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Mariposa Democrat. [volume] (Mariposa, Calif.) 1856-1???, August 06, 1857, Image 1

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iHoriposu Democrat.
WAUKKN U.VUII, Kdllor and Publisher.
VOL. 1.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
«, A. HKHEITX U.EX. PEEKING.
.HEItniTT K HEEHI.ra,
ATTOR N E Y S A T L. AW .
Office on Main utrect, bctvveeu Fourth and Fifth,
MAIIIPOKA. alt/
ALEX. DEEUINO, NOTARY PUBLIC.
Hem} (i, Worthington,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Office in Fremont’s Adiihn House. corner Maitland Fifth at*,
altf MARIPOSA.
HAUL. U. AUSOX U. H.BAWHS.
AL.SSON & HARRIS,
AT T ORNEYS A T 1/ AW ,
MARIPOSA .
Okficr on M ain. iiet.vkkn Fourth am» Fifth Sts.
Alt'
Xlcli o I a s CI c* ar y,
ATIVIIXKY 4* COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
MARIPOSA, CAL.
Orricc—Fast Hide of Main direct, hot ween Fourth find Fifth
slrn.lv jy23tf
R . H . DALY,
COUNSELLOR AT LAW;
PISTUICT A iTOUN’KV AND NOTARY PUBLIC;
MAU/P O S A .
Office In the Court IlmtNC Building. aivtf
R. R. Hall,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
STOCKTON. altf
J . S . WATTS,
J U STICE OF THE PEACE FO3 TOWNSHIP No. 3.
Office on Mam street, two door* below the Post Office,
MARIPOSA. altf
ALFRED F. WASHBURN,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE FOR TOWNSHIP No. 3,
OFFICE IN MARIPOSA. altl
Dr. \V. S. KavanaiiKli,
■ imtT -ON MAIN WTREIT, OPPOSITE PR. linmFJX’B
PAIICKItRFAN GAT.I.ERV MARIPOSA. altf
DR. JAMES L. CLARKE.
. . Fil l -. FINE TREE HOUSE " CORKER FIITII AND
MAIN STREETS, MARIPOSA- altf
DU. THOMAS l*AVi\E.
*F#“‘hnrK —At Pr. A. p. Ilorre’a Drug store, opposite
the Vosemile Motel. .Marfpoft.i,—where he may In- consulted
- t nil hours. altf
COOK & FENNER,
COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
I'.tr'-ms llniitlintr. -N't. 140 Clay Street,
-‘if SAN FRANCISCO.
JOHN A. LENT,
Attorney and Counsellor at Lmv,
Vo. JJ Montgomery Block, Montgomery street,
al If Sam Fka .v cisco.
Be E. 0 A If PKN T l E if.
COUNSELLOR AT LAW AND NOTARY PUBLIC,
Corner Merchant and Montgomery street*.
*1 tf 1» Sax Francisco.
N. Potty,
CONSTABLE, TOWNSHIP NO. 1.
Particular attention paid to the collection of
Accounts. Notes, Ac., jeiitf
J. W. HUEY,
Constable.
Will attend to tha Collecting of Accounts, and
all other business appertaining to his office.
tiW" Orders loft at Justice Washburn’s office, will
be promptly atlcudcd to. a stf
J. B. ISBAIL,
X> 33 KT T X S T ,
MAIN STIIKET, MARI HOP I,
I FORMERLY UK I*IIII.ADEI.PIIIA. (PENN.) IS PERMA
’ nently loc.iicd in Mariposa. havimr a comfortable and
convenient Office, next door to the Pacific Express. with ail
the necessary Instrument* and appliance*. Will do any
kind of \>nrk that icrtaln* to the profession of Itenlitry, in
a manner which shall give cnl're satisfaction, or tiie money
refunded. Artificial Teeth inserted on Mold Piute or on
Pivot, a* the rase may require. Teeth Plugged with pure
<fo!d. or extracted Children's Teeth regulated when neces
•*ary, and all IHseasoa of the (toms treated, the most of
which are called scurvy of the gums. Cure, nr no pay.
Chloroform administered, if desired. Terms reasonable
■Examination free. altf
DOCTOR RIDDELL,
Licentiate of the Royal College of Burgeons. Edin
burg; Physician Accoucheur. Dublin, Master
in Surgery, and Bachelor of Arts,
Audersonian University.
OmrF, AT INDIAN On.(’lL fSAVTA CRUZ) MAKIIftSA
COUNTY.
T
HE IHXTOR luiHsod his fir»t examination in IRU6. and
Graduated in 1H42 ; during the interim being » pupil in
Madame Stephen*’ Hospital. Dublin ; Guy s bunion, and
the Glasgow Royal Infirmary practicing since, in F.urope,
Mexico and theVniU*d States, he should be well acquainted
with every department <*f hi* Profeiiftion.
KUrrUICSTY aclenlifn «lly applied as a Medina! agent in
Paralytic. Nervous, Rheumatic. Uterine ai 1 Syphilitic dis
eases’ The Imh'i.Tlvk IVmciJpr employed to extract Mercn
rv, and other Mineral* from the system.
Patients Roar-hd at per week. or visited at their
Tdcuof i, promptly jell um
HORNITOS, MARIPOSA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, THURSDAY MORNING, AUGUST (>, 1857.
MARIPOSA BUSINESS HOUSES.
UNION HOUSE.
-
B Y FU ANK WILLIAMS,
(Formerly of the “Franklin House.”)
MARIPOSA.
*#- THE FROHIUETOK INVITES FRIENDS,
Strangers and Old Customers to give him a coll at his
Now House, near the head of Main street.
At the Liberty Pole;
Where Board and Lodging of a first dash Hotel cun
be obtained.
.... To bis House are also attached
LIVERY S T A Ti T. E
...AND
BATHS! BATHS! BATHS!
Those who desire the comforts and benefits of a
• lean, luxurious Bath, Hot, Cold, Temperate, or
Shower, can be accommodated, ns the Proprietor
spares no pains in administering to the wants of the
outer as well a* the inner man. Bat lis Fifty Cents
each. ultf
BOWLING SAL O O N
AN D
Purnlslioci Rooms,
AT T H K
PINE TREE HOUSE,
i CORNER OF FIFTH AND MAIN STREETS,
M A RIP O S A .
| NEW ROOMS HAVE BEEN FITTED AND
• Furnished recently, in a style unsurpassed, and arc to
j let on reasonable term-*, by the Week or .Month.
1 Transient Travellers may be ure of finding accom*
■ modfttions suited to their various m» • ,it i*«.
! THE POSTOFFICE IS KEPT HERE.
1 nitf McNamara a crippen.
LIVERY STABLE.
M A 1 N STREET, M ARI PUS \.
'pHE I.’NDERSIiiNED TAKES THIS METHOD
«»f Informing his friends oi'd tlie public generally
ihat he is ill to Is* found at the name old place, on
Main st., a short distance above the Union House,
{ where <*hn Is* found at all time*. he think*, n little Hie
best Saddle H t in town, and on t jually a* reason
able terms.
The hi‘sl of Grain and Slay
CONSTANTLY ON HAND. •
Horses and Mules Kepi l»j- Hie Day or Week.
and the best of care bestowed on them. He flatters
hmiHcll that those who patronize him will lie well sa
lisfled, rs be knows be has the coolest and most plea
sant Stable in the place, and prices are such :is to suit
the times. Thankful for past patronage, be respect
fully solicits a « onliiiuatioii of the same.
ultf M. 0. BARBER.
FURNITURE
AN ID HET)I> I N ( i .
MARIP U S A .
CHARLES STURCKE
MdrWOL’LD INFORM HIS FRIENDS AND THE
Public that be has Removed his Manufactory as above
of Furniture and Bedding, to a spacious plan-, nearly
opposite the Post Office, Murlnosa, when; he is in.w pre
pared to sell and Manufacture to order any article in
ids line. He has now on hand, and will sell at us low
a price as possible, a lot of Furniture, consisting oi
CANE-SEAT CHAIRS;
OFFICE CHAIRS;
HOCK (NO CHAIRS;
NCRSK CHAIRS;
BEDSTEADS;
BERKACS;
WASHSTANDS;
TABLES. ETC., ETC.
With a great variety of other Aitide* in Ida line,
tin) numerous to mention.
All Article* that leave his Store are warranted to be
what they are aold for. or no Rule. altf.
NEW TOBACCO, Cl (TAR,
AND ...
VARIETY STORE,
.... WIIoLH-’ALK AND RETAII
OPPOSITK CASH MAN’S »KAV STORK.
MARIPOSA.
By Noal cfc MoGraiin.
4#- THE PROPRIETORS HAVE RECENTLY
received an addition of many Article* most common
in use, and will try to accommodate tho wants and
taste of the Public, especially in
TOBACCO AND CIGAR*
(Jreat pain* have been taken to select a good variety of
FANC Y AKT I C EES,
Tliat are mi-e tu sail our Cust-'mer.. To enumerate
nil our Articles, is useless: we will only mention
Nt'TS. BOOKS,
iitcrrs, statioseby,
BI'TTKIt. CUTI.KKV.
CIIEESK, FANCY TOYS.
OARUEN SEEDS, COXKEI.'TIONEUY,
Oil,, WALL PAPER,
ETC., ETC, altf
MARIPOSA HOOK STORK.
AND
NE W S IT EPO T ,
AT THE OFFICE OF WELLS. FARGO k CO.
.Main Mlrr rt, Mariposa.
THE I ’NT)ERSKiNED WOULD KESPECTFULI.Y
inform the Public Ilia 1 he will keep constantly on
hand a good selection of
BOOKS, STATIONERY,
FANCY ARTICLES,
MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPERS,
Which will be soli at Hates to suit the Times.
STEAMER PAPERS, for sending to the Atlantic
States or Europe, (in wrappers, postage paid.) will be
kepi on the counter, nt 26 cents per copy.
California Daily or Weekly Papers furnished ov the
single copy or by the week.
Orders for soon Books or Articles a* are not on hand
will la* received and promptly attended to. Jyßtf
Mariposa, July «. 1966. * J. B. CONDON.
"the union and its GOVERNMENT."
MARIPOSA BUSINESS HOUSES.
TO THE PUBLIC.
YOUR ATTENTION IS PARTICULARLY RKRUKSTED
TO TUK
PRESENT PRICES OF GOODS,
... NOW SELLING BY
|sU LLIVAN & CO.
MAIN HTiIEKT, MARIPOSA.
WE HAVE RECENTLY OPENED A BRANCH
of our Hoi iso in SAN FRANCISCO, through which
we now receive our supplies direct from
NEW YORK AM) BOSTON.
By this arrangement we tut enabled to sell you Goods
.I 1 Sa ii Francisco C out:
Freight added, We would respectfully solicit you to
j give us a call, and examine our STOCK and THICKS,
i previous to purely-dug elsewhere, as we are determined
to sell (FOR CASH) LOWER THAN ANY OTHER
HOUSE IN THIS SECTION OF COUNTRY.
I*. 8 . . . Ail orders entrusted to us w ill bo promptly
■ ttlle ided to, and weights and measures guarantied
i correct
Tin: SAME ADVANTAGES AUK TO BE
HAD AT OUR STORE AT
Cou 1 t or v 1 1 10,
altf MAXWELL’S CREEK.
; r. F. MacDKRMOT C. KERKINS D. BRIEN.
Main street, Mariposa,
iMl
SiYJLTOJNTS CXIEEII.
Have recently associated together as u Trading Firm,
under the name of
M A, DEKMOT & CO.
KOH TIIK PI RI'OSE OK CONDI'CTINO A
Wholesale and Retail Business
IN
GROCERIES AMI PROVISIONS;
Superior Old Wines and Liquors,
Of the Gioimt Brenda;
HAVANA AND AMERICAN CIGARS;
Clothing, ISools anil Shorn:
DUCKS, DRILLS AND BLANKETS;
Mining Tools, Ktc.
.... AND A r.KNKKAL ASSORTMENT OF ....
HARD W ARE.
»rf- We won't] respectfully inform our Friends and
lie Public that one of tire firm will remain constantly
in S.m Francisco, for the purpose of purchasing and
forwarding Good-, and by this arrangement we will
be enabled lo sell Goods
•I* f,otr as ant/ Other House
IN THE SOUTHERN MINES,
FOU CAB II .
Q.CIC K MALES A*l> K.VALL PROFITS!!
Call and examine our Stock and Prices before pur
chasing elsewhere.
Mahiposa, July 4, 1866. sltf
EMPIRE STORE.
j MARIPOSA.
DK. ORANDVOIKET
I'roi isions.
Ifost Cognac,
Liquors,
Wines,
I'itiicli anil American Preserves.
D R UGS:
LARGE AND FRESH STOCK OF MEDICINES ;
FAMILY AND PATENT PUKPAIIATIONS;
LEECHES; PERFUMERY;
CAMPHKNE; BURNING FLUID;
j OILS; PAINTS.
At Wholesale and Retail. aI3-tf
M veil I \ E SHOP
AND
FOUKTDH. Y,
BULLION STREET,
j Immediate/ if in tin Hear of ('ashman'* New Store.
Mr. n. iia-'kki.i,. machinist, having ms ma
chine Shop and Foundry now in complete working or
der, would respectfully inform his friends and the public
generally, that he is now prepared to do all kinds of Cast
ings to order, and will superintend lu person the Making and
i Repairing of even description of Machinery in general use
iin the county, lie is prepared to make Castings of IMHIlbs.
! weight, and will warrant all of his work strong and perfect,
j If required, he will visit places requiring work done on Boil
i era or Kngines. altf
IkiT HILLIARD BALLS RKPAIRKD, and made perfectly
round and true. Also—Rails for Rondo turned.
EL DOB.ADO
FANCY IIUINhINGAM) BILLIARD SALOON.
ITIIF. UNDERSIGNED BEGS LEAVE TO IN
form his friends and the public generally, that
having renewed business at his large and spacious Sa
loon known a* the “ EL DORADO,’’ he will now he
i happy to receive the patronage of his old customers.
0* THE BAR will always be supplied with the
1 choicest brands of LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
LEROY VINIXG, Proprietor.
Mariposa, May 20th. 1857. m2otf
Ufariposa Jlmocrat.
i PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING,
BY WARREN BAER,
EDITOR AND PUBLISH KB.
TERMS:
* P«»r nnmim. in Ativan**** .. fMM}
Kor six months, in advance 3 00
Single copies ’^6
Advertisement* linerted at tin* lowest rate**.
Utf" Every <1 •*»*<?ription "f Plain and 1 anejr Job Printing
neatly and promptly executed.
A (i E NTS.
JAMES M. VAN DYKE, c orner of Main and Fourth streets,
i Mariposa, is our authorized agt-nt to receive Subscription*,
Advertisement-, and Job Work, All orders left with him
will receive prompt attention,
THOMAS IMJYt'K. northeast corner Washington and
Montgomery street s San Frauelscu, is our duly authorized
j agent to receive subscriptions and advertisements.
T. M. HE-TON'. Express Rider between lids place and
Kern River, is duly authorized to receive subscriptions, ad
vertiKcments and Job Work.
jg*- Mb. K. D. TODD. ofStocWlon, is our duly authorized
Agent to receive subscription* and advertisements.
COL. WELLER IN SAC RAMK.NTO.
The Stale Journal of July 27th, says that
on Saturday evening last an immense gather
ing of the Democracy was held in front of the
Orleans Hotel, it having hcen announced that
a speech might be expected from that gallant
leader of the party, Col. John B. W ell be. —
Col. Weller was enthusiastically received,
and after a moment’s delay he commenced by
referring to the position which he sustained to
the Democracy of the State, by the action of
the nominating convention. He ably discussed
the present condition of atfairs in California ;
! adverted to the difficult duties of the office of
Governor, and said, if elected, ho would cn
i dcavor to promote the best interest of the
State and the welfare of the people. He re
ferred to charges made ag.iinst him by the op
position papers; and his vindication of himself
gave entire satisfaction to the immense crowd.
He took up the infamous charge against him,
that he was opposed to the Irish and the nat
■ uralized citizens, and read extracts from his
] speeches to show that he had ever been the
steady friend of this class of our citizens.
The following from his speech delivered in
the Senate on the Homestead Bill, was read
by the speaker while still alluding to this
subject:
“ I cannot forget the fact that in every war
in which our country has been engaged, not
I only naturalized but unnaturaliz d foreigners
j have been found standing by us. Where, I
I ask, is the evidence of their disloyalty ? IT
you can show roe that these men are dangcr
i ous, that they are disturbing the peace and
tranquility of tlic country, that they are en
dangering our institutions, then 1 might join
in the crusade against them, but I find no evi
dence of their disloyality. I under take to af
firm here to-day that there was not a single
regiment or corps organized during the Mexi
can war that did not contain a large number
of naturalized foreigners. Sir, you had there
! the warm, anient and impetuous Irishman and j
the firm, steadfast and unyielding German.— j
In the regiment to which I was attached dur-1
ing that war, there M as one company compos
ed exclusively of Germans, and the greater
portion of them were unnaturalized, and there
was another company composed of Irishmen.
They stood shoulder to shoulder with your na
tive born American.: in sustaining the honor
of your flag, and thousands of their country
men sacrificed their lives in the prosecution of
that war. If you could have seen these men
upon the bloody field of battle when stricken
down by the balls of the enemy cheering their
i comrades on to avenge their M ounds and sus
tain the honor of your banner you would not
this day have engaged in proscribing foreign
ers. He Mho has been with them on the field
and witnessed their bravery cannot be expect
ed to join in a crusade against them.”
In alluding to the settler question, says the
Journal , the speaker assumed a bold and
manly ground, and declared himself as the
warm friend of those who desire to settle upon
and cultivate our public lands. He had no
sympathy, however, with the class known as
“ political squatters,” who, while endeavoring
to jump a fat office, bad sought to array him
in opposition to a class of men for whom he
had always held the highest regard, ami for
whoso interests he had ardently labored. He
then referred to and read from a speech deliv
ered by him in the House of Representatives
in 1811, while lie Mas representing there a
State not having a foot of public lands. At
that time Col. Weller said ;
“There is another subject to which 1 beg
leave to refer. I allude to the “prospective
. pre-emption laM',” which, I rejoice to learn,
was passed by the Democratic parly in the
Senate on yesterday, and is now in this House
for its action. It has been denounced here as
a •* humbug, designed to catch votes; ” and
gentlemen have volunteered the assertion that
we did not desire its passage. Now, sir, what
is this bill? It is simply a proposition to give
the settler upon the public lands the right of
pre-emption; and differs only from the law's
heretofore passed, in the fact that it is pro
spective in-its operation. It docs not propose
to give the public domain to the settler, but to
allow him to take that portion on which he
has settled and built a log cabin, at the Gov
i eminent price, within a limited period. It is
a measure for the benefit of the poor man, for
the humble tenants of the log cabins; for
those Mho may be driven by poverty from the
TEK M S FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM. IN ADVANCE.
older States, and who may go with no bank
bills, perhaps, in their pockets, but with strong
arms and honest hearts, to hunt for themselves
and their families a home in the far W cat. —
Sir, if this were a measure for the advance
ment of the pecuniary interest of speculators
or bankers, it M'ould not meet with the oppo
f sition it docs from Whig gentlemen. Although
| loud in their profession of attachment to the
poor man, when office is to be obtained, in
their legislation little regard is paid to his inte
rests. Gentlemen have denounced these set
tlers as “ laM'less squatters ” and “land pirates,”
and told us that the United States Marshal
ought to be sent with a military force to dis
possess them. Sir, if a banker (as is the prac
tice every day) swindles the community out
of millions, the act goes unwhipt of justice ;
but if a poor man settles down on the public
land, and endeavors, by his industry and fru
gality, to procure a livelihood for his children,
you would raise a military force to turn him
off, and deprive him of the little improvement
he had made. This may be Whig policy and
Whig justice; but, I venture the assertion,
the American people are not prepared for such
doctrine. In the estimation of these Whig
orators, to cut down a few trees in a dense
and almost unbroken forest belonging to the
Government, for the purpose of cultivating a
few acres of corn, is a most heinous offence ;
whilst they suffer the bankers to violate the
laws, make sport of their legislation, acquire
w ealth by their villanies, and ride in proud
triumph over the ruin and desolation of the
laboring man. Sir, there is a point beyond
which forbearance ceases to bo a virtue ; and
the time will come when this great money
power, which is eating out the substance of
the people, must be checked by your legisla
tion, or the land will be deluged in blood. The
•lay of retribution is at hand, and woe be to
that legislator who seeks to aggrandize the
few by the oppression of the many.
“ The pre-emption bill is a favorite measure
with me, and enlists all the sympathies of my
nature. It afford* me the most sincere pleas
ure to do all in my power to advance the in
terest of the hardy ami enterprising emigrant,
who, abandoning the home of his fathers, the
worn-out, worm-eaten land of his nativity, has
I taken up his abode in the rich valleys of the
! far West. Sir, 1 would rather be recognised
as the champion of such men, than hold the
highest office within the gift of my country. —
Let these men have the encouragement of the
Government—the promise that, within a limi
ted period, they shall be permitted, at your
present price, to purchase the land on M'hich
they reside; and, with their industry and en
terprise, the rude cabin will soon give way to
the comfortable dwelling, and the wilderness
be made “ to bloom and blossom as the rose.”
By the passage of Ibis act, many, in the old
.States of this Union, who now feel, from day
to day, the cutting lash of penury and want,
and who have families growing up around
j them, without the ability to supply them with
even the necessaries of life, would emigrate
to the West, settle down on your lands, and
soon surround themselves with all the com
forts of life. In this way you would not only
contribute to their happiness, but in making
them owners of the soil, increase and strength
en their attachment to the Union; and thus
lay the foundation for the permanent prosper
ity of the country broad and deep in the affec
tions of the people. I would, for my own
part, much rather make a gift of the public
domain to bona Jidc settlers, who would im
prove the country, than to see it falling at the
Government price into the hands of specula
| tors.”
The speaker then proceeded at considerable
length to explain his exact position upon this
subject, ami his sentiments were such as fully
satisfied the gathering that upon this point he
entertained such principles as could not fail to
meet the worm approbation of every honest
Settler in the land.
“ Don’t put too much confidence in a lover’s
vow’s and s*'l is,” said Mrs. Partington to her
niece: “Let him tell you that you have lips
like strawberries and cream, cheeks like tarna
tion, and eyes like an asterisk, but such things
oftener come from a tender head than a tender
heart.
“ Wonderful Things aro done now-a-days,”
said Mr. Timmins; “the doctor lias given
Mack’s boy a now lip from his check.” “ Ah,”
said his lady, “ many’s the time 1 have known
a pair taken from mine, and no very painful
operation either.”
When the Duke of Rutland was Viceroy to
Ireland, Sir John Hamilton attended one of
his levees. “This is timely rain,” said the
Duke; “it will bring everything above ground.”
i “1 hope not, my lord,” said Sir John, for I
have three wives there.”
Hide in a Closet half a dozen times, and
listen to the conversation which takes place
between a couple who have been married one
year, while they think themselves entirely
alone. The sweets of matrimony will be fully
developed.
The Imperial Prince of Franco lias just
taken an important step for himself —that is to
say, he has walked alone. A Paris paper
adds the singular fact that the drill-sergeant
was introduced into the nursery on the occa
sion, to make him go off with his left foot first!
NO. 18.
Police Incident—On* or the Sovereigns.
The supply of vagabonds was rather scanty
observes the Philadelphia Sunday Mercury ,
on Friday morning. Only one scurvy rogue,
i named Joe Gatchell, the most perfect tattcr
damclion, the ugliest blear-eyed, hook nosed,
wry necked, hip-shotten, bandy-legged rascal
i that ever wo had the ill luck to look at,
presented himself. He came to the watch
house and asked for lodgings, passed the night
under the stove, and came up at the usual
, hour to say his catechism.
Q —What ha\e you to say for yourself, Joe
Gatchell ?
A.—Say?—why, I guess 1 have done noth
ing that I’m not able to answer for; have I,
mister ?
Q. —Why did you sleep in the watch house ?
| A.—Cos I had a right to. That s soon
answered.
Q. —What right?
A.—Why, who docs the watch-house belong
to—eh?
Q. —To the public?
A.—Well, aint I one of the public? Aint
it part mine? and aint I a right to sleep in it
when*l please?
Q, —Where’s your regular place of living ?
A.—l doesn't live rcg’lar. I travels, I’ve
! been on to look at some of my property in
Washington.
Q.-What kind of property?
A.—Halo estate. That large white building
on Capital Hill, and t'other edifices where they
| keeps the departments, and that snug house
what my servent Jim Buchanan, lives in.
Q Your servant?
A.—Yes; ain’t I one of the sovereign people ?
Didn’t I help to put him in his sitewation?
and won’t 1 help to put him out, if he don’t
behave himself?
y.—Your property don’t appear to be very
productive, Mr. Gatchell. It’s of no use to you.
A.—Yes it is though, I slept on the steps of
I the capital all the time I was in the metropo
lis; and 1 had my vitlcls for nothing in the
kitchen of our palace—cos I had a light.
Q. —Well, Mr. Gatchell, I shall recommend
you to a residence of thirty days in another
palace of yours, over in Moyamensing.
1 A. —Well, I’ll go and look at it.
i So Mr. Gatchell was conducte d away to sec
how he would like his new habitation, to which
he, most unquestionably “ had a right”
Hen Persuaders. —The Springfield Kepvh
| Heart, in speaking of a new' invention for a
hen’s nest, whereby the eggs drop through a
trap-door, and so deceives the hen that she
keeps on laying, is responsible for the follow
ing : “ Blobbs met w ith a loss, however, with
one of the j ersuaders. Blobbs had a lovely
young Shanghai pullet of boundless ambition.
Blobbs bought a persuader, and his lovely
| Shanghai used it. She went upon the nest in
the morning. Blobba saw her go, and his
heart hounded within him ! Alas! he never
saw her come off again. At night he visited
the persuader. In the upper compartment
was a handful of feathers, a few toe-nails and
a bill. In the lower compartment were three
dozen and eleven eggs ! Blobbs saw it all!
Her delicate constitution had been unequal to
the effort, and fired by young ambition she
■ had laid herself all away.”
I Magnanimous. —By n steamboat explosion
on a western river, a passenger was thrown
unhurt into the water, and at once struck out
lustily for the shore, blow ing like a porpoise
the while. He reached the bank almost ex
hausted, and was caught by a hy-standcr and
drawn out, panting.
“ Well, old fellow,” said his friend, “ had a
| hard time, eh?”
“ Ye-yes, pre-pretty hard, considerin’. Was
| not doin’ it for myself, though; was a-workin’
! for one o’ them insurance offices in New York,
i Got a policy on my life, and I wanted to save
them. 1 didn’t care.”
Washington’s Guard. —An Englishman in
Philadelphia, speaking of President Washing
ton, was expressing a wish to sec him. While
this conversation passed, the American, to
whom he was speaking, replied, “ there he
goes,” pointing to a tall, erect, dignified per
sonage passing at the other side of the street.
“That General Washington?” exclaimed the
Englishman; “ where is his guard ? ” “ Here!”
replied the American, striking his breast with
emphasis.
Remedies. —Pickerel oil is recommended by
some people as a remedy for deafness, on ac
count of the fish from which it is extracted
having so acuto a sense of hearing. On the
same principle, wc understand, cod liver oil
w*as first thought to bo excellent for coughs
I and colds, because the cod fish are so much
1 exposed to dampness and w’ct without ever
being known to suffer from trouble of that
character.
“ Harry,” said a young lady at the theatre
“ how I should like to bo an actress.” 44 An
actress, Hcnrictte, why?” 44 0 h! it must bo so
nice to bo made love to in such pretty w’ords
every evening.”
A Gentleman of the name of Marten mar
ried a lady of the name of Martin, and it was
punningly said that ho knocked her eye(i)
out on the day of her marriage.
An Albany editor thinks his property would
I have been carried away by the late flood had
1 it not been for the heavy mortgages upon it

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