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Yorkville enquirer. [volume] (Yorkville, S.C.) 1855-2006, May 15, 1879, Image 4

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fiumflwitsi ?cj?artwf?t.
"FIFTEEN CENTS OFF."
A Detroiter, who dresses well and has a
reasonable share of good looks, had occasion
. last week to make a trip to the country, and
one night he found himself at a farm-house
at which a party was to come off. He was
invited to participate in the festivities, and
after he had consented, the old farmer took
him around the corner of the house and said:
"The young folks are mighty fond of any
game with kissing in it. They'll ^et up
something, and fix it to make you kiss the
handsomest gal in the room."
"Well, I'll kiss her," was the prompt reply.
"Yes, but hold on a little," continued the
old man. "There's my gal, Emma. We
iL'mU aVa'a as ao ontr 'am knf nor^oin
LJLilllBk DUG 9 OQ CIO CIUJ VA w?) vuv vw
folks around here kinder sniff at .her 'cause
her nose crooks a bit and her hair is a trifle
high-colored. Now, I want you to kiss Em
for the handsomest girl in the room. It'll do
the ole woman good, do Em good, and kinder
set these 'ere sniffers back a little. I don't
ask you to kiss her for nothing, but, if you'll
do it, I'll throw fifteen cents off'n your bill
in the morning ? What d'ye say ?"
The young man said he'd do it, and the
father continued :
"That's the checker. Don't have any
make-believe about it, but kiss her right pop
out, so that we kin all hear the smack!"
The game was played, the Detroiter was
"fixed," and he kissed "Em" like the pop of
a pistol. He felt all the happier for it that
night, seeing how greatly the old woman was
pleased; but next forenoon, ss he jogged
along, he had to run the gauntlet of a score of
farmers' sons waiting in the fence-corners to
lick him because he passed their "gals" by
for "Em." He was struck by thirteen stones,
six clubs, and about a bushel of potatoes, before
he got out of the neighborhood; and
when he came to figure up, he realized that
fifteen cents was no inducement at all.?Free
Preu.
Sambo's Humor.?Two darkeys were vaunting
their courage. "I isn't 'feard o' nothin', I
isn't," said one. "Den, Sam, I reckon you
isn't 'feared to loan me a dollah?" "No,
Julius, I isn't feard to loan you a dollah, but
? i * ? < A
1 does bate to part wid an oie iren roreober."?Knoxville
Tribune.
The Noah's Ark Baptist Church (colored)
of Louisville, tried one of its members for
profanity the other day. Next to the pastor
he was the most prominent man in the
church. One brother testified that, as he was
gwine on to his work Monday mornin,' he
heered a mouty racket, he did, down toward
Brudder Jimson's. "An I says, says I, fo'
God, whut'sdat? Is de communers riz up
and broke loose ? And I crop* 'long up side
de fence, I did, and kinder peeked over, an'
bless de Lawd ef I didn't see Brudder Jimson
out dar in de garden by hisself a swarin'
an' a-perfanityin' an a-rippin' out oafs as if
the very old pandelonium had a holt of
him!" Other witnesses gave in similar testimony.
Brother Jimson then rose and calmly
said: "I would like to ax if de Lawd
didn't make red pepper?" The pastor replied
that he did. "1 would like to ax if he
didn't make it to be planted in de ground ?"
The pastor said he did. "I would like to ax if
he didn't make it to come up Y' The pastor
aaid he did. "I would like to.ax if he didn't
make it so as it will not come up ef de pusson
who plants it aint't a cussin' like blazes
when he puts it de in groun' ?" A sigh of relief
fluttered up from the congregation. The
pastor scratched his head, eyed his big toe,
and then inquired: "An was you a-plantin'
of pepper, Brudder Jimson?" "I was." "Well,
sir. I renounces vou not cuiltv."?Louisville !
Courier-Journal.
Equal to the Em eroency.?General
Hardee, whose manual of infantry tactics
was in use in all the Southern armies, visited
a rural Georgia town one day during the war,
and the commander of a "home guard" company
sought to do himself and the General
honor by parading his command in front of
the inn in which Hardee bad rooms. The
writer upon tactics came out upon the balcony
to review the command, and the militia
officer put his men through their paces. In
one of the manoeuvres the men became confused
and got into a hopeless tangle. Hardee,
in telling tne story, said that he could think
of no possible way in which they might be
extricated, and waited with great curiosity to
see what the militia commander would do.
That rural tactician looked at the confused
mass for a moment with a scowl of perplexity
upon his forehead; then his face cleared, and
he shouted the order:
"Disentangle to the front?march."
Whereupon the men marched forward and
formed a new line without regard to the order
of the old one. Hardee said the command
was not in his own or any other book
on tactics, but that it ought to be incorporated
in them.
A Candid Opinion.?An old lawyer, famous
for his wise and candid opinions, was
the other day visited by a young attorney,
who explained:
"I was admitted to the bar two years ago,
and I think I know something about law, yet
the minute I arise to address a jury, I forget
all my points and can say nothing. Now, I
want to ask you if this doesn't show lack of
confidence, in myself, and how can I overcome
it ?"'
Tfye wise attorney shot his eyes and studied
the case for a moment before answering:
"My young friend, if it is lack of confidence
in yonrself it will some day vanish;
but if it is lack of brains you bad better sell
out your office effects and buy a pick-axe and
long-handled shovel."
"But how am I to determine ?" anxiously
asked the young man.
"I'd buy the pick-axe anyhow and try my
chances!" whispered the aged adviser, as he
moved over to the peg for his overcoat.
Splitting the Difference.?A young
man with the blush of country life on his
cheeks sold out his produce on the market
yesterday, and entered a shoe-store and said
he wanted a pair of shoes for his wife.
"What number ?" asked the clerk.
The young husband scratched his head,
looked very much embarrassed, and finally
said:
"Well, I've been married eight months, but
this shoe business stumps me. I don't hardly
believe she wears 'levens, and I don't think
she kin git into fives. I guess if we split the
difference we'll hit her pretty close."
He was given a pair of eights, and after
squinting along the soles, he observed:
"I guess them'll do. She's awful proud,
and I know she'll squeeze into them for all
she's worth."
# Half of It.?The other day a pretty girl
of ran a rtf t)io faVklaa in tho ntiBrihr nii> nflforo/t
a bunch of roees to a gentleman.
"How much ?" said the gentleman, a well
known sharper at the Stock Exchange.
"Four dollars," said the lady.
"Four dollars! Good heavens, madam, I
might as well be robbed in the street However,
maybe you'll sell me half of it"
"Why, certainly," said the lady, and with
a clip of the scissors cut the roses in two and
handed him the stems.
"Two dollars, if you please," she said.
He paid without anotner word.
a ?
Stir A colored minister in Georgia was brought
to trial before his church on a charge of stealing
baoon. After a number of witnesses had
been examined, the deacons retired, and soon
afterward returned the following verdict:
"De Rev. Moses Bledso am ackwitted of de
'sinuations dat he actually stole de pork, as it
was not shode dat somebody else miten't have
been wearin' his close; but de brudder is
heerby 'fectionately warned dat in de future
he must be more keerful."
It is hard to respect old age when we
get stuck on a venerable pair of chickens.
?*a4i?g fat fha |iiM.
OONDUOTBD BT
REV. ROBERT LATHAN.
f Original .J
THE PASSOYER.
By the command of God, the Jsws celebrated
three annual feasts?the Passover,
Pentecost and Tabernacles. In their nature
and design, these feasts were retrospective and
prospective. In other words, they were designed
to commemorate remarkable past occurrences,
and they were also typical of important
future events. The Passover was the
first in point of time of these annual feasts,
and in some respects it was the most important
The time designated for its celebration
-* *- - ^fiwif mnnfK
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called sometimes Abid and sometimes Nisan.
The hour of the day was specified with conI
siderable exactness. "In the fourteenth day
of the first month, at even is the Lord's passover."
Lev. xxiii: 5. A literal rendering ef
the words of the original text require the
passage to be thus translated: "In the fourteenth
day of the first month between the two
eveninga is the passover of Jehovah."
The Jlebrews, as well as many other Oriental
nations, divided the afternoon of the day
into two parts. The first part they called the
first evening and the second part they called
the last evening. The evening began at the
sixth hour, which corresponded with our
twelve o'clock and ended at sunset The first
evening or first part of the evening extended
from the sixth hour to the ninth, or to our
three o'clock in the afternoon. The second
evening or second part of the evening, began
at three o'clock and ended at sunset The
passover was killed between the ninth and
eleventh hours of the day, or between three
o'clock in the afternoon and sunset Thus we
read that when Jesus Christ was crucified the
darkness enveloped the earth from the sixth
to the ninth hour, and sometime between the
ninth and eleventh hour Jesus died. That is,
1 JJ-.J k.tn.Ann tliaaa n'/itn/it in tlio ftfVpr.
06 U1CU UCblTCCU bUiTO v vivya ?u wuv * *
noon and sunset
The paschal sacrifice was a lamb, either of
the sheep or of the goats. It is probable,
however, that a goat was seldom, if ever, offered,
although admissible. It was prescribed
that this paschal lamb should be a male without
any defect &&d less than one year old.
The object and design of this passover feast
was two-fold. The one was national, the other
universal. More properly, the passover
was a commemorative feast and it was at the
same time a typical ceremony. It was designed
in the first instance to perpetuate the
memory of the deliverance which God effected
in rescuing the Israelites from Egyptian
bondage. "I am the Lord thy God which
brought thee out of the land of Egypt and
out of the house of bondage," was, on the occurrence
of this annual feast, brought vividly
to the recollection of every Israelite. The
other and more important design contemplated
by God in giving to his ancient people
the passover feast was to prefigure a Saviour.
The paschal lamb was typical in that it symbolized
Jesus Christ the Lamb of God which
taketh away the sin of the world.
Four days previous to the departure of the
children of Israel from Egypt, they, by the
command of God, selected a lamb for each
family and kept it up until the afternoon of
the fourteenth day of the month A bid. At
the appointed hour the lamb was slain, and
its blood caught With this blood the two
side posts of the doors of their houses, together
with the upper door post, was sprinkled.
At sunset which was the beginning of the
fifteenth dav. tbev be&ran to eat the paschal
lamb. Their loins were girded, their staves
were in their hands and their shoes were on
their feet They were ready for the exodus.
Together with the roasted lamb, they were
commanded to eat bitter herbs and unleavened
bread. The bitter herbs, no doubt, were
designed to impress upon their minds the
hardness of the bondage to which they had
been subjected, and the staves in their hands
and shoes on their feet indicated that they
I must be in haste to accept the promised freedom.
' -At midnight the Destroying Angel passed
through the land of Egypt and destroyed
the first born of all the Egyptians. From the
first-born of the humblest subject to the firstborn
of the king on the throne, none escaped.
The houses of the Israelites were passed over.
The Lord saw the blood upon the door posts
and passed oven the houses inflicting no in
jury upon the inmates. This was a most won
derful deliverance. Pharoah was convicted.
His soul was filled with consternation. The
haughty monarch sent for Moses and Aaron
hw niorbt. and tremhlinc and terror-stricken.
he told them to take the whole of the Hebrews
and all they possessed and be gone.
As the "children of Israel, under the Old
Testament dispensation, were a type of all
God's people during the present dispensation,
everything connected with the passover feast
was no doubt typical, and all these types found
their anti-type in the incarnation, life, death,
resurrection and ascension of the son of God.
Whatever the paschal lamb was to the pious
Jew, the Lord Jesus Christ is to his people,
and far more.
The first passover feast was.celebrated by
the Israelites in their own private families.
After they were settled in the promised land,
all the males were required to go up to Jerusalem,
and there keep the passover. The
whole nation left their homes and went up.
In the 122nd Psalm we have the embodiment
of the national feeling on the annual
return of the passover. Every pious heart
was triad. The roads leading? to Jerusalem.
from all quarters of the country, were crowded
with happy souls, singing "our feet shall
stand within thy gates, 0 Jerusalem ! For
my brethren and companions' sakes, I will
now say, Peace be within thee."
To this feast, the males were required to go
up to Jerusalem, and the females were permitted.
A number of passages of Scripture
might be quoted, which prove that women
were not excluded from the privileges of the
passover feast. See first Sam. i: 1 and Luke
ii: 41. All Jews by birth, male and female,
were guests . at this annual feast, unless excluded
by legal uncleanness. Strangers who
dwelt in the land were admitted when they
complied with the law. See Exodus xii: 49.
This typified the fullness and freeness of
the salvation in Jesus Christ, whom Paul calls
"our passover." In Christ Jesus there is
neither Jew nor Gentile. His blood cleanseth
from all sin. Whosoever cometh to him shall
in no wise be cast out. The deliverance of
the Jew was temporal, but Christ procures
freedom from sin. God, the father, poured
out the wrath which was justly due to the
sinner upon the son of his love. This is a
far greater passover than that which took
place when the Destroying Angel passed over
the houses of the Israelites.
-
The ordinary employment of artifice is
the mark of a petty mind ; and it almost always
happens that he who uses it to cover
himself in one place uncovers himself in another.
He ?fim? and iieeside.
THE GOOD OLD FARM.
"There's got to be a revival
Of good sound sense among men,
Before the days of prosperity
Will dawn upon us again.
The boys must know that learnin'
Means more'n the essence of books;
An' the girls must learn that beauty
Consists in more'n their good looks.
"Before we can steer clear of failures, ?
And big financial alarms.
The boys have got to quit clerkin',
And get back onto our farms.
I know it ain't quite so nobby;
It ain't quite so easy T know,
Ez partin' your hair in the middle
An' settin' up for a show.
"But there's more hard dollars in it,
An' more independence, too,
An' more real peace'n contentment,
An' health that is ruddy an' true.
I know it takes years of labor,
But yu've got to 'hang on' in a store
Before you can earn a good livin'
An-' clothes with but little more.
"But you steer clear uv temptation
On the good old honest farm. ^
An' a thousand ways'n fashions
That only brings us to barm.
There ain't but a few that can handle
With safety other men's cash,
An' the fate uv many who try it
Proves human natur' is rash.
"So, when the road to State prison
Lays far from the good old farm,
An' the man sees a toilin' brother
"T.n a. tk*
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He mourns that he hadn't staid there,
A tillin' the soil in peace,
Where he'll yet creep back in dishonor,
After a tardy release.
"What hosts uv 'em go back broken
In health, in mind and purse,
To die in sight uv the clover,
Or linger alone, which is worse !
An' how many mourn when useless
That they didn't see the charm,
The safety and independence,
Uv a life on the good old farm.
"So preach it to !em, parson,
Just lav it out plain and square,
Thatlana flows with milk'n and honey,
That health and contentment are there.
An' call back the clerks'n runners,
An' show 'em the peaceful charm
v. That wants to cheer an' bless them,
On their father's dear old farm."
? -?
THE RANGE OF PRICES.
It is interesting to occasionally go over the
records of past years and compare the prices
of various articles with those of the present.
Some industrious person who has recently
given his attention and time to this occupation,
presents to the world a table of the prices
of farm produce for fifty-three years, or from
1825 to 1878, and it affords a very profitable
study. The prices are given as the average
prices in New York City, for the month of
January for each year. Take the item of
corn, for example: We will not attempt to
give the table in full, but present the most
notable fluctuations. In 1825 corn was worth
42 cents per bushel; and from that year to
1836, it fluctuated from the foregoing price to
901 cents, and in 1837 it reached $1.06.
Falling off again in 1838 to 86 cents, and in
1844 touched 43 cents, it began once more its
upward course, and in 1855 was rated at $1.01.
During the eight years following, it rose and
fell from 93 cents in 1856 to 61 cents in 1858,
and, in 1864, when the war was at its height,
if fnn/ik/ul 41 OR in Iflfifi itinmmd tn 81.94.
IV WUVUVU VAtMV y *44 MWVKy j*.?.j?? - ? w ,
then fell, in 1866, to 95} cents; in 1867
touched $1.16}, and in 1868 was $1.20; fell
to 90 cents in 1869; in 1870 was $1.12; in
1875 was worth 97 cents, and in 1877 was
quoted at 59 cents.
In 1825 wheat was worth $1.01; in 1828,
$1.15, and in 1838 had touched $1.92}.
There was then a depreciation up to 1843,
when it fell to 88} cents, but it jumped the
following year to $1, and in 1854 was found
stiff at $2.04, while in 1855 it rose to the
very high figure of $2.57 per bushel. From
this time on to 1856 there was a downward
tendency, in 1861, it having fallen to $1.14,
while up to January of the year the war
closed, 1865, it had not gone above $1.85. In
1867, however, it suddenly shot to $3, fell off
in 1868 to $2.45, and was quoted at $1.25 in
1875, and in 1877 was worth $1.47.
Oats, in 1825, were worth 27} cents per
bush'el; in 1827, 56 cents; in 1837, 57 cents;
in 1838, with wheat $1.92}, 42} cents, and in
1840, 33} cents. From that year down to
1865 the price was not marked by any vital
variation, but in the last named year it rose
to $1.03, and in 1866 to $1.20, the maximum
for the 53 years under consideration. In
1867 it fell to 80 cents, rose to 85 in 1868,
and in 1877* had fallen to 55 cents.
Mess pork in 1825 was quoteff at $13.37
per barrel. In 1837 it rose to $23.50, and in
1843 fell off to $8.87}. The following year
it rallied to $10.12}, in 1846 it was worth
$13.56, and in 1865 had reached $35.25.
The price since then has been generally down
ward, sinking to 81h.1z in iooy rallying to
$29.75 in 1870, and touching $17.50 in 1877.
The article of wool has undergone some
radical changes. In 1825 the quotation was
32} cents per pound. In 1827 it fell to 25
cents, in 1830 to 21} cents, and then, beginning
an upward course, went to 80 cents in
1838. It fell off to 38} in 1839 and to 19
cents in 1843, when the following year it once
more enhanced in value, and went steadily on
until 1863, when it was 63} cents. In 1864
' it fell to 28} cents, rose to 56 cents in 1855, to
70 cents in 1866, fell to 48 cents in 1871, and
again went up to 70 cents in 1872, holding
that price for two years. Beginning a decline
it went down steadily until 1877, when it was
worth 48 cents.?Prairie Farmer.
- ?
HOW BOCK CANDY IS MADE.
Candy! All candy is nothing but sugar?
only it is done differently, just the same as
all printing is only types, but they set them
up in different ways. Well, let us begin at
the beginning. Let us start with sugar, loaf
or lump sugar, good white sugar of any sort.
How are we to make this sugar into candy,
into the many candies we see, from lozenges,
drops, stick candy, and all kinds, to rock
candy, so unlike alj the rest ? They are all
sugar, but how very different! We must
start somewhere. Let us take a teacup half
full of boiling water and drop a lump of sugar
into it. It dissolves. rut in another
lump, and another; they dissolve. The sugar
disappears, and the water becomes thick.
We are making a syrup. We are getting sugar
in a liquid state. What was hard and
white now has become liquid and transparent, j
a great change truly. Wow keep on adding
sugar as long as the water will dissolve any,
and when no more will be dissolved, put
the cup aside, in a warm place near the
stove. Hang a thread in the liquid, and
look at it every day. In a day or two, or
more, I can't tell you how soon, as that will
depend upon the relative amount of sugar
and water, you will find little bits of clear
sugar sticking to the thread. Let them alone
for several days, still keeping the cup in a
warm place, and you will find the bits of sugar
becoming larger and of more regular
shape. Why, it is rock candy! Exactly so.
This is the way in which rock candy is made.
Just as much sugar as it will dissolve is put
in the water, usually in a tub, and threads
are hung in the syrup, and the whole put in
a warm place. Gradually the sugar leaves
the water and gathers upon the threads. Not
in a shapeless mass, but all in beautiful crystals,
more nicely formed than you could possibly
make them, and as clear and transparent
as glass. This then is the way in which
rock candy is made. Sugar, after it has
been dissolved in water, is allowed to deposit
itself slowly and quietly. The regular forms
it takes are called crystals, and they are always
in the same shape, whether large or
small, and are formed with as much care and
beauty as if they were diamonds or other
.precious stones. You will ask why they
form upon strings. Crystals always form
I upon rough surfaces, sooner than upon smooth
ones. I cannot tell you why any more than
I can tell you why boys and girls like candy.
A Secret Worth Knowing.?A sort of
trade secret among upholsterers, is this recipe
for ridding furniture of moths: A set
of furniture that seemed to be alive with the
larvae, from the month it came "new, and
from which hundreds of these pests had been
picked and brushed, was set in a room by
itself. Three gallons of benzine were purchased
at thirty cents a gallon, retail. Using
a small watering pot, with a fine rose sprinkler,
the whole upholsetry was saturated
through and through with the benzine. Result
: every moth, larvae and egg was killed.
The benzine dried out in a few hours, and
its entire odor disappeared in three or four
days. Not the slightest harm happened to
the varnish, wood,or fabrics, or hair stuffing.
That was months ago, and not a sign of a
moth has since appeared. The carpets were
also sprinkled all around the sides of the
room with equally good effect. For furs,
flannels, indeed all woolen articles containing
moths, benzine is most valuable. Put them
iu a box, sprinkle with benzine, clpse the box
tightly, and in day or two the pests will be
exterminated, and the benzine will evaporate
on opening. In using benzine, great care
should be taken that no fire is near by, as
the stuff* is in fluid or vapor form and is very
inflammable.
A SERMON TO GIRLS-ON COOKING.
Cooking-classes have besn popular among
fashionble young ladies of late years. But
there is no cooking-class which quite equals
in its opportunity for excellent information,
which you may find at home. Presuming
that I am talking to a girl that has just leu
school, I advise you to make use of your leisure
in taking lessons of your mother. There
is an absolutely SDlendid feelincr ofindeDeud
ence io knowing bow to make perfectly light,*
sweet, substantial bread. Then try your
hand at biscuits, muffins, corn bread, toast,
and all the different forms into which breadstuffs
may be blended. Xoast seems a simple
thing enough, but is frequently so poorly
made that it does not deserve the name.
Toast, a necessity of the sick room, is often a
hopeless mystery of women who have the
vaguest idea of how it is evolved from the
raw material. After you have mastered the
bread question, try meats and vegetables.
Any bright girl who can comprehend au
equation, or formulate a syllogism, can overcome
the difficulties which beset her when
learning to cook. Lucent syrups, golden
cake, delicately browned bread, quivering
jellies, melting creams, and the whole set
of material things glorified, because made
for love's sake, and for the good of one's dear
ones, are fit expressionrfor any woman. The
charm of this accomplishment lies in the fact
that it imparts to its owner a gratifying
sense of power; it bestows on her, too, the
power of blessing and resting those she loves
best. Wherever the cook goes she takes tier
welcome along. One may tire of the sweetest
sinking, of the loveliest poetry, of the
most witty conversation, but of good cooking,
never. But I would be sorry to have you
contented to be only a cook, only a domestic
machine. That is not my meaning or intention.
Be artist, poet, inventor, and wellbred
woman ; be the most and the best that
you can, and add, as a matter of course, ability
to keep house well and to do all that good
housekeeping includes.?M. E. Sangstjbr.
4 ? I
Corned Beef.?8ix pounds of brown sugar,
five gallons of water, six ounces of saltpetre,
six ounces of pearl ash, one pint of molasses,
and' fine salt enough dissolved in liquid
to make it float an egg. Scald and skim the
brine and pour it on the bee? which should
lie cut into proper sized pieces and packed
closely in a tub. After standing for ten days
the beef should be ready to use, but may be
kept as long as desired if well covered by the
brine.
A pretty picture is a hestlthy looking and
well cared for Baby. By the use of Dr.
Bull's Baby Syrup you can keep the health
of your Baby in splendid condition. Price
25 cents a bottle.
THE GENUINE' ~
DR. C. MoLANiE'S
Celebrated American
WORM SPECIFIC
or
VEKMlJJ'UUrJiS.
SYMPTOMS OF WORMS.
THE countenance is pale and leadencolored,
with occasional flushes, or
a circumscribed spot on one or both '
cheeks; the eyes become dull; the pupils
dilate; an azure semicircle runs
along the lower eye-lid; the nose is irritated,
swells, and sometimes bleeds;
a swelling of the upper lip; occasional
headache, with humming or throbbing
of the ears; an unususl secretion of
saliva; slimy or furred tongue; breath
very foul, particularly in the morning;
appetite variable, sometimes voracious,
with a knawing sensation of the stomach,
at others, entirely gone; fleeting
pains in the stomach; occasional .
nausea and vomiting; violent pains
throughout the abdomen; bowels irregular,
at times costive; stools slimy;
not unfrequently tinged with blood;
belly swollen and hard; urine turbid;
respiration occasionally difficult, and
accompanied by hiccough; cough
sometimes dry and convulsive; uneasy
and disturbed sleep, wilh grinding of
the teeth; temper variable, but generally
irritable, &c.
Whpnovcr ahnvf? wmntoms
are found to exist, *"
. DR. C. McLANE'S "V ERMIFUGE
will certainly effect a cure.
it does not contain mercury
in any form; it is an innocent preparation,
not capable of doing the slightest
injury to the most tender infant.
The genuine Dr. McLane's Vermifuge
bears the signatures of C. McLane
and Fleming Eros, on the
wrapper. ?:0:?
DR. C. McLANE'S
LIVER PILLS
are not recommended as a remedy "for all
the ills that flesh is heir to," but in affections
of the liver, and in all Bilious Complaints,
Dyspepsia and Sick Headache, or diseases of
that character, they stand without a rival.
AGUE AND FEVER.
No better cathartic can be used preparatory
| to, or after taking Quinine.
As a simple purgative they are unequaled.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS.
The genuine are never sugar coated.
Each box has a red wax seal on the lid with
the impression Dr. McLane's Liver Pills.
Each wrapper bears the signatures of C.
McLane and Fleming Bros.
Insist upon having the genuine Dr. C. McLane's
Liver Pills, prepared by Fleming
Bros.;, of Pittsburgh, Pa., the market being
full of imitations of the name McLanet
spelled differently but same pronunciation.
February 13 7 ly
r?DAW\T J- BRIDE & CO'S new
Jctiu TT lw Crown Jewel Stationery
Package, $7.50 per 100 to Agents.
THE CHEAPEST IN THE WORLD.
Two samples with jewelry, by mail, post paid,
25 cents. Illustrated Circulars of staple and
profitable Novelties free.
J. BRIDE & CO., T171in7,T
297 Broadway, New York, cf JJi IT JCi AJ
Established 1870. Favorably known throughout
the U. 8.
November 21 47 6m
NOTICE.
* oi?a'Pirr>Ti?TTT.T.V inform the Dublic that I
JL am prepared to sharpen razors, scissors, shears
and other fine-edged instruments. Prices?for
honing and sharpening razors, 25 cents, and for
sharpening scissors or shears, 10 cents each, and
satisfaction guaranteed or no charge.
TOM BALLARD, Barber.
January 2 1 tf
REMOVAL.
I HAVE moved my Barber Shop from the
room next door to the Enquirer office to the
"SADLER BUILDING," where I shall be
pleased to meet my regular customers and serve
the public generally in all branches of the tonsorial
art. THOMAS BALLARD.
March 20 12 tf I
Lord & Taylor
NEWYORK.
OpeningSpringDisplay
OK
NEW DRY GOODS
WE CAN POSITIVELY ASSERT THAT AT NO PERIOD
RAVE WE DISPLAYED AN ASSORTMENT OP DRY
GOODS SO ADEQUATE TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF
THE PUBLIC OR AT PRICES SO ADAPTED TO THE
NECESSITIES OF ECONOMICAL SHOPPING.
SILKS.
Oor BLACK SILKS contain the well-known brands of
Bonnet, Ponson, Tapissior. Gnlnet, Girard, and other
equally prominent manufacturer*. The Lord A Taylor
FAMILY 8ILK enjoy* a reputation for univeraal excellence
that ia unsurpassed.
Our American Cuchemlre INDE8TBUCTIBLE BLACK
8ILK justly claim* earnest attention, belnft cqui.l to the
best of forclirn manufacture at half the coat EVERY
YARD WARRANTED.
In COLORED SILKS our well-selected stock ia offered
at prices that cannot be undersold.
Also,
COLORED AND BLACK BILK DAM ASSES, embracing
the rarest items of the European or
Amcncan Markets.
In SUMMER SILKS and FOULARDS we have everything
that la new anil beautiful.
DRESSGOODS.
Novelties In Caoheinores. Suitings, Debeiges, and the
standard cloths, in splendid variety. Also, "Anderson's"
Scotch Zephvrs, printed, cottor Dress Goods, Momie
Cloths, Cotcftnes. Percales. Cheviots, Ac., with every
grade to be lonnd in a first-class establishment
Aiialllin A. A1UA I Ufa lailtlflA
SHAWLS, ULUAAS, AHU WHArd.
This department maintains Its supremacy, and shows
the best productions troui the European centre a
Our Cloaks and Sacques are cut and made by men
tailors, therefore style and flt are guaranteed.
SUITS * COSTUMES.
Our 8UIT8 and C08TCME8 fully sustain that pre-eminence
so Justly established, and always represent the
latest styles and lashiona
Ladies' & Children's Undergarments.
Superb assortment of line Trench hand-made UNDERWEAR,
comprising every requisite for a lady's wardrobe.
Also, children's suits for every age and size. N
Our Infants' Tarnishing Department Is thoroughly
equipped. Complete Wardrobes as low as 835; better
goods in proportion. Any article in the Wardrobe at list
price; really cheaper than the home-made article, and
much more satistactory.
Hosiery, Gloves, & Handkerchiefs.
The largest, rarest, and moat nnlque Trench novelties
in the city. Also, the mediant grades of hose for ladles
and children at very moderate prices.
Ladles', misses', and children's kid, cloth, and I4sle
Thread Gloves of the best manufacture, in ail the newest
hades to match any dress material.
A superior selection of plain hemmed linen, and all
linen hemstitched, and scolloped Handkerchiefs. Also,
embroidered Bilk Handkerchief* unsurpassed in beauty
or color.
RIBBONS.
All the choice grades, containing every color and shade
known. Tresh additions dally.
_ Gents' Furnishing Goods.
Every possthle requisite for a gentleman's outfit Tirstclass
ana medium grades or goods at oar asnal reasonable
prices Quality, style, and flt the prominent features
of this department
BOOTS in SHOES.
Tor spring and summer, for Ladles. Mines. and CbU-'
dren. Cloth top, low button shoes, the novelty of the
season, 13.50; genuine kid walkimr boots, $3.75. Low
shoes from 82 to $5; fine quality slippers from 91.33 to
2.50; Misses' best pebble goat worked button holes, $2;
Children's hand made, spring heel, batton boots, $1.00;
Infants' shoes, all colors. 81.2S.
Boys' and Youths' Trench calf button boots, 12.75, and
a good, durable laced shoe, $1.93.
ITOer roods an all flrat-elosa. Wo Ml all
orders exactly and to the Interest of parchasers,
gaarnateo all purchases to bo satisfiietory
to buyers, aad stoad ready to remedy
all errors. We invito orders, coavtaeed that
a first trial will liisaro as the regalsr eastern
hereafter.
All orders for Goods to ho aeessspaalod by
the moneyt or, where parties wish, floods will
be seat by express, C. O. B. Where the remittance
is too large, we always return the difference.
Broadway and Twentieth St,
Grand, Chiystie, and Forsyth, N. Y.
April 8 14 2m
A. WILlilPORD,
FEED AND SALE STABLE
BOCK Bill. S. C.
MORE FINE STHSaBl!
I WOULD respectfully inform the public that
I have just received FORTY young, fat
KENTUCKY MULES,
Which are now offered for tale on the most accommodating
terms, at my stables in Rock Hill.
These mules are all in fine condition, and I am
prepared to offer Bargains to all who want
FINE FARMING STOCK.
I will sell them cheap for cash, or on time, with
note and good security. I also have a number of
fine
SADDLE AND HARNESS HORSES,
Which I offer cheap.
When you come to Rock Hill, don't fail to call
round at WILLIFORD'S SALE STABLES. If
3rou wish to buy stock I will give Bargains in almost
any grade of stock desired; and if you
don't want to buy, but have an animal that you
wish to swap, come and see me, as I am prepared
to exchange on fair terms.
A. WILLIFORD.
March 6 10 tf
YORKVILLE LtVERY STABLES.
THE proprietors of the ?* ~
Yoritville Livery8ta- ^
bles would announce that m
they usually have on hand yj?
ana for sale HORSES and jjfbIL
MULES adapted to saddle, V|iXf-aSi?=^u?'
harness and plantation uses. If you wish to buy
stock for either of these purposes, call at our
Stables and we will endeavor to please you, both
as to quality and price.
FEEDING STOCK.
We would also remind the public that we are
prepared to board horsen and mules by the day.
week, month or single meal. We have careful
hostlers, comfortable stalls, and plenty of hay,
corn, oats and fodder. Stock left in our charge
will be well fed and careiully attended, at the
lowest living prices.
CORN AND FODDER WANTED.
We pay, at all times, the highest cash prices for
corn and fodder. WHITAKER A WILSON.
March 18 1 Ty
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTORY
STATIONERY, AND
BOOK BINDERY
THANKING the public for liberal past patronage,
I now invite attention to my complete
stoek of
STAPLE AND FANCY STATIONERY,
consisting, In part, of Plat Papers, Midium, Polio
Post, Demy, Letter and Note. Blank Books,
of every variety; Envelopes, Slates, Ink, Ac,
Fancy Stationery, Gold Pens and Pencils, PenKnives,
Writing Desks, Ac. Also,
BOOK BINDING DONE,
in all its various branches. Sheet Music, Periodicals,Law
Books, Ac., bound in any style desired.
Ola Books rebound and repaired.
PRINTED BILL AND LETTER HEADS A SPECIALTY
Orders promptly attended to, at lowest cash
prices. E. R. STOKES,
155. Main Street Columbia 8. C.
August 15 33 tf
DOWN
WITH HIGH PRICES!
THE CHICAGO SCALE CO.,
149 & 151 Jefferson St., Chicago, Illinois,
Have reduced the prices of all kinds of
SOCLES,
4-TON WAGON SCALES, $60.
2-TON " ? $40.
All other sizes at a great reduction. Every
Scale folly warranted. All orders promptly
filled. Circulars, Price List and Testimonials
sent upon application.
BUY THE CHEAPEST AND BEST..
March 27 13 ly
ROSE'S HOTEL,
YOKKVILLE, S. C.
i mTHIS HOUSE has been thoroughly
renovated from cellar to
fltrtiSuK- garret, and newly tarnished, in*
V&SSaEr eluding GRAFTON'S PATENT
SPRING BEDS. In view of the times, our motto
is a full House at a moderate price.
TERMS?$1.50 PER DAY, OR 50c. PER MEAL.
Sample Rooms reserved especially for Commercial
travelers. HENRY W. SMITH.
August 30 34 tf
NOTICE.
IAMstill Agent for the "Ameri An" because it is
the best and cheapest Sewing Machine made.
J. R. SCHORB.
THE VERY LATEST AND VERY BEST.
THE "FAMILY FAVORITE IMPROVED"
WEED
Sewing1 Machine.
T IGHT-RUNNING, Noiseless, no Gears, no
IA Cams, no 8prings, new and elegant styles of
Woodwork. Simple, Easy to Learn, Requires
no Repairs, Instruction Book so plain no other
teaching required, largest Shuttle used. If you
see it you will buy it.
Prices as Low as any First-Class Machine.
LATIMER A HEMPHILL, Agents,
Yorkville, S. C.
February 6 6 tf
HOW IS THE OPPOBTUNITlf I
AVAIL YOURSELF OF IT!
PRESERVE YOUR ROOKS,
PERIODICALS,
NEWSPAPERS AND MUSIC.
ALL families have old Books, Periodicals,
Newspapers, Music, Ac., which they desire
to transmit to their posterity. Then
HAVE THEM REBOUND!
Which will preserve them and make them look
almost as well as new.
Old Books, Ac., should not only be rebound,
but the current literature ofthe present day should
beput in a durable form for preservation as well.
This can be done in the shortest possible time,
with the best material, in the most handsome and
durable style, and at prioes which cannot be du-1
plicated anywhere, by
?. R. STORES,
Stationer, Book Binder and Blank Book Manufacturer,
No. 155 Main Street,
COLUMBIA, S. C.
jBT- Send in orders at once.
February IS 7 tf
THE YORK MARBLE YARD.
SAM still conducting the MARBLE BUSINESS
in Yorkviile, and am prepared to farjUj
MONUMENTS, TOMB 8TONES. or ANYTHING
IN MY LINE, as low as the lowest.
As an evidence of this, I can furnish Tomb Stones
for CHILDREN from $3.00 upward ; for ADULTS,
from |8.00 upward.
/er Monuments and Tomb Stones designed and
finished in the most elaborate style, ana in point
of workmanship and material, equal to the work
of any establishment in the country.
Siiecimens always on band, to an inspection of
which, those in want of marble work are respectfully
invited.
Estimates and other information furnished on
IsnnMoation. ' ? " :
Work delivered at any point on the Chester
and Lenoir Narrow Gauge Railroad, between
Chester and Dallas, or at any place between
Rock Hill and Winnsboro, on the Charlotte, Columbia
and Angnsta Railroad, free of charge for
transportation.
Thankful for the patronage heretofore bestowed
npon my establishment, my determination is to
merit a continuance of tne same.
F. HAPPEBFIELD. !
January 2 1 ly
MILLS AND RILL KACHIHE&Y.
?? ? ? - > - .?.? in/Ami.
rntiis unaenikdea utk? uiu un?uw u> iuiwiuI
ing the public, that under the hrm name oi
WELLS BROTHERS, they are engaged in the
MILLWRIGHT BUSINESS, and are prepared
to enter into contracts for the building or repairing
of MILLS and MILL MACHINERY ofevery
description, from the largest and most complete
Flouring Mill, to an ordinary Cotton Screw.
Each member of the firm is a skilfhll workman
and has had the benefitof a number of years' experience.
We-are, therefore, prepared to guarantee
that all work entrusted to us, will be executed in
By permission, we rqfer to the following persons,
for whom we have worked: W. J. Rainey,
Blairsvllle, S. C.; J. B. '& R. M. Whitesides,
Hiekoiy Grove, 8. C.; Major T. P. Whitesides,
R. N. McElwee and Elias Ramsay, Yorkville,
S. C.; W. D. Lessley, Clover, S. C.
We are also agents for the sale of "Excelsior 1
Bolting Cloths." and improved Mill Machinery
of every description. Our post office address
Antioch, York county, 8. C.
W. 8. WELLS,
M. R. WELLS,
J. W. WELL8.
September 26 89 1y?
^tiTE "]
FARMERS WHO ARE
REAPER, MO WE
Will find it to their interest to call and examine, o
before purchasing, and we beg the Farmers to bea
WE GUARANTEE SATISFj
Or no trade; and we are selling, thi
CHESTER AGRICl
BENNETT & MOi
CHESTER. SOU
May 1
SERGEANT 4
GREElfSBC
MANUFACTURERS 0)
"TROPIC" COO
w I
gpraa^i
T. M. DOBSON & CO., Agent
LONDON & IHRIE, Agents,
A. F. LINDSAY, Agent, McC
J. L. CARROLL, Agent, Cha
August 2
Mmti 1 i (M|c
mH|H . a i\ I
|| 1 The
Best Family
The "NEW AMERICAN" is easily lean
more work with less labor than any other
application.
AGENTS
J. 8. DOVE! Manager. (
Agent for Yorkville and vicinity,
July 18
ft. H. O'LEARY.
~ SUNDRIES.
4 LARGE lot of Buggy Whips, Baggy Umbrellas,
Saddle Trees, Wood Stirrups, Trace
Ins, Backles, Bridle Bits, Harness, Collars,
Back-bands, Plow, Riding and Halter Bridles,
Martingales, Horse Brushes, Spurs, etc., etc.,
for sale at G. H. O'LEARY'S.
COOKING STOVES.
I AM selling the LIBERTY STOVH WORK8
8TOVES, Chas. Noble A Co., of Philadelphia,
an old established house. Any part of the Stoves
can be duplicated, when worn out. All Stoves
warranted and sold very cheap.
G. H. O'LEARY.
SADDLES AND HARNESS.
1AM manufacturing and selling, at low figures,
everything in the Saddle and Harness line,
and will not be undersold, for the same grade of
goods. Call and be convinced.
G. H. O'LEARY.
FURNITURE.
JUST received, a large lot of Furnltare, consisting
of Walnnt Dressing-Case Suits, Walnut
Chamber Suits, Bureaus. Bedsteads, and
Washstands, all of which will be sold very cheap
by . G. H. O'LEARY.
TABLES.
Th/fARBLE-TOP Walnut Centre-Tables; ExiyJL
tension, Dining, Breakfast, Teapoy, and
Office Tables. Also, Flower Stands, at
G. H. O'LEARY'S.
SAFES.
COMMON KItfcben and Cupboard Safes, cheap,
at G. H. O'LEARY'S.
CIS AIRS. J" .
^ * "V Walnut Manln. Oak TMninfr. Rattan
U andSplit Bottom (Thai rs, at'
GEORGE H. CLEAR VS.
PICTURES. ~~
A LOT of beaatJfai Pictures, handsomely
framed in Walnut and Gilt, unusually cheap,
at G. H. O* LEAHY'S.
PROSPECTU S.
HAVING met with the encouragement necessary
to the enterprise, the undersigned will,
at an early day, commence, at CHESTER, 8. C.,
the publication of
THE STATE BULLETIN.
The STATE BULLETIN will be a weekly newspaper
devoted to
THE INTERESTS Of THE PEOPLE.
The title of the paper has been selected with
special reference to what its editors propose to
make its prominent feature?a prompt, reliable
bulletin for all the important and Interesting
events transpiring within the limits of the State
of Sonth Carolina. Onr columns will comprise
editorials on topics of fresh interest, a complete
Local Department, articles on Agriculture, Select-,
ed Stories, Ityd Correspondence, a melange ot
General and Foreign News,'and a variety of. Instructive
matter?m short, everything eafcnlated
to render the paper SPRIGHTLY, NEWSY and
ENTERTAINING.
LETTERS FROM TEXAS AND WASHINGTON.
Besides correspondence from other points, onr
readers will be favored with an occasional letter
from onr former fellow-citisen, Col. E. C. McLnre,
of Dallas, Texas, and a graphic letter from the
National Capital.
With the attractive features enumemted, the
editors and proprietors of THE 8TA1*E BULLETIN
hope, by perseverance and energy, to
make the paper a welcome visitor to every home
It reaches.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTIONS
ONE COPY, ONE YEAR, *2.00 IN ADVANCE.
For a club of eight subscribers, at 91.75 each,
an extra copy of the paper wili be giver .
* T~. w!^CLA^80NjJr.,} ,3dltorHChester,
8. C., February 27; 1579. 9 tf
HOUSE PAINTING.
mHE undersigned would respectfully inform
1 the public that he has resumed the business
of HOUSE PAINTING in aUits departments
a trade to which he baa served a regular apprenticeship,
under a flrat-class painter,and in which
be has nadseveral years' experience. Work done
in the most durable manner, and at the lowest
prices st which it can be afforded. MARBLING,
GRAINING in Imitation of different woods, arid
all kinds of PINE INTERIOR PAINTING
done in as good style as oan bedonebyanypainter
in this section of the oountry. 1 can be seen
or addreesed at Yorkville, and win cheerfully
make estimates on work in any part of York, or
the adjoining counties.
References.?As to my skill as a workman, I.
respect fblly refer to the following gentlemen:
L. M. Grist, W. A. Moore, Hon. I. D. Witherspoon,
A. W. lngoid, J. F. Wallace, Lawson Jenkins,
Col. W. H. McCorble, Dr. H. G. Jackson,
Dr. J. F. Lindsay, James L. Clark, Jamas E.
Smith, Hon. A. 8. Wallace, Yorkville ;mL 8. R.
Thomson, Spartanburg; R. M. Wilson, Gaston;
J. A. Brice, Fairfield; J. Harvey 8mith, Cheater.
NELSON DAYIE8.
July 11 28 ly
j, R. SCHORB'S PHOTO-fiALLERTj
1ST H0B8E EAST OF TBS JAIL
A SUPERIOR Skylight, a gallery with every
convenience, ana a determination to do my
best, enables me to promise satisfaction to all in
want of correct and nattering likenesses. Cloudy
weather is as good or bettor than sunshine tor all
subjects, exoept small children. ,
BEST."
! ').,,i .,: *! : I,; V 1)04. iiv?:ti>su^^frrt " ' NEEDING
EITHER A
R or THRASHER,
r send for CATALOGUE AND DESCRIPTIONS
r in mind that we sell no "Hambug."
ACTION IN EVERY CASE,
s season, REMARKABLY LOW. .
JLTURAIi WORKS,
'FATT, Proprietors,
TH CAROLINA.
18 . ... im
tMcCAULEY,
IROi Jf* Cm ., t ~r
F THE CELEBRATED '
KINO STOVES!
PRICE GREATLY REDUCED
on Cooking and Heating Stoves,
Hollow Ware And-Irons, and
Castings of al. zinds. Also, on
PLANTER'S PRIDE' PLOWS
and Plow Castings,
STRAW CUTTERS,
Corn Shellers,
HORSE POWERS,
Saw Mills, Ac.
ts, Yorkville, S. C.
Rook Hill, York county, S. G.
lonnellaville, York county, S. G.
iter, S. C.
si tr
Joy only the
^ NEW
W AMERICAN
It tu
Only 8ewing Machine
^ WHICH HAS A
^raStil ^ielf'^htadhui^huttli
BmB
RjltigBR It tu Self Setting Needle.
fflfflniH Never Breaks the Three!
HjSgHp Never Skips Stitches.
KhHV Is the Lightest taring.
The Simplest, the Most Durable,
and in Eoerg Respect
Sewing Machine!
ied, does not get out of order, and will do
machine. Illustrated Circular furnished on
WANTED.
14 . Charles Street, Baltimore, JM*
HUNTER & GATES.
iy
' i

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