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Yorkville enquirer. [volume] (Yorkville, S.C.) 1855-2006, July 13, 1906, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026925/1906-07-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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tumorous Jlcpartmrnt.
Rksolrcjcfi'l Man.?The late James
E. Martin, brother of Bradley Martin,
was a man of old-fashioned integrity
and the illegal practices of many noted
financiers and corporations angered
and shocked him.
In a discussion of a certain muchinvestigated
company Mr. Martin said
one day:
"This concern seems always to have
found it easy to break the law. It has
been as ready and resourceful as a
tenant I once had.
"My tenant was an enthusiastic
?1 ~Ana /loir Ka tncilr a nitrpnn
pi^truu ilj CS V/IIC UUJ uv tW(% ?*
in a bag to the Grant monument, intending
to time its tlight home. But
when he took the bird out of the bag
a policeman came up and said:
"What are you doing here?"
"Getting ready to fly this pigeon."
said my tenant.
"You can't fly no pigeon here," said
the policeman.
"Why not?" the tenant asked.
"It's against the law?that's why
not," said the policeman. If you try
it I shall be obliged to lock you up."
"My tenant placed the pigeon on the
ground, stroked it and said to it
gravely: "I can't toss you up here, for
it's against the law, so you must walk
nome. l>o you near; xuu uiusi nam
home."?Chicago Inter Ocean.
Hb Waj Patjknt.?Bishop Ellison
Capers in an address at Columbia, S.
C., praised the virtue of patience.
"We may have industry," he said,
"sobriety, ambition?all the virtues
that make for success, yet without patience
we will accomplish nothing.
"A young man was overheard on a
street corner the other night reproaching
a young girl. That young man
was patient. He had so highly developed
this excellent quality that I shall
not be surprised some day to see him
a millionaire, a college president or
even a bishop.
"The young man said as the young
girl drew near him on the corner:
" "What a time you have kept me
waiting.'
"The girl tossed her head.
" 'It's only 7 o'clock,' she said, 'and
I didn't promise to be here until a
quarter of.'
'The young man smiled a calm and
patient smile.
" Ah, yes,' he said, 'but you have
mistaken the day. I have been waiting
for you since last evening." *
?Cleveland Leader.
Afraid of Their Wine.?Henry
White, the American ambassador to
Italy, tells this story: "Two Englishmen
attended a dinner at one of the
Neapolitan hotels on the water front.
"After the dinner the Englishmen
went out for a walk along the embankment.
The sea was rough. The
spray splashed over them. Soon they
saw a statue, and as they neared this
statue it nodded to them gravely.
" 'Did you see that statue nod?' the
first Englishman said:
" 'I certainly did,' the second said.
" 'It is this confounded Capri wine,'
the first said.
" 'Well,' the second said, 'we had
better get back home to bed before we
are run in."
"So, ashamed of themselves, the
Englishmen went home to bed, and
when, amazingly fresh when ali things
were considered, they sat down to
breakfast the next morning their
waiter said to them: Did the gentlemen
fe<i the last night's slight earthquake
hock?"
*
Not the Right Question.?"The
bravery of young men," said Rear Admiral
BuhJer at Atlantic City, according
to the New York Tribune, "is a fact
that I shall never cease to marvel over.
Did you ever hear of a hope too forlorn,
a risk too overwhelming, for the
young men of the armies and navies
of the world to undertake?
"If only the young men's wisdom
equaled their bravery! But this is impossible.
Sometimes I think boys have
so much bravery there is no room in
them for anything else.
"I used to know a boy who was brave
enough, but reckless, careless, extravagant.
He accumulated a great quantity
of debts.
"His father gave him a talking to
one day.
" 'Suppose,' he said, 'that I should
ho taken awav suddenly, what would
become of you?'
" 'I'd stay here," the boy answered,
smiling. 'The question is. What would
become of you ?' "
Webster's Retainers.?Edward M.
Nason, superintendent of buildings for
the state of New Hampshire, tells the
following anecdote of Daniel Webster,
says the Boston Herald:
One day a man came to Webster's
office and consulted him in regard to
a prospective law suit. At the close
of the conference he paid the attorney
a retainer of $100 to look after the
matter. After returning to his place
c\f Knclnooo ho fminri thnt his nnrtner
had already settled the suit, obtaining
the sum demanded without an attorney.
He thought $100 was altogether
too much for an office fee. so he dispatched
his clerk to look after the
subject.
"Mr. Webster," said the young man
"my employer thinks you should return
a part of your retainer. That case has
been settled."
"Young man," said the lawyer, "you
go back and tell your employer that
a retainer is something to be retained."
Tcrnino thk Tabi.es.?a statesman,
in an argument, had turned the tables
rather neatly on bis opponent. Sena
tor Dolliver, to congratulation, said:
"You remind me of a Fort Dodge doctor.
Dr. X. Tills gentleman once had
a grave dug for a patient, supposed to
be dying who afterwards recovered,
and over this error of judgment the
doctor was joked for many years.
"Once he attended, in consultation
with three confreres, another patient.
This patient really died. After the
death, as the physicians discussed the
case together, one of them said:
" 'Since quick burial Is necessary, we
might inter the body temporarily. I
understand that our brother here
has a vacant grave on hand.'
"Dr. X. smiled.
"'Yes,' he said. 'I believe I am the
only physician present whose graves
are not all tilled.'"
Not So Sillt.?Weary from the
chase, the ostrich of the desert had
stuck his head in the sand.
"You silly bird." said the hunter
coming up. "Do you imagine I can't
see you!"
"You mistake my purpose," replied
the ostrich, with dignity. "Of course
you see me, but you miserable, feather
stealing, egg hunting, land pirate. I
thus relieve myself of the necessity of
seeing you."
Conscious that he had the better of
the argument, the ostrich yielded $40
worth of plumes without a murmur.?
Philadelphia Record.
iUiSfflliiurmii ilfiulinp.
IN COUNTIES ADJOINING.
News and Comment Clipped Fror
Neighboring Exchanges.
LANCASTER.
News, July 11: As published In
previous issue of the News, Senato
Tillman will speak in Lancaster on th
OA?U Inatont TV^A oq nrl {Hot pq f or POH
gress from this district will also spea
here the same day. A large crowd wi
no doubt greet the distinguishe
speakers Mrs. Alice E. Beckhan
widow of Ed Beckham, who was kille
on the L. & C. road, in Chester, som
time ago, has brought suit for fort
thousand dollars" damages against th
railroad company. Mr. J. Harry Fos
ter is attorney for the plaintiff.
GASTON.
Gastonia Gazette, July 10: Mr. F
B. Bablngton. general manager of th
Piedmont Telephone and Telegrap
Company returned Saturday fror
GafTney. where a deal was made i
which Piedmont acquired the propert
of the GafTney Telephone Companj
The GafTney Company has from 25
to 300 phones. The Piedmont will tak
charge August 1st, and will go to wor
to fit out the Gaffney Exchange wit
the latest and best equipments. Here
tofore the people of GafTney were com
pelled to go to the central office in or
der to use the long-distance lines
which has been a great inconvenienc
to all parties concerned. After th
change is made the long-distance line
" in miiHu tn pvt?iui into the home
and offices of the Gaffney subscriber:
and Gastonia people can then talk t
Gaffney without having the person the
want called to a central booth. Gas
tonia will now be headquarters for th
Gaffney Telephone company Mi
James L. Kendrick and Miss Maggi
Spencer were united In marriage las
Thursday night by Rev. R. C. Andersor
The ceremony was performed at th
home of the bride's parents, Mr. an
Mrs. Caleb Spencer, south "of the Lo
ray. The wedding was a quiet horn
affair, but still there were a large num
ber of the young couple's friends pres
ent. The happy couple left Monday to
Charlotte where they will be at horn
for the summer Mr. W. Meel
Adams started west on train No 3
yesterday morning. He is on a visi
to his sons. Thomas and Leslie, in Col
orado, and will take pains to have th
best sort of time while he is on th
trip?and the best sort of time is wha
all his friends wish him Marriei
on July 4th at Bowling Green, Mr. J
L. Huffstetler and Miss Blanche Cos
both of Gastonia. The ceremony wa
ncrformpil hv Mr. R. M. Dulin. th
notary public, at his residence
Mr. It. M. McSwain has a horne<
toad that is a curiosity. It seems t
be a cross between a lizard and ai
ordinary toad. Mr. John McSwaii
brought it from Oklahoma a few week
ago and gave it to his brother's soi
Mr. A. C. McSwain. There is anothe
in the community somewhere that wa
turned loose two or three years age
It was 49 years ago when Mi
J. L. Carpenter left the Beaver Dan
section and sought his fortune in Ala
bama and Texas. Thirty-five years ag
he visited the old home, and then re
turned to Texas. Now he is at horn
again to spend the summer?the firs
time he has set foot on his native soi
in 35 years. Mr. Carpenter and hi
daughter. Miss Minnie, came fron
Travis county, Texas, about tw
weeks ago. They have been visitin,
Mrs. Henry Kiser, beyond McAden
ville. She is a sister of Mr. Carpen
ter, and Mr. Mark Carpenter is i
brother. They went to Long Shoal
yesterday to visit relatives in tha
section. Mr. Carpenter will be 6
years old the 18th of next Octobei
He is looking hale and hearty am
seems good for spending many mor
happy years on his 1500 acre rancl
in Texas For raising an orde
a negro named Tom Michael is ii
Dallas jail. He was sent up Frida;
from Gastonia. Mr. Jno. F. Joy gav
him an order for $1.1*0 for work a
his saw-mill. When the order wa
presented to Mr. T. A. Joy in Ml
Holly it read $21.90. He was offeree
$1.90, but wouldn't take it. "I'l
have to go to the bank then to ge
the change" said Mr. Joy. The negr
started out, saying he would be bad
in a few minutes. Mr. Joy went ou
too, but instead of going to the ban
he went to Deputy Sheriff Lent:
That officer kept up his search fo
three weeks until on notice by phon
the Gastonia police nabbed Michat
here Thursday night where h
expected to take train 35 for Sout
Carolina. He was at the depot sittin
on a truck when arrested.
CHESTER.
Lantern, July 10: Mrs. F. W. Cull
of Washington, D. C., arriver i
the city Saturday and spent yester
day at the home of her father-in-lav
Col. J. R. Culp, and left for M
Prospect yesterday to spend severe
weeks with her mother, Mrs Eliza
beth Baokstrom Miss Mary Git
son, who is attending the summe
school at Rock Hill, came down Sal
urday and spent until yesterday wit
her sisters. Her cousins, little Miss*
Is.ls and Ethel Black, of Rock Hit
accompanied her The date c
Senator Tillman's speech has bee
changed from Saturday, the 21st, t
Thursday, the 19th instant. Commit
tees will be named in our next issui
The congressional candidates hav
been invited to speak, as they hav
no place in the state campaign meel
ing. All other candidates are invi
ted to attend, but they will hardl
have an opportunity to speak. Th
meeting will be in White's Grovi
near old Purity Capt. W. V
Adams, the ranking officer of tli
penitentiary guard and Tor 27 yeai
a member of that command, die
suddenly of appoplex.v yesterday morn
big at 7.20 o'clock, lie was f?2 yeat
of age, and came to Columbia froi
Barnwell county to accept a positio
as private on the force of guards i
the state penitentiary. During tlui
time, he has risen through the se\
eral grades of rank to the position t
captain, to which he was appointe
several years ago Mrs. Mar
Sanders, aged fifty-three years, an
wife of Mr. Clayton Sanders, die
suddenly from heart failure, aboi
2.20 o'clock, Saturday afternooi
July 7. 1906. She had not been we
since she had measles several week
ago but was always busy with he
house-keeping and never gave ti|
Saturday she had been busy all da
preparing for the return of her soi
Mr. Tuttle Sanders, with his brhh
from Anderson, and was going to th
basement for something. When abo*j
half way down the stairs she sa
down for a minute then her hea
turned to one side and she fell o
the steps, a distance of four or flv
feet, to the floor below and was dea
when Mr. Sanders got to her. He
son and his wife reached here aboil
one hour after her death.
FOLLOWED BY A LION.
Hunter's Night Adventure In an African
Jungle.
To stroll through the African jungle
with a gun loaded only in one
barrel and with dusk approaching
seems to invite adventure, and so It
did in the case of William Cotton Osa
well, the friend of Livingston. Os,r
well started out from his camp one
e evening, fired his one shot at a
quagga. which he wounded, and
^ then followed his tracks, marked the
" place where it fell, and then turned
his steps, as he thought, toward the
11 wagons. In his biogruphy the incident
Is described in his own words:
e It was not until I had wandered
carelessly hither and thither for half
e an hour, feeling sure that it was only
the one particular bush in front of
me which hid the wagons, that I very
unwillingly owned to myself that I
I. was drifting without bearings in this
e bushy sea.
h .Twilight in the tropics is very short,
n Just before the sun set I followed a
n game track which I knew would lead
y to water. After a good draught I
r. began collecting firewood, but the
0 night closed in so rapidly that a bare
e hour's supply was all my store,
k Partly to save fuel, partly in the
h hope that as night crept on signals
- would be made from the wagons, I
- climbed a tree and had not been long
- perched before I heard, far off, the
*, boom of guns.
e Alarmed at my absence, my come
panions suspected the case and were
s Inviting my return; but It required a
s very pressing invitation indeed to in3,
duce a man to walk through two
o miles of an African wood on a dark
y night.
It grew bitterly cold. I determine
ed to come down and light my fire. I
p. had reached the lowest bough of my
e tree and placed my hand beside my
it feet before jumping off, when from
j. the bush immediately under me a
e deep note and the sound of a heavy
il body slipping through the thorny
- scrub told me that a lion was passe
ing. Without the warning, in another
half second I could have alighted on
- his back. I very quickly put two or
r three more yards more, between the
e soles of my feet and the ground,
k I could not much longer endure
9 my cramped position in the scraggy
t tree, and felt I must get down. Walt
ing until the moon was about one tree
e high. I came down and dived into
e the bush. I struggled on for an
t hour, I should think,, when four or
d five muskets fired together within
T. fifty yards told me I was home again.
:, I hope I was thankful then: I know
s I am now. Two of my Hottentot
e servants and a batch of Kaffirs had
come to meet me and escorted me to
1 the fire in triumph. As I held my
0 half thawed hands over it the roar
tl of a disappointed lion rang through
n the camp.
8 "He has missed you. Tiaga, by a
' little this time," said my black
r friends. Let him go back to his
s game."?Youth's Companion.
AS SOUII as it man gcin a
d that his employer can't get along
without him he is getting ready to lose
his job.
0
itiT There is always the danger that
every man will become the hired man
e and every mother the hired girl to
t their family.
s
a Every Dollar Saved in the Came ol
s Life Is
t A POINT SCORED.
8 ONE DOLLAR WILL START
AN ACCOUNT WITH TIIE
e BANK OF CLOVER
h It Will Give Us Pleasure to Add Your
r Name to Our List of
u Depositors.
1 BANK OF CLOVER
t CLOVER, S. C.
* JAS. A. PAGE, Cashier.
k Body--Mind--Soul
c.
Must be equally trained to fit a boy
for life. The school that does thb
e honestly is cheap at any price, and
>1 any other school is high at any price.
,'j Catawba Military Academy
g ItOCK HILL, S. C.
Endeavors to do this. It strives aftei
THOROUGH TRAINING?CAREFUI
, OVERSIGHT ? CANDII) DEALING
I, with Parent and Pupil. Rates as
moderate as Excellence will allow,
For information address,
D. J. HRTMM, Rock Hill S. C.
il
F. C. BLACK
Life Insurnnee
r
h Old Line Mutual
?S
Legal Reserve
n
<> Just as solid as it is possible to
niaivc (iii^ 1111115.
e. THE SECURITY LIFE
AND ANNUITY COMPANY
'e
t_ Has compiled with the general insurance
laws, and is licensed to do business
as legal reserve "Old Line" comy
pany. This means, that the state oi
lt. North Carolina guarantees that tht
company's assets and liabilities art
correctly given in its published state'
ments.
ie That the Company has deposited
cash securities with the insuranct
commissioner for the absolute protec*'
tion of its policy-holders.
FRED C. BLACK.
" STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
(l County of York.
l( IN PROBATB COURT.
- Ry L. R. Williams, Esq., Probate Judge
of York County.
d TI71IKRKAS S. M. CAROTHERSVV
has applied to me for Letters o1
Y Administration, with will annexed, on
d all and singular, the goods and chat(]
tels. rights and credits of THOMAS M
CAROTHERS. late of the count)
aforesaid, deceased:
' These arc, tnererore, 10 cue ami aaII
luonfsh all and singular the kindred
;s and creditors of the said deceased, tc
he and a hi tear before nte at our nexl
Probate Court for the said county, tc
' he holden at York Court House or
y the 20TH DAY OF JULY, 1906
, to shew cause, if any. why the said
Administration should not he granted
*' Given under my hand and seaJ, this
p 3rd day of July, in the year oi
d our Lord one thousand nine hundred
it and six and in the 130th year ol
<1 American Independence.
IT L. R. WILLIAMS,
e Probate Judge of York county,
d July 6th f 3t
it W Bound Volumes of Horse Shoe
Robinson at The Enquirer office, $1.00.
w vtf
/ r Tnderscoring \
^ parts of a :
letter for empha1
sis mars its ap- I
pearance.
The Ne*rTti- Chrome
frnMi Premier TVpeavrtter
which writes
black, purple or
red as desired,
enables you to
send out letters
emphatic to the
I mind as they
I are pleasing to
I the eye.
This machine permits not only the
1 I nee or a three-color ribbon, but also
I of a two-color or single-color ribbon.
I No extra cost for this new model.
|| Smith Premier Typewritep
Company
II S. RHEA PRESTON, Jr., I
II Greenville, S. C. fl
Real Estate For Sale.
One 3-room dwelling and lot, 70x165
East Jefferson street.
One corner Lot, East Jefferson street
adjoining above.
1 six-room, new Dwelling on west
, side Wright avenue. New fence
around lot. new barn, and wood shed.
City water.
160 Acres, 2-story dwelling, 8
rooms; 2 tenant houses; good new
barn; 4-horse farm open; 60 acres in
timber: capable of high cultivation;
6J miles from Yorkville, 71m to Rock
Hill, on Yorkville and Rock Hill road.
, Terms to suit purchaser.
301 Acres, 31 miles Yorkville; 20
acres in cultivation; good stream of
1 water; 1 nice weatherboarded 4-r
house; 1 tenant house.
80 Acres, 51 miles southeast Yorkville;
adjoining lands W. R. Carroll;
1 Spencer place; 1 4-r dwelling; 10 acres
; fine bottom; 20 acres forest land. ?
72 Acres, 32m. Yorkville, on Rutherford
road; 2 houses and barn; 55
acres in cultivation; 15 acres timber;
i branches; 80 fine fruit trees; 1-mile of
> public school.
451} acres, 2 miles of Tirzah, 6}
( miles Yorkville, 7} Rock Hill. On public
road from Yorkville to Rock Hill,
near Adner church; high state of
cultivation, 75 acres bottom in corn,
10-horse farm open. Large new barn,
12 stalls and cribs. 10 acres fine orchard,
2-story dwelling (painted) in
beautiful oak grove. Produced 1^0
bales cotton 1905.
> 115 acres 2} miles Incorporate limits
of Yorkville, Pinckney road; six
room dwelling, 1 tenant house, 40
acres in woods. Cheap?1-3 cash.
203 acres on Pinckney road, J mile
, incorporate limits of Yorkville, In cul'
tivation, level, one five room dwelling,
2 tenant houses. Price $850.
190 Acres. 4} miles south of York,
ville. One Dwelling, 2 Tenant houses;
75 acres open land, balance in Timber.
3UU eruu i rees. per acre.
377 acres, farm, both sides King's
Mountain road, about 2j miles Bethany
High School, 1 7-room dwelling,
I tenant house and other buildings;
at least 100,000 feet saw timber; has
mineral prospects; A. C. Stroup place.
Farm in fine condition; 140 acres;
II Room Dwelling; 40 acres in wood
and saw timber; 8 acres bottom; good
out buildings; half mile Bethany
High school; $4,000.00.
57 Acres; 8 miles west of Yorkvllle;
near Rutherford road; one two-room
house; Cheap.
FOR SALE?237 acres, "Enloe
place," miles from Yorkvllle. 3
houses, 4? horse farm open. 100 acres
, in wood. 50,00 to 100,000 ft. of saw
. timber. 40 acres fine bottoms on
Buckhorn creek.
79 q/ipqc nn Phiialer rnnd 4 miles
Yorkvllle; adjoins Philadelphia church
at Delphos station. 20 acres original
forest, dwelling, etc.
50 acres 1 mile of Tirzah: 10 acres
in wood; 6 acres good bottom. Youngblood
place. Price $800.
i Fine dwelling on Main street. 10
( Rooms?Splendid location.
55 acres, J mile Tirzah station. Per
acre, $16.00.
40 acres, 8 miles northeast of Yorkvllle.
bounded by lands of Mrs. Nichols
and Mrs. Youngblood; 18 acres
. woodland.
1331-3 acres J mile west of Hoodtown.
On public road. 60 acres in cultivation.
35 or 40 acres of fine bottoms.
12 acres bottoms in cultivation. Cheap.
Six valuable lots on Lincoln ave.
60x296 feet. W. H. Herndon prop
eriy.
Small house on W. Madison street.
Lot containing one acre.
85 acres, 3-mile from Yorkville on
Charlotte road; a two-room house, 15
acres in bottom in high state of cultivation.
> 83 acres 2 miles from Yorkville, 2
tenant houses?3 and 4 rooms?
New Barn with sheds, new double
crib, good pasture, good 2-horse
' farm in cultivation. 200 nursery trees
consisting of pears, peaches, apples
' and cherries.
113 acres f> miles west of Yorkville,
't 70 acres cultivated land, well water
ed, 2-story dwelling, 6 rooms, on H.
! F. D., about 28 acres in pasture and
! second growth pine.
230 acres, 2 miles from Yorkville,
2 dwelling and 1 tenant house.
1 Well timbered.
! 35 acres in the town of Yorkville,
' will sell in lots from one acre up.
Five room cottage 8 x 30 foot hall,
front and back portico, good well, 80
foot frontage on Wright avenue.
Four lots in Whisonant?CHEAP.
235 acre farm about 81 miles from
Yorkville, 3 miles from Ehenezer; 1
new 6-room dwelling two 4-room tenant
houses, 30 acres fine bottom land
, ?five horse farm.
J. C. WIIiHOttV, Attorney.
[ COTTON INSURANCE.
I AM prepared to write Insurance
on Cotton stored either in open
yard or in outbuildings on farms.
Farmers can arrange to borrow
! money on my Insurance policies on
( cotton held on their farms the same
, as if the cotton were stored In a
| warehouse in town. Rate 3? per cent.
* Write or call at my office for rates of
1 insurance and other Information.
[ J. R. LINDSAY.
1 Oct. 3. t.f. tf.
"DON'T FORGET"
i
' You Can He Cured of CANCER, TUMOR.
or CHRONIC OLD SORES.
Ten Thousand cases treated. It is the
surest cure on Earth. Delay Is fatal.
How to be cured? Just write
D. B. GLADDEN,
i Grover, N. C.
May 11 f 3m.
ffllTAI
nnMiKi
PROFITS THROWN TC
I STOCK-TAKING HAS SHO^
THOUSANDS OF DOLL;
MER GOODS THAT
INTO CASH WIT
OUR PRICES WILL DO T
mi rms mm
UilUU JJUU111 U lflUlll/.
OUR STOCKREDUCINGI
Standard Calicoes, worth 6c ^
Hickory Shirting, worth 15c 7
These Prices Are Ticklers.
HEAVY UNBLEACHED SHEETING NOW GOING AT 5 Cls. Yard.
A. C. A. FEATHER TICKING?BEST QUALITY?13 1-2 CIh. Yard.
LADIES' 25c HOSE SUPPORTERS NOW GOING AT 15 Cls. Pair. .
25 CENT QUALITY OIL CLOTH NOW GOING AT 15 CTS. YARD.
LADIES' 25c HACK COMBS, NOW GOING AT 15 Cents.
LADIES' 25e BELTS NOW GOING AT 15 Cts.
30 Do/.. Indies' Handkerchiefs, worth 10c each, Going 3 for a DIME.
40 Doz. Indies' Swiss Ribbed Gauze Vests, Taped Neck, 4 Cts. Each.
ABOUT 5,000 YARDS GINGIIAM AND APRON CHECKS, HILL
LENGTHS, WORTH 6 CENTS A YARD, GOING DURING
THIS SALE AT ONLY 4 CENTS A YARD. BUY QUICK.
50 DOZ. LADIES' BLACK HOSE, worth 15 Cts. Going 10 Cts. Pair.
1.500 Yards TEN CENT LAWNS, including all sliadcs and popular
patterns?Usually considered an Extra Bargain at 3 Cents a
Yard, NOW GOING AT 3 1-2 CENTS A YARD.
BLACK TAFFETA?ALWAYS SELLS FOR A DOLLAR A YARD?
BUT THIS STOCK REDUCTION SALE MAKES A DIFFERENCE
AND OUR PRICE IS 77 CENTS A YARD.
Dress Goods Off One-Fifth
OF COURSE THE STOCK REDUCING CYCLONE STRUCK
I OUR DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT AND MADE IT
TREMBLE SOME. IT MIGHT COST US MONEY TO DO IT
BUT THEY MUST GO AS FALL AND WINTER GOODS
WANT THE ROOM AND WE WANT THE MONEY TIED
UP IN OUR DRESS GOODS?THEY MUST GO ALONG
WITH THE REST AND NOW THEY GO AT EIGHTY
CENTS ON THE DOLLAR?OR TWENTY PER CENT OFF.
Furnishings 2 a Fer uent
MEN'S AND HOYS' SIIIHTS, COLLARS, CUFFS. CRAVATS AND
OTHER TRIMMINGS INCLUDED UNDER THE GENERAL
HEADING OF "GENTS FURNISHINGS" ARE OFFERED
AT 25 PER CENT REDUCTION?IN OTHER WORDS $1.00
SHIRTS GO FOR 75 CENTS EACH; 50 CENT SHIRTS GO
AT 57 CENTS AND SO ON DOWN THE LINE.
Straw Hats at Half Price
MEN'S AND BOYS' STRAW HATS ARE GOING LIKE THIS: $1.00
HATS AT 50 CENTS EACH; 75 CENT HATS AT 37 CENTS;
50 CENTS HATS GO AT 25 CENTS AND SO ON.
On Shoes We Always Lead
OUR STRONGEST POINT?IF WE HAVE ONE POINT IN
WHICH WE ARE STRONGER THAN ANOTHER?IS IN OUR
SHOE DEPARTMENT. \VK I)() NOT BKMKVK~\NI) TIIKKK
ARK SCORES OF CUSTOMERS TO BACK OUR CLAIM?THAT
ANY CONCERN IN THIS WHOLE SECTION CAN EXCEL US IN
QUALITIES, STYLES OR PRICES. THE SHOE DEPARTMENT
OF THIS STORE IS KEPT UP TO THE HIGHEST PITCH OF EFFICIENCY
AND YOU CAN REST ASSURED THAT THE BEST
OF SHOE VALUES CAN BE HAD HERE.
HERE ARE SOME SPECIAL SHOE BARGAINS, GOOD
DURING THIS STOCK REDUCING SALE; LOOK THEM OVER
CAREFULLY?THEY WILL SAVE YOU MONEY:
Indies' White Canvas Ovfords. worth $1.00?GOING AT 75 CENTS.
liUdies* White Canvas Oxfords, worth $1.25?GOING AT 85 CENTS.
Indies' White Canvas Oxfords, worth $1.50?GOING AT $1.10.
Indies' White Canvas Oxfords, wortli $2.00?GOING AT $1.50.
Uulios Low Cut, Black Sinn's go like this: $1.00 Shoes ut 75e; $1.35
Shoes for $1.00; $1.50 Shoes at $1.18; $2.00 Shoes for $1.50;
$2.50 Shoes at $1.75: $3.00 Shoes for $2.25.
The above are in Kid Patent Leather, with or without tips, in
Hlucher Oxfords umi Newport Ties and Strap Sandals.
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S M)W CUT SHOES?60e quality at 40c
pair; 75c quality ut 50c pair: 85c quality at 00c: $1.00 quality
at 75c; $1.25 quality at $1.00 for Children. For Misses like
this: 85c quulity ut title; $1.00 quality at 75c; $1.25 quality
at 9t)c: $1.35 quality at $1.00; $1.50 quality ut $1.15.
MEN'S LOW QUARTER SHOES?$1.35 quality for $1.00; $1.50
quality at $1.18 a puir; $2.25 quulity for $1.10 a puir?heavy
soles; $3.0(1 quulity Tun Oxfords at $2.00.
m-rTr-n nnrn A Tm
L mu OlltAUD
TORZVII
i stocTI
CI HMD!
OLUlTin
I THE FOUR WHS
VN US THAT WE HAVE
*RS TIED UP IN SUMnn
nirTnATT^n
MUai JDTj lUIV^eil;
HOUT DELAY. V m
'HE TRICK QUICK
.. ?'
I Y JULY 9TH, and ConA
| tinues Thro' July 19th
A ) TEN DAYS
PRICES GO LIKE THIS:
{ <1, Going at 41 "2 C^s- Yd.
STd, Going at 9 Cts. Yard.
Clothing Prices Smashed
YOU HAVE BEEN READING OUR CLOTHING ADVERTISEMENTS
IN THE ENQUIRER. COMMON SENSE TELLS
YOU THAT THE PRICES WERE TERRIBLY LOW; THEY WERE
RITT THEY ARE LOWER NOW?THEY HAVEN'T BEEN GOING
FAST ENOUGH?THESE PRICES WILL MAKE THEM GO SOME
FASTER. ARE YOU ON TO A GOOD THING?
LOT NO. ONE.
Coat and Vest left from $9 Suit, size for 19 year old youth
or for size 35 man, single breasted, small brown check. The
REDUCED PRICE MAKES COAT AND VEST FOR ONLY $2.50.
Coat and Vest, size 34. former price was $12.00. The Pants are
gone. This Is an imported piece of goods. Coat is unlined, but well
taped. COAT AND VEST NOW OFFERED AT $2.50 FOR BOTH.
LOT NO. TWO.
A lot of Coats and Vests, sizes 34, 35, 36, 37 and 38, double
breasted, skeleton lined, small check, imported goods.
Former price of Suits $12.50. Regular price of Coat and Vest was
$8.50. NOW GOING AT ONLY $2.50.
LOT NO. THREE
Is made up of Coats and Vests from Suits we sold at $10
and $12.50 a suit?the Pants are gone. The Coats are all
round cut Sacks, skeleton lined and worth the price we asked
at the beginning of the season. Sizes 33 to 38. The
onvwir I?pnneivr. PRICK MAKES THEM NOW ONLY $2.50.
kJ A V/V 1\ 11S4A/? _
Style 7460?Sack suit of Scotch tweed cheviot, In dark brown,
with a combination mixture of gold and gray. NOW GOING AT $5.
85,500?Black Sack Suit of Washington Mills 14 oz. Clay Worsted,
diagonal weave, excellent grade, fast black, regular $10 Suit.
NOW GOING AT ONLY $0.00 SUIT.
2289.?Black Sack Suit of fine all wool Thibet, diagonal weave,
with lustrous finish. Coat is lined with serge. The kind of suit
most people will ask $15 for. NOW GOING AT $10.00 SUIT.
8614.?Round Sack Suit of Middlesex all-wool Indigo blue
Flannel, each garment bearing the label "Genuine Indigo Dye."
Medium weight and will stand hard service. NOW GOING AT $7.00.
MEN'S PANTS.
We believe we have the best line of Men's Pants to be found
on this market. Here Is the guarantee that goes with every pair
of our $1.50 Grade or Pants NOW GOING AT $1.00 A PAIR.
GUARANTEE FROM CLEVELAND MILLS, CLEVELAND, TENN.
The Weaver of the cloth and the Manufacturer of this Pant is
One and the Same, and by reason of this Mill's many years' experience,
it is erfabled to see every naturally weak place in the construction
of the fabric and the design and workmanship of the
Trouser. We all agree that it is about as easy to make "good work"
*" " 1 "-'l'IIIf.<I Onui-Qlnru anil amnio I'unitill anil
as "Da(I worn, UIIU UUI nmiuui
large Production puts us in a position to produce the best of work
at the most reasonable cost. We have full contldence in the merits
of our production, and to fully inspire those not already acquainted
with the line, we give each and every Merchant handling our goods
full authority to replace this Pant, without charge to the Purchaser,
should It prove within thirty (30) days from date of purchase to be
defective in workmanship, such as would condemn the Pant as an
unsatisfactory garment.
MEN'S ODI) PANTS?$1.00 quality at 75e |>air: $1.50 quality at $t
a pair: $2.00 quality at $1.50: $2.50 quality at $2.00 pair;
$2.00 at $2.25 a pair; $4.00 quality at $2.00 a pair; $5.00
quality at $2.75 u pair. NOW'S A GOOD TIME IX) BUY.
CLOTHING FOR BOYS.
Style 87,702?Double Breasted Suit of Union Melton, gray and
black mixture, delicate garnet and brown plaid, ages 6 to 14 years.
Former price $1.25. NOW GOING AT ONLY 89 CENTS.
87,873.?Single breasted Square Cut Sack Suits of Union Twill
Melton, dark ground, with gray and garnet pin head mixture and
having olive overplaid. Coat buttons up to neck, front and back
plaits. Former price $1.50. NOW GOING AT ONLY $1.14.
Other Suits for boys, sizes from 6 to 14 years, of different
qualities and styles, ranging in price like this: $1.75 Suits now
$1.50; $2.25 Suits now $2.00; $2.50 Suits now $2.25; liner and better
Suits from $2.00 to $5.00 a Suit. r
SUITS FOR YOUTHS?AGES 14 TO 19 YEARS.
Style 87.307?Sack Suit of fancy Worsted In black, Interwoven
gray threads and has a pronounced stripe of olive. Was $5.00 a H
Suit, but NOW THEY ARE GOING AT ONLY *4.18
87,353.?Sack Suit of Fancy Casslmere, trimmed with satin piped
facings. NOW TIIEY ARE GOING AT ONLY - *4.89
87,370.?Sack Suit of West End English Wool Cheviot, deep
brown ground, mottled In variegated color effect. We'll leave to
you to judge the value. NOW THEY'RE GOING AT ONLY *8.68.
87,325.?Sack Suit of Fancy Casslmere, deep blue ground, having
indistinct garnet and olive stripe. NOW THEY GO AT . .*4.38.
87,351.?Double Breasted Sack Suit of Fancy Mercerized
Worsted, with a combination mixture of gray, garnet and gold
threads, brightened by broken gray threads. GOING AT ....*0.16.
iS-SMITH CO.,
S- Q_ I

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