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Yorkville enquirer. [volume] (Yorkville, S.C.) 1855-2006, September 09, 1875, Image 4

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Sfamcrousi ?epattwent.;
IX OX I ox THEBE IS STRENGTH., v
- ' * " fc ? - /
The Governor of Ohio, whom a great many
people irreverently caFl "Old Bill Allen," in
his younger days had not only a voice closely
allied to seven-fold thunder, but was' a
shrewd practical lawyer. His rude demolition
of sentiment once gained him a case.
General Murphy, a member of the Chillicothe
bar, thirty years ago was one of the most
noted advocates that rode the circuits of Ohio.
He could weep profusely over the most hardened
criminals and sbed quarts of real tears
whenever the occasion required it. The results
was that he usually carried the jury
with him. On one occasion General Murphy
was engaged to defend a noted horse thief in
Itoss county, while the State secured the services
of Gov. Allen. The usual routine was
gone through with, and the prisoner's guilt
tlfiin ?? / >1 AO *>1 r. /lorvt AnnfwA^A/] U It f AHA *?0 1
?? U3 pictl-j tiCftlJJ UCUJUUObI flLCllj UUt UOllCiat
Murphy relied upon working up the sympathies
of the jury. His effort was unusually
brilliant, and toward the close of his appeal
tears rolled down his cheeks in torrents,
while the jurors rubbed their eyes with their
cuffs. All this time Allen sat stiff and upright,
glaring with dry and frozen eyes upon
Murphy. When the latter wound up with
a final burst of eloquence and tears, which
left the whole audience sniffling, Ohio's tall
Governor, that was to be, straitened himself
to his fullest height, and pointing his long
bony finger at the jury, said: "Gentlemen,
there is such a thing as blotting out justice
with tears and confounding judgment with
very much weeping. General Murphy understands
this better thau any living man. But
before his tears work an absolution of the sin
hardened criminal at the bar, and cheat the
state prisou of its dues, I wish to show the
fountain from whence these tears flow so copiously."
With one swope of his long right
arm he was down in General Murphy's coat
pocket and withdrew an immense red onion,
denuded of its outer covering, and holding it
aloft before the eyes of the astonished jurors,
he continued : "The ancient Egyptians worshipped
the onion because it was typical of
.1 - ?i Tr :? / L
me ceiesnai spnerea. nere iu vyuiu ?c u?vc
good reason to curse it, because in General
Murphy's pocket it has so often cheated the
gallows and the prison of their dues." The
prisoner was convicted, and Gcueral Murphy
never rubbed his handkerchief on a peeled onion
again when Old Bill Allen had the other
side of the case.
DEPRECIATION OF VALUE.
A very intelligent old darkey was met by
an ante bellurn friend the other day, for the
first time since the war, and the old man's
delight in seeing one of the Massa's tickler
friends in old times was unbounded. After
a hearty hand-shaking and a protracted laugh
peculiar to the Southern darkey, the gentlemau
asked :
"Weil, Uncle Joe, how are you getting
along in the world ?"
"Sorter slow Marse . Been had rheu
matiz right smart lately, and things ain't going
exactly right any how," replied the dar
key.
"A great many changes have taken place
since I last saw you, Uncle Joe. Death hae
taken your old master away, the family are
scattered about the four quarters of the globe
the farm is divided up, and strangers occupj
the old house. It makes one feel right sad
Uncle Joe, to think of the changes that have
been wrought by old Father Time."
"Yaas," replied Uncle Joe. "You 'member
when I was a slave I worked hard at odd
times, and made money 'nuff to buy myself
I paid old massa 81,000 for ray freedom."
"Yes," said Mr. , "I distinctly remera
ber it."
"Wish I had dat money now," mused the olc
darkey.
"Well, yes," replied Mr. ; "it would
be quite a fortune for you."
"Lots 'o fortune, Sar," said the old man
mournfully, "and every time I think about
it I kinder rue de bargain. Nigger was wufl
a thousand dollars then, but now he ain't
wuff a cuss. Mighty changes in this world,
massa."? Vichburg Uerald.
How He Made Himself at Home.?
"Make yourself at home," is a common form
of hopitable welcome; but the invitation maj
be awkwardly taken advantage of if youi
friend happened to be odd. "The Nashville
Banner says :
The eccentric "Brother Carr," whose name
has become a nousenoia wore in mis city,
once paid an informal visit to a good religious
family, as he was in the habit of doing when
he came to Nashville. The lady of the house
came iu, but after some time excused herself
to atteud to some household duty, but begged
Brother Carr to make himself at home.
When she returned she found the reverend
gentleman on his knees in front of the fireplace,
taking up the ashes. Perfectly taken
aback at this spectacle, she said:
"Why, what in the world are you doing?"
He answered:
"You told me to make myself at home; and,
if I were at home and the ashes needed taking
out as badly asyour's, I would do it myself."
She was not much comforted to find that
he had been out in the back yard, and had
hunted up an old ash pan with as much idea of
being at home as she could have possibly desired.
A Bald Head?It has been generally supposed
that a bald head was of no account, even
to the owner, but Vicksburg stands up and
remarks to the contrary. The other day a
resident of that city went up to Thompson's
Lake to get a shot at the big alligator, and
while eating a cold bite iu the shade, a man
jumped over the fence, presented an old array
musket at his head, and cried out:
"Stranger, unkiver yer head !"
The Vicksburger was dumbfounded, but
made haste to remove his hat and exhibit a
pate which shone like a newly-polished pilpaw.
"Stranger, that saves ye?" continued the
man, as he shouldered the musket; "I thought
ye was the red-headed peddler who charged
iny wife seventy-five cents for a testiraent
which hasn't got a darned picture in it!"
By The Roots.?A geutleraan, wishing
some bushes removed from bis garden, tola
his gardener to pull them up by the roots.
Some time after, he went into the garden, and
fouud the gardener digging trenches around
the bushes. "Why, George," he said, "you
need not dig around those small bushes in
that way. I am sure you are strong enough
to pUl them up by the roots." "0, yes, sir,"
replied the gardener, "I am strong enough,
but-1 oust dig a little before I can get hold
^the toots. If you had told me to pull
by the branches, I could easily
--'moved them without digging."
Op<??UR8f k*111 j'n.?A middle-aged woman
fell as she was deso..^ a pairofstaire
on Jefferson Avenue yesterj5 and the first
man to help her reach her feet a banker
who happed to be passing.
"Did you fall, madamhe inquired,
seized her arm.
"Fall! Of course I fell, you fool, you
You don't suppose I'd sit down here to rest
do you ?" she snapped.
He didn't say.
Left Behind.?An Irishman got out of his
carriage at a railway station for refreshments,
but unfortunately the bell rang and the train
left before he had finished his repast. "Hould
on!" cried Pat, as he ran like a madman
after the car, "hould on, ye murtherin ould
stame iujin ; ye've got a passenger on board
that's left behind."
S&~ "It is a settled principle, your honor,'
said an eminet lawyer, "that cause alwayi
produce effects." "They' always do for the
lawyers," responded the judge; "but I've
sometimes known a single cause to deprive a
client of all his effects."
-4
! JUtintltel f cHartwcilt.
^ f " ' IP> 7 2. > <t ? ,_j
[From (lie Southern Plainer and Farmer.
/.rr'MJr
COST OF FENCING.
When I look around me in this eulighteued
nineteenth century, with my political economy
study capon, and see the stupendous folj
lies of people, for want of what they always
claim to have in a high degree, a little c^mraon
sense, and the waiit of sensible concurrent action
to achieve important results, I have no
hope of a millennium in agriculture, or anything
else, and believe the "dies ine" will come
and find the fool-killer's work not half ae!
complished.
In this day of degenerate politicians, how!
ever, who never attempt to enlighten the peo|
pie, but follow iu the wake of crude public
j opinion, as sharks in the wake ofa vessel'; who
listen for the "vox populi" with ears as erect
as a wild Indian who catches the sound of his
; game upon the passing breeze ; who are all for
' personal success, and nothing for principle or
me cuuiiuuu weai?mere jb uu iiupe iur ub
i but to await a change in the tide, and hope
I almost against hope, that a better day will
j dawn. Some year or so or ago there appeari
ed in an agricultural paper the broad asser|
tion that the cost of fenoiug in the State of
j Pennsylvania was equal to the whole value of
the live stock in the State. This was so remarkable
a statement as at once to attract our
attention. | ( { / ) j ' f \
To make some approximate estimate of the
cost of the fencing to the people of Virginia, is
the object of the preseqt^ article,, and whilst
the data are insufficient or not sufficiently accurate,
perhaps, to arrive at a high degree of
approximation, low estimates h*v? been advisedly
taken, that the actual costs shall
rather exceed than fall short of the results obtained.
... .... ..
From the statistics of Agriowlture in 1870,
we find that in* the State of Virginia, as at
present organized, there were 73,849 farms of
all sizes; and that of improved lands, exclusive
of wood lauds and other unimproved
lands, there were 8,165,040 acres. This gives
, 110 acres as the average size of the farm of
improved lands necessitating a fence. If we
I add ten acres additional to cover the wood
I and other lands under fence, we may safely
I assume, we think, that the averaire farm in
our State requiring to be enclosed is about 120
acres, or 1200 square four-pole chains. If we
suppose this farm to be in the form of a square
which, of quadrilaterals, gives the minimum
feucing for the area enclosed, the side of the
square would be 23.64 chains, or as a very
close approximation, 762 yards. If divided
into six rectangular tields, the amount of fen1
cing required would be seven times as much,
1 or 5,334 yards.
Allowing 400 rails for every hundred yards
of an ordinarily good fence, we have, to enclose
properly the average farm, 21,336 rails.
The rails are worth per hundred in both the
timber and mauliug about 81.10 say, upon an
' average through the State ; though as we have
uo means of verifying this hypothesis, it may
not be a very near approximation, yet the
true value would probably exceed the amount
assumed as our basis, as 100 good railjB would
make a cord or more of wood, and the cost ol
' mauling is from 50 to 75 cents per hundred
' in different sections.
This gives say, 235 dollars as the cost oi
' the rails necessary to enclose the average
square farm. But this beiug the most eco|
nomical form of enclosure for four-sided areas,
' and not adhered to in practice, we may safely
assume in consideration of the crooked fences
j and irregular forms of our fields, 8250 dollars
as a still closer approximation. Now comes
' in the additional expense of hauling and fen
i .L. J:_4
CIDg. >v e suppose hi me average uisinuut
for hauling rails at different seasons of the
year, nine loads per day with a two-horse
team, and 33 rails at a load would be a suffiI
ciently high estimate. This would make 300
rails per day. If we assume the cost of hauling
and the addition expenses of fencing the
' 100 rails to be two dollars, a low estimate, the
f cost of fencing the 21,336 rails would be 142
dollars, and allowing the small amount of
eight dollars for the irregularity of fields as
' above, 150 dollars.
Thus we have 400 dollars as an approximate
result for the outlay necessary to fence
in 120 acres of land with a good new enclos,
ure into six fields.
It would therefore require an outlay to en,
close the 73,849 farms in the manner and upon
the basis adopted, $29,539,900, or twenty,
nine and a half millions of dollars. The
value of all the livestock in the State by the
! same census was $28,187,669?over twentyeight
millions.
Even if a four-field enclosure be adopted,
the expense would be six-sevenths as much,
or it would do away with only one division
line, and the cost would be over twenty-five
millions. We may safely assume, then, that
the cost of good new enclosures for all the
farms of the State equals the value of their
live stock. Granting that these enclosures
require to be replaced every twelve years, we
have here a little item of nearly two and a
half millions of annual expenditures sunk in
! fences to keep out stock, two millions of which
could be saved by requiring all farm stock to
be fenced in, in standing pastures, or by
moveable fences that could be durably con
structed.
It should be observed also that the smaller
the farm the greater the relative expense, as
it requires just half as many rails to enclose
25 acres as prescribed, as it does to enclose
100 acres. The poor man and small farmer
is thus much more interested in this matter
than he has ever been taught to cousider, but
i as we said before, our public men and lawmakers
never attempt to teach the people up
to economic laws, but rather mount the rostrum
to teach them how to vote.
We omit here the losses incident to our agriculture
from successive droughts, which by
some are supposed to be due in part to the
destruction of our forests. This is, however,
controverted. Though we have paid no special
atteution to this subject, either as to its
AAnmktt aw nfofiofi/ia if ora onv ynliu.
[JI1UU9UJJU v \JI Oiauoui/O, 11 bugiu c*i ^ uuj IUIM
ble?which we doubt. Yet one fact is worthy
of consideration, and that is, that waters
which fall to the earth are rapidly collected
into streams and move off to the ocean presenting
very little surface for evaporation,
whilst the immense amount of water caught
aud held for evaporation by the great forests
of a contineut, cau be better appreciated by
the little urchin, who inveigles his playmate
under a tree to shake down a heavy shower
upon him, than the philosopher who has forgotten
his boyish tricks.
But we leave this to the philosophy that
rides upon the wings of the wind, and shoulders
all responsibilities upon the gulf stream.
What say the editorial fraternity of your city,
yourself included. We believe they all speak
ex cathedra on kindred subjects, and English
Grammar. C. J. KEMPER.
Fresh Air for Horses.?Horses, as they
roam wild over their native plains of Arabia
and Persia, or over the prairies of Texas
and Mexico, are not the delicate and diseased
animal we find in our stables, and the great
reason for this is that in their wild state they
have abundance of exercise and fresh air.
"k Erse's excrement decomposes rapidly and
nils the ofokln arith ammnnin. arid n&rbonic
acid. We\*ar sometimes said that a horse
stable is a he^ky place, and the care of
horses a healthy bujne8Si Let those believe
, this who can. A groom ,pay be healthy in
consequence of his exercise *ad drives, but
[ not in consequence of his conti^^ent in a
[ stable. In most of the stables which see,
! | we should never set our foot if we could aVoi<j
1 i it. We should expect to carry away in our
| | clothes and hair enough ammonia to manure
! a small potato patch. A person may become
accustomed to breathe this vitiated air and
' not mind it, just as he can become accuss
tomed to the smoke of tobacco ; but that am5
monia or tobacco smoke improves the healthj
fulness of the air, is too big a dose of falsehood
l for us to swallow.?Alexander Hyde, in
New York Times.
j Reading Iff*
OOJfDUCTKD BY * *" " '
j REV. ROBERT LATHAN.
[Original.]
"I WISH I WERE A CHRISTIAN."
I These, or words of similar ; import, are not (
(infrequently heard. It is no uncommon thing i
i to hear persons publicly declare that they are J
| not, but they sincerely desire to be Christians. *
1 Itseems uncharitable to question either the 1
honesty or sincerity of any individual. This
j we will not do; but there is something strange,
j something inexplicable about the condition
J <jf?he mau *who'desire$ to,be a Christian and J
! yet is not. If he desires to be a Christian, why ; *
is he uot? Who or wlmt.preveuU him. from j
being a Chris tiay ? Upon whom does the j j
'blame of this tnihg rest ?
The excuses which men offer for not ma- king
a public profession of religion are often .
j weak and silly. We have heard of individ-1
j uals who objected to connecting themselves
| with any branch of the Christian church be- (
cause they found something defective either '
, in-the jrioctrines or in the mode of worship of
all denominations of Christians. This is true.
Christ gave the world a perfect church, just as 1
God gave us a perfect world ; but the latter
was marred by man's sin'and the former corrupted
by man's innovations. There is not <
an iustitution on earth?human or divine?
with which man has had any thing to do, but
he has, in some way or other corrupted. There (
is nothing on earth perfect, in" the' sense that
it is not in some way or other corrupted by
man. But with all the innovations which
man has made, the church is the. purest institution
itf the World. 'The individual who objects
to the church on account of human cor;
ruptiona, to be'consistent, must object to every
j institution and relationship which exists
amongst men.' He who refusesi to connect
himself with the church because of defects, ]
should cut himself off from all connection with
any and every member of the human family, J
and isolate himself from all association with
any of his race. Really, to harp about corruption
in the church, is as silly as it is fallacious.
There is less error in the church, as it
now exists amongst men, than can be found
?.u'tUA
ttu y |iiatc cisc uciitain liio sinning ouu.
* Alt tliafethose ?who say tbey wish'they were
Christians mean, is they desire the present
comforts which Christians enjoy anil, the eter,
nal joy which awaits them in another world.
They love the ways of the world and the carlial
pleasures of sin. They have rto*eal dosire
1 to serve God. They dread the punishments
which follow siu, but they love ardently the
' practice of sin. There is not one holy desire
, in their breasts. .Their desires are selfish.
; They would not, for auy consideration, abani
don the practice of sin. If in reality they
desired to be Christians, then they would be
Christians, for there is uo barrier in the way
. but their desires.
s [Original 1
NOT SAVED.
1 "The harvest is past, the summer is ended,
( and we are not saved." Jeremiah 8: 20. No
, doubt these words will be, in substance, rei
peated by countless multitudes of our race.
In grace as in nature, there is seed time and
1 harvest. Spring, summer, autumn and win1
ter. He thatbeiug often reproved hardeneth
his neck, shall suddenly be destroyed and that
without remedy. Prov. 29 :1. Such is the
condition of things. God is long-suffering, i
i slow to wrath and of great pity, but there is .
a point beyond which the offers of grace do
not extend. The Lamb of God is also the j j
Lion of the tribe of Judah. He who to-day i
offers pardon through His peace-speaking 1
blood, being spurned and despised, may, to.
morrow, hurl the guilty soul into hell. Then, J
in accents of woe, the soul will begin to re- i
peat the words of the prophet: "The harvest (
is past, the summer is ended and I am not
saved." How sad to see an immortal soul
banished to that gloomy abode of sin and
hopeless sorrow. How agonizing to part for- ,
ever from all that is good. t i
That such will be the final destiny of ]
"many" we are assured by our Saviour. What J
proportion of the human family will be saved, 5
no one can say. We are warranted, however, 1
in saying that Jesus will say to many on the
great day of final, assizes, "I never knew you. j
Depart from me ye cursed." ,,
Now, every sensible man must admit that '
there is something awful in the thought of
going to hell. Men may say they are not
afraid to die, and no doubt there are some so i
far from being afraid to die, that they desire
to die; but no sane man can say he does not
fear to go to hell. Instinctively the soul
shrinks back from such a thought. Devils
dread God's wrath. Hell is as full of fear as t
it is of suffering. Fear will never cease to 't
exist iu the world of woe. Hope dies, but ?
fear?dread, immortal fear?grows and Hour- j!
ishes.
Why then should any, at last, when too ] f
late, exclaim lost? Who will be blamed for !
the loss of an immortal soul ? It is not on
account of any defect in the plan of salvation.
No one will be able at last to complain that
he is lost because of some defect in the pro- '
visions of the gospel. Neither are any lost
on account of the inflexible decrees of God. 1
In 110 place in the word of God, so far a3 we : s
know, is it said or even intimated that men I J
are lost because of the decrees of the Almighty, i <
This is your condemnation or this is the rea-;.
son that the sentence of your condemnation | t
will be executed. "Light has come into the I .
world and ye chose darkness rather than J
1- A! 1 ?,1 l <
ilgni. i>LUU aiu UUUUUlUliuu utwiuau iiicj nic
sinners, and they are driven into the pit of
perdition because they reject the Saviour.
Thk Contrast.?A faithful Christian uses , Jj
the name of God reverently, spreads his word ?
before him, calls on him from the heart? (
praises him, confesses him.
The wicked man does exactly the contary;
treats God's word as a fable, blasphemes him, '
curses meu j
A Christian holds the office of the preacher j
dear, hears and learns God's word with ear- ''
nestness and diligence. j1
The wicked does the contrary; despises the 1
preacher's office, hears God's word carelessly,' j 1
or notat all.
A true Chrstian honors and obeys, for God's i
sake, parents, magistrates, ministers, teaclier9. 1
The other obeys not parents, serves and ;'
helps them not, nay, dishonors, despises, and t
troubles them; despises them when they are I
old, infirm, and childish ; obeys not authority. 1 1
A man of true heartenvies not his neigh- j {
' bor, speaks not evil of bita, bears no ill-will
against him, desires no revenge, helps him as 1 .
much as he can.
The other hates, envies, rejoices in his j
| neighbor's trouble, is busy with slanderous re-1
| ports. ! f
j A God-fearing mau lives temperately and ,
' | "hastely ; the other the contrary, in thought, J
1 woH, and act.
! A go^d man maintains himself by labor,
lends, helps, and gives to the needy. j
The other taU<s every advantage. A good
man speaks evil ot no man?yea, even if he
; knows that his neighbor is guilty, he covers
j his sin with love.
I The other backbites, detracts, misinterprets 1 c
I betrays. j
' A. WILLI FORD, !
KOCK HILL, S. C.
MORE YOUNG HORSES.
[NOW have on hand, at my Stable in Rock
Hill, S. C.,
"SIXTY HEAD
)f young and fat Kentucky Mules and Horses? '
imong them some good saddle and harness aninals,
which I will sell ON TIME, payable first of
October, KJ75, the payments to l>e satisfactorily se ured
; or I will exchange them for old ones, on
easonable terms.
A. WILLI FORD.
NOTICE.
ALL persons indebted to me for Horses or Mules
purchased in 1874 and due in that year, are
equested to pay up at once and save cost. A fall*
ire to comply may injure their credit with me
luring the present year. A. WILLIFORD.
CORN WANTED.
ONE THOUSAND BUSHELS CORN wanted,
for which I will pay the highest cash price.
A. WILLIFORD.
FODDER WANTED.
[WISH to buy 10,000 pounds GOOD FODDER,
for which I will pav$1.50 per hundred pounds.
A. WILLIFORD.
SOUTHERN LIFE INSURANCE CO.
principal okkicks :
MEMPHIS, TENN., AND ATLANTA, GA. |
NET ASSETS JANUARY 1, 1875,
OVER J^2,000,000 OO.
ANNUAL INCOME,
OVER >*1,000,000 00.
BRANCH OFFICE, Y0RKV1LLE, S. C.:
W. B. WILSON, President.
JOHN S. RRATTON, Vice-President.
J. C. KUYKENDAL, Sec. and Agent.
I. 0. WITHKRSPOON, Attorney.
Dr. L. ALEXANDER, Med. Examiner.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE :
J. F. Wallace, L. M. Grist, Andrew Jackson,
I. A. McLean, S. G. Hemphill, W. B. Metts, J.
F. Hart, A. Coward, C. E. Spencer.
Policies transferred from Northern Companies,
without loss or additional annual outlay. Apply
:o Dr. J. C. KUYKENDAL, Agent, or to
1IAGOOD it TREUTLEN, Gen. Agents,
Columbia, S. C.
August 5 31 Uy
COTTON GINS, HORSE POWERS,
ANI)
STEAM ENGINES.
\\TE are now prepared to receive orders for the
f f immediate delivery of the above articles.
THE NEEDLE GIN
surpasses any Gin now made. It turns off more
lint, of liner texture, and Gins very rapidly. We
refer to R. E. Guthrie, Dr. J. F. Lindsav and G.
L. Riddle.
THE WINSHIP SAW GIN
gives best satisfaction over other Saw Gins. We
now sell these celebrated Gins at $'}.50 per Saw,
delivered at any of the Railroad Depots or Stations,
in this State or North Carolina, free of any
charge for freight. We refer to John B. Whitesides,
J. Ran. Wallace, F. H. Brown and T. W.
Clawson.
We are also Agents for the sale of
THE ERIE CITY ENGINE,
and arc prepared to furnish any size that may be
needed, for ginning Cotton or other purposes!
JEFFERYS ?fe METTS.
July 1 26 tf
YORK MARBLEVARD^^
mESs
to a costly monuthe
art, with the very best materials, and at as
low prices sis the same class of work can be fur-:
-1 ' I?? ITnifn/l fttufna HpflAry
IIISIKHI (WIV ? ilCiu in hid vyiuwu w. v.v. ^
Irom a distance promptly tilled, and tlie same attention
given to work ordered by mail as if the
parties were present in person. "From this date
work will be delivered at any point on the Chester
and Lenoir Narrow Gauge Railroad, between
Yorkvilloand Chester, or at any place between
Rock Hill and Winnsboro, on the Charlotte, Columbia
and Augusta Railroad, free of charge for
transportation. Thankful for the patronage heretofore
bestowed upon my establishment, my determination
is to merit a continuance of the same.
F. HAPPERFIELD.
January 14 2 ly
SINGER SEWING MACHINE.
I WOULD respectfully inform the people of
York countv that I am Agent for the celebra:ed
SINGER FAMILY SEWING MACHINE,
ind am prepared to sell them on most reasonable
erms, either for cash or on the popular monthly
INSTALLMENT PLAN. TheSinger is toowell
md universally known to require any word of
ommendation here. It is the MONARCH OF
SEWING MACHINES, for the substantiation of
vhich assertion I refer to all who have them in
ase.
I also keep on hand a full supply of ATTACHMENTS,
NEEDLES, OIL, Ac., which I sell at
Manufacturer's prices. Those in want of such
trticles can procure them, in my absence, from
Dr. May, Yorkville; L. II. Bradford, Fort Mill;
r. M. Wylie, Black's Station. E. F. BELL,
Agent Singer Manufacturing Company.
August 2(i 34 ly
JNITED STATES INTERNAL REVENUE!
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE,)
an nTSTUTCT SOUTH CAROLINA. )
Columbia, August 1!), 187;"). ' J
TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.
J^rOTICK is hereby given that the following
[N described property has been seized for violaion
of the Internal Revenue Laws of the United
States, and the Bonds for the costs of an action in
he United States Court must lie filed in this office,
vithin thirty days from the date hereof, or the
same will be forfeited under provisions of Sec.
Act July 13th, ISM, as amended, to wit:
1 Wagon ami Cover, 1 set Double Harness, 2
doles, ? empty Spirit Casks, and 1 Pistol, seized
rom Jacob Mull.
L. CASS CARPENTER, Collector,
3d District, S. C.
September 2 35 3t
COTTON GINS, WAGONS," &C.
COTTON GINS that need REPAIRING, can
be put in good order by seeding them to me,
m or before the first of September.
Farming Implements and Machinery REPAIRED
at short notice.
WAGONS MADE AND REPAIRED, of seaioncd
timber. This Department is conducted by
dr. \V. F. < i ARV1N, who is ready to give prompt
ittcntion to all orders for Wagons and Repairs of
ither Vehicles.
Thankful to the public for the generous patrongo
hestowod, I respectfully ask a continuance of
he same, J. ED. JEFFERYS.
July 15 28 tf
. S. It. THOMSON. O. B. SI'KNCEB.
THOMSON & SPENCER,
Solicitors in Bankruptcy
irAiiiririt rtn cs t\
lUiinMLijc, n. v.
ClPKCIAL attention given to tiling of petitions,
3 to the prosecution of claims in Bankruptcy,
ind the collection and forwarding of Dividends to
creditors.
February -1 .1 tf
NEW STEAM MILL.
rim undersigned respectfully informs the
public that he now has in operation, on his
ilace in Yorkville, a STEAM MILL, and is pre?ared
to grind Corn, Grist, Horse-feed and Peas,
rhe regular davs for running the Mill will lie
rUESDAYS AND SATURDAYS; though, for
ho accommodation of customers, I will always
lave on hand Meal, Grist, Ac., which will be exhanged
for Corn. T. W. CLAWSON.
July 1 2<? tf
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA^
N THE COUET OF COMMON PLEAS?YOEK COUNTY.
11HE Creditors of WILLIAM CROOK, late of
York county, deceased, are hereby notified
o call upon me, at my office, at York Court
louse, on or before the first day of October next,
o present and establish their claims against the
(state of the said deceased.
t nr a t r a nw r? n Pio
tl, P yVALilJAVjW, V. V. A !?
September 2 35 4t
rHE STATE GRANGE FERTTUZIr;
AND
"THE CLIMAX."
r\VO first-class, pure bone, ammoniuted Fertilizers,
for sale by D. JENNINGS & SON and
I. D. AIKEN, Agents, Charleston, S. C. The
lighest testimonials can be given. Please send
or circular.
September 2 35 3m
C.E.SPENCER,
ATTORNEY AT 3LiAW
YOllKVILLE, S. C.,
ITITILL practice in the Probate and Circuit
f f Courts of the State, and in the District Court
?1' the United States.
January 7 1 ly
TEE YORKVILLE ENQUIRER,
NEW PREMIUMS FOB CLUBS!
UNPRECEDENTED OFFERS!
BY a very liberal contractjuHt entered intotvitl
the Weed Manufacturing Company, we gr<
, enabled to offer greater inducements to drib
makers than ever heretofore.
READ OUR PROPOSITIONS!
Weed Sewint Machine, No^ 1.?Price, $65.
t For a club of 40 subscriber*, at$2.50each, we wil
give a WkedSkwing Machine of theal>ovestyle
the casli price of which is sixty-five dollars.
Weed Sewing Machine, No. 2.?Price, $70.
For a club of 45 subscribers, at $2.50 each, we wil
give a Weed Sewing Machine of the above style
the cash price of which is soventy dollars.
Weed Sewing Machine, No. 3.?Price, $75.
Foraelubof50subscribers, at $2.50 each, we wil
give a w ked sewing machineoi me aoove siyn
the cash price of which is seventy-five dollars.
p&'Tha reputation of the Weed Sewing Ma
chine is equal to that of any other first-clans ma
chine in the market, and of its merits we ca:
speak advisedly?having had one in constant ns
in our own family since 18(56, during all of whic!
time it has never failed to work in the most sal
isfactory manner.
OUR LIBERAL OFFERS.
In addition to the attractions of the Enquire*
we invite attention to our terms of subscription
and the liberal offers we make to those who ma;
be disposed to form clubs.
TERMS-FREE OF POSTAGE.
Single copy, one year, $3 0
Two years to the same address, 5 0
In clubs, each subscriber, one year, 2 5
PREMIUMS FOR CLUBS.
To those willing to form clubs for the Enquire]
we make the following liberal offers:
1. For 40 subscribers, at $2.50 each, we will giv
a No. 1 Weed Sewing Machine, worth $65.
2. For 45 subscribers, at $2.50 each, we will giv
a No. 2 Weed Sewing Machine, worth $70.
3. For 50 subscribers, at $2.50 each, we will giv
a No. 3 Weed Sewing Machine, worth $75.
The engravings given above in this column rep
resent the style of the different machines. No. li
black walnut, oiled, plain table. No. 2 is blacl
walnut, oiled, half case. No. 3 is black walnui
oiled, half case, with two side drawers, and wit]
or without drop-leaf, as may be preferred.
These offers are not confined to a single clut
nor is there any competition invited as to wh<
shall procure the largest club. Each and ever
club of 40, 45 or 50 names will be entitled to th
designated premium.
The machines will be shipped from the neares
branch office of the Weed Machine Company b
the persons entitled to receive them, transports
tion charges, which will rarely exceed $5, if sen
by freight line, to be paid by the person receiving
the machine.
The offer made in this prospectus will be bind
ing upon the proprietor of the Enquirbb unti
the 15th day of October, 1875; and persons wh<
may commencemakingclubs, can forward namei
as rapidly as procured, in every case to be paid ii
advance, having until the above-mentioned dab
in which to complete their lists.
It is not required that subscribers shall all re
cei ve their papers at the same post-office; but sub
m?uf Ka far it term nnf. Iams than oni
! 9U1 iptlUHO iiiunv ww .w? ? .v.... ?~- ?
year. One subscriber for two years will bi
equivalent, in making up lists, to two name!
for one year each.
Subscriptions may commence with any num
ber, and the paper will be sent for a full yea:
from the time the subscription begins.
Each club-maker will be credited with name
as they shall be received; and should any fail t<
secure either premium by the 15th of October, 1875
but should procure ten or more subscribers, ai
extra copy of the paper will be Riven for the tei
names thus procured, and for all subscriptions it
excess of ten, a cash commission of twenty-fiv<
cents will bo given on each name.
The Enquirer is sent Free of Postage t<
all Subscribers.
Remittances may be made at our risk, bv draft
post-office order, or in registered letter; if uiad<
otherwise, we will assume no risk.
Write names plainly, giving post-office, count}
and State.
Specimen copies of the Enquirer will be sen
to any address on application.
ANOTHER SPLENDID OFFER,
premiums to single subscribers.
For the advantage of those who are inaccessible
by a club-maker, but may yet wish to avai.
themselves of our liberal oilers to subscribers
we have made arrangements with the publish'
ors of Smith's Bible Dictionary by which wt
are enabled to oiler that valuable work as a premium
to subscribers, at a cost to the subscribe!
for the book and the Enquirer, of little mort
than the publisher's price of the book. Smith't
Bible Dictionary is a standard work, and indispensably
necessary to every student of the Bible,
or to ovory person who desires to read the sacred
volume intelligibly. The Dictionary is the work
of Dr. William Smith, of the University of London
?ml tlm most eminent lexicoeraDher in tlx
world, who, in its preparation associated witt
himselfovcr seventy distinguished divines and
authors, of l>oth Europe and this country, in the
great task of preparing a comprehensive Dictionary
of the Bible, and supplying a want long fell
by the religious public. The result of these lalx>rs
appeared in three large and very costly volumes,
a wonderful monument of learning. An
abridgement of this great work, for popular use,
made by Dr. Smith himself, is the one we have
arranged to furnish otir subscriliers. The lx>ok
contains every name in the Bible respecting which
anything can bo said. It embraces the results ol
historic research, antiquarian investigation, the
study of languages and dialects, and the discoveries
oftho modem travelers and explorers in the
Holy Land?Robinson, Rawlinson, Ferguson,
Layard, Offert and Stanley.
'the book is printed from new stereotype plates,
oa good paper, and is appropriately illustrated
with over 125 Engravings of beautiful Scones,
Ancient Cities, and Memorable Places of the
Holy Land, descriptive Figures and valuable
Maps. It contains noarly 800 closely-printed,
double-column, octavo pages, including 24 elegant
full-page, Steel and Wood Engravings. II
is printed in type of a heavy, distinct, and very
legible face.
The publisher's price of Smith's Bible Dictionary
is 93.50. We will furnish a copy of the work,
substantially bound in cloth, ana a copy of the
Enquirer one year for 94.50. Or for a club ol
five subscribers'at 92.50 each, we will furnish a
copy of the Dictionary to thegetter up of the club.
The book will be mailed, free of postage, to the
person ontjtled to receive it, direct from the office
of publication.
Subscribers whose terms of subscription have
not expired, by forwarding the money, will receive
a copy of the Bible Dictionary, and have
their subscription to the Enquirer extended one
year. The ca?.h must accompany all orders.
L. M. G RIST, Proprietor,
Yorkvllle, S. C.
W. P. HOBBS.
THE NEW BUSINESS.
HAVING become, bv purchase, sole proprietor
of the YORKVILLE COACH FACTORY,
1 respectfully announce that. I shall conduct the
business as heretofore. Besides keeping on hand
a full stock of PLEASURE,VEHICLES QE-AJ,L
DESCRIPTIONS, any article of special style or
design will be made at short ftotibe and in superior
manner. By havingemployed only the most
competent workmen, in their respective' branches,
' I feel assured that I can please tne most exacting
taste, both as to style and durability. Persons in
want of any kind of PLEASURE CARRIAGE
win cio wen to examine my siock.
W P. HOBBS.
1 GRE^T-B ARGAINS.
IWOULD inform the public tliat I now haveon
hand alot of BUGGIES, finished in finestyle,
m "which RARE BARGAINS can be oTSGined.
I will sell a tifr-6op Buggy f?r <Soh*i(terably less
than such class of work has ever been sold in this
market since the war. Call and examine my
stock and be convinced of the truth of what I sav,
and if you want a Buggy take advantage of the
present opportunity to secure one CHEAP.
W. P. HOBBS.
I *7 REPAIRING,
REPAINTING, Ac., done, as heretofore, inthe
best style and at the lowest prices for cash,
which, in all cases will be expected on the delivery
of work. W. P. HOBBS.
The sweetest, most powerful and durable
now in use." , ,
BLOOMFIELD & OTIS,
NEW SCALE PIANOS,
209 EAST 19TH ST., NEW YORK.
EMBRACING new and most valuable Patents,
giving a greatly improved treble; also, by a
new manner of bringing and a new method of inserting
Mound board, the most important results
have been obtained. |
"The tone is full and sonorous, with a sweetness
and delicacy of touch that cannot be surpassed. I
have tested them as I would a Grand, for points
of delicacy and strength, and they have stood the
test in every way. In mimy respects they are superior
to any manufactured in America.
Charles Fradel."
i (The eminent and favorite Composer and Pianist
to His Royal Highness, the Due Gustave of
' Sax Weimar of Eisenach.)
(Rochester Musical Times.)
"The tirm of Bloomtield A Otis have lately made
several important improvements in their pianos,
placing thorn in the front rank of American manufacturers."
(Toledo, O., Blade.)
"Bloomtield A Otis, of Now York, carry away
the first premiums at the Ohio Stato Fair as they
did at the Fair of the American Institute. Considering
the fact that they met in competition all
the established favorites, such as the Knabe, Dunham,
Lighte, Bradbury, and many others, which
were skilfully handled, this is certainly a high
compliment, as the torts were thorough and critical.
(Brooklyn, N. Y. Eayle.)
"The Music Committee of the Board of Education,
Brooklyn, together with the local committees,
alter examining and thoroughly testing all the
principal instruments manufactured, have purchased
Bloomtield A Otis' celebrated PatentTreble
Pianos for the use of the schools."
These Pianos are warranted for seven vears.
Kcsj>on8iblo and energetic AGENTS WANTED
everywhere.
pBr Send for Circular and mention the name of
ij the paper in which you saw this advertisement.
, January 28 4 tf
h? '
Nos. 3 Broad Street and 109 East Bay Street,
0 CHARLESTON, S. C.
| STITIOIllS
: ^ b7*?i?s
? First-Class Work
OUR SPECIALTY,
^ YET, BY USING CHEAPER GRADES OF STOCK,
J WE CAN FURNISH WORK AT
b LOWEST LIVING PRICES.
s fine fashidnwlTsiationehy,
g Piries Paper and Envelopes.
Redding and (Ball invitations
' ON THE BE3T STOCK ANO PRINTED IN THE
' LATEST STYLE.
t *c;
f September 10 37 tf
COTTON SAW GINS,
1 Equal to any in the country.
5 WITH AN IMPROVED COTTON ROLL,
9
j superior to any other Gin.
0 MANUFACTURED BY
J . JM. JL JL ,
WIHNSBOEO, S. C.
B
j. References : W. b. Creight, R. R. Agent, and
' Maj. T. \V. Woodward, President of the State
3 Agricultural and Mechanical Society, Winnsboro.
July 22 29 2m*
r f THE J AS. LEFFEL
3 i Doable Tarbine Water Wheel, 1
5 I JfL Manufactured by
|f POOLE & HUNT,
l JL Baltimore, Md.
1 III 7,000 SOW IX USEt
l 111 n Simple, Strong, Durable,
B I ahvays reliable and satisManufacturer*,
also, of
3 i iS^SEggWbPortable & Stationary
\~\J wBfj nD11 Steam Boilers,
I & Grist Mills, Min|
fSSaSfir :forCotton Mifl's, Flonff
Oil Mill Machine^^Hyjraullc6 an dither
. Presses,&c. 8hafting, Pulleys and Hangers
1 a specialty Machine mado Gearing; accurate
and of very best fiulsh. Boud for Circular,. J
, March 25 12 Om
3 REMOTAL.
I HAVE removed my
> <-*. rsF"** TIN SHOP to the resigSflKgLas|yQ
dence of Mr. WILLIAM
AIKEN,six lniles^South
TURK ANDAREPAIR
TIN WARE, at short notice.
STOVE PIPE made to order cheap, for, the
cash. Address J. M. ADAMS,
(luthriesville, S. C.
T.,?? o 99. tf
; CHESTER AND LENOIR RAIL ROAD.
THE trains over the CHESTER AND LENOIR
NARROW GAUGE RAILROAD will rnn
: daily, (Sundays excepted) as follows, making 1
i | close connection with the trains on the Charlotte,
f Columbia and Augusta Railroad: 1
> ; Leave Yorkville at 8.30 a. ni 1
j Arrive at Chester at 10.30 a. in.
> Leave Chester at 5.10 p. m.
i ! Arrive at Yorkville at 7.00 p. ni.
A. H. DAVEGA,: President.
, ! June 10 23 ' tf
i! AUCTIONEERING. ! I
rriHE undersigued takes this method to notify 1
1 .1 the public that he will give prompt attention
' to AUCTIONEERING in York and the adjoining <
counties. Communications may be addressed to j t
I him at Yorkville, S. C. S. G. BROWN. <
II March ft 10 tf ?
FINE GOLD OPERA CHAINS^ '
17JOR Ladles, and handsome Vest Chains for
r Gentlemen, at R. BRANDT'S Jewelry Store, i
opposite the Court House, Chester, S. O. I
^ii?I
statje; of south Carolina.
COUNTY OF YORK-COURT OF COMMON PLEAB.
Givens Gallaher, Surviving Administrator of Arthur
Kirkpatrick, deceased Plaintiff, against
Catharine Blair and William White, Administora
of estate of Matthew White, deceased,
Defendants.?Summon* to Renew Execution.
To Catharine Blair (formerly Catharine White)
and William White, Administrators of ail
and singular, the goods and chattels, rights
and credits of Matthew White, deceased.
WHEREAS, judgment was obtained in the
Circuit Court for the Countv of York, and
State of South Carolina, on the 19th day of March,
A. D. 1W>9, in the above entitled cause, against
the Estate of Mathew White, deceased', and execution
was duly Issued thereon, but the active energy
thereof has now expired, and it is desired to
have the same renewed. . , (
Now, therefore, You are summoned to appear
at thf* next Term of theOlrcuit Court, to be neld
forsaid County, at the place of holding the same,
and then and there show cause, if any you can,
why said execution should not be renewed according
to law. ' " ?!
Dated July 2<lth, A. D. 187/>.
WILSON WITHERSPOON,, ,
Plaintiff's Attorneys.
The Defendant, William White, Administrator
of Matthew White, deceased, will please t^ke notice
that the summons, of which the above is a
copy, was tiled in the office of the Clerk of the
Court of Common Pleas for York county, on the
2nd of August, 1875.
WILSON & WlTHERSPOON,
Plaintiff's Attorneys.'
August 12 > 32 Gt*
THE COOKING STOVES manufactured atour
works in Greensboro, N. C., give universal
satisfaction wherever introduced. They are made
of the BEST SCOTCH PIG METAL, with heavier
arid thicker plate than any other Stove in the
market, and consequently will the longer withstand
heat and hard usage. They are of band
some pattern and neat finish, and warranted equal
in every other respect to any Cooking Stove sold
in the United States, while it is confidently claimed
that they are the CHEAPEST. All the usual
pieces of ware and cooking utensils are furnished
with Stove. An imDOrtant consideration
with purchasers is the fact that oar patterns and
sizes are never changed. Should a piece get accidentally
broken at any time, we can replace it at
the mere cost of casting. Not simply Decauae it
is a home production, buton accountof its intrinsic
merits as an article of household economy, do
we ask the patronage of home purchasers. More
than ONE THOUSAND of these Stoves are now
in use, and among many others having them we
respectfully refer to the following: R. E. Guthrie,
D. M. Campbell, M. H. Currence, York county;
Mrs. Elizabeth J. Wylie, Chester; D. A. Gordon,
Guthriesville; John A. Brown, Rock Hill j^B. P,
Boyd, Joseph Herndon, L. M. Grist, Yorkvjlle.
You can save the freight from the northern cities
and the dealer's profit, which is no small item,
by buying of us, and at the same time get a
STOVE THAT IS MORE DURABLE than those
of northern make. The following are our prices
e#' Z^onnt in rJroontiV\AI?n d
UOUVCI CU fXV i?? v>< wvuvt/w?w _
No. 8, with 10 pieces ware and 8 feet pipe, $30 00
it y ii ii ii ii ii ii A 26 00
Address, SERGEANT A McCAULEY, ,
Greensboro, N. C.
T. M. DOBSON A CO., Agents, Yorkville, S. C.
JOHN R. LONDON, Agent, Rock Hill, 8. C.
! A. F. LINDSAY, Agent, Lowrysville, Chester
county, S. C.
J. L. CARROLL, Agent at Chester,8. C. :
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
COUNTY OF YORK?COURT OF COMMON PLEA8.
Givens Gullaher, Surviving Administrator of Arthur
Kirkpatrick, deceased, Plaintiff, against
Catharine Blair and William White, Administrators
of Matthew White, deceased, Defendants.?Suvinwiut
to Itf hew Execution.
To Catharine Blair (formerly Catharine White)
and William White, Administrators of ail and
singular, -the goods and chattels, rights and
credits of Matthew White,deceased.
WHEREAS, judgment was obtained in the
Circuit Court, for the County of York, and
Stateof South Carolina, onthe Pith day of March,
A. D., 1889, in the above entitled cause, against
the estate of Matthew White, deceased, and execution
was duly issued thereon, but the active
energy thereof has now expired, and it is desired
to have the same renewed.
Now, therefore, You are summoned to appear
at the next Term of the Circuit Court, to be neia
for said county, at the place of holding the same,
and then and there shew cause, if any you can,
why said execution should not be renewed according
to law.
Dated July 2fith, A. D. 1875.
WILSON A WITHERSPOON,
Plaintiff's Attorneys.
The Defendant, William White, Administrator
of Matthew White, deceased, will please take notice
that the summons, of which tne abeve is a
copy, was filed in the office of the Clerk of the
Court of Common Pleas for York county, S. C.,
on the 2nd of August, 1875.
WILSON A WITHERSPOON,
Plaintiff's Attorneys.
August 12 32 6t?
BLAAKBOOk MANUFACTORY
STATIONERY, AND
BOOK BINDERY.
THANKING the public for liberal past patronage.
I now invite attention to my complete
stock of
STAPLE AND FANCY STATIONERY,
consisting, in part, of Flat Papers, Midium, Folio
Post, Demy, Letter and Note. Blank Books,
oeve ry variety; Envelopes, Slates, Ink, Ac,
Fancy Stationery, Gold Pens and Pencils, PenKnives,
Writing Desks, Ac. Also,
BOOK BINDING DONE,
in all its various branches. Sheet Music, Periodicals,
Law Books, Ac., bound in any style desired.
Ola Books rebound and repaired.
PRINTED BILL AND LETTER HEADS A SPECIALTY
Orders promptlv attended to, at lowest cash
prices. * E. R. STOKES,
155 Main Street Columbia, S. C.
March 25 12 tf
SKY LIGHT,
AND NO MORE CLIMBING UP-8TAIRS !
- 'n* vv nlouonro fo inform nil In want of PHO
1 TOGRA PHIC PICTUR ES.that I have just
taken possession of my NEW GALLERY, built
with tino sky and side-lights,near my residencefirst
house east of the jail, and only a few hundred
yards from the Court House corner. An
experience of 28 years and every convenience for
business, will enable me now to do better work
than ever before.
Frames and Photo-Albums, Stereoscopes and
Views always on hand.
I am also prepared to sell you a MASON ?fc
HAMLIN ORGAN, or an AMERICAN SEWING
MACHINE, forcash or on time.
J. R. SCHORB.
July 8 27 tf
BARBER SHOP.
THOSE in want of an EASY SHAVE, a fashionable
and stylish cut of hair, or a pleasant
and luxurious Shampoo, are reminded that
THOS. BALLARD, Professor of the ArtTonsorial,
is still in business, in his old Shop next door
to the Enquirkr building, where it will afford
him great pleasure to wait upon all who may desire
his services. Razors honed and sharpened,
and any other work of that kind promptly done.
He may be found at the Shop on Sunaay mornings
from 7 to 10 o'clock.
THOMAS BALLARD.
June 11 25 ly
NOTICE^
1 RESPECTFULLY inform the public that I
am prepared to sharpen razors, scissors, shears
and other fine-edged instruments. Prices?for
honing and sharpening razors, 25 cents, and for
sharpening scissors or shears, 10 cents each, and
satisfaction guaranteed or no charge.
TOM BALLARD, Barber.
February 25 8 tl"
RAGSWANTED.
A f\ POUNDS of clean cotton and linlU#UUy
en Hags wanted, for which 2 cents
per prurid will be paid, at the
^'ENQUIRER" OFFICE.
TRIAL JUSTICE'S BLANKS.
RECOGNIZANCES, Warrants of Arrest, Summons
in civil action, and Executions. For
?ile at the ENQUIRER OFFICE.
tit* tL . tit*f3ti\ i'ER Day at home. Term* free. Addreim
^^"o.Stinhon fc Co.,Portland, Me. 3 ly?
She ^orlnillr tfwggjtarr,
T ICTIMW?IN ADVANCE ,
Dne copy, one year...... $ 3 00
Dne copy, six months, ] 50
Dne copy, three mouths, 100
Single copy, 10
rwo copies, one year, 5 00
ren copies, one year, 25 00
jb&'To persons who make up clubs often or
more names, an extra copy of the paper will be
tarnished one year, free of charge.

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