h. A few students are accomr
dated at a cost of only ?7 per month
board i? the College building. Tuit
from $4n to f?00 per yoar, according
class.
For Catalogue address
JAMES H. CARLISLE,
A. M , LL. D.
Aug. 2, 18S3.-34] Presider
Sheriffs-Sale.
STA-TE.-OE, -SOUTH 'CARi
EDGEFIELD COUNTY.
Jennings, Smith & Co. vs. J. Y>\
Barr.-Execution.
BY virtue of an Execution to
rected in the above stated ci
will proceed to sell at Edgefield
House, on the first Monday in A
next, the Defendant's, J. Wesley Bi
interest in a certain tract of land,
in Edgefield County, and State afon
and on the road leading from Edgfj
Court House to Trenton aud the
House, containing iivo hundred
more or less, adjoining lands o?
Addison, James and Walter Mille
M. Padgett and others, being tbej
ol land conveyed to tho said J.
Barr by R. H. Quattlebum.
Terms Cash. Titles extra.
W. H. OUZTS, S.
July ll. 1883.-4130
TO introduce the now branches
added to my business, I wil
free, to any ono buying an outfit
me, the arts of either DECALCOMj
[China, Silk, ?fcc, Decorating) (
rAL (or imitation Sholl Work)
MO PHOTOGRAPHY, or the ai
iring Photographs in oil to imita
;elain miniatures, GRECIAN, or
parency painting. Samples of
works "may be seeu by applicatioi
residence, where I am keepings f
>f Frames, Paintings, Chromos,
Materials, Paints. Oils, Varnisheij
di
se, I
irt
Igust
Irr's,
luata
said,
Ifield
Pine
cres,
L.
r, M.
[tract
esley
lRs.E.ERICHA?flDS
A Chance
For 8? Da vs O ii I vi
have
teach
from
UNE
tlEN
(H RO
of col
e por
trans
Jl these
tat my
"llino
irtist's
k Ac.
f 10NTRACTS for House, SignJ
w namental Painting will rece
? rom pt attention and good w<
ihip. Address or apply to,
E. V. R1CHARJ
Edenfield, C. Hi
Jilly I ?, IMBIL
CARPET
Carpets nnd House Furnlshiiif
he Largest Stock South of Ba
doqnet, Brussels. 3-Ply and
Carpets, Rugs, Mat? and Crural!
Vindow Shades, Wall Papera,
?ace Curtains, Cornices and Pc
oa and Canton Mattings, Cpl
engravings, Chromos, Picture!
."..tr Write for Samples and F
GEO. Ai BAILIE, ACG?8T/
June 28,1*83.-29
RANTED
SEED
BUIST'S IMPROVED RUTA BAGA.
RED, or PURPLE TOP, YELLOW ABERDEEN,
WHITI^GLOBE, GEORGIA WINTER,
FLAT DUTCH, SEVEN TOP, YELLOW GLOBE
-o
We have just received a large Fiipply of the above reliable Turnip Seed.
G. L PENN & SON.
August 1, 1883.-4184
// J: .STHLEY.
WM. J. CRANSTON.
R P. SIBLEY,
COTTON FACTOR,
GUANO DEALER, COMMISSION MERCHANT
REYNOLDS ST., AUGUSTA, GA.
Liberal advances rnade on Consignments. Bagging and Ties furnished at
lowest rates. STRD"T PERSONAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO WEK;niNn 2nd
SAMPLING COTTON. CONSIGNMENTS OF GRAIN SOLICITED.
AGENT FCXR
JUSTLY
? CELEBRATED
BROWiY
COTTON GL\,
FEEDER
AND
CON?ENSERV
CONDENSER.
And PRESSES of all Descriptions.
IQ?*Send for Circular. All inrormation cheerfully furnished.
R. P. SIBLEY.
Augusta, Ga., July 17, 1883.-3m
~ CLARKE "
SEED-COTTON CLEANER.
PRICE, $75.00.
Clarke Seed Cotton Cleaner ?Mfg. Co., Allanta, f?a.
JOHN H. HUIET,
Batesburg, S. C., Gen'l. Ag't. Edgefield Co.
At tho International Exposition
in 1881, it was kept constantly on
exhibition, and many thousands
of people beheld its operation
and effects with satisfaction and
pleasure. There its utility was
shown beyond question, and the
award of the examiners gave it
tho highest rank in ?hat class of
inventions to which it belongs.
It is alleged, by those who have
used it, that cotton passed through
it is advanced at least two cents
in its market value. There are
some people, however, who be
lieve that it pays better to sell
dirty cotton than it does to clean
it. Now this is a great mistake,
and wo call their attention to the
following example, which is
made on a 5C0 pound bale of cot
ton on a basis of 10 cents for mid
ling cotton : Allow, say, 50 lbs.
?l?ii??**f~7&g Val' !' OhigLfagiu 1 d
lass "low ordinary" anti would
?e worth 0 eta. per pound, which
would be f>0 pounds dirt at 0 eta.,
$3.00, and -?.50 pounds of cotton at
0 cts., ?27.00, or 830 00 net for the
dirty halo. A bale cleaned of
tho ?Jimo grade cotton would lose 50 pounds in weight, which would leave 450 lbs.
net of dean cotton, which would be increased in value by the cleaning process 2
eta. per pound, making .450 pounds at 8 cts., $30.00, or a gain of $0.00 per bale hy
tho cleaning process rifler having lost SO pounds in weight.
Say:
Dirty Hale-'M lbs., including 50 lbs. of dirt, at fi cfs.$30 00
Chan Unlr-rm lbs. less GO lbs. roi dirt, 450 lbs., at 8 els.|3ti 00
(lain by cleaning process.$ 0 00
We Refer to the Following Certificates:
300IETV H ir. i., S. C., January 10,1882.
Gents- Tho Clarke Seed Colton Cleaner T bought of you gives entire .satisfac
tion, f believe tho Cleaner paid for itself on ten bales of dirty cotton.
J. M. WADDELL.
S i'A UTAN'ni J no, S. C., January 27,1882.
Gents-T ara a colton [.lauter in Spartanburg county, and had dirty storm cot
ton cleaned on Clarke's Cleaner, sold by you to W. H. Cantrell. I sold my clean
cotton for II cents, and dirty ...iiton ol' the same grade uncleaned for 8 cents.
J. C. WALL.
ENON GROVE, HFARO Co., CA., December 7, 1880.
The Clarke Seed Cotton Cleaner it'f'ff. Co., Atlanta, (Ja.:
Gentlemen-Before I would purchase Clarke's Seed Cotton Cleaner, I wished
to make a trial test, which I did in the following manner: I weighed carefully 1,500
pounds ol' dry seed cotton, which I cleaned and ginued. I then ginned 1,500 lbs.,
taken from tho same stall, uucleaned. Sent to Newnan both bales, which were
sold for me. The cleaned bale lost threo pounds in weight-and sold for lt cents
Eor pened more than the bale not cleaned. This season the patronage to my gin
as gieatly increased, several parties patronizing me to get the benefitof the Clean
er, closing their private gin houses and hauling me their crops.
J. V. D. STEPHENS.
July 18, 1683.-32 _
JOHN W. WALLACE,
GOTTOIST FACTOR.,
-AGENT FOR
The Celebrated Hall Gin,
With or Without Feeder and Condenser.
PRICES AND TERMS SATISFACTORY.
729 & 731 Reynolds St, Augusta, Ga.
CLINTON WARD, S. C., May 29, '83.
Mr. J. W. Wallace.
UKAR SIR-In reference to the Hall
Gin, 1 must say I am well pleaded with
it. It gives perfect satisfaction and a bet
ter vUrnout in lint I have never had than
the Hall Gin gives. I ginned last season
500 bales, aud every ono was satisfied
with tho turnout ol their cotton, as itover
thirded itself considerably; and another
thing about it, you can gin theco ton wet.
and it will gin it c eau from the seed.
This is a great thing for agin to do-that
is, ginning for the public.
On the 70-saw Gin I bought of you. I
have ginned from 12 lo 13 bales in one
dav. Yours most respectfully,
J. H. LAGRONE.
RIDGE, SPRINO, S. C., May 25, '83.
Mr John W. Wallace, Augusta, Ga.
DEAR SIR-We ginned nine hundred
bales of cotton the past two seasons with
the GO-saw Hall Gin you sold us, and
with great s itisfaction. Tho Hall is ac
cepted iu this community as the stand
ard Gin, Very few others are sold.
Knowing its value I gladly aid you bj'
my endorsement (if that will aid you),
in sellin' it to brother planters and gin
ners. Yours truly,
B. E. NICHOLSON.
Juno 20. 1883.-3m28
ANDERSON
FEMALE SEMINARY.
Tho next Session opens
FIRST MONDAY IN
SEPTEMBER.
Order and examine a copy of our Oata
logne, and you will be surprised at our
low terms lor board and tuition ; .and, at
the same time, you will be convinced
that you can not'send your daughter to
any other College where she will be
more tenderly cared for or bettor edu
cated in overv respect. Addross,
LEWIS M. AY'ER, Pres't.,
Inly 1?, 1883.-<ii32] Anderson, 8. C.
Legal Warning.
ALL persons are hereby warned not
to hire or harbor one William Wig
fall, a very large colored person, as he is
under contract with me for tho year 188ft,
FELIX WALKER,
July Ul, ISM.-3L32] Elmwood, S. C.
LYCURGUS CHARLTON.
Attorne)-at-Law,
Edgefield C. HM S- C.
Ofllce near residence, -^?.
Feb. 7,1883.
Just Received
SQUIRES' HAMS,
COLD MEDAL FLOUR
X. 0 SYRUP. CREAM CHEESE
SNOWFLAKE CRACKERS, CANNED
TOMATOES. OKRA A TOMATOES
RIC E. GRITS, SODA, CI G A RS
SMOKING & CHEWING
TOBACCO,
ONE SPOON BAKING POWDER
PL! ? W HOES, HEEL SCREWS, GRASS
HODS. PISHING TACKLE
KEROSENE OIL
M v plork of
STAPLE GROCERIES
will he kepi. Full, Fresh acd Complete at
all times. Try my GLEEN and BLACK
TEAS. IRISH POTATOES to close out.
BUCKWHEAT-not Shorts-at ,r>c per lb.
A small quantity of CORNED BEEK stilj
left. Give me a call. Quality and
price guarantied.
H. BRANSON, Ag't.
Apr. 17, 1883.-tf G 0
aa pta
A RAFI OPPORTUNITY
-FOR
BARGA INS
''?HOES!
SLIPPERS! SLIPPERS!
SLIPPERS! SLIPPERS!
-AND
HATS! HATS!
'.THE LEADERS" intend opening tbn Spring Trade with their usual
vim. They will open the ball with a wonderful t-ale-$125,000 worth of the
Latest Novelties in SHOES, SLIPPERS and HATS at prices unheard of
before. These goods are all from fir^t bands and were bought in immense
quantities; therefore, we are enabled to o(i'<;r them at Retail for what they
cost small buyers by the ten eise lots.
Wo know how to go to work to take
advantage of the market, and are al
ways ready to obtain Bargains for the
ltonofit of our customers. Remem
ber that tn this way we are able to
sell our goods at the lowest margins,
and to get tho beat from tho manu
iactnrers. Do not disappoint your
self or your friends by neglecting to
'.all and examino our superb line of
Ladies', Misses', Children's, and Gents' spring Shoes and Slippers.
In Ladies' Shoes We Will Offer Some W?.i
derful Bargains!
Ladies' Kid Button Roots, flOc. worth ?1 ?0; Ladies' Pebble Hutton Boots, 87jc,
worth $1 25 ; Ladies' 18 Thread Kid Fox Button Boots, 81 50 worth 82 25; Ladies'
Kid Fox Polish Boote, $1 25, former price 82; Ladies' Opera Slippers 75c, former
price ?1 25; Ladies' Opera Slippers, 90c, woll worth Si 50; Ladies'Kid Opera Ties,
jil 25, well worth ?2; Ladies' Glove Kid Oxfords, hand-made, Si 75, worth $8; La
dies' French Kid Magnolias, gt 75, worth $3; Ladies' French Victoria Ties, $1 70,
worth $2 50; Ladies' Pebble Buskins, 70c, worth Si ; Ladies' Serge Buskins, 25c,
Kid Newport Ties, 75c, worth 82 25; .Ladies'Kid Newport Button, 90c, worth $1 50.
The Largest and Most Carefully Selected Stock
nSf Mists' and Children's Shoes-Ever Offeree^
Misses' KidxOxfords fl. worth 50; Misses' Kid Sandals, 75e, worth $125^
Misses'French Kid Magnolias, SI 2=>, worth S2 ; Misses'Kid Sandals, 85c, worth
it 50; Misses' Kid Polish, 75c. worth SI 25; Misses' Seree Polish, 70c, worth $1 35:
Misses'Kid Button Boots, ST'., worth % I 2."> ; Misses' Pebble Button Boots, 85c,
worth ?1 35; Misses' Pebble Polish, 7()c\ worth St ; Misses' Acf. Polish, 00c, worth
?1 ; Children's Ankle Ties, 25c. worth 50e; Children's Newport Ties, 40c, worth 75c;
Children's Sandals, 50c, worth ?1 ; Children's Kid Lace Bals., 10c, worth 40c; Chil
dren's Kid Spring Heeled Shoes, fiSc, worth 81 ; Children's Pebble Spring Heeled
Shoes. fiOe, worth $!.
850,000 WORTH
OF MEN'S SHOES, THE LATEST ST
WE INTEND TO RUN OFF AT THl?
Men's French Kid Hand
Sewed Ties at Si 75, worth ?7 Oft
Men's Calf Ties af, :< 00, worth fi 00
Men's Oxfords at. -? 75, worth I 50
Men's Calf Sewed Con
gress at .'? 50, worth 5 On
Men's, Acf. S S. Oxfords I 25, worth 1 75
Men's Prince Alberts 125, woith 17.'.
Men's Strap Ties at '.?:"?, worth 1 45
.The way to get rich is to buy witera
Y LES AND FRESHEST GOODS, THAT
FOLLOWING MARVELOUS PRICES.
Men's Pcf. .Tersevs at
Men's English Ties at
Mon's West Point Ties
Hoys' Congress Gaiters
Roys' Jersey Tics at
Roya' Strap Ties nt
Roys' English Rais, at
Roys' Low Buttons at
87i, w'th 1 25
1 00, worth 2 00
1 25, worth 1 70
75, worth 1 25
70, worth 1 00
1 00, worth 1 50
1 00, worth 1 45
1 25, worth 2 00
you can got the best goods for tho l?f?sl
money. This you know, and certainly
will not forget that at our store is tho
place for you aud your friends to trade.
We want you to remember u couple nf
things, and these are
HONEST GOODS
-AND
LOW PRICES,
Assuring you -that wo shall not rcln.x our
offerts to retain tho pro eminence our
store has already attained, and shall try to
tho old, tho young, tho short, the tal), tho
heed tho writing on thc wall. COUNTLE
rich, the poor; so bring them all and
SS BARGAINS AT YOUR CALL.
-:o:
OVERLOADED I
$175,000 WORTH OP
READY-MADE CLOTHE
THAT MUST GO !
Our Bayer's anticipation of the Spring
Trade was too great ! Thc result is that
we are overloaded, and must sell at half
price to unload.
It will be to your interest to give us a
call Before buying elsewhere. Come in
here.
-:o:
The J? BB White
Dry Goods, Clothing, and
Shoe Co.,/
724, 738, ami 740 Broad Street,

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