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Yorkville enquirer. [volume] (Yorkville, S.C.) 1855-2006, July 09, 1912, Image 4

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tumorous department.
The Revenge of a Tramp.?It was a
cold and snowy day, cold as charity?
which. It may be mentioned, is going
some in the line of real freezing
weather. Weary Willie presented himself
at the farmhouse door and humbly
requested the sharp-faced woman
to provide him with enough food to
sustain within him the spark of life.
He explained that, while this spark
was not especially useful at that time,
he had ambitions and expected to fan
it into a iame of industry which would
fully Justify any kindness on her part.
Tho farmer's wife was not at all
impressed with Willie's plea, and
emitted a long, shrill denunciation of
any man who was unwilling to hurl
himself out of bed at four o'clock in
the morning and work feverishly until
nine o'clock at night, capping off the
day's recreation by finding the cat and
giving her a saucer of milk. Finally,
however, she indignantly flung Willie
~ <* hunt nf mlnpo nirv Wil
0. JI UII III V U1115 uu??n "w r? -lie
failed to catch it and it struck the
snow so heavily that it stirred up a
cloud of feathery flakes. Willie fished
it out and disappeared.
The next day he returned and said
to the sharp faced woman in a tone of
great respect:
"Would you be kind enough to give
me the recipe for the mince pie I got
here yesterday?"
"The idea!" said the woman, and
launched into a terrific howl against
Willie's Impudence.
"Well," explained the tramp, "I Just
wanted to settle a bet. My partner
says you used three cups of Portland
cement to one of molasses, but I claim
It's only two and a half."?Popular
Magazine.
Something for Nothing.
Upon Sinclair was talking at a dinner
in New York about the recent imprisonment
of the notorious English
promoter, Ernest Hooley.
"What's a Hooley " asked, from the
end of the table, a ycung westerner
who had only caught a word or two
of Mr. Sinclair's argument.
"I'll show you what a Hooley is,"
said the novelist; and he continued
with a smile:
"A Britisher, one Easter, called on
a milkman and said:
"' How would you like to celebrate
the day with an egg-nog?'
"'Bully! Going to treat?'
" 'Well, I'll supply the eggs and liquor,
If you'll supply the nogg?the
milk, I mean, along with the sugar
and spices.'
" 'Agreed,' was the reply.
"Then the Britisher called on a
dairyman.
"How would you like to celebrate
with an egg-nogg?'
" 'Bully! said the dairyman.
" 'Will you supply the eggs if I supply
the liquor, milk, sugar and spices?'
"Sure,*
"Next the Britisher called on a II
quor dealer.
" 'Will you Join In an egg-nogg If I
supply everything but the liquor?'.
" 'Why, yes. of course?gladly," the
liquor dealer said.
"And so, that evening, these four
men gathered about a superb eggnogg.
As they drank It, they told
what part of it each had supplied.
Thus the milkman had supplied the
milk, the dairyman the eggs, the saloon
man the stiffening.
" 'But you,' they asked, turning to
the fourth celebrant, 'where do you
come in?'
"'Where do I come In?' ihe Britisher
answered indignantly. 'Where
do I come in? Why I'm the Hooley!"
A Double-Barrelled Escape.?Miners
are among the most heroic people In
the world. Danger is always beside
them, and they are schooled to believe
that at any time they will come face
to face with death. The result of this
is that they are humorous In their
boldness.
In one of the mines of Pennsylvania
there was a cave-in which imprisoned
a miner ngmed Jack Thornton. The
accident happened on Friday afternoon
and the fellow laborers of the entombed
man set to work at once to dig him
out. It was not until Sunday morning,
however, that they reached his
prison chamber, and by this time they.
# were wondering whether he had been
suffocated or starved to death. One
of them stuck his head through the
aperture made by the picks of the rescuers
and called out:
"Jack, are you all right?"
"All right." came the reply, and then
after a pause, "What day is this?"
"Sunday," answered the friend.
"Gee!" exclaimed Jack. "I'm glad of
that. That was one Saturday night
when those saloon keepers didn't, get
my wages!"?Popular Magazine.
Why It Was Not Libelous.?"I would
like to know, senator, whether this is
a libelous article " one of the Washington
correspondents asked Senator
John Sharp Williams of Mississippi.
"What did you say about the man.?"
asked the Mississippi solon, running
his eye down the page of manuscript
devoted to the shortcomings of a brother
senator who had gained for himself
a rather generous share of unpopularity.
"Why, I guess the worst thing I said
about him was that he is a cross between
a buzzard and a hyena," replied
the newspaper man.
"Libelous? No, I should say not,"
exclaimed Williams. "There ain't no
such animal."
According to His Kind.?A copper
was the complaining witness in a case
in which he had made the arrest. The
prisoner had riviled him, it appeared. 1
"Your Honor," began the policeman,
"how would ye like to be called an
Irish goat?" '
The magistrate smiled a little and
observed that the case could hardly be
settled on such procedure. "Besides," '
he added, "I am not Irish.
"Suuuose he called ve a German
goat?"
"The same objection lies. I am not
Clerman."
"Well, then, suppose he called ye
the goat that ye are?"?Chicago Post.
A Useful Invention.?A Yorkshire
farmer was paid by check for some
cattle he had sold. It was the first
time that it had ever happened.
"What's this?" he said.
"Why, money for the beasts," said
the cattle dealer.
The farmer stared, and had to be
assured that if he took it to the bank <
they would give him gold for it.
"Well," said he. "Aw'll try, but if It's
a wrong 'un thou'll hear about it."
The check was cashed, of course,
and the farmer went home happy, but
he could not sleep. He had seen a
wonderful thing, and it had excited
him. As soon as day broke he made i
for the cattle dealer's house, and woke
the dealer.
"It's me." he said. "Where's tha ,
got thim bits of paper from? Aw cud
do wl' half a dozen myself!"?Youth's
Companion.
ijftijwllaurous grading.
COTTONTOT'S LAMENT.
Present Wisdom the Child of Past
Errors.
Following Is a part of the address of
welcome that Hon. John L. McLaurln
delivered at the opening meeting of
the State Farmer's Institute, which
commenced a three days meeting at
Bennettsville this morning:
Old maids grow tougher,
Old bachelors grow rougher.
Because, the hook-worms grow longer,
And the bill bugs grow stronger.
In Marlboro.
Hobble skirts grow tighter.
Peroxide hairs grow lighter,
Grandma is In a trance,
Because girls wear pants.
No hoops or crinoline,
All hobbles and gasoline,
In Marlboro.
The cattle ticks are few,
The cotton is all blue.
The reason rich we feel,
Is because all ride in automobile.
We are the proudest,
Because bed-bugs smell loudest,
In Marlboro.
Because the cows cotton lice do eat.
Hook-worms devour the only homemade
meat;
The cattle tick on dog meat fed;
No wonder. It Is said,
There's pellagra in all the corn bread.
In Marlboro.
Tick with louse has row, "
Because he can't find a fat cow.
Pellagra Is badly "skeered,"
Because the hook-worm "heerd,"
There's a new motion born,
To quit eating western corn,
In Marlboro.
The flies are tamer,
The mosquitoes are gamer.
Because, when the devils are cast out.
They cannot go tie hog route;
Because cotton's c'estroyed every
snout;
There's nothing but "white side"
about,
In Marlboro.
We farm by this good rule, ,
Easy followed by any "fule."
Because, "a nigger an-a mule,"
With "8-four-four-"
And more-more-more,
Makes cotton grow, grow, grow,
In Marlboro.
My credit is badly hurt,
Because, with a ton to each acre of
dirt.
It is so very risky.
I kill bugs with whisky,
Burn lice with soda;
Hook-worms feed on "nigger" odor,
In Marlboro.
With elbows crook "here's how,"*
In can I buy my cow,
Because milk is a notion, butter all
goshen;
Corn In Chicago, hogs in Ohio;
For hay "on the Wabash;"
I spend all my cash,
In Marlboro.
It makes the Yankee smile,
Because Pee Dee bottoms are rich as
Nile;
The climate is so mild,
That oats grow wild;
Acorns and cane; bermuda all over,
Haws, huckleberry and clover.
In Marlboro.
If we had "horse" sense,
"We'd buy wire fence,
Hogs and cows to keep.
Because with big flock of sheep,
We'd raise less hell and cotton.
And more beef and mutton,
. In Marlboro.
Our fathers found It true,
But we never knew,
A fertilizer factory's near,
In each old cow and big fat steer,
Because, we depend you see
On the great Y. C.
In Marlboro.
The shirt of the Sultan of Sulu,
The clout of the King of Zulu,
The lingerie from gay Paree,
The clothes of the heathen Chinee,
All come through me,
In Marlboro.
V* Arnniifl'o rlolnKr Kol 1 p
And London's howling swell,
It's silk they think;
But I know well.
Because Dave Coker grew the seed,
And Bob or Wallace, the Webber
weed,
In Marlboro.
Here is how It goes.
The Goddess of Liberty In cotton
clothes;
In the sweet lure of her smile,
I forget woman's guile.
In Delilah's arms, soft and round,
With rope of cotton, Samson's safely
bound.
In Marlboro.
What does he care if his eyes are out.
So long as Delilah leads him about;
But if ever she whispers in his ear,
"Pull It down, Samson dear,"
Blind eyes, see red, with toss of his
head,
A laugh and a sigh, without a look
at the sky;
Because why, he hardly knows, .
But down the temple goes,
In Marlboro.
It is clearly writ that Joseph's coat,
Was not from skin of goat.
It was of many hues.
Because made from Marlboro blues.
Joseph to Pharaoh was sent,
Because that coat to a lady he lent,
In Marlboro.
Sheba's Queen, cotton stockings wore.
When she went to see Solomon in
days of yore.
Solomon was awfully wise;
Because though he had 700 wives,
From stockings he never took his eyes.
In Marlboro.
The lice that my cotton hurt,
Do not live under the dirt.
In automobiles they ride around.
But never a bale of middling is
found.
With lordly mien they do declare,
"There's no such thing as middling
fair,"
In Marlboro.
The tick that "gets my goat,"
Is the old rusty shoat.
Parasite of the body politic.
Eradicate the sort of cattle tick.
That by lending money
Extracts all the honey.
In Marlboro.
With his fiercest bark.
The darn'd old shark,
"Kicks my houn dog aroun,"
Knocks my cotton down;
Because, every bale I can make,
He doth surely take.
In Marlboro.
The hook-worms that do harm
Are not bred on the farm,
But in the court-house shadow.
Like the poisonous adder,
They sit in the shade.
While cotton is made.
In Marlboro.
"Thou shalt steal no more."
And Teddy waved his sombero.
How'er that may be,
It does seem strange to me,
Eiecause, I who tend the dirt.
Must wear last year's shirt.
While King George blows his nose.
And the Czar covers his toes,
With cotton that grows, everybody
knows.
In Marlboro.
Like young eagle seeking change.
Or lion's cub wider range,
I scaled the loftiest peak.
Only to find it cold and bleak.
Fifty years of storm and strife.
And I sigh for the farmer's life.
In Marlboro.
The setting sun, a burning ember.
The lonely pine tips in splendor;
Standing strong against the sky,
Its shadow on deep waters lie;
In the south wind's moan
Fallen angels groan.
In Marlboro.
On the waters "a kindly light,"
Only shadows speak of coming
night;
As feathers dropped, tell of eagle
flight.
With the traces ringing, the plowman
singing,
Across the pond a holy glow,
Because from God all blessings flow.
In Marlboro.
They come, a laughing band
Women and children, Jioe in hand;
Each row is swept clean;
Not a sprig of grass is seen,
As with tired sigh.
My crop is "laid by,"
In Marlboro.
As for the harvest I wait,
In the shadow of Heaven's gate,
On the tropics green,
Field of snow is seen;
Beautiful as in Eden grew,
Flowers of every hue.
As they bring the cotton in,
I hear the music of Heaven's gin.
In Marlboro.
In Abraham's bosom at last
As I sit thinking of the past,
Way down in the depths of hell,
"Water, water," I hear them yell,
"This is no place for cotton clothes,"
So I turn on the garden hose,
In Marlboro.
The mill merger Is seen,
Hiding behind asbestos screen;
Because, the dividends they paid,
Were by child labor made.
"Little children," you see.
He said, "Come unto me,"
In Marlboro.
Not a bull is there,
But in the hot air,
I smell the singed hair
t ?r every couon near.
With blue ribbon on horn,
The bull eats Heaven's corn.
In Marlboro.
The Cotton Buyer, gallant raider,
He has lived an undergrader;
Up to 'he gate he goes,
Dressed in his fireman's clothes;
But St. Peter Is very sore,
And shows him the furnace door.
In Marlboro.
The political worm,
Takes his turn.
I give it straight;
They said at the gate,
"Go to hell,'
"You hit John L.,"
"We'll roast you well,"
In Marlboro.
Dear friends, as together we meet.
And crowd around the mercy seat,
In wonder we stand,
And view Heaven's land;
Because, the Jordan is the Great Pee
Dee;
And Heaven is, and shall ever be
In Marlboro.
The Sex In 1346.
"About twenty-five years after Crecy
(1346)," records a writer In Harper's
Magazine, "when the age of chivalry
was beginning to decline, a French
gentleman, the knight of La Tour
Landry, being oppressed with the
care of three daughters, bethought
himself of writing a book for their
instruction In the conduct of life; and
his book, which was translated by
Caxton and much read, gives us great
Insight into the social conditions of
that romantic age.
"The virtues most popular in the
middle ages were the Scriptural vlr- |
tues.
"The knight begins his book by telling
his daughters a story of how his
own father had wished him to marry
ja certain lady, whose appearance and
manners had pleased him well, until |
at the end of their first interview she
begged him to come often, whereat
the knight was greatly shocked, seeing
her so pert. 'It caused me,' said he, i
'to be discouraged from her, for the
which I have thanked God since many
times.'
"He then instances ladies who
through hot and hasty language 'lost
their marriage'?and no more dreadful
thing apparently could happen to
a lady in the Middle Agesi
"Women," he says, "are always too
readv to talk, whereas they should re
nit* puvturn aic vnj niuun n v?.. ?v
controlled by repeated cutting. In the (
clover fields the Infested patches
should at once.be cut and the material
removed and destroyed. If the fields
are badly infested, cut tbe crop early
for hay. and then plow* the land.
Up to Father.?Inspector James I>.
Hughes of the* Toronto Hoard of Education
was illustrating the differences J
in child minds, at a lecture before the
City Club of Chicago.
"I have a little girl whose tastes are
strongly mathematical, while her
brother has no gift for numbers, but
still manages to think quite clearly.
"My daughter was speculating on the
degrees of relationship of her two half
sisters. Jane and Helen, and on other
possible combinations in fractional
sisterhood and brotherhood.
" 'Papa.' she asked, 'if mother were
to die and you were to marry again
and have some more children, what
kin would they be to Jane and Helen?
Would they be half sisters too?'
"I had not replied when my small I
son volunteered an answer after his J
own kind.
'"I think,' he said, "if anybody's
going to die, it's papa's turn this
time.' "?Everybody's Magazine.
has proved a great convenieiK
users of the
2VcwBgr/?dio
Oil Cook-stov*
'i Thia vear we are sellins
fer people who ask them questions to
their lords. Eve should have said,
'Ask my husband that question, not 1
me'?and all would have been well.
The primary virtues appear to have
been, after silence, meekness and submission
to your husband."
Strangely Tongue Tied.
The police of a western city tell a
singular story of the capture of a
burglar there. During severely cold
weather the burglar went out alone
one night to make a raid on a small
bank. His plan was to enter through
a window at the rear of the building
and to make his way through the offices
to the vault. An iron grating '
proieiieu uiu wmuvn.
The night was Intensely cold and i
the streets were like glass, a heavy
snow having melted as it felt and
then frozen smooth and hard. While
the burglar was filing the first bar of
the grating his foot slipped, throwing
him forward violently against the
window.
As luck would have it, the fall Jerked
his mouth 'open, his tongue was
forced between his lips, and froze instantly
to the icy iron bars. All efforts
to release himself were vain, as
nothing short of pulling his tongue
out by the roots would have effected
this, and he could not bring himself j
to that. A watchman making his j
round found him a half hour later J
almost dead with cold.
The burglar is alive and safely j
housed in jail, but his tongue was f
never used again, being completely ?
and hopelessly paralyzed. f
' ? ? l
Dodder a Serious Pest.?This is an "
annual, with slender yellowish and
reddish stems, which become attached
to the clover by suckers, through
which the parasite obtains nourishment.
The flowers are whitish or pinkish,
and appear in clusters around the
threadlike twining stems. The seed is
very small, is yellowish or.brown in
color, irregularly spherical, somewhat
angular and is granularly roughened. '
It flowers from July to November, and
ripens seed by September. It is propagated
by seed alone and occurs very
abundantly in Imported alfalfa and (
clover seed. Alfalfa fields which are
badly infested should be brought under
cultivation at once, although if
(\nfnkAN "oMf OtVtoll Pfl n
INTEREST1
There are more kinds of interest
than the kind you pay for money '
when you borrow from a bank.
There is a PERSONAL INTER- |
EST, the kind that the officers of
THIS BANK feel In its customers v
?an interest which prompts us ?
to do whatever we possibly can a
to encourage and to aid those e
who give us theli1 patronage. ji
Sank of Hickory GroveQ
Hickory Grove, S. C. ,,
New Perfection
Heating Plate
-e t0 Aik to tee thia Store at
your dealer*. It ia haad omely
finiahed. It ha* long
enameled chimney*, turW
quoMe-blna. Aim caniarl
Zmm top, drop ihehre*. towel
rack He. Mad. with I.
k 2 or 3 barrier*. Free Cookf
Book with every Stove.
Cook-Book alio given to
anyooe tending 5 cent* to
cover mailing coat.
&
Ua door at eel J J TJv
:in^i^onu / J \
? COMPANY
New Jersey)
BALTIMORE. MD.
Report On
Yorkville Water
Mr. W. B. DuPre, Supt.,
Yorkville, 8. C.
Dear Sir:
I beg to inclose analysis of sample
of water received from you re-|
cently.
The analysis shows the water to be
Free from Contamination, anil In Good
Condition.
Yours very truly,
P. L. PARKER. Jr.,
State Bacteriologist.
NOTICE OF REGISTRATION
Supervisors Will Fill Appointments at
Rock Hill, Fort Mill and Clover.
NOTICE is herey given that in obedience
to the provisions of law so
requiring, we will be at the places
named below at the times mentioned
for the purpose of issuing registration
certificates to such citizens as may
ipply for them, and who shall furnish
satisfactory evidence of possessing
the necessary qualifications to enable
them to receive the same:
Clover, August 6.
Fort Mill, August 8.
Rock Hill, August 9 and 10.
The constitutional .vquirements as
to eleglbility for regh>rn>iion are: (1)
Applicant must be 21 years of age.
(2). Must have been a citizen of the
state two years, of the county one year
ind of the polling precinct at which he
leslres to vote four months. (3). He
must be able to read and write, or pay
taxes on $300 worth of property. (4).
He must furnish satisfactory evidence
if having paid all past due state and
county taxes. The receipt of the county
treasurer is sufficient evidence of
laving pai,d taxes.
R. M. WALLACE, Chairman.
A. M. BLACK,
J. E. BURNS.
Supervisors of Registration for York
County. 53 t 5t
EGGS FOR HATCHING
"I FOR 11 Indian Runner Duck
iJP JL Eggs. Best stock. Call or adIress
W. R. CARROLL. Yorkvllle.
5. C. 41 t tf
If* You can savo a third to half by
mying a Rebuilt Typewriter. See Hie
Inquirer Ofllce.
r !
ines in a day. and fortunes made Jleldom
last long?they come easy |
such fortunes have wings and '
e them. If YOU would build a
a small way?A Little at a Time
?Is the SURE, the CERTAIN
e that will have the STAYING
benefit to you for investment or
. SAVINGS ACCOUNT with this |
?We'll help it to grow by pay- i
nded Quarterly, on what you deSteady
Savings will do In build- j
i you make a start TODAY.
IONAL BANK,
LE, S. C.
SAFE THAN SORRY." ?
R. C. ALLEIN, Cashier.
SHINGLES
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A
CARLOAD OF SHINGLES THAT
WE WILL MAKE CLOSE
PRICES ON.
DON'T YOU NEED A NEW BUGGY?
We have something new in Mohair
Top. Sold on easy terms.
iVE HAVE FLOUR?
Bought before the advance and
are in oosltlon to make close
prices. See us for your next sack.
\)R BEST GROCERIES?
See us. We have the quality and
we make the prices right.
CARROLL BROS.
Let Me Sell You
CULTIVATOR POINTS,
PLOWS of all kinds,
FLOW POINTS,
COTTON HOES,
VII kinds of DRY GOODS at the
Very CLOSEST PRICES.
WRM SUPPLIES?
For your needs about your Farm,
,'hether it be Heavy or Fancy Groerles
or Farm Supplies in general,
ome and see me. I have the Goods
,nd I have the Prices that will interst
you.
IEFORE BUYING SHOES?
Come and see what I have to offer in
jualitles, Slyles and Prices.
M. A. McFARLAND
'inckney Road R. F. I>. No. 4. I
f The New Perfection Brc
The New Perfection Tot
3 The New Perfection Gri
> each designed specially for use on
Perfection Stove.
Wkh thne ppEaoca and the New Perfection 8
oven, the New Perfect** n jiwt ti compile end ttt<
regular coal range. Certainly, k M much cleaner
Many people uae the New Perfection all the year r<
STANDARD O
(Incorporated In
NEWARK. N. J.
MEDICAL COLLEGE I
OF THE STATE OF
SOUTH CAROUNA
CHARLESTON. 8. C.
MEDICINE AND PHARMACT.
Session opens Oct 1st, 1912. ends Jane
2d. 1911. Unaurpaaaedclinlcaladvantagea
offered by the new Roper Hospital, one
of the largeat and beat equipped hospitals
In the South. Extensive outdoor
and Dlapenaary Service under control
of the Faculty. Nine appointments each
year for gradualea In medicine for Hospital
and Dispensary aervlcea. Medical
and Pharmaceutical Laboratories recently
enlarged and fully equipped.
Department of Physiology and Embry
ology In affiliation with the Charleston
Museum. Practical work for medical ,
and pharmaceutical atudenta a apeclal
feature. For Catalogue, Address <
ROBERT WILSON, JR.. M. D?
Cor. Queen and Franklin Sta.,
Charleaton, S. C.
This is The Place
i
TO BUY YOUR GROCERIES.
See us for FLOUR, MEAL, CORN .
and OATS, and all kinds of COW and i
HORSE FEED. i
See us for MEAT, LARD, and the i
best quality of HAMS. <
See us for SUGAR, COFFEE, TEAS s
and EXTRACTS. i
See us for IRISH POTATOES, CAB- 1
BAGE, Etc. 1
We are selling for CASH.
Yours for business,
Yorkvllle Banking & Mercantile Co. !
? i
i
t
HARRTS
__==
<
1
THE PHOTOGRAPHER 1
OP CHILDREN.
YORKVTLLE STUDIO I
OPEN ALL DAY
EVERY SATURDAY.
THE HARRIS STUDIO'
Shelby Yorkville Henrietta |
*
ONLY LUCK!
GAMBLERS
Make forti
In this way s
and go easy?i
know how to us
fortune start It In i
?Steadily added toway
to build a Fortun
QUALITY that will be of
in your old age. START A
good Rank?Add to It steadily
ing 4 Per Cent Interest, Compou
posit?You'll be surprised at what
ing a permanent fortune. Suppos*
The FIRST NAT
YORKVIL
"YOU HAD BETTER BE
O. E. WILKIN8. President.
Fresh
Arrivals
Yeah Mackerel,*
Salt Herring,
White Fish,
Sweet and Sour Cucumber Pickles, i
Big Hominy in Cans,
Kraut In Cans,
Pure Honey,
Tomato Catsup,
banned Corn and Peas. 1
Apple Butter.
Barrel Coffee,
Coffee In Cans,
Quaker Oats,
Toasted Corn Flakes, .
Jell-O, 1
3old Medal Tooth Picks,
All kinds of Candles.
See us for Tomato Plants.
J. M. BRIAN COMPANY.
WATERMAN
"IDEAL"
FOUNTAIN PENS
If you would like to see the most 1
elaborate display of FOUNTAIN PENS
ever made In Yorkvllle, call and let
me show you the Waterman line. If i
you would spend your money for a
Fountain Pen, spend It for a
WATERMAN "IDEAL" PEN
I have them at all pricee, $2.50 and Up.
In all sizes and can Just exactly "fit"
your hand.
T. W. SPECK. The Jeweler.
OUR
SPECIALTY
Ever since I opened this store my
specialty has been FEED for Horses,
Mules, Cows, Hogs and Poultry and
my uuBiiie?8 (it uiese guuuo iuus givwu
steadily. Why? Simply because I have
always sold the Very Best Feeds at the
Very Lowest Prices.
If you have Horses, Mules, Cows,
Pigs or Poultry to feed, come and let
me show you why It is to your Interest
to buy your FEED STUFFS from me.
Before you buy FLOUR, come imd
see me. I have the Quality and the
Price.
J. M.FERGUSON.
What of the Future?
Every man knows what Is behind
him, but there is not one on earth today
that knows what is ahead of him
except death, and none know the day
it will come, unless they have been
tried and sentenced to death In Virginia
or Massachusetts, in Canada, or
some one of the European countries
where law is supreme. While it is a
fact that the only reliable guide we
have as to the future Is the past, this
guide is not infallible in every respect.
For Instance, an individual may have
passed through many years of successful
business experience and accumulated
quite a handsome estate and-almost
without warning meet with reverses
that practically wipe out all material
gains. Can you recall Instances of this
kind? If you carry life Insurance In
any one of the old established companies
and never have occasion to ask
any concessions and go on paying your
premiums for a specified number of
years, provided you have a limited
payment policy or until death, If you
have an ordinary life, the company
will do exactly what it promises In
your contract. All companies are
"About the same." in this respect. On
the other hand If you stumble or fall
down no company in the world guarantees
in its policies to treat you so
liberally as does the Mutual Benefit
Life Insurance Co., and besides it is
the only company which applies Every
Improvement made In Its new contracts
to all the old ones. A policy
written in 1847 carries every privilege
written in one issued in 1912. I have
never met, or heard of a dissatisfied
Mutual Benefit policy holder.
SAM M. GRIST, Special Agent.
| HaveYour Business
With the facilities wl
X lished connections, \
A Accounts of the go<
f VERY SATISFACTO
? It is Our Aim and 1
T Customers, PROMP1
9 GENT SERVICE at
a which is consistent v
A Call On Us. We will
| Our Customers Are Our Referenc
| Loan and Sa
I YORKVIL
t- J., .t. ,Tj , r. /r. iTl rf? lt-> A iT+rfi
tvtvtwtvtvtwtwtwtwtwtvtwtwt
CITY MEAT MARKET
C. P. SIIERER, Prop.
We keep everything that is good in
the MEAT line, and handle only the
BEST.
STALL FED STEERS are a specialty
with us, and also fine Western Beef.
The Finest CURED HAMS to De
had anywhere, Raw or Boiled, by the ,
Whole Ham or by the Pound to suit
the customer. Also Breakfast Bacon.
We buy all the Butter we can handle
and sell all the Eggs we can get.
We are always in the market paying
the Highest Cash Prices for Beef
Cattle, Calves and nice Fat Hens.
We study to please the trade, and if |
things are not right we take pleasure
in making them right.
Yours for quality,
C. F. SHERER.
I Real Price
gj Now is the Best Tii
The Best Place to Bu
Dress Goods, Ladiei
etc. Prices Reducei
EXTRA GOOD !
All Men's $5.00 LOW CUT SHOESAll
Men's $1.00 LOW CUT SIR
All Men's $3.50 LOW CU1
All Men's $3.00 LOW
All Men's $2.50
All Ladles' $3.50 LOW CUT SHOE!
All ladles' $2.50 LOW CUT S
All Ijodies' $2.00 LOW CU1
All Ladles' $1.75 LOl
SAVE ONE-THIRE
ALL OUR SPRING AND SI
MEN?GOOD STYLES, GOC
FITTING?FOR TEN DAYS
CHOICE AT ONE-THIRD O
ALL BOYS' CLOTHING GC
TION?ONE-THIRD OFFWORK
OF A BIG ROUND
MEN'S ODD PANTS?PRICES AI
$3.48; $4.00 Pants At $2.89; $:
At $2.25; $2.50 Pants At $1.98.
EXTRA GOOD VALUES 1
One lot FIGURED LAWNS, 10c a
UTILITY GINGHAM, regular 10c a
Lot WHITE GOODS, choice patterr
Lot WHITE GOODS, choice patten
Ix)t WHITE GOODS, choice patter
Lot WHITE GOODS, good patterns
LADIES' SKIRTS RE!
All {3.00 and J3.50 POPLIN SKIR'
All J2.SO SKIRTS?Now Go At
Big lot of BLACK UNDERSKIRTS
J. 0. WRAY-I An
Apples On Ice
We have Freeh Country CABBAGE.
I get them every day.
You can get Choice BALDWIN APPLES,
right off the Ice, at Sherer's.
When you want Oranges or Bananas
come to SHERER.
How I can sell BEEF so cheap Is a
secret that others would like io know.
But I will tell you what makes corn
and bacon so high:
The mule, he am grazing around.
While the negro am lying asleep;
White man In town got a lien on his
crop,
So the negro and mule can eat.
OLD GEORGE
THE BUTCHER.
G. H. O'LEAKV
IJuclor
PORCH SHADES
G. H. O'LEARY
Ice Cream Freezers
Make your Ice Cream at .home?
Chen you will know what there
Is In It and you will eat It with
more of a relish than the cream
that you buy.
Come to thlB store for the BEST
ICJE CREAM FREEZERS?
All sizes from 1 quart to 8 quarts.
Prices are Just right.
Also see us for
REFRIGERATORS,
ICE PICKS, SHAVERS,
CREAM DISHERS,
CREAM SAUCERS.
And other hot weather necessities
that you need.
Yorkville Hardware Co.
NOTICE
MY House and Lot on Wright avenue
for sale. For terms apply to
C. E. Spencer. Esq., Yorkville, 8. C.
wtf IDA TO LOACH.
O
0
1 I
< I
<)
< I
lilch we have and our well estab- (1
ve are in position to handle the !'
od people of York County In a ' ;
RY MANNER. < >
'urpose at all times to give Our <,
\ COURTEOUS and INTELLI- <1
id EVERY ACCOMMODATION ? |
vith SAFE BANKING,
be glad to see YOU at any time. (>
** ;; 1
?
vings Bank jj
LE, S. C. i; !
VTWTVTVtvtvTVTVTVTU1 I'V I WT* 1
LUMBER
If you need any kind of Lumber,
either Dressed or Rough, Green or
Kiln-Dried, come and see us for what
you need. We can supply your wants
at the Right Prices.
If you want Doors, Sash, Blinds,
Frames, Window Weights, Locks,
Hinges, Nails or other Building Supplies
come and see us before you buy.
If you expect to Build or Remodel
any buildings see us about the work
before making any contracts.
L J. KELLER & COMPANY.
Reiliirtinns I
lie, and Wray's is B
ly Clothing, Shoes, 3
s' Skirts, Hosiery, 3
d on Everything. h
SHOE VALUES |
-NOW $3.75 Pair. ?
>ES?NOW $3.25.
P SHOES?NOW $2.08. H
CUT SHOES?NOW $2.39. U
LOW CUT SHOES?NOW $1.98. 0
S?NOW $2.48. ?
HOES?NOW $1.98. gf
r SHOES?NOW $1.69. M
IV CUT SHOES?Now $1.25. H
> ON CLOTHING |
FMMER CLOTHING FOR H
>1) QUALITY?PERFECT H
! YOU CAN TAKE YOUR H
FF REGULAR PRICES?
)ES AT SAME REDUC- 9
66 2-3 CTS. DOES THE M
DOLLAR AT WRAY'S. g
IE LIKE THIS: $5.00 Pants At ??
3.50 Pants At $2.48; $3.00 Pants m
Buy 'em At WRAY'S. |i
N DRESS GOODS 9
nd 12Jc values?Now 5 CTS. 8
nd 12Jc quality?Now 8 1-3 CTS. H
is, 25c quality?Now 10 2-3 CTS. 9j
us, 20c quality?Now 15 CTS. S
ns, 15c quality?Now 10 CTS. H j
, 10c quality?Now 8 1-3 CTS. ga
DUCED IN PRICE B
rS?Now Go At $1.98. 1
$1.69. a
? 39 CTS. and Upward. H
i Looking for You 1j
MHHUHBUHHH i
FOR SALE
130 Acres?5 miles west of the city of Jfc"
Rock Hill. Joining farms of A. E. Willis,
John Mcllw&ine and W. L Plexlco.
This is one of the best producing farms
per acre in Ebenesser township; good
pasture, hog wire; 3 horse farm Open;
dwelling has & rooms; good tenant
house with 3 rooms. Property of Johnson
Cameron. For prices apply to J. C.
Wilborn, Yorkvllle, S. C.
116 ' ores?The Holmes Place; Joining
Holbrooke Good, Ed Thomas and
others; a nice new cottage, I rooms,
good barn; also a nice 6 room house
and store room, barn, etc. Located at
cross roods. Good land at the low price
of $4,200. <*
177 Acres Property of Marlon B.
Love, three miles from Sharon station
and six miles from Yorkvllle; 29
acres in cultivation, balance In timber.
Some of the finest oak timber In Yorkcounty
on this place. Prios $17.00 per ^
acre. 9
961-2 Acres?Joins J. B. Scott, Ed
Sandifer and depot grounds at Philadelphia;
76 acres In cultivation; 1
dwelling house, 4 rooms; 2 tenant
houses. Property of J. P. Barnes. A
great bargain.
166 Aorss?In Bbenezer township; 1 - A#
mile of Newport, 1 mile of Tlrxah
church. A nice 2-story, 7-room dwelling;
several good tenant houses. High
state of cultivation. Wilson Huey.
101 2-3 Aorss?Joining McGUl store
at Bethany, fronting King's Mountain
road; 1 dwelling, 6 room*; barn, cot- ^
ton house and crib; property of Char- w
lie Douglass. This is a cheap bargain
and can be bought at once.
331-2 Acre*?On King's Mountain
road, one mile from Bethany High
School; land lies level; 17 acres in
cultivation, balance in timber. A part
of the Douglass tract
68 Acres?More or less, joining C. M.
In man, Norman Black and others.
One mile from the incorporate limits
of Yorkville, About S6 acres clear,
balance in timber. One S-room house,
good barn, etc.
159 Acres?1 dwelling, 6 rooms; 70 f
acres In cultivation; 60 acres in timber;
2 1-2 miles of Smyrna; 1 tenant
house, new, with 4 rooms; good barn,
crib, lumber and buggy house. Property
of H. M. Bradley. Price, $8,000.00.
100 * Acres?Joining Mrs. Mattie
Nichols, T. J. Nichols and others. The A
property of L. R. Williams. Price, "
$81.00 an Acre.
810 Acres?2i miles.of Sharon; 1
dwelling house, 2 tenant houses, good
barn; half mile of Sutton Springs
school. Splendid Farm.
A Nice Cottage Home?In the town
of Smyrna; 6 rooms, situated near the
Graded school building. One of the
best cottages in town. Price, $460.
800 Acres?Tom Gwln home, three ejtt
miles of Sharon; I tenant houses; a
large brick residence, worth twothirds
of the whole price of the farm,
31 f3Acre*?Joins R. B. Hartness, M.
B. Love and others. 1 House, 1-story,
6 rooms; K tenant bouses, all well fin(shed;
1 6-room, 4 S-room; good barn,
double crib; hydraulic ram running
water to house; S good pastures; 1<I
acres under cultivation; 166 in timber.
Price upon application. Property of
John T. Feemster.
20 Acrea?At Filbert. One-story
house, 4 rooms; one-half red and other
sandy. Price, $1,000.00.
11 Acres Joins u Ferguson, Frank
Smith, J. W. Dobson. 1 house, 1-story,
6 rooms. Prioe, $1,300.00.
220 Acres?Near King's Mountain
Battleground; 1 house, 1-story, seven
rooms. New; 26 acres under cultivation,
balance In timber; 6 miles from *
King's Creek. Good new born, dressed
lumber; 2 tenant houses, I rooms ee?h.
PHfA S1R.75 nap Aero.
200 Act? Fronting public road, 1story
4-room bouaa; 4 horse terns, open;
75 acres In timber; 2 miles from Rodel
ey. Price, $3000 per Acre. ^
Residence of J. J. Smith, deceased.
In Clover, on King's Mountain street;
2 stories, 7 rooms; wood bouse; barn,
cow stable; good garden; well for
stock near barn.
75 Acres Level land, 2| miles from
Sharon; 1 house: 40 acres in cultivation.
Price, $2000 per Acre. Walter
Q. Hayes.
57 Acres?2 miles of Hickory Grove; 4
on public highway:' fronting Southern
railway. PrToe, $2000 an Acre.
153 Acres Joins T. W. Jackson L.
T. Wood and others; 1 2-story t-room
house; 1 tenant house, 4 rooms;
miles of Newport. Price, $2100 Acre.
A beautiful lot and reaidenoe of lira
Ada B. Faulconer. On Bast Liberty *
street, 100 feet front, about 400 feet
deep; joins Rev. B. B. Gillespie and
Hon. G. W. 8. Hart Prioe on Application.
369 Acres In Bamberg Co*?Joining
lands of D. O. Hunter and B. F. Smoak;
126 acres in cultivation, balance in
timber; at one of the finest schools in
the county; 1-4 mile of church. Much -g
of the land in this neighborhood produced
1 bale of cotton to the acre.
Any one wishing a fine bargain will do
well to investigate it
102 Acroa, Fairfield Conjoining
lands of R. S. Dunbar, 4 miles of Woodward
station. On Little river; 40 acres
in cultivation. Prioe, $360.00. *
Do you want Bargains in Moore Co*
N. C.7 See me ana talk it ever.
J. C. WILBORN.
Geo. W. Knox J. L. Stacy,
President . See. and Mgr.
CLOVER REAL ESTATE CO.
CLOVER. 8. C. M
1. One 0-room House and Lot situated
in Clover on RR St; good well and
barn; large lot; fine situation. 8ee us
for prioe.
2. Large Lot on King's Mountain St.
171 feet front, 210 feet deep; S good 4
tenant houses, one 4-rooms; two 2rooms,
and two 2-rooms; paying fper
cent on |2,000. A good investment
4. Five beautifully located Lots, near
High School. See us quick for these.
They will not last leng.
Two sold: they are going fast, as ewe
expected. 8ee them quiok if you ex- ~
pact to buy. They will not be any w
cheaper.
6. 44 Acres?1 mile Clover; 7-room
house, barn, well, etc. $42?0 per Acre.
7. 90 Acres?3 miles Clover; plenty of
timber; 10 acres fine sure crop bottom
land; fine pasture; new, 3-room house.
8. 3 Lets on Bethel road, for quick
sale; 300 feet deep; nice location. 9
9. 5 Room House?80 ft. front; located
on one of the best residence streets w
in Yorkville. A bargain. Now, or
never, is your chance. See us for
price.
10. 30} Acres?4 miles west of Yorkville;
large orchard of young fruit
trees beginning to bear; 6 acres bottom f
land; joins EHmore Stephenson. $17.50
per Acre. Good terms on this.
11. 100 Acres?Lying 1| miles noith
of Battleground; 100,000 feet of saw
timber. If you need timber now is the
time to buy. Lumber is going up;
owner will cut in July if not sold. Tim- ^
bar worth price asked. 8ee us for a
price.
12. 6 Lota nicely located, on New
Brooklyn street. Good terms on these.
13. Six Lots, fronting on Falres St;
also 11-3 Acres fine pasture, Immediately
in rear of lots. Will sell as a
whole or cut to suit your taste. Property
of Ralph N. Adams.
14. One 16 h.-p. Tolbort Tngine, 60
saw Eagle Gin, one Pin Centennial
Cotton Press, and one 36-Inch Corn
Mill, and Belt In good condition. A SQ
Bargain. $400.00.
16. One complete Brick Mill Outfit? M|
Engine, Brick Mill, Trucks, Racks.
Sugar Cloth and Fixtures for 10,000
per day capacity?At a Bargain, and
on good terms.
16. Two 100-acre tracts of land In .
Moore, county, N. C.; Joins J. E. Jackson.
For quick sale, $9.00 per acre.
Come to Clover and buy property and AH
help a live town grow.
CLOVER REAL ESTATE CO.
J. L. Stacy, 8ec. and Manager,
BRATTON FARM.
Phone No. 132.
Two fine bred Bull Calves for sale at
reasonable figures?Right blood to
head a herd; also two full bred Guernseys
and several Grade Cows.
We want more customers for Cream
and Milk. M
Stove Wood, split and qawed to
length, delivered on short notice.
J. MEEK BURNS, Manager.
FOR SALE
8 SEVENTY-FIVE bushels Whlppoorwill
Peas, at $2 a bushel; also ^
two Milk Cows with young Calves. ^
JEFF D. WHITESIDES,
63 t f 2t R. F. D. 2. Hickory Grove.

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