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The Charleston daily news. [volume] (Charleston, S.C.) 1865-1873, September 25, 1865, Image 1

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VOL. X....NO. 36.
CHARLESTON, S. C.r SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER. 33, 18G5.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE
CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS,
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lias always tho latest dates of the DAILY NEWS, as ho
docs of all the other principal journals of the country.
BY TELEGRAPH,
Tho Alutmitin Convention*
MONTGOMERY, September 23.-Tin- Convention
ibis day pawed an ordinance dividing tho State
into six Congressional districts. Tho Committee
on tho S?cession ordinance will report early next
TTOek. mmmm-mmm-mmm_
COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE.
[FROM OUE OWN conr.KsroNur.NT. ]
COI.UMP.IA, Sept. 20.
To-<lay Hie llrst and second clauses of the first
article <>f the Constitution, as reported by the
Committee, were adopted by the Convention, and
?became a portion of tho organic law of this (State.
"When the third clause came up for consideration,
irllich provides that every judicial district in the
State shall bo an election district, except Charles
ton, which shall bo divided into two election dis
tricts, Mr. ANDREWS moved to amend by dividing
Charleston into three election districts, to be
known as East Charleston, West Charleston, and
"Washington, bi offering tho amendment, he said
that he believed that this arrangement was not
only just, but would benefit tho State at largo.
The arrangement of tho Committee inpurely arbi
trary, fixed by no rule of property, wealth, or taxa
tion* Charleston, by tho last census, contained over
60,000 population, "and they promise to give tho
same repr?sentation to districts (laving one-quar
ter, one-sixteenth, one-tenth of lier population.
With regard to taxes, sb" pays from 26 to88 per
cent. Tli?- principal enterprises in the Stato are
started there, and all parts of the State feel her
prosperitv. nc, however, left the matter to their
sense of Justice and fair dealing.
Mr. BOLLING opposed the amendment on the
ground of inequality in tho Senate.
Gen. MCGOWAN was in favor of giving Charles
ion three Senators. Her white population waa, by
census, 29,186; Ten thousand whites was a large
average in the Stato for a Senator. If wo compare
her black population and her taxation with that of
other districts, ber claim is still floater. He also
said thut it had "been thc effort of his Ufo to
break down thc feeling between up and low-coun
try. South Carolina is, after all, a small affair.
She can only rely on her moral and intellectual
?worth. It is no disgrace to thc country to say
that Charleston is superior. True, tho appointment
of Senatorial districts is arbitrary; but m making
the rule, uomo regard should bo lind to justice.
Mr. TILLMAN delivered, on this subject, one of
his characteristic Bpcecbes, in which he railed at
the low-country, saying that its people sought
office with tho pertinacity of thc blood-hound and
the cunning of the fox, and opposed the amend
ment.
Mr. FARROW opposed the amendment on the
ground that a compact city did not requiro repre
sentation in proportion to her population.
Mr. YOUMANS moretl to amend this amendment
by inserting clause of tho old Constitution! ?nd in
a well considered speech, before a body whose
opinions were already Axed, he quoted an up-coun
tryraan, Mr. CAIJIOUN, in favor of thc parish sys
tem. He said that the Convention was called for
a certain purpose, and that tho parish system was
not one of tho ?HBUOS of the war. Ho asked the
np-country if it was good faith to destroy the com
promise of 1808. Will this body, in tho hour of
gloom, called on a different basia from any other
Convention, destroy tho compromioe? First act of
l?gislation of this kind in South Carolina.
Mr. Ono said that he would vindicate his re
marks of thc other day on the anti-republican
form of government of South Carolina. Any sys
tem of government not dispensing privileges equal
ly is unjust. Objection to parish system was that
?arishes were entitled, for years past, to rcpresen
ation to which they were neither entitled bv taxa
tion or population. Tho voice of Picken?, in thc
Senate, could bo neutralized by the vote of tho
small Parish ot St. Thomas and St. Dennis. Even
twenty years ago there was a larger population in
Pendleton alone thau in all of tho Parishes, ex
cept Charleston.
For thirty years past bills have been passed by
the Hoifsc, ,u,,i defeated in the Senate, to give
election of electors to tho people; defeated because
thc parishe s would have lost uower in casting the
vote.
Tho argument brought before the other Con
ventions was, that thoy would have no power be
yond the Object for which they were called, and
thut it w..uld not do in great emergencies to throw
an apple of discord. Never can we have an occa
sion when action can so appropriately bo taken as
now.
In reply to the charge of unconstitutionality,
he asked what Constitution have wo now in thia
?tate? Our Constitution of 1W?0 has bt en over
ruled, and I do not know if we have a Constitution
at all. If it were certain that we have, Chancellor
INGLIS would hot have felt obliged to introduce an
ordinance to retain the Constitution iu force. Wc
could not have gotten a two-third vote if the
Legislature had been alic n,\ to nieot. The Pre
sident says that all of our iion i* void, and ho
ha? appointed a temporary Governor, and author
ized him to call a Coin ention. We wore assembled
through Proclamation of Provisional Oovornor;
.without that WO should not have been here.
Quoted thc Governor's Proclamation; wanted tho
Convention to remodel the Constitution.
Does not understand compromise as perpetual:
up-country did not get majority jp House until
about 1820; changes which have taken pti.ee de
mand the plunge; ?300,000,000 property destroyed;
relation of negroes is changed; whole Constitution
founded on slavery; that being dead, should not
Constitution bo remodelled-If oaftro hos been
represented as ?lavo undor tho Constitution, what
propriety is thore in continuing that now?
In reply to Mr. HUOER, ho said had hp,usod tho
words unequal and unjust, he, Mr. H./weeM not
havo oxcepteci to it. Tho pariahes. aWfcll as? tho
rest of the State, had honored him. He had no
beling against then), but tho chango ought to bo
ade. He know no reason why ' unlagoniBm
should exist between the up-country ?nd tho low
country.
Mr, Hua? folloJBed 'Jo one of his eloquent
speeches, thc BkelotOD of which I will send you to
morrow.
Thu amendment of Mr. ANDKKWS was adopted,
and hy tho prcBent third clause of the first articlo
of tho Constitution tho parishes havo perished.
Peace bc with them. They have exorcised a
wholesome influence in the State, and though thc
abolition of slavery rendered them no longer ne
cessary, still wo must all feel as if we were parting
with an old friend, who leaves us forever.
COLUMBIA, September 21.
Thc ordor of the day was taken up, and tho 4th
section of thc first article of tho Constitution was
considered. This section reads thus : "Tho boun
daries of the several judicial and election districts
phall remain as they aro sc~ established." Mr.
TILLMAN, who is ono of tho representatives from
tho largo District of Edgefiold, moved to amend so
as to empower the Legislature, by a mere majori
ty vote, to divide a district. After some little de
bate, in which Judgo FnoBT, Mr. TILLMAN, Gov.
PICKERS and Mr. RION took part, this amendment
giving to the Legislature thc power of changing
its own organization by a mero majority vote of
its own body, was rejected. After tho rejection of
this amendment, thc section was passed.
Tho fifth section was then taken up, which
reads : "The House of Representatives shall con
sist of 124 members, to bc apportioned among the
several election districts of this State, according
to thc number of white inhabitants returned, and
tho amount of all taxes raised by the General
Assembly, whether direct or iudircct, of whatever
species, paid in cash," &c.
Mr. SIMONTON" moved to amend the last part of
the section, so as to enable East and West Charles
ton for the present to jointly elect their represen
tatives. This amendment "was agreed to. Mr.
JONI?S then moved to amend so as to make the
House of Representatives consist of but 100 mem
bers, and to mnko population the basis of repr?
sentation iu the House, and property in the Sen
ate. This amendment was lost. Mr." Onn moved
to strike ont, so as to base the representation in
the House of Repr?sentatives on population alone.
This amendment was also lost. *Ir. DOZIER then
moved to strike out the word "white,*' and on the
discussion of this amendment the entire day was
spent. Tho negro was on the carpel, and, as
always has been the case, he caused a great deal
of trouble. Mr. BOYCE led oft' the opposition on
tho ground-nominally at least-that it opened the
door to negro suffrage; but in fact, as it appeared
from his speech, because he feared that the low
country would have too many representatives.
On these words the changes were wrung in evorv
possible shape. If the negro were represented
would ho not claim a vote, and would not tho
Northern radical make the same demand? This is
an attempt, sHid Mr. TILLMAN, lo bring back to
life tho dead body of the parishes. In vain the
argument was urged that while this is the govern
ment of the white race, thc negro has ci\U, though
not political, rights; that those civil rights ought
to be protected; that they did not and could not
be expected to carry with them the elective fran
chise; that white women and white children formed
a part of the basis of representation. They either
could not or would not understand the proposition;
and at about three o'clock th"e vote was taken, and
the amendment rejected by a vote of 57 against
52. The Convention then took a recess until seven
o'clock.
This question I consider thc one of the gravest
importance that the Convention will be called upon
to consider. In it is embraced tho system of labor
which must prevail in all parts of this State for
years to come, and much of our happiness or mis
ery, our prosperity or adversity, is dependent on
a wise and proper decision. If it were probable
that the negro would remain scattered over the
entire State, or if it were probable that all parts of
tlio State would continue to be inhabited by a race
of men familiar with the. character and capacity of
the negro, it would bo a matter of small impor
tance whether representation was based on entire
population or on white population alone. But we
are all satisfied that if South Carolina is ever to
advance, if she is over to shake from her feet tho
dust of the past, the indolent past, and take her
position among the progressive peuple of the
world, she must be sided in her work by foreign
emigration. This emigration, if it comes at ail,
and come it probably will, will first seek the heal
thier parts of the State, and the negro, unable to
stand the competition with the white mau, will be
fuossed down towards thc coast, and will seek a
lome and bread on our rice and eotton fields. His
labor there will, in all probability, be required for
years to come; and, to make that labor effective,
the negro must form a part of the basis of repre
sentation. If he does not-if he is not protected
by the white man, who knows and needs him, from
him who is inimical to him, and who, being a
stranger to him, knowing nothing of his wants
and habits, will be able to and will override the
opinions of those among whom he lives-tho poor
negro will not oidy be destroyed before his time,
but also thc prosperity of the State will be de
stroyed with hun. Thc whitc man of the planting
portion of our Slate must have power enough to
cope with the white laborer, or not only will the
negro be destroyed, but the State will lose a largo
part of her wealth, iu losing a large part of her
laboring population.
These ueing tho views of your correspondent,
ho was rejoiced when a reconsideration of the
whole matter was moved this evening; and thc
probability is, that unless a change takes place be
fore to-morrow, the negro will form, under tho
Constitution, a part of the basis of population.
Tho Rev. J. P. BOYCE showed me, to-day, a tele
gram from the President to him, announcing his
pardon, and adding, that "the proceedings of the
Convention so far gave him great satisfaction;
that he hoped all will be right, and that in less
than twelve months tho union of thc States will be
completely restored."
The Convention proceeds but slowly with its work.
Tho members that I have spoken to do not think
that it can adjourn before the latter part of next
week. I very much doubt if its business will even
be finished then.
CoLTMniA, September 22.
The day has been entirely spent by tho Conven
tion in discussing and passing the first nnd a part
of tho second articlo of tho Constitution. The
members applied themselves steadily to the work
from 10 A. M. till 3 P. M., and from 7 P. M. until
half-past IC, and the consequence was that a great
deal of work was done, hud to-night the h ading
members of the Convention are speaking of the
probability of an adjournment by Tuesday night.
Some of tho members propose, when thc buoiucHs
is finished, to adjourn sine die; but others, among
whom nro some of the wisest and most conserva
tivo members, suggest that it may be necessary
jor them to empower the President to call them
together again after the meeting of Congress,
when they will have been able to see the effect of
their present action. I do not clearly seo how
the Convention can finish its business at the time
indicatod, becauso there is work still ahead. The
Bill of Rights lias to bo ?eted on after Execu
tive and Judiciary havo received the attention of
the body. A scries of resolutions on political ques
tions of vital import une,., favorably reported on
by the Committeo, rnay provoko discussion. Thc
reportB of thc Committee on Amendments general
ly, may consumo timo. Tho members, however,
are anxious to get homo, live dollrrn a day not
holding ont to thom any inducement to remain
here, and work may bo done speedily.
Tho proceedings of to-day may In) given in a
few words. Fnnn sortie caiiBO or other il waa as
certained this morning that tb(T opinion of the
Convention hart undergone a completo change on
tho subject of making all population tho basis of
roprowmtation ; and though tho section of tho
Constitution hod'been recurred to, for tho pur
pose of reconsidering the matter, tho friends of
tho movement found it necessary to/have the mo
tion to reot.nsklor laid on the table.
The decision with regard to the City pf Charles
ton Was ohangod. Tho city is alto wot to eteet jhar
Senators and jftopresentatives as from ono ?tt
trict.. The property qualification has been re
moved with regard to a seat in the Senate. Emoh
Judicial District ia to biro a Senator, except
i raaiaa?o.ta?aai , /l"AiJSTA
Charleston, which will have, in addition, two for
the city. Foreigners having declared their inten
tion to become citizens, ann resided in this State
two years after such declaration of intention, are
entitled to vote. Tho maximum number of Rep
resentatives for any one district is twelve. Taxes
must bo levied on valuo of tho property. Tho
Governor is to bo elected by tho people, and to
Bervo for four years. During tho debate on tho
propriety of giving to thc Governor the appoint
ment of certain officers, a motion to adjourn was
mado and carried.
Above you have all of tho information that can
be given "on tho subject of the business of to-f}?y.
I will make no remark in tho premises. My opin
ion waa clear on the point that most of thc changes
should bo made, but I did not believe this Con
vention to be tho proper body to mako tho neces
sary reforms. I thought thal it had certain work
to perform which alone it could lawfully do; but
as it has gone further, and becauso it had the
fewer of a Convention, framed a now organic law,
, together with all good citizens, pray for the
success of tho work, and Bay God save thc Stute.
Facts vg. Theories.
"Give me a place to rest my lover on," says Ar
chimedes, "and I wUl move the world.'' "(?ive me
pure and unadulterated drugs," sayB Medieus, of
the olden time, "and I will cure disease."
In one sense, both of these learned pundits were
the veriest charlatans. They knew tuero was no
place to rest their levers on, either to move the
world or to cure di seas?'. Mechanism WUH in a
backward state, and the medical profession was
but another name for sorcery and nil the adjuncts
of magic tilters and channa against tho effect of
"evil eye," tko.
But these latter days have borne unto us some
thing more than even superstition ami its crew
ever dreamt of in their maddest philosophy. In
these days of practical scionoe, what was theory
of yesterday is fact to-day, and al! the old time
notions become as bubbles in the sun, and burst
.and break with every breath we draw.
Let Archimedes shoulder his lever and wc will
find a resting-place for it to move the world. Let
mino ancient Medieus pant and toil no moro for
the drugs he so sorely needs, for we have them at
our hand, ever ready ta serve them at his beek.
Retined in the laboratory of Dr. Maggiel, the
finest materials known in the medical profession
arc obtainable by any one. His Tilious, Dyspep
tic, and Diarrhoea Tills stand unrivaled, and his
Salve operates with magic effect upon burns,
scalds, and all sores and ulcers of the skin.
In fact, wo think Maggiel's Tills and Salve are
the wonder of this century, and we aro happy in
the thought that many others of our brethren of
the craft agree with us. Wo would earnestly
counsel that all families provide themselves with
Dr. Maggiel's Preparations ut once, and keep them
ready al hand, so as to use them at tho most op
portune time and as occasion serves.- Valley Sen
tinel
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, S. C .,
SEPTEMBER 20. iso:..
TnE PROVISIONAL GOVERNOR OF MOUTH CARO
LINA lias appointed the following named gcntie
ni' !i Special Aiits for the purposo <>f assisting him iii
the discharge of hin official duties iu reconstructing the
State, anti restoring her to all her civil and political
rights in the federal Union:
WILLIAM L. TREN HOLM, of Charleston City.
STEPHEN ELLIOTT, ol Beaufort District.
WAUK HAMPTON, in., of Columbia.
ROBERT L McLs>W, of Yorkville.
WILLIAM H. EVA NH, of Society Hill.
JAMES H. HARRISON, of Anderson Village.
The above-named gentlemen will receive and commu
nicate to the Provisional Governor, BENJAMIN FRANK'
LIN PERRY, all information which they may deem ad
visable as to thc condition of the State, its citizens, the
freedmen, the home police, and the military garrisons.
They will likewise report to him by letter, at Iiis head
quarters, at Greenville Court House.
Ry order of the Provisional Governor.
WM. H. TERRY.
September 25 :i PriYate Secretary, icc.
BY THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNOR.
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT SOUTn CAROLINA, )
SKFTEMBKB 18, 18C5. j
WHEREAS, IT IS REPRESENTED THAT IN MANY
portions of the State thero la great disturbance
and apprehension from lawless persons, who aro thiev
ing, marauding and committing acts of violence remote
from military garrisons stationed at die Court Houses;
and whereas, Brigadier-General AMES, commanding the
Northwestern portion of the State, has suggested tho
organization of a militia police forco in euch District of
Iiis command, to act in concert with his forces in pre
serving order and peace in the community; and whereas,
it is supposed that the other military commanders will
have no objections to thc aid and assistance on the part
of thc citizens iu suppressing crime and maintaining
order; and whereas, also, it appears that Prealdent
JOHNSON haa sanctioned and authorized thc Provis
ional Governor of Mississippi to organize a similar forco
in th..* State, and has forbidden the military authorities
there to Interfere with such organization :
Now, therefore, I, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PERRY,
Provisional Governor of the State of Mouth Carolina, do
proclaim, order and declare, that thero shall bo formed
and organized in each Judicial District one or more mili
tia companies for a homo police, to act nuder and bo
auxiliary to tho military garrison of such District In pre
venting crimea and preserving the peace of tho District.
Thc companies will consist of a Captain and throe Lieu
tenants and eighty men, scattered over the District so aa
to bu easily accessible from all points where any distur
bance may occur. When tho compunlca aro formed,
they will report, through their Captains, to the respec
tive Brigadier Generals commanding in South Carolina,
and to tho Provost Marshals at tho respectivo Court
Houses, and from them receive their order?. When ar
rests have been made, they will tum the offenders over
UM olvfl -o<M./.ri?tcx av i.wno timm before thu Provost
Court Marshal for trial and punishment, according to
thc terms of agreement between Generals MEADK and
GILLMORE and myself aa to the respectivo jurisdictions
of thc civil and military authorities in Mouth Carolin?.
Tills police gourd will bo voluntary in Its organiza
tion, and should bo composed of nono but discreet per
sons of standing und character in tho community, who
are willing ro render their services promptly when the
occasion avfitltrca. It is thought that tho bare organiza
tion of stub forces throughout tho State will have a
most salutary intluenccju preserving peace and order
aud in preventing crime. The evil-doers will know that
there is a power, ready at hand,' to arrest them and tiring
them to justice. It is to be hoped that all good citizens
will cheerfully render this service. It should bo a post
ul honor, as it ls, to guurdimd protect tho country.
Done at Oituinbia tho day and year above stated.
B. F. PERRY.
By order of the Provisional Governor.
\V. H. PKRUV, Private Secretary. 3 September 92
WILLIS & CHISOLM,
FACTORS, COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
OFFICE, .MILLS HOI SF.
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E. WILLIS.A. R. CHISOLM.
WELL ATTEND TO THE PURCHASE, SALE AND
SHIPMENT Ito Foreign and Domestic Port?) of
COTTON, RICE, LUMBER, NAVAL 8TORES; to the
JoUcction of Drafts, Purchase and Male of ah Securities.
Jonsignmonta of vessels solicited.
HKKKUS TO!
Messrs. JOHN FRASER A CO., Charleston, S. C.
M. .ft-.-. GEO. W. WILLIAMS ? CO., Charleston, 8. C.
Messrs/ PENDERGAST, BR08. A CO., New York.
OEO. SC H LEY, Esq.., Augusta, Ga.
T. 8. METCALF, Esq., Augusta, Ga.
Messrs, CLARK, DODGE A CO., New York.
. Messrs- MURRAY A NEPHEW, New Ysrk.
Mesura. E. W. CLARK A CO.. Philadelphia, Penn.
Messrs. PENDERGAST, FENWICK h CO., Baltluaors,
lld.
MoOsr?. SAMT, H ABItffl ? SONS, Baltini ore, Md.
av The Columbia lticfenlx wiU pnr>ilah etwj other [
lay Car. one month, and other South Carolin* papen
lor tho some period of time, and send billa to thia
August 14
D. J. STURGES,
AGENT FOB THE STA ll LINE N. Y. PACKETS,
Shipping and Commission Merchant,
ALT, GOODS TO BE FORWARDED TO AND FROM
New York or tho country, will receive my pomonal
attention. Consignments solicited, and advances made.
Office, No. 1?; VENDUE BANGE, charlcstoa. 8. C.
Agent in New York, GEO. W. BROWN, No. 115 Wall
street. _Imo September 25
H. E. Screvon.Douglas Nisbet.
SCHEVEN & NISBET,
PRODUCE BROKERS,
WILL ATTEND TO TnE PURCHASE OF
COTTON, RICE, NAVAL STORES, &c.
And Sample, Class, Mark and Ship the same.
OFFICE, FOIl TUE PRESENT,
No. GB Broad-st., up stairs,
NEXT TO THE CHARLESTON LIBRARY 1JU1I,D!N(V
(The present Custom House.)
September 25 m th
WAI. M. LAWTON & CO.,
Wm. M. Lawton, Gr.Winliorn Lawton.
Factors and Commission Agents,
WILL RESUME BUSINESS IN THIS CITY. OCTO
BER int. An extensivo connection in South Caro
lina, Georgia ami Florida, and long experience in tho
COTTON and RICE trade, tliey trust will give them a
share of uatronape.
PLANTATIONS. IIOUNKS and LOTS, BONDS,
STOCKS and other securities, will lie bought aud sold
on commission.
Consignments of Produce will he shipped to New York
or a Foreign Market, when desired l>v lue owners.
No. t? BROAD-STREET.
September 1H 1? iii 39 'JS -Jd Oct*
COURTENAY & TRENHOLM,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
NLWiJET.riY COURT HOUSE, S. C.
rpirr UNDERSIGNED HAVE FORMED A COPART
_| NER8HIP for the purpose of conducting ? OENE
; RAL COMMISSION AND FORWARDING BUSINESS,
at Newberry, s. c. Ithe present available terminus of the
I Greenville Railroad). Consignments of Merchandise for
all Depots on th" Greenville Railroad and its Branches,
and orders for the purchase and shipment ol" Cotton,
.Vc., solicited.
Our covered Wasons, for the present, leave Newberry
Depot on the 1st. loth and 20th, Oraogeburg on tho nth,
15th and 25tb of each month, In charge of a trusty wagon
master. WM. A. COURTENAY.
September ll mthg P. C. TRENHOLM._
T. A. JBTTOBDS.HUNKY Kllt? K.
T. A. JEFFORDS & CO.,
Commission and Forwarding Merchants,
Cor. Main-street and tho Katlroiul,
ORANGEBURG, S. C.
T. A. JEFFORDS, for many years connected with the
house of JEFFORDS k Co.. Would solicit from bis friends
in the City aud Country, part ol' thc Forwarding busi
ness. He promises to nive ull business entrusted to his
care his personal attention; and, having a large Store
house within three yards of the depot, can always (when
wu;;ons are not present) store tile goods at small expense
to the owners. nrfinSC September 0
TROUT k AMSBURY,
T. II. Trout.Oliver Amsbury.
DEALERS IN LIME AND BUILDING MATERI
ALS GENERALLY, Also. HAY AND PRODUCE,
CON8IGNMENS OF VE88ELS AND MERCHANDISE
aro respectfuUy solicited, and thc utmost attention paid
to all business entrusted to our care, office at
No. 20 CUMBERLAND.
September lt", imo NEAR CHURCH-STREET.
ZIMMERMAN DAVIS,
(LATE OF THE FIRM OF ADAMS, FROST fe CO. )
Has resumed tho
FACTORAGE & COMMISSION BUSINESS,
OFFICE FOR THE PRESENT
Cor. Accommodation Wliurf and East Bay.
Will attend to the sale of COTTON, RICE, or any other
PRODUCE, in thin or any foreign market. Also, to the
PURCHASE AND SHIPPING OF COTTON. Will also
RECEIVE AND FORWARD GOODS.
September 9 Imo*
BOWpS & SILCOX,
Brokers, ^A-uctioneers,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Ay WILL ATTEND TO THE PURCHA8E AND SALE
OF COTTON, RICE, DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES.
Also, their attention will be given to SALES OF FUR
NITURE, REAL ESTATE, fcc.
Office for the present, at No. 238 KING-STREET.
August 30 Imo
J. M. EASON.
COMMISSION AGENT,
No. 9 EXCHANGE-STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
September 8_Imo
JAS. B. CAHILL,
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DEALER IN
Groceries, Provisions, Wines & Liquors,
No. 171 Broad-street,
AUGUSTA, (iEOROIA.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED.
September 1_ Cmos
R. M. MARSHALL,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER,
AND
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT,
HAS RESUMED BUSINESS AT HIS OLD STAND,
No. 33 Broad-street. Attends to the BUYING
AND BELLING OF REAL ESTAT!*. FURNITURE, Ac,
A-c. Also to the RENTING of HOUSKS._September ?
TUPPER & THURSTON,
TIMBEE, LUMBER,
AND
WOOD MERCHANTS,
(TORRE'S STEAM SAW MILL,)
CHARLESTON, S. C.
GEORGE TUPPER.JNO. O. THURSTON.
September ai _*_
HM 1' T UK!
FURNITURE!
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Nos. 87 AND 89 BOWERY_ i,.,
AND fl? Cn RI8TY-8TREET.
DEG RAAF & TAYLOR
Have tho largest variety of _
ROSEWOOD. WALNUT
AND MAHOGANY
PARLOR, CHAMBER,
DINING BOOM
AND LIBRARY FURNITURE
To he found In this city, and at the lowest prices.
MATTRESSES AND SPRING BEDS
FROM SB TO S7
, , EXTRA WIDE CANOPY BEDSTEADS
FOR THE SOUTHERN TRADE.
August 14 mwi 2mo
STYLES & CARTER,
SHIPPING AXD
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AGENTS FOB
Orleans Line of Southern Packets,
NO. 19 Vniiderhorsl Wharf,
i. r. CABTKB. j CHABLESTON, S. C.
WM. H. ROBSON tc CO., AGENTS IN NEW YOUR.
Advances made on consignments.
September 4 1 mo
HERIOT BROTHERS,
General Commission Merchants,
CHARLESTON, S. C.,
Will give then attention to the pur- tase and sale o? Mer
chandise and Produce vi every description.
CONSIGNMENTS or COTTON SOLICITED
J. E. HERIOT, JR.E. M, HEBIOl
REFEREN? KK:
WM. R. HERIOT & CO., ( !:;::: .*!?.!!, S. C.
BAHMOND HULL k CO., Ko? York.
BEMERKST fi WYOANT, New York.
.INO. SLEIGHT, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
September 1 _-_]MO
C. E. CHICHESTER,
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
Ko. IS BROAD-STREET,
CHARLESTON, s. C.
4 GENT FOP. TUE PURCHASE AND SALE OF
iV. REAL ESTATE in any of tho Southern States.
ALSO AGENT FOR THE SALE, RENTING, RE
PAIRING, fcc, OP CITY PROPERTY. August 23
ARCHIBALD GETTY & CO.,
SHIP & STEAMBOAT AGENTS,
ANO
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Nos. 12G AND 128 MEETING-STREET,
Charleston, S. C.
LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS.
August 15 _ _
HOWE, DOUCIN & CO.,
ComiTLis.sion ]VI ^reliants
Ship Chandlers ami Grocers,
No. 151 EAST BAY. CHARLESTON, S. C.
c. HOWE, JR.r. M. nonces.E. C. HOWE.
C. & E. HOWE,
Commission Morel ian {s,
No. 71 BROADWAY;, NEW YORK.
c. HOWE, jn.E. C. ROWE.
Consignments solicited. Prompt attention piven to
sales of Merchandise Produce purchased on Commis
sion, ami liberal advances made.
Refer by permission to Messrs. HEN-RY SWIFT fe Co..
No. 115 Broadway; .INO. M. SMITH'S SO:: A: Co., No. 122
Broad-st. ; KEMP. DAY ?V. Co.. No. ll?; Wall-st. : THOMAS
.V 1SBNIIAM, No. 108 Ur.w.l.st . Jg. V_finiO*^ August 24
. I, DRAYTON FORD,
BROKER, AUCTIONEER
AND
INSURANCE AGENT,
HAVING RESUMED HIS BUSINESS, WILL PUR
CHASE AND SELL REM. ESTATE, BONDS,
STOCKS, and all other kinds ot' Property on Commis
sion. Also, will take RISKS OF INSURANCE AGAINST
FIRE on Cotton, Buildings, Stockt of Gooda, fcc, in
First Class Companies. Office No. ?W HASEL-BTBEET,
next to Kinj;. fmwlJ September 18
MARINE, FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
AGENCY.
GREAT WESTERN
Marine Insurance Company,
OP NEW YORK,
WILL TAKE RISKS ON MARINE AND INLAND
Transportation on COTTON and MERCHANDIZE, on
favorable terms.
Merchant's Fire Iusurauee Company.
OF1 HARTFORD, IOX.V.,
WILL TAKE RISKS ON DWELLINGS, STORES,
MILLS, MERCHANDIZE, COTTON, fcc., and on terms
which cannot fail to please those who look for real se
curity in Insurance.
ATLANTIC FIRE
AND
Inland Transportation
INSURANCE COMPANY,
BROOKLYN.
OFFICE /JV ,V?ir YORK.
WILL COVER ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF MERCHAN
DIZE, COTTON, BUILDINGS, FACTORIES, fcc, on
their weU known liberal rates.
National Banking and Insurance
COMI^JNTY,
OV ST. LOUIS,
PRESENTS ITSELF FOR A SHARE Ol' SOUTHERN
BUSINESS, and by ita liberality and promptitude will
provo itself to bo worthy of patronage.
New York T^ife
INSURANCE COMPANY,
Assets, S3,G58,755.55,
WILL ISSUE POLICIES ON LIFE, WHICH MAY
secure faradios comfort and easo when the husband aud
father may bo removed forever.
Do not Neglect your Life Insurance I
British Commercial Lire Insurance
COMPANY,
UNITED WITH THE
British Nation Life Assurance Company,
No. 310 Regent-street London.
THESE COMPANIES HAVE "PAID PROMPTLY
OVER 8EVEN MILI JONS OF DOLLARS, thereby pro
viding for many families who otherwise would have boen
left destitute." Call and get pooka, which cost nothing,
and uro interesting.
Our IN8URANCE DEPARTMENT being partly ar
ranged, wo are able to offerte our friends ampio security
up to such amount* ?# wo can safely take.
GEO, %: WILLIAMS & CO.
September 22 UHTfi

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