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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, June 05, 1895, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1895-06-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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__________Jr____
T1I0S. J. ADAMS, PROPRIETOR EDGEFIELD, S. C., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 1895. VOL. LX. NO. 19. ~
Pauperism is on tho wane in Ireland
but is increasing alarmingly iu Eng
land..
There were 1600 patents issued by
tho United States Patent Offico for
electrical inventions during thc year
1804.
Tho detailed report of tho Health
Department shows that Brooklyn is
healthier than any other of tho world's
great cities.
Tho trolleying process goes on,
notes tho New York Recorder. Ne w
Xork Central is to inn its excursion
business between Eufialo aud Niagara
Falls by trolley.
John Schultz, of Lautonbur- Wost
Frnssia, has invented a new kind oe
paper, but tho authorities will nut
allow its manufacture because whai
-^IlLyaiB ?ritten on it may bo washed
Oil' easily.
Tho French idea that France is a
good country to live ia is illastr.-its.l
by tho fact that the French immigrant
to this country iu the last fiscal year
numbered ou?y 3G?2 persons-2112
men and 1350 women.
"Thc advantages of kissing," FOJS
Dr. A. E. Bridges iu tho British Hied:
cal Journal, "outweigh its infinitesi
mal risk; for impr?vidos us with mi
crobes useful for digestion.'" Even
the strongert advocate of kit-sin? will
admit, opines the New York Tribune,
that this is a somewhat grewsomo aid
unpleasant view of osculation.
There is still mouey iu real estate iu
New York City, as is tkown by a tran
saction of two young brokera, F.ako
aud Dowling. Last December they
bought the old building on the south
west corner of Nassau and Liberty
streets for $031,000. They sold out
the property recently to a synd-'ente
for SI, 150,000; a profit of $300,000 in
three months is not so bad.
Secretary Morton declares that tho
plow has been less improved than nuv
other agricultural implement, and
that it packs down tho furrows it
turns over, making them impervious
to rainfall. Ho regards this matter of
6nch importanco that ho has Chan
cellor Canfield, of tho Nebraska Stato
University, to ask the 1600 students of
that institution to try to invent a new
plow.
in tho atmospheTo^^vTi?cl
unite with any other substance, prom
ises to be followed by other equally
important revelations in science. It
may bc, suggests tho San Francisco
Chronicle, that tho end of this century
will be marked by discoveries a3 far
reaching as those which revolutionized
science when Darwin's great theory
was given to the world.
In an articlo on tho commercial
value of weather forecasts published
in the Engineering Magazine, by E.
B. Dunn, he says that tho value of
lifo and property 6avcd in a single
great 6torm more than compensates
for thc cost of maintaining tho Weath
er Bureau. And doubtless he is right,
adds the New York World. The world
owes an unimaginably great debt to
Matthew Fontaine Maury, tho inven
tor of tho science of meteorology.
A well-known European engineer
who has been exploring the Panama
Isthmus for many years reports that
bo has discovered a route along the
Toto, Javiesa and Tayra Eivers by
which tho two oceans can be con
nected by a ship canal at a total cost
of not more than $13,000,000. The
most important work on the route
would be a tunnel under the Cordilleras
two miles long, which could bo built
for $11,000,000. Only two tidal locks,
ono on each sido of tho mouutaiu,
would be required.
The London Spectator praises Lord
Kosebcry for grauting a pension of o
hundred pounds a year to Y/illiam
Watson, and thinks he might also have
conferred the laureateship on him
without risking tho condemnation ol
any judgment worth considering. It
regards Swinburne as Watson's oulj
rival, and thinks that not even the
richness and melody of Swiuburne'e
early plays could outweigh "tho lofty
and sinularly crystal beauty of Mr.
Watson's eleg?aos aud the delicate
humor of his more familiar verso."
The recent voto in the British House
of Commons on the navy estimates
was more than ordinarily significant
aud impressive, declares the New York
Tribune. Tho estimates, as is well
known, aro unprecedentedly large.
They pr?vido for au increaso of naval
strength so vast as to startle even those
who are most familiar with the "bloat
ed armaments" of Europe. They com
mit Great Britain definitely and em
phatically to tba c <nstruction and
maintenance of a fleet 1 trgcr aud mor J
powerful than t?c combine 1 fleets ol
any other two Powers, if not, indeed,
of all the European Power-. TLioy
are such as would a few years ago have
aroused against them the opposition
of a formidable party in both House
and Nation. Yet on this occasion not
one man of serions importance raised
bis voice against them, and they went
through the House with culy luirtj
??f9 dissenting votes.
A Sim T SCENE.
HOW MADAGASCAR'S QUEEN DE
CLAKED AGAINST E1?AXCE.
"nrefootcd, and Clothed In n Second
Uand Whit? Satin Ball Dress
Madcby Worin, ShcEx
Iiorts Her People.
' Il ANGE'S enemy in Madagas
car, the dusty Queen Ean
avoloua Hf., against whose
army tho French invaders aro
advancing, on slate occasions appears
wearing a second-hand Worth ball
dress of fashion long gono by, and
with a bnrboric crown on her head
and nothing on her black feot. She
appears in tho great square of
AndriJho, at Tananarive, tho capital,
where ehff issues stirring proclama
tions to her people.
Tho scene is a picturesque one.
With one hand she grasps a sword and
with vehement gestures emphasizes
her exhortations, and with all tho pas
sionate eloquence of her race threat
ens, commands and prays her hearers
to take np arms against and exter
minate the hated white men who for
ten years have held tho Nation in
enroll.
The war is a holy one, sho declares,
ind the choicest blessings of the here
lfter will bo tho reward of thoso who
?all. She also promises substantial
rewards to tho victors who survive.
Tho Prime Minister's dress is no
ess striking. Its principal features
ire a sort of dolman of purplo satin
panglcd with gold, short trousers of
flute silk and long boots. About
ns waist ho wears a belt of yellow
eather studded with gems, from whioh
lADAGASCAE'S QUEEN IN A WORT!
(From a s
rings a Eword in ? golden scabbard,
ho aunt and sister of the Queen wear
ie nativo dress, with bare arms, their
mg black hair streaming over their
loulders.
The military profession has been an
npopular one in Madagascar of late
ears, because the amount of booty
nd pillage to be obtained has beeu
mall, and it has therefore boen diffi
ult to keep tho ranks filled. In timo
f peace recruiting goc3 on for three
nonths each year, but as eoon as a
nfficient complement has been ob
ained and drilling begin, desertions
ommence, and in a short timo tho
anks are badly thinned. Desertions
.re rarely punished unless the}' fail to
?ribo their superior officers; thoo
hey aro shot. Under the present cir
inmstances, despite tho Queen's burn
ng proclamations and harangues, the
volunteers have been few, for tho na
ives fear the French and do not
ove their tyrannical ruler.
Tho real monarch of Madagascar,
lowever, is not Queen Eanavolona
DI., or as sho prefers to be called, Ka
aavolomanjaky UL, but it is the
Primo Minister, Rainilaiarivony,
whom tho curious law of tho land
obliges to bo tho husband of the
Queen. Ho is now past seventy years
nf ago and has held his post for more
than thirty years, during which time
ho has been tho husband of turco dif
ferent queens. Ho it is who decides
all questions of state, and tho Queen's
part is merely to indorso his judg
ments, which she invariably docs.
The French Protectorate, which
was established after tho war of 1885,
has been bitterly opposed by Ilain
ilaiarivony, and his hatred of the
whites has brought about the present
conflict. Thc French, however, havo
moro to fear from thc fevers of thc
country than they havo from tho un
trained troops which aro being gath
ered with so much difficulty.
The Queen is well educated, thirty
five years old, and is fond of playing
draughts and chewing betel. Her
private expenses are paid from a fund
to which all who enter her presence;
are required to contribute a fivo-frauc
piece (ono dollar). Tho youngest
member of tho royal household pre
sents a hat in which tho money is
placed.-New York World.
Thc New Standard Dictionary gives
twenty ono eminent American author
ities, including Wendell Phillips and
George William du i is, who cay that
tho proper prooaucialiou of the word
'?jtrk"" is "clari?,"
<?U?EN ASSE HOUSES.
They
oro Popular, Although.
Name is Misleading.
(Copyright ISO?.)
Queen Anne will hava much to an
swer for if she is held acconntablo
for all the architectural abominations
that have been erected in her name.
During- the earlier days of this coun
try, tho major part of tho dwellings
tyere simple and plain and could give
but little direct offence to aesthetic
taste, even if lacking in some of the
prime requisites of beauty. Thc
larger and moro expensive honses
were, happily, almost without excep
tion, of tho ColoniaL etyle. and were
dignified, stately, comfortable and
substantial. But ns wealth became
more widely diffused and the tastes of
tho people grew moro pretentious,
architecture developed along lines
t?at wore ugly almost to tho verge of
the grotesque. Simplicity gave place
to elaboration that was without rhyme
ar reason. Instead of utility adorned,
which is, or should bc, the cud and
iiui of architecture, ornateness was
sought even at tho expense of utility.
Thc hideous structures of tho "GO's
iud 70's," which line "every street of
the older cities and dot every suburb,
svere tho result. Gradually these
ibominatious grew to havo a certain
limilarity and a name was needed for
he style.
Among tho different architectural
ty les tho Queen Anuo seemed to
invo the leant strongly marked pecu
inritios. It was a sounding title, and
he public, when it could not place a
[welling as Gothic, classic, Renais
anco, Colonial, or what not, gravoly
ubbed it Queen Anne. So it has como
bout in tho usage cf uninformedpco
lo that tho Qaccn Anno style of arch
I GOWN AND BARE FEET, DECLAP
ketch mad? by a French resident ia Madagc
ecturo has been widely perverted
om its technical aud original signiQ
mee.
This so-callod style is supposed lo
c founded on tho class of designs
lat were used to a largo extent at tho
eginning of tho eighteenth century,
ne buildings that wcro cr?ete i dnr
A QTJEEX AXXE VILLA.
ng tho reign of Queen Anno were
imple and plain, with classic cornices
,nd details, and frequently had largo
vindows that wcro often divided by
nullions. Somo of tho picturesque
eaturcs of tho old buildings are util
zed to tho best advantage in thc
nodern revised stylos, and au iutircst
ng example accompanies this articlo.
Tho porspectivo view is shown aud
he principal rooms and their sizos,
dosets, otc, will bo found by refer
m?e to thu lloor plans.
"??yJz\*\ ^i?r- ?V^'T
""Extreme width, inelnding veranda,
35 feet <i indies; depth, including
veranda, 49 reef.
Heights of stories: CMlar, <? feet
6 inches; first story, 8 feet 10 inches;
second story, 8 feet i indies.
Exterior ' ?iterfols j FonndfmoD,
brick; first story, clapboards; second
story, gables, dormers and roofs,
shingles. Outside blinds to all win?
do^va except those of the cellar.
Inferior finish: Hard white plaster,
! soft wood flooring and trim, ash
staircase, kitchen wainscoted, panels
under windows in parlor; interior
woodwork finished in hard oil.
Colors: Clapboards, dark greon;
trim, outside doors, blinds and rain
conductors, bronze green; sashes,
J ark red ; veranda floor, dark olive
drab; veranda ceiling varnished;
brickwork, Indian rtd ; -wall shingles
dipped and brush coated venetian red
3tain ; roof shingles dipped and brush
:oated with a darker red stain.
Accommodations: Collar under
kitchen, with concreto floor, but the
;ellar may extend under the whole
jouso or bo omitted entirely. Open
ireplnces in parlor, sitting and dining
UNG WAR AGAINST THE FRENCH
usc.ir.)
.ooms, with mantels over sanie. Vesti
)ulo door is mado to slide to avoid
nterference with passage to stairway.
Sliding doors connect dining and sit
;ing rooms ; back stairway to second
itairway. Sliding .doors, fireplaces
vnd mantels, and part of the veranda
nay bo omitted. Bathroom with
martial or full set of plumbing may be
introduced.
Cost: 82G87. This inoludes man
tels but not the range and heater;
the estimate based on New York
prices for materials and labor, but in
many sections of tho country the cost
should be less.
The name "Queen Anne" is quite
misleading, for the stylo partakes
more of tho nature of tho buildings
of the earlier Renaissance or of the
Elizabethan period than of those of
Queen Anne's reign. It has also bor
rowed from tho Renaissance of Ger
many and France, ns well as some of
its best features from the classic and
tho late Gothic styles. The Queen
Anne stylo is best fitted to villas and
structures of that order.
Veterans ot Foreign Birth.
In tho Togus (Mo.) Soldiers' Homo 5
a careful cstimato shows that tho num.- -
hers of foreign born and nativo in
mates aro about equal, although at
tho close of tho war tho former wore
in tho largo majority. This is easily
explained. Many of tho foroign bon
Union volunteers had no families i
this country. They wero young mer
ond when thc war loft thom wrecl
they perforco went to Togus and
tho other branches of tho Natior
Homo. The most of American hoi
of course, had relatives and homes
which they could go, and there tl
remained until actually obliged by
creasing years und infirmities to E|
tho homo.-Boston Transcript.
Governor Marvil's Foreboding
That Governor Marvil did nc
peet to live long is shown by his1
words. On tho day of bis inar"
tion, as ho rodo to tho Court !?
to take tho oath of office, h?rend
to Governor Reynolds, who w,e
occupant of the carriage with 1
"Governor, this is a great'10
me. lt is the proudest mornong
life, but I will not live lonf1'
Watson will bo Governor."'
Governor Reynolds told a f?J*
mato friend? of tho new G:/r?
remarks, but they never w<ye
public uulil UQW. -Af\\x?\^pf?) j
Newt;,
sf
SOD
or
eho
me]
sati
set
to f
ma!
and
clo!
des
bes
Elai
LATEST FASHIONS.
-
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ENG
LIS|i AND FRENCH MODES,
ron
Tho Frqnch Woman's Hat Is Perched
on Her Forehead, While Her Kng
ilsh;SLstcr is Very Priin-Loolc
ing-Beautiful Blouses.
ynryHEBE is still an enormous
I f ? difference between French
j J and English styles, and where
. *G J .one woman can wear tho lat
ter "with gratification to herself and
friends, another looks much better
and prettier in Parisian-mado gowns,
soys.a Paris fashion letter to the Nev/
York Jo ornai.
To begin with the hat, the French
woman wears that right on tho top of
her forehead, her hair is dressed very
wide at-the sides and very closo to the
nape ofr her neck in tho back; her
skirt , is) extremely full in front,. her
jacket left open, and quantities of rib
bons and laces adorn her neck.
Her English sister, on the contrary,
is very jprim in appearance; the hat
Bets far "back, showing an expanso of
fringein front and large coils in tho
baok; the fullness of tho skirt is only
in the bjiok, and tho blouso is invari
ably of simple detail, with a neat box
plait down the front, guileless of lace.
Speaking of blouses, I saw somo
genuine.beauties in tho 6hops yester
day, oui accordingly send you some
4^
SOME PBETTY PAB1
ats of my favorites, being sure you
ill appreciate tho novel and dainty
fiEales^_
espousing. Vandykes ol ecru "fSf!
uipurc, now laid over violet velvet,
ow faljling loosely over tho chiffon,
nrich-'tho blouse and delight the eye.
In No. 2 thero is a largo collar of
rhite muslin and lace, over a Chine
ilk blouse, shot-gray and red, and
howered over with tinny black spots.
No. 3 is exceedingly Parisian in
one, made as it is of soft heliotrope
lurah silk and tau lace insertion. The
'rout is a mass of tiny tucks, broken
1?re md there by a band of insertion.
Lt is cf the pouch order and fastens at
;ho side, while the back, which cor
responds in trimming, is close-fitting.
Puled elbow sleeves aro held into
tho am by a twist of silk.
Poe helotrope surah is also used in
the take-up No. 4, which boasts of a
box lait and zouavo jacket of lace.
Nc 5 is quite a novelty in black
stoclnette, with apricot silk slocves
-an note the daintiness-collar, box
plait dotted with groups of three
Bmal buttons. The design may bo
repeted in white or any colored silk.
IrNo. G the bodice is of shot-rose
ondancy surah silk, spotted. Tho
cirdar yoke is trimmed with two
bans of tiny gathers, which almost
resnble a necklot, and the collar
bai is fulled at tho sides.
?jere is no doubt that alpaca is to
be very serious rival to crepon as a
fado nable fabric, and many dresses
fo ordinary wear aro mado of 'this
meriah In all cases the lawn collar,
ecd with lace, is an enormous im
plement to an alpaca coat.
i gloves the latest thing is a cano
ccred chevrette, finished with Victor
pats, black or self-colored, and four
l?e pearl buttons. Lavondor and
vto kids will also bo much worn.
?u
wi
an
"de
am
tat
wa
?C:
mi
eic
CAPES AND JACKETS.
?he capes are shorter, fuller and
jntier than ever and stand out over
i volaminous sleeves with grace and
rnity. The ones to match the dainty
ie hats aro of accordion pleated
iffon with racking around edge and
ck and yoko trimming of the finest
;ted lace. They como midway to
e waist and tho front} aro slightly
intod, long cuds of ribbons com
bing tho dainty effect. Very hand
tbc
thc
C??
bli:
ite
DAINTY CHIFFON CAT-E.
ie velvet styles full sweep military
pointed fronts are finished with
rter capes of hand cut jot passe
rs :.erie or medallions of jet with a
in niche on edge and ucck. Sun
moire capes aro likely to he worn
lome extent with skirts of tho same
?.erial, and combined with chiffon
jet they aro very handsome, fn
;h appliqued on satin or silk the
?gus outline I willi jet are ninny
uti fal examples, both iu hl?iek and
io colors, and bead ?iud jot ein
idery aro also Heep.
jus
phi
bk
sor
sta
wo
tba
kef
for
fae
rec
\
ms
me
eic
eve
of I
or
em
sor
It i
fuh
to 1
tho
of!
a m
the
by
gre
lion
thai
aim
?pei
lint
well
No
it w
jute
vote
lite
R??t
fash
11*9
__________Jr____
T1I0S. J. ADAMS, PROPRIETOR EDGEFIELD, S. C., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 1895. VOL. LX. NO. 19. ~
Tho Nestor o? thc Stage.
No living mau, says the Now Yo??
Advertiser, is better qualified to speak
on "Dramatic Art" than tho veteran
actor, Joseph Jefferson, whoso portrait
is given herewith. Ho lectured on
that subject recently before tho eel
lecians of Yale. Mr. Jefferson con
JOoCrn JEFFERSON.
demned in strong terms the practico
of Yule and many colleges giving no
attention to puro drumatic art, and of
giving farce comedies, such as "Mr.
Napoleon," the play now in prepara
tion by tho Yalo secret societies. Mr.
Jefferson looked on the custom as a
sign of degeneracy.
wu ' ?
How Brick Tea is Made.
Great quantities of tea aro exported
to Bussia and Mongolia overy year in:
the sbapo of bricks, writes Frank G.'
Carpenter. These aro made of the
lower grades of tea and of tea dust.
The leaves are ground up and steamed
and cooked until they aro soft and
mushy. They are then put into
molds about tho size of an ordinary
brick and aro pressed into shape, so
that they become as hard as chocolate
cakes. The finer varieties aro molded
into small cakes, in fact, of just about
the size of tho small cakes of sweet
?hocolate which you buy in the candy
?tores. I visited several of the fac
tories in Hankow, which make this
dud of tea, and the process was even
ess appetizing than that which I de
scribed as to the ordinary tea. The
'actories, in the first place, are very
varna. The steaming tea is handled
ay dirty coolies, and is sweetened by
jerspiration. After the bricks aro
inished they are carried by boats up
he rivers and canals to Tientsin, and
rom thence go on camels into Mon
golia and on to Russia,. Thf>T> -
ibont sixty bricks in on?
hey are so arranged th : they can" bo j
arried on camels. Tl.. tea
akes the place of mo J.;
?arts of Asia, and .
lasses as currency, each
rorth from fifteen to t
4?^_J?fltt??pls_j^vido a '
ne largesW>i tneTE5?a=5? . -
n Hankow, "and 3 mot Bu !
vho were makin" fortUL
hipping brick % " Bus;
if the factories -
honsand hands, .
lmost as great as that of sh ippia;
ea to Europe,
fe
m
ci
cl
in
Bl
fe
ot
or
ar
wi
ie.
til
th
cr!
??cw United States Army Cap.
Herewith is presented a picture of the
ow cap for the United States Army, a
ap that seems to be a much more sensi
le piece of headgear than the one which
i will displace after July 1, as to of
cers, and after January 1, 1896, for
nlisted men. Those among army
fficers who see no necessity for
lange criticise the . now cap as being
?void of what they term "military
aartness," but nono of them has as
it attempted to assail the cap as a
.actical piece of wearing apparel,
nong the advantages it has over tho
osent headgear tho most conspicu
LS ono is that it will stay on tho head
thout being held; another advan
50 is the sloping visor, which affords
ateful protection to the eyes.
ashington Star.
Laid a Live Chick.
Albert Martin, who lives near tho
ilton County lino, in Indiana, has a
vinonth Bock hen that has not been
.ing for some time. Yesterday she
nt on tho nest and the family was
satly astonished to find, upon her
,ving it shortly afterwards, that she
cl laid a live chick. Only a few
gments of the sholl wero about its
id, and it was still wet. Tho theory
sauced is that tho ogg, in some mau
r retarded in its progress, was held
tho sao until germ developed uud
jceoded to tho stage of incubation,
far as is known, this is the first case
the kind on record.
Vnother remarkable lusus natural is
it of a pig owned by Frederick
ipman, of Pulaski County, Indiana,
ich was born recently with its tail
cctly in the middle of its forhcad
1 with nostrils nu Ide of its snout
a a duck's. Unfortunately its
ther lay upon it and smothered it
tho second night of its arrival or it
?ht have proved a valuablo find for
10 museum.-San Francisco Exam
Fishing lor (?rense.
L curious sight followed tho launch
tho St. Paul yesterday, when twen
Sve or thirty rowboats, manned by
mg men amt boy?, who evidently
1 au eye to busiuess, were sent
mining over the surface of the river
search of tallow. When a vessel is
nehed tho tallow with which the
rs aro greased Hies out iuto tho
?er in great quantities. ' The boat
2 aro not slow to take advantage of
i opportunity to earn a few dollars,
[ almost before the St. Paul came
i standstill yesterday the water was
ted with the ekiflfl, and all the
ilab?e tallow was gathered in. This
old back to the dealers and used
r again,- Philadelphia Becord,
ho
th.
ne:
i
fei
mi
su;
an
tin
tin
are
cei
of
sta
ton
woi
fon
no
I
qui
inc
fen:
resi
in I
wit
gra
mei
the
not
I
T
Yor
roac
inet
first
trie
can
mea
on t
lng
mar
app?
engi
and
opoi
raili
mile
and
due i
cuse
trac
syst
dire
of
on a
ing
For
sing
own
prac
Anti
eleel
curr
equi
engi
call}
com
tho
with
prop
Tho
as ci
is al
Sing
tem
bett(
vals.
show
p03Sl
own
pliai]
for p
So:
stool
A NEW SWINDLE
which the people of the South
arc-resonting, is the efforts of
some to sell them imitations for
the real Simmons Liver Regu
lator, because they make ,more
money by the imitation ;w and
they care little that they swindle
the people in selling them an
inferior article. It's the money
they are after, and the people can
look out for themselves. Now
this is just what the people are
doing, and merchants are having
a hard time trying to get people
to take the stuff they offer them
in place of Simmons Liver Reg
ulator-which is the "King of
Liver Medicines," because it never
fails to give relief in all liver
troubl?s. Be sure that you get
Simmons Liver Regulator. You
know it by $0fi?????f?&& the same
aid stamp W^^^s^j of the Red
Z on the package.
Lt has ^?^plfo never fail
ed you, ^^^^J?| arjd people
?vho have ^^^?^gjg been per
suaded to take something else have
il ways come back again to The
Did Frieud. Better not take any
hing else but that made by J. H.
NEILIN & Co., Philadelphia.
WOMEN AND CRIME.
ew of the Fair Sex Among New
York's Prisoners.
In tho official reports mado by the
olico Department a separate record
i kept of tho felonies. These form a
?latively small percentage when
om pared with the total number of
rrests, and a peculiar thing about
lem is that very few women aro
mong the prisoners. According to
ie official report of tho last quarter,
! 1.G81 arrests in New York foK.
ilonies only 92 woro women, while
f)S9 were men.
Of tho ninety-two women, fifty
oro than half-woro charged with
.imo of larceny; fourteen were *
?arged with an offense which is
ade a felony by statute, attempted
licido; eight wore charged with
lonious assault, usually against an
her woman ; three with burglary,
ie with bigamy, ono with perjury,
id one with forgery, raie among
jmen.
In the total of arrests thirty-six dif
rent crimes aro represented, and in
orr v.-.-.- i ?. :V??'.??>. o ni y. .At
0 hoad'of th? lis?.-was t ho odious
im? of arson, nnd lower down wero
" " fc.Ibo-v,. conni"rfc-il-in"
:*ig emir, to fte it." .
'. -nbe/zler :?.
Harge it ha?> os
. -'....,n H*. U/ J
:? . ^..^.<ix?-~.\>r?l - r-y -
; ?; has IM r-r ? .
&h t.. ?c ,
\ ' *ri T.; be>?zloraent3
.0 as tb hu pract?f
.. and the standard of
nosty has been greatly raised by
eir employment in offices and busi
ss houses generally,
lhere are some things about the
ony record of the police depnrt
>nt which do not appear upon the
rfaco. Thus the number of arrests
d prosecutions for bigamy are four
aes more numerous among men
m among women. If novelists
1 to be believed, duplicity and do
t are much oftener characteristic
women than of men. Yet for the
tutory legal crime of false pre
ses there were no arrests among
men in the lust quarter, and it is
dly to be hoped that there was
occasion for any.
?ho homicide record of tho last
irter was not so large as usual. It
luded thirty-four malo and four
mle prisoners. There were no ar
ts for murder, and it is very rare
few York that a woman is charged
h that offense, in its highest
de, though tho victims of pre
Jitated murderous assaults are in
groat majority- of cases women,
mon.
Electricity for Railroad Trains.
he announcement that tho New
k, New Haven and Hartford rail
l has made a contract with a prom
it electrical company for tho
? part of its equipment with dec
al motors has a signilicancejwhich
hardly be overestimated. It
,ns that tho march of electricity
he domain of steam in railroad
has reached a stage from which
ly of the vague generalities and
arently wild theories of electrical
neprs aro looming up into distinct
startling possibilities. The
.ation of electric locomotives on
roads of fifty and ono hundred
is is now under consideration,
electrical experts aro already re
ng to tho level of a business dis
lion tho question of electrical
tion of heavy trains. The. ideal
em has yet to bo evolved ; but tho
ct curront throe wiro system
not less than 1,000 volts
, side, using tho rail as a balanc
conductor, is freely advocated,
traffic requiring frequent stops,
le cars, each equipped with its
motor, according to present
tice, could bo used. Professor
liony is convinced that even now
brically propelled trains, deriving
ent from centr-il stations
ppod with the best high duty
nos, can be run more economi
r than trains drivon by steam lo
otives, and any improvement in
maintenance of high efficiency
varying speed will give electrical
ulsion a still greater advantage,
greater flexibility of tiie electric,
>mpared with the steam service,
ways a groat point in its faVor.
lo cars running at frequent in
ils accommodate thc public far
?r than long trains at long inter
And, as Professor Anthony
s, such frequent single cars aro
i Lie from each car becoming its
locomotive, the operating ap
ices occupying no room available
assongers.
ME men aro like one-leggei milk
a-no good unless sa.t up93,

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