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Edgefield advertiser. [volume] (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, March 10, 1892, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1892-03-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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Utilize all wastes as manure.
Make your corn crib rat proof.
Too rich a soil grows too much
wood.
Insects are as often scavengers
as pests.
Sell stock only when in good
condition.
. Fit the collar to the horse and
see that it fits.
Pure-bred animals are uniform
in their color.
Regular feeding makes animals
more content.
Use such f?rtil izers as the crops
demand.
Broad tires are at a disadvant
age on a rough road.
Keep your watering troughs |
scrupulously clean.
" Decaying organic matter in the I
soil gives warmth.
Fertilizers for wheat or oats!
should be kept near the surface.
Mellow soil is more penetrable j
to air, rain or sun heat.
Land too steep for cultivation j
may be made good pasture.
There is not enough attention j
paid to the selection of seed..
A cow was not made to trot,
. The cow gait is a walking one.
Lime is generally abundant,
i but some soils are deficient in it,
. One of the greatest wastes on a
farm is that of fertilizing mate
rial. "
The manure of a well-kept ani
mal goes far towards paying for |
winter keep.
Do not look for a better year for I
the farming community than that j
; of;1891.
Cotton seed-may be safely fed
more heartily in winter than in
milder weather. -
Study your farm. No one else
ought to know its needs and ca
pacity as well as you.
Bone meal decomposes slowly,
and therefore its application is
felt for some time.
Some crops clear the soil of
weeds. This should be considered |
in a system of rotation.
All waste matter should be ap
plied to the furface as mulch or
worked into the soil as compost,
s The value of commercial f?rtil
-izers-4ePen?i on their containing
the elements which the soil needs.
A foul watering trough is an I
abomination.
The dog under the wagon de?s |
no harm.
Farmers should live on the fat |
of the earth.
--Make your soil the hfttter__fer_|
every crop it grows.
The stingy man breeds froml
poor stock and underfeeds.
Have you considered the shrink
age of corn in the crib?
If you have no silo, take good |
care of your corn fodder.
Concentrated foods should al
i ways be fed with those mor?
bulky.
Just enough feed to sustain life I
is a loss of growth or other pro-1
duct.
The droppings of a mature ani
mal are worth more than those of I
a young one.
Have, everything ready for work
aa soon as the frost is out of the
ground in the spring.
There is no profit in making
one hand wash the other-one
crop make up the loss on another.
Putting all your money into
some new enterprise is like staking
it all on a single throw of the
dice.
A man shows his mental and
moral status as much by what he
condemns as by what he accepts.
Liberal feeding returns two
profits-one in the increased pro
duct and the other in the manure
It is more profitable to buy
linseed or cotton seed meal than
corn ; but no butter ration should
be without corn.
A heap of manure is a blessing
when spread on the soil,{but a curse
when rotting against the side of
the barn.
A farmer in Missouri grafted a
tomato vine into a potato vine and
got two crops, one from the top
and the other from the roots.
The coarser the manure the less
value.
Worthless land is often made
valuable by underdraining.
If your neighbor knows more
than you do, beat him at his own
game.
Ifyouhavoa small farm, en
large it by putting more work and
manure on it.-American Farmer.
If a farmer buys a mule colt for
$10 and in a few years it grows up
and becomes worth $150 he is ex
pected to pay taxes on it at the in
creased value, although he has gone
to great expense in feeding and at
tending it.
If a phosphate man buys a share
of stock for $100 and in the course
of a few years it becomes worth
$300 he claim? that he should pay
taxes only on the stock at the
value of $100,. which sum he first,
paid for it. In the meantime he
has not fed the stock (although he
may have watered it) and has
been at no expense in keeping it,
PoLlTIGAL^o
THE HON. JOSEPH H. EARLE.
He Counsels the Democracy to
Stand Together-Conservatism
in Politics Never so Much need
ed KS Now.
To the Editor of The News and |
Courier : Your circular letter has J
been received. You ask that I ex
press my views as to the political J
situation, and as to the course
that the conservative people of the
State should pursue.
Never before perhaps in the his-1
tory of South Carolina has it been
so important as now for the people
to be conservative in all that they |
may say or do in political matters.
For never before have tho white
people been so divided in senti-1
ment and separated into factions j
by internal dissensions. The con
tinuation of this condition will
necessarily tend to drive them fur
ther apart, and will prevent their
co-operation for the good of the
State.
I have no axe to grind, nor have j
I any personal wrongs . to avenge.
I opposed the election of Governor |
Tillman in the last campaign with j
all the earnestness of my nature
because I believed that he should
be defeated. The people, however,
decided otherwise and he was tri
umphantly elected. Those who
opposed his election were naturally
sore over their disappoiniment, and
a large number of them are still
dissatisfied. But under our sys
tem of government the majority
must rule and the minority must
submit. The more quietly and
gracefully that they yield to the
will of the majority the better it (
is for all concerned.
Governor Tillman has been
many times condemned for his un
just criticism of others, and un-1
just criticism of him by his op
ponents will not injure him, but j
will tend to his advantage. If it
was wrong in him to slander others
when he was a candidate, it is
simply wrong in others to slander
him while he is Governor.
L?t his former opponents deal
justly with him and give him due
credit for all that he may do or try to |
do for the good of the State.
That he has done mauy things that
are to be commended none can
deny; that he has done some
things that might be condemned
all will admit, but any man in his
position and surroundings would
be liable to make some mistakes.
Then I wouldsuggest to the Anti
TillmuTntes that it would bc wall?
to deal fairly with him and to
avoid committing the same sin of \
which he has been so often ac
cused. Don't follow his example
of making unjust accusations
against him and by magnifying
little faults into grievous sins.
This course will not bring the
two factions together, but can re
sult only in keeping them apart.
My deliberate judgement is that
Gov. Tillman is at present as strong
with the farmers as he ever was, |
and i believe that he will be re
elected over any ono who will
probably take the field against j
him. Such opposition would in
tensify the bitter feeling which
now unfortunately exists amoung j
the white people, and could suc
ceed only by invoking the aid of
the negro vote. Victory at such
a cost would be too dearly
bought. Give me Tillman a thou- j
3and times before a Scott or Moses !
When the Convention meets let j
trim be nominated, if a majority J
)f the delegates are in his favor ;
md if nominated, let him be j
elected without opposition, so far
is any Democrat is concerned.
Dur best, wisest and most!
?onservative men should be
sleeted to the General Assembly, j
This is far more important than j
the election of any man as Gov
ernor. With a good Legislature a |
bad Governor can do little harm ;
srith a bad Legislature a good|
Governor can do little good.
Respectfully,
Jos. H. EARLE.
THE HON. W. D. EVANS.
He Does Not Think the Situation |
at all Serious.
To the Editor of the NOWB and j
Courier: Your favor of the 16th
instant to hand, and I note that
you say that the political situation
in South Carolina is serious, and
that you desire to obtain trom me
an expression of views upon what
course the conservative people of
the State phould take to bring
about the unity and harmony of
party, etc. I will freely give you
my views, provided you will pub
lish what I have to eay. I do not
think the situation at all serious,
because I believe the Government I
is safe when it is'the hands of the|
people, and that the State Govern
ment is more completely in the
hands of the people than at any
time since the war no one of or
dinary intelligence will deny.
As to the best plan to bring |
about unity and' harmony of the j
party it strikes me that if you and |
others like you who have labored
in season and out of season to de
stroy the party for the last two
years, because you could no longer
dictate its policy and command its
leadership, would in good faith ac
cept the Democratic doctrine that
in party affairs the majority must
rule, and be willing to give and
take gracefully, then all would be
well. But to go into a Democratic
primary and bind yourselves aE
honorable men to abide-the result
and then to lead an Independent
ticket and vote for a Republican
for Congress against the Demo
cratic nominee, as Judge A. C.
Haskell did, and for him and hie
sympathizers, among whom I
count the News and Courier, to be
solicitous about the unity of the
party, is certainly to me_ a very
strange state of affairs.
It looks to me like the proper
course for all such, who are now
so solicitous far the welfare of the
party, to pursue would be to ac
knowledge their error and put
themselves as quickly as possible
right before the true Democracy,
the people of South Carolina, by
doing less talking and indulging
.in less abuse of the representa
tives of the party and prove them
selves entitled to consideration in
in the party by voting the party
ticket at the next general election.
In my opinion the best and only
way to unite the party is for the
opposition to Governor Tillman to
accept the inevitable and bow
gracefully to his renomination,
which is a settled fact, provided,
however, ho does not in any seriofia
way antagonize his Alliance breth
ren. Yours,
W. D. EVANS.
Bennetrsville, Feb. 18.
SENATOR J. JJ. M. IRBY.
He Does Not Feel That He Should
Have Been Asked for Advice.
To thc Editor of the News and
Courier: I have the' honor to ac
knowledge the receipt of your let
ter dated Feb. 16,1 1892, which
would have been answered before
this but for my absence in New
York.
My reply must necessarily be
brief : The "political situation" in
South Carolina is not now seri' %
notwithstanding that it might. j
appeared so a month ago, for .ue
conservative people of this State
aro always to be relied upon to do
tho right thing at the right time.
According to alf political rules
for the government of parties, mi
norities are .expected to show theil
allegiance to their party by sub
but it seems that this rule mustbe
GEO. R. LOMB/
MACHINE, BOILER aM GDI WORE! ]
AUGUSTA,
Is the place to get Machinery
Prices.
50 New Gins and 62 New Eng
If you want a First-Class CO'
for a New Catalogue and Reduced
COTTON GIN. See the extra fir
work.
Mention THE ADVERTISRR wh<
IF YOU AR
Fi
P0P?L?R PRICED, STYLIS]
We with all sincerity recommend
see the immense stock of
I. C. LEv.
Tailor Fit
A-TJG-TJSTA.,
Thorough-br
Farmers would it not pay you
Barn-yard Scrubs.
WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS,
SILVER LACED W
SILVER SP>
Will be glad to have you call
trated circulars.
HENRY
Dealer in Gener
GRANITES
Ashley Phosp
Charles
SOLUBLE GUANO, highly ammoniac
DISSOLVED BONE, highest goods;
ACID PHOSPHATE, for composition
Agfa Element, for Cotton, Wheat, Peas, &
COTTON AND CORN COMPOUND;
SMALL GRAIN SPECIFIC;
GENUINE LEOPOLDSHALL KAIN
GENUINE FLOATS, of highest gradt
FHE ABOVE FERTILIZERS ARE OF VERY 1
They are rich in Ammonia, Pliospl
pounded with a special view to the war
.hanent improvement of the soil.
Special Formulas made to order of
Special inducements are offered foi
For terms, Hand Books, Agricultui
Element, Peas, ftc, address
Ashley Phosp
CHARLESTO?
-r-"fr
viol-ated in Sou^h -Carolina when I
nine-tenths, of the . people repre
sented in convention riominated
Tillman as Grovernor. ijAs I take
it, the way to secure and;j maintain
unity and harmony in Any-'party
inJSouth Carolina, or elsewhere
for all factions to subfmit their
claims to the primaries/: and then
like men abide bv the j result,
presume that it will be \ generally
admitted that if a majority of the
Democratic electors wanii Governor
Tillman to be chief magistrate of
the State, the minoritV has no
right to complain, but srjould give
him full credit for all thjat he says
and does. It is sheer nonsense, as
long as we pretend to hajpe a Dem
pcratic party, for a , disappointed
minority, stung by defeat, to bring
about discontent and then demand
that the majority must submit to
avoid a permanent breach 01 the
.party.
It seems strange to me that you
who have kept up a constant fusi
lade against Governor Tillman
since his inauguration, should now
call upon me to advise what course
the "conservative people of the
State should pursue to bring about
the unity and harmony of the
party." I do not mean~7t& convey
the idea-here that Governor Till
man is the Democratic party; but
he, as- the Governor under the
Democratic Administration, is its
exponent and will bo held respon
sible for its failures.
I might well, on the other hand
infer from your course, as the lead
ing editor of the State, that the
peace, and harmony, and unity of
the party can only be obtained by
the defeat of Governor Tillman.
This unity and harmony of the
party (if it has never been broken
under and by the leadership of
yourself, Williams and..Gonzales)
and if your paper, the ?reenville
News and other Demociatic papers
of the State had deal; as fairly
and as justly by the Democratic
Administration of Gorrnor Till
man as they had by otier Admin
istrations since 1876, the party
would now be united aid harmo
nious. When the Rinfwas nom
inating and the people electing, it
would have been a gre!! political
crime for the majoriy to have
shown their discontentby abusing
the Governor, who is tb exponent
of the Democratic part in South
Carolina.
Very truly youri?
JOHN L. IRBY.
Washington, D. C., FeL 19, '92.
A convention of the Republican
party of South Carolina -ns been
called to meet in Columbia on
[April 19th to elect de|gates to
their National Convention, which
June 7th.
{RD & COMP'Y,
\'?LL: ENGINE ail GB SUPPLY HOSE.
- GA.
and Supplies and Repairs t Bottom
ines in stock.
[TON GIN at Bottom Pries write
Prices of IMPROVED AJGUSTAi
ie recommendations of 1st year's j Wi
RC
m you write. jly301y [
_ - Hc
E LOOKING?
OR
B, WELL MADE CIT??ING
you to call when in Augita, and
got
TY & CO.
; Clothiers. '
3-A..
ed Poulty.
to breed the best, and diard the
YANDOTTES,
LNGLED HAMBURGS,
EGGS, $3.00 for 137 $5) for 28.
to see mv stock. Send r illus
E
F\ COOI,
al Merchandise
rILLE, S. C.
ton, ?S. O.
id; COTTON SEED 2AL;
NOVA SCOTIA LAND ASTER;
; SOUTH CAROLI>ME AL ;
;c; GROUND RAW BONI
GROUND DRIED ,OOD;
GROUND DRIED FIS1
IT;
!, product of the Due Atomi;
fflSH GRADE AND OF ?NIf'OR??ALlTY.
lorie Acid and Potash, ancre oom JI
its of our Staple Crops, andthe per
best materials.
. cash orders by the car load
.al Primers and ?rood artic on Aah
LEE
UND
hate Compay, OH
r, .-, s.e. I J
THE FARMERS LOAN AND SAVINGS BANK,
OF EDGEFIELD.
DIRECTORS:
J. NORRIS, W. H. TIMMEBMAN? *W. H. FOLK,
r. H: EDWARDS, N. A. BATES, W. R. PARKS.
N. F. ROATH, T. A. PITTS, A.E.PADGETT,
orrjieERs :
L J. NORRIS, President; W. H. TIM??BBMAI?,vice-President.
i. E. PADGETT, Cashier; FOLK & FOLK, Attorneys.
TRANSACTS A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
SAYIHGS DEPARTMENT':
Interest allowed on deposits in the Savings Department at the
ate of 4 per cent, per annum-when allowed to remain six months or
bnger-computed July and January. Any amounts received on de- '
>osit in the Savings Department, iroin 10 cents upwards. aprl5
McHugh Bro?.,
Edgefield, S, C.,
We have now removed to our new quarters on the corner next to
he Farmers' Loan and Savings Bank, where we shall be pleased to
ee and entertain our friends and the balance of. mankind, right
oyally.
That we are prepared to do this, a bare inspection of our inner
dornings will establish. Our ... ,
Liquors, Wines, Cigars, Etc., Etc., ?
re of the latest, best, and most approved brands. Give us one call
nd you will need no further invitation.
Respectfully,
McHugh Bros.
FOR A LARGE ASSORTMENT AND LOW PRICES,
-GO TO
R. FOX.
Edgefleld, S. C.
8. B. EVANS,
fe ano" Fine insurance (lol
EDG-EFIELD, S. C.
Kepresents the best and most liberal
omp?nies.
Edgefield and Johnston.
fe are Iii i|e King roi 1898
ith a full line of VEHICLES, WAGONS, BUGGIES, CARRIAGES
>AD CARTS and HARNESS
ALSO
?use Furnishing Good?, such as STOVER, BEDS, BEDSTEADS
LTTRESSES, Cotton and Spring, CHAIRS, SOFAS, &c, &c.
Give us a call and be o on vi need that we are in earnest in offering
>d good's-and fair prices to the people of Edgefield county.
EDGEFIELD ?nd JOHNSTON.
SCH WEIGERT,
Tile JeA^ellejr,
-732 Broad (Under Central Hotel,) Street,
OUI
fol
Schneider,
IMPORTEBS OF FINK
?Tines, Liquors and Cigars,
AMD* D2 ALEKB IN
Bourbon Rye and Corn Whiskey.
6oi and 8o2 Broad Street,
igh Prices for Cotton
\ MADE POSSIBLE BY INVESTING WHERE YOU CAN OBTAIN
1ST VALUES FOE LEAST CASH.
L. J
CB.?
Tl
lill
A GOOD TEAM
LOWE8T PRICES,
BEST GOODS.
Weare headquarters for BLANKETS, CLOAKS, DRESS GOODS,
?ERWEAR, and everything in Dry Goods.
Home and see us when you come to the city.
MULLARKY & HARTY
D
0.flce
O Broad St.,
Augusta, G-a.
OUR MOTTO, "PICK SALES AND SMALL PROFITS'"
h KELLI
AUGUSTA,
OA:.*
AGENTS FOR THE
"FAMOUS OLD MOBY Al TENNESSEE MI
BEST IN THE MARKET.
CARRIAGES,
BUGGIES,
ROAD CARTS,
HARNESS,
SADDLES,
TRUNKS,
VALISES,
BUGGY PAINTS
VARNISHES,
LEATHER,
SHOE FINDINGS.
( 959 Broad St., (
REPOSITORY, ] FACTORY, \ 914 Jones St.
( 946 Jones St. (
rHE BEST, CHEAPEST, AND MOST RELIABLE HOUSE.
O
co
>
fi
d
ll
Sf I
an*
Sis
Q pi ti
pippin
4
<D CQ fn
SCO-*
m 2 r?
'S
CC
co
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0
rf ^
?md--.
?P ra M S ? & (D
c? ? o
? ^ g g
THE
OW
Tears Standard,
Bright and smiling he comes to the front, and in his hand he
ds the banner inscribed with the name that has come to mean
much-quality, cheapness. More than ever this year will
. name stand to this. To demonstrate for a starter, we name the
lowing :
Ladies* Muslin Underwear.
Corset Covers, a lot to close, at 10c. each. Chemise, starting at 26c.
iwers, as low as 25c. Skirts, down to 50c. Nightgowns, going., at
., etc., etc.
Childrens' Embroidered Cloaks.
Infants' Long Cloaks from $1.50 to $10. Childrens' Short Cloaks
n $1.25 to $7. Everybody should see these goods, they are beauti
and are cheaper than you can buy the material for.
A Few Dozen Ladies* Fur Capes.
At slaughter prices to close. Hats and Millinery Goods offered
?rices that will save us the trouble to throw them out in the trash
when the season is over.
Close wholesale buyers invited to inspect our large and well as?
ed stock.
C. J. TT. BALK.
4 Broad street,_AUGUSTA, QA,
OHNSON, PRESIDENT. W. H. WILLIAMS, SUPERINTENDENT
LS. F. DE6EN, General Manager and Secretary and Treasurer.
IE
L
MANUFACTURERS OF
jnber,
Laths and
Shingles,
Doors,
Moul
ALL KINDS OF
ressed Lumber and General Building Material,
i, Factory and Yard,
Adams, Campbell, DWntignac and Jackson Streets,
4
.ings,
Blinds,
Augusta, Ga.

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